Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924)

This year marks the 150th birthday of Giacomo Puccini, whose operas have become repertory mainstays.

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
* The Belasco Connection20080103

With Donald Macleod. The two operas Puccini composed to plays by the American dramatist David Belasco showed him to be making real advances in orchestral techniques and the handling of characters. While these developments were largely ignored in the first of them, Madama Butterfly, the premiere of La fanciulla del West was a different story altogether.

Un bel di vedremo (Madama Butterfly, Act 2)

Mirella Freni (soprano)

Vienna Philharmonic

Herbert von Karajan (conductor)

Viene le sera...Vogliatemi bene (Madama Butterfly, Act 1)

Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)

Datele voi qualche soccorso...Addio fiorito asil (Madama Butterfly, Act 2)

Robert Kerns (baritone)

Elke Schary, Christa Ludwig (mezzo-sopranos)

La fanciulla del West (Act 1 excerpt)

Mara Zampieri (soprano)

Placido Domingo (tenor)

Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

Lorin Maazel (conductor)

La fanciulla del West (Act 3 excerpt)

Juan Pons (baritone)

Chorus and Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

01* A Star Is Born20071231

Donald Macleod follows Puccini's path from small town church musician to fame and fortune on the operatic stage.

Nessun Dorma (Turandot)

Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)

London Philharmonic Orchestra

Zubin Mehta (conductor)

Straniero ascolta...

Figlio del Cielo (Turandot, Act 2)

Birgit Nilsson (soprano)

Franco Corelli (tenor)

Chorus and Orchestra of the Teatro dell'Opera di Roma

Francesco Molinari-Pradelli (conductor)

A te

Placido Domingo (tenor)

Julius Rudel (piano)

Missa di Gloria (Kyrie)

Jose Carreras (tenor)

Hermann Prey (baritone)

Ambrosian Singers

Philharmonia Orchestra

Claudio Scimone (conductor)

Crisantemi

Martfeld Quartett

Ansia eternal, crude!...

Presto! in fila! (Manon Lescaut, Act 3)

Kiri te Kanawa (soprano)

Jose Carreras, Carlo Gaifa (tenors)

Natale de Carolis (baritone)

Giorgio Tadeo (bass)

Orchestra of the Teatro Comunale di Bologna

Riccardo Chailly (conductor)

01A Star Is Born20081222

Donald Macleod follows Puccini's path to fame and fortune on the operatic stage.

Donald Macleod follows Puccini's path from small town church musician to fame and fortune on the operatic stage.

Nessun Dorma (Turandot)

  • Jose Carreras (tenor)
  • Jose Carreras, carlo gaifa (tenors)
  • Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)
  • Placido Domingo (tenor)
  • ambrosian singers
  • birgit nilsson (soprano)
  • chorus and orchestra of the teatro dell'opera di roma
  • claudio scimone (conductor)

    crisantemi

  • francesco molinari-pradelli (conductor)

    a te

  • franco corelli (tenor)
  • giorgio tadeo (bass)
  • hermann prey (baritone)
  • julius rudel (piano)

    missa di gloria (kyrie)

  • kiri te kanawa (soprano)
  • london philharmonic orchestra
  • martfeld quartett

    ansia eternal, crude!...

    presto! in fila! (manon lescaut, act 3)

  • natale de carolis (baritone)
  • orchestra of the teatro comunale di bologna
  • philharmonia orchestra
  • riccardo chailly (conductor)
  • zubin mehta (conductor)

    straniero ascolta...

    figlio del cielo (turandot, act 2)

  • 01A Star Is Born2007123120081222

    Donald Macleod follows Puccini's path from small town church musician to fame and fortune on the operatic stage.

    Nessun Dorma (Turandot)

    Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)

    London Philharmonic Orchestra

    Zubin Mehta (conductor)

    Straniero ascolta...

    Figlio del Cielo (Turandot, Act 2)

    Birgit Nilsson (soprano)

    Franco Corelli (tenor)

    Chorus and Orchestra of the Teatro dell'Opera di Roma

    Francesco Molinari-Pradelli (conductor)

    A te

    Placido Domingo (tenor)

    Julius Rudel (piano)

    Missa di Gloria (Kyrie)

    Jose Carreras (tenor)

    Hermann Prey (baritone)

    Ambrosian Singers

    Philharmonia Orchestra

    Claudio Scimone (conductor)

    Crisantemi

    Martfeld Quartett

    Ansia eternal, crude!...

    Presto! in fila! (Manon Lescaut, Act 3)

    Kiri te Kanawa (soprano)

    Jose Carreras, Carlo Gaifa (tenors)

    Natale de Carolis (baritone)

    Giorgio Tadeo (bass)

    Orchestra of the Teatro Comunale di Bologna

    Riccardo Chailly (conductor)

    Donald Macleod follows Puccini's path to fame and fortune on the operatic stage.

    Donald Macleod follows Puccini's path from small town church musician to fame and fortune on the operatic stage.

    Nessun Dorma (Turandot)

  • Jose Carreras (tenor)
  • Jose Carreras, carlo gaifa (tenors)
  • Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)
  • Placido Domingo (tenor)
  • ambrosian singers
  • birgit nilsson (soprano)
  • chorus and orchestra of the teatro dell'opera di roma
  • claudio scimone (conductor)

    crisantemi

  • francesco molinari-pradelli (conductor)

    a te

  • franco corelli (tenor)
  • giorgio tadeo (bass)
  • hermann prey (baritone)
  • julius rudel (piano)

    missa di gloria (kyrie)

  • kiri te kanawa (soprano)
  • london philharmonic orchestra
  • martfeld quartett

    presto! in fila! (manon lescaut, act 3)

  • natale de carolis (baritone)
  • orchestra of the teatro comunale di bologna
  • philharmonia orchestra
  • riccardo chailly (conductor)
  • zubin mehta (conductor)

  • 01A Step Forward20171016

    Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano, starting with Manon Lescaut.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today it's Manon Lescaut, a woman whose love of pleasure and the good life ultimately leads to her destruction.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, Puccini was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly pushing the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - which include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    It was his third opera, Manon Lescaut that marked a significant turning point for Puccini. After three years of hard graft, working with a succession of librettists on this adaptation of Abbé Provost's novel, when it was premiered in Turin in 1893, the critics were universal in their praise, citing in particular the quality of the vocal writing.

    In quelle trine morbide (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)
    Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano

    Minuet (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)
    John Fryatt, tenor, Dancing Master
    Kurt Rydl, bass, Geronte
    Mirella Freni, soprano, Manon
    Chorus of Royal Opera House
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Giuseppe Sinopoli, conductor

    Act 4 (Manon Lescaut)
    Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
    Yusif Eyvazov, tenor, Des Grieux
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano , conductor.

    01A Step Forward20171016

    Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano, starting with Manon Lescaut.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today it's Manon Lescaut, a woman whose love of pleasure and the good life ultimately leads to her destruction.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, Puccini was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly pushing the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - which include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    It was his third opera, Manon Lescaut that marked a significant turning point for Puccini. After three years of hard graft, working with a succession of librettists on this adaptation of Abbé Provost's novel, when it was premiered in Turin in 1893, the critics were universal in their praise, citing in particular the quality of the vocal writing.

    In quelle trine morbide (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)
    Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano

    Minuet (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)
    John Fryatt, tenor, Dancing Master
    Kurt Rydl, bass, Geronte
    Mirella Freni, soprano, Manon
    Chorus of Royal Opera House
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Giuseppe Sinopoli, conductor

    Act 4 (Manon Lescaut)
    Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
    Yusif Eyvazov, tenor, Des Grieux
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano , conductor.

    01An Italian Composer2013040120150629 (R3)

    Donald Macleod on how Puccini's music was linked with the ideas of the new unified Italy.

    When Italy became a unified country in 1861, a heated debate blew up as to how culture might represent this newly formed nation. Two musicians were to stand out as emblems of that ideology, Verdi and the successor to his crown as Italy's king of opera, Giacomo Puccini. Today, Donald Macleod considers how Puccini's music came to be linked with those ideas.

    01An Italian Composer2013040120150629 (R3)

    When Italy became a unified country in 1861, a heated debate blew up as to how culture might represent this newly formed nation. Two musicians were to stand out as emblems of that ideology, Verdi and the successor to his crown as Italy's king of opera, Giacomo Puccini. Today, Donald Macleod considers how Puccini's music came to be linked with those ideas.

    Donald Macleod on how Puccini's music was linked with the ideas of the new unified Italy.

    02* * Elvira20080101

    Puccini's elopement with one of his pupils, Elvira Gemignani, had lasting consequences. A married woman with two children, Elvira took a brave leap when she ran off with him. Having survived the ensuing scandal, the couple conducted their relationship in a fashion which, for most of their friends and colleagues, defied comprehension. Yet despite Puccini's frequent infidelities and her obsessive jealousy, they remained together until his death in 1924.

    Capriccio sinfonico (excerpts)

    Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

    Jacek Kaspszyk (conductor)

    Sola, perduta, abbandonata (Manon Lescaut, Act 4)

    Julia Varady (soprano)

    Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

    Marcello Viotti (conductor)

    La boheme (Act 1)

    Mirella Freni (soprano)

    Luciano Pavarotti, Michael Senechal (tenors)

    Nicolai Ghiaurov (bass)

    Gianni Maffeo, Rolando Panerai (baritones)

    Berlin Philharmonic Choir and Orchestra

    Herbert von Karajan (conductor)

    Senza mamma, o bimbo (Suor Angelica)

    02Elvira20081223

    Puccini's elopement with one of his pupils, Elvira Gemignani, had lasting consequences.

    Puccini's elopement with one of his pupils, Elvira Gemignani, had lasting consequences. A married woman with two children, Elvira took a brave leap when she ran off with him.

    Having survived the ensuing scandal, the couple conducted their relationship in a fashion which, for most of their friends and colleagues, defied comprehension. Yet despite Puccini's frequent infidelities and her obsessive jealousy, they remained together until his death in 1924.

    Capriccio sinfonico (excerpts)

  • Luciano Pavarotti, michael senechal (tenors)
  • berlin philharmonic choir and orchestra
  • berlin radio symphony orchestra
  • gianni maffeo, rolando panerai (baritones)
  • herbert von karajan (conductor)

    senza mamma, o bimbo (suor angelica)

  • jacek kaspszyk (conductor)

    sola, perduta, abbandonata (manon lescaut, act 4)

  • julia varady (soprano)
  • marcello viotti (conductor)
  • marcello viotti (conductor)

    la boheme (act 1)

  • mirella freni (soprano)
  • nicolai ghiaurov (bass)
  • royal philharmonic orchestra

  • 02Elvira20080101

    Puccini's elopement with one of his pupils, Elvira Gemignani, had lasting consequences. A married woman with two children, Elvira took a brave leap when she ran off with him. Having survived the ensuing scandal, the couple conducted their relationship in a fashion which, for most of their friends and colleagues, defied comprehension. Yet despite Puccini's frequent infidelities and her obsessive jealousy, they remained together until his death in 1924.

    Capriccio sinfonico (excerpts)

    Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

    Jacek Kaspszyk (conductor)

    Sola, perduta, abbandonata (Manon Lescaut, Act 4)

    Julia Varady (soprano)

    Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

    Marcello Viotti (conductor)

    La boheme (Act 1)

    Mirella Freni (soprano)

    Luciano Pavarotti, Michael Senechal (tenors)

    Nicolai Ghiaurov (bass)

    Gianni Maffeo, Rolando Panerai (baritones)

    Berlin Philharmonic Choir and Orchestra

    Herbert von Karajan (conductor)

    Senza mamma, o bimbo (Suor Angelica)

    02Elvira2013040820081223

    Puccini's elopement with one of his pupils, Elvira Gemignani, had lasting consequences.

    Puccini's elopement with one of his pupils, Elvira Gemignani, had lasting consequences. A married woman with two children, Elvira took a brave leap when she ran off with him.

    Having survived the ensuing scandal, the couple conducted their relationship in a fashion which, for most of their friends and colleagues, defied comprehension. Yet despite Puccini's frequent infidelities and her obsessive jealousy, they remained together until his death in 1924.

    Capriccio sinfonico (excerpts)

  • Luciano Pavarotti, michael senechal (tenors)
  • berlin philharmonic choir and orchestra
  • berlin radio symphony orchestra
  • gianni maffeo, rolando panerai (baritones)
  • herbert von karajan (conductor)

    senza mamma, o bimbo (suor angelica)

  • jacek kaspszyk (conductor)

    sola, perduta, abbandonata (manon lescaut, act 4)

  • julia varady (soprano)
  • marcello viotti (conductor)
  • marcello viotti (conductor)

    la boheme (act 1)

  • mirella freni (soprano)
  • nicolai ghiaurov (bass)
  • royal philharmonic orchestra

  • 02Five First Nights - Tosca *20060725

    Donald Macleod recreates the premières of five different Puccini operas.

    On 14th January 1900, Tosca opened at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome.

    Set in real-life locations in the Eternal City, it featured the Romanian-born soprano Ericlea Darcle in the role of the vengeful diva Floria Tosca.

    Act 1: Opening

    Cavaradpsso....Giacomo di Stefano (tenor)

    Angelotti....Franco Calabrese (bass)

    Sagrestano....Melchiorre Luise (baritone)

    Chorus and Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

    Victor de Sabata (conductor)

    Act 1: Duet

    Tosca....Maria Callas (soprano)

    Cavaradossi....Giacomo di Stefano (tenor)

    Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

    Act 2: Torture Scene

    Cavaradossi....Giacomo di Stefano (tenor) (off-stage)

    Spoletta....Angelo Mercuriali (tenor)

    Scarpia....Tito Gobbi (baritone)

    Sciarrone....Dario Caselli (bass)

    Act 2: End of Act (incl.

    Vissi d'arte)

    02Five First Nights - Tosca *20060725

    Donald Macleod recreates the premières of five different Puccini operas.

    On 14th January 1900, Tosca opened at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome.

    Set in real-life locations in the Eternal City, it featured the Romanian-born soprano Ericlea Darcle in the role of the vengeful diva Floria Tosca.

    Act 1: Opening

    Cavaradpsso....Giacomo di Stefano (tenor)

    Angelotti....Franco Calabrese (bass)

    Sagrestano....Melchiorre Luise (baritone)

    Chorus and Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

    Victor de Sabata (conductor)

    Act 1: Duet

    Tosca....Maria Callas (soprano)

    Cavaradossi....Giacomo di Stefano (tenor)

    Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

    Act 2: Torture Scene

    Cavaradossi....Giacomo di Stefano (tenor) (off-stage)

    Spoletta....Angelo Mercuriali (tenor)

    Scarpia....Tito Gobbi (baritone)

    Sciarrone....Dario Caselli (bass)

    Act 2: End of Act (incl.

    Vissi d'arte)

    02The Bohemian2013040220150630 (R3)

    Donald Macleod explores Puccini's evocation of bohemian life, La boheme.

    Donald Macleod looks at the variety of sources and experiences Puccini drew on to create one of his best loved operas, a sparkling evocation of bohemian life, set in nineteenth century Paris, "La Bohème".

    02The Bohemian2013040220150630 (R3)

    Donald Macleod looks at the variety of sources and experiences Puccini drew on to create one of his best loved operas, a sparkling evocation of bohemian life, set in nineteenth century Paris, "La Bohème".

    Donald Macleod explores Puccini's evocation of bohemian life, La boheme.

    02The Bohemians20171017

    Series on Puccini's heroines spotlights La Boheme's Mimi and Musetta.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss Puccini's vivid evocation of student life, La Bohème, and the characters of the fragile embroiderer, Mimì and the flamboyant Musetta.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, Puccini was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    Set in the Latin Quarter of Paris, and premiered in 1896, La Bohème was the first of a series of highly successful collaborations with the writers Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica.

    Mi chiamano Mimì (La Bohème, Act 1)
    Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
    Berlin Philharmonic
    Herbert von Karajan, conductor

    Musetta's Waltz (La Bohème, Act 2)
    Michel Sénechal, tenor, Alcindoro
    Elizabeth Harwood, soprano, Musetta
    Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
    Nicolai Ghiaurov, bass, Colline
    Rolando Panerai, baritone, Marcello
    Gianni Maffei, actor, Schaunard
    Chorus of Deutsche Oper, Berlin
    Berlin Philharmonic
    Herbert von Karajan, conductor

    Act 3 (La Bohème)
    Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
    Luciano Pavarotti, tenor, Rodolfo
    Rolando Panerai, baritone, Marcello
    Chorus of Deutsche Oper, Berlin
    Berlin Philharmonic
    Herbert von Karajan, conductor.

    02The Bohemians20171017

    Series on Puccini's heroines spotlights La Boheme's Mimi and Musetta.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss Puccini's vivid evocation of student life, La Bohème, and the characters of the fragile embroiderer, Mimì and the flamboyant Musetta.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, Puccini was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    Set in the Latin Quarter of Paris, and premiered in 1896, La Bohème was the first of a series of highly successful collaborations with the writers Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica.

    Mi chiamano Mimì (La Bohème, Act 1)
    Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
    Berlin Philharmonic
    Herbert von Karajan, conductor

    Musetta's Waltz (La Bohème, Act 2)
    Michel Sénechal, tenor, Alcindoro
    Elizabeth Harwood, soprano, Musetta
    Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
    Nicolai Ghiaurov, bass, Colline
    Rolando Panerai, baritone, Marcello
    Gianni Maffei, actor, Schaunard
    Chorus of Deutsche Oper, Berlin
    Berlin Philharmonic
    Herbert von Karajan, conductor

    Act 3 (La Bohème)
    Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
    Luciano Pavarotti, tenor, Rodolfo
    Rolando Panerai, baritone, Marcello
    Chorus of Deutsche Oper, Berlin
    Berlin Philharmonic
    Herbert von Karajan, conductor.

    03* Torre Del Lago20080102

    Donald Macleod looks at the lifestyle Puccini enjoyed at his home in Torre del Lago. There, away from the glare of publicity, he could compose in peace, play cards, drink rough red wine with the locals and was able to shoot wildfowl on Lake Massaciuccoli.

    Casa mia, casa mia

    Placido Domingo (tenor)

    Julius Rudel (piano)

    L'uccellino

    Roberta Alexander (soprano)

    Tan Crone (piano)

    Recondite armonia (Tosca, Act 1)

    Angelo Veccia (baritone)

    Philharmonia Orchestra

    Giuseppe Sinopoli (conductor)

    Mario! Mario! Mario!... Ah, quegli occhi! (Tosca, Act 1)

    Leontyne Price (soprano)

    Vienna Philharmonic

    Herbert von Karajan (conductor)

    Dov'e Angelotti... nel pozzo... nel giardino (Tosca, Act 2)

    Tito Gobbi (baritone)

    Giuseppe di Stefano, Franco Calabrese (tenors)

    Maria Callas (soprano)

    Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

    Victor de Sabata (conductor)

    Tosca (Act 3, excerpt)

    Angela Gheorghiu (soprano)

    Roberto Alagna, David Cangelosi (tenors)

    Sorin Coliban (bass)

    Chorus of the Royal Opera House

    Orchestra of the Royal Opera House

    Antonio Pappano (conductor).

    03A Roman Truth20171018

    Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano turns to a tale of passion and revenge, Tosca.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss one of the most passionate and complex of characters, Tosca.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    Now firmly established as an internationally acclaimed figure, there was a lot of hype surrounding a new opera by Puccini. But when Tosca was first heard in Rome on 14th January 1900, the audience simply didn't get what they were hearing. They were confused. Where, they asked was the melody?

    Vissi d'arte (Tosca, Act 2)
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Tosca
    Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
    Antonio Pappano, director

    Tre sbirri, una carrozza (Tosca, Act 1)
    Ruggero Raimondi, baritone, Scarpia
    David Cangelosi, tenor, Spoletta
    Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
    Antonio Pappano, director

    Act 3 (Tosca)
    Gwynne Howell, bass, Carceriere
    Roberto Alagna, tenor, Cavaradossi
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Tosca
    David Cangelosi, tenor, Spoletta
    Sorin Coliban, bass, Sciarrone
    Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
    Antonio Pappano, director.

    03A Roman Truth20171018

    Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano turns to a tale of passion and revenge, Tosca.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss one of the most passionate and complex of characters, Tosca.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    Now firmly established as an internationally acclaimed figure, there was a lot of hype surrounding a new opera by Puccini. But when Tosca was first heard in Rome on 14th January 1900, the audience simply didn't get what they were hearing. They were confused. Where, they asked was the melody?

    Vissi d'arte (Tosca, Act 2)
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Tosca
    Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
    Antonio Pappano, director

    Tre sbirri, una carrozza (Tosca, Act 1)
    Ruggero Raimondi, baritone, Scarpia
    David Cangelosi, tenor, Spoletta
    Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
    Antonio Pappano, director

    Act 3 (Tosca)
    Gwynne Howell, bass, Carceriere
    Roberto Alagna, tenor, Cavaradossi
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Tosca
    David Cangelosi, tenor, Spoletta
    Sorin Coliban, bass, Sciarrone
    Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
    Antonio Pappano, director.

    03Five First Nights - Madama Butterfly *20060726

    On 17th February 1904, Madama Butterfly had its eagerly awaited première at La Scala, with Rosina Storchio in the title role.

    But circumstances conspired to make this occasion one of the most notorious flops in operatic history.

    Act 1: Gran ventura

    Butterfly....Maria Callas (soprano)

    Goro....Renato Ercolani (tenor)

    Pinkerton....Nicolai Gedda (tenor)

    Sharpless....Mario Borriello(baritone)

    La Scala Chorus

    Orchestra of the Teatro alla Scala, Milan

    Herbert von Karajan (conductor)

    Act 1: Ed eccoci in famiglia

    Suzuki....Lucia Danieli (mezzo)

    Bonzo....Plinio Clabassi (bass)

    Act 1: Vogliatemi bene

    03Five First Nights - Madama Butterfly *20060726

    On 17th February 1904, Madama Butterfly had its eagerly awaited première at La Scala, with Rosina Storchio in the title role.

    But circumstances conspired to make this occasion one of the most notorious flops in operatic history.

    Act 1: Gran ventura

    Butterfly....Maria Callas (soprano)

    Goro....Renato Ercolani (tenor)

    Pinkerton....Nicolai Gedda (tenor)

    Sharpless....Mario Borriello(baritone)

    La Scala Chorus

    Orchestra of the Teatro alla Scala, Milan

    Herbert von Karajan (conductor)

    Act 1: Ed eccoci in famiglia

    Suzuki....Lucia Danieli (mezzo)

    Bonzo....Plinio Clabassi (bass)

    Act 1: Vogliatemi bene

    03Freedom Versus Tyranny2013040320150701 (R3)

    Donald Macleod explores the dark recesses of Puccini's political thriller, Tosca.

    While on the one hand, a controversial subject matter and the musical merits of Puccini's "Tosca" would continue to divide opinion for years after its premiere in 1900, on the other, the strength of its dramatic impact immediately struck a chord with audiences. Today Donald Macleod considers how Puccini's masterful adaptation turned Victorien Sardou's play, originally a vehicle for the actress Sarah Bernhardt, into an operatic tour de force.

    03Freedom Versus Tyranny2013040320150701 (R3)

    While on the one hand, a controversial subject matter and the musical merits of Puccini's "Tosca" would continue to divide opinion for years after its premiere in 1900, on the other, the strength of its dramatic impact immediately struck a chord with audiences. Today Donald Macleod considers how Puccini's masterful adaptation turned Victorien Sardou's play, originally a vehicle for the actress Sarah Bernhardt, into an operatic tour de force.

    Donald Macleod explores the dark recesses of Puccini's political thriller, Tosca.

    03Torre Del Lago2008010220081224

    Donald Macleod looks at the lifestyle Puccini enjoyed at his home in Torre del Lago. There, away from the glare of publicity, he could compose in peace, play cards, drink rough red wine with the locals and was able to shoot wildfowl on Lake Massaciuccoli.

    Casa mia, casa mia

  • Placido Domingo (tenor)
  • angela gheorghiu (soprano)
  • angelo veccia (baritone)
  • antonio pappano (conductor)
  • chorus of the royal opera house
  • giuseppe di stefano, franco calabrese (tenors)
  • giuseppe sinopoli (conductor)

    mario! mario! mario!... ah, quegli occhi! (tosca, act 1)

  • herbert von karajan (conductor)

    dov'e angelotti... nel pozzo... nel giardino (tosca, act 2)

  • julius rudel (piano)

    l'uccellino

  • leontyne price (soprano)
  • maria callas (soprano)
  • orchestra of la scala, milan
  • orchestra of the royal opera house
  • philharmonia orchestra
  • roberta alexander (soprano)
  • roberto alagna, david cangelosi (tenors)
  • sorin coliban (bass)
  • tan crone (piano)

    recondite armonia (tosca, act 1)

  • tito gobbi (baritone)
  • victor de sabata (conductor)

    tosca (act 3, excerpt)

  • vienna philharmonic

    Donald Macleod looks at the lifestyle Puccini enjoyed at his home in Torre del Lago. There, away from the glare of publicity, he could compose in peace, play cards, drink rough red wine with the locals and was able to shoot wildfowl on Lake Massaciuccoli.

    Casa mia, casa mia

    Placido Domingo (tenor)

    Julius Rudel (piano)

    L'uccellino

    Roberta Alexander (soprano)

    Tan Crone (piano)

    Recondite armonia (Tosca, Act 1)

    Angelo Veccia (baritone)

    Philharmonia Orchestra

    Giuseppe Sinopoli (conductor)

    Mario! Mario! Mario!... Ah, quegli occhi! (Tosca, Act 1)

    Leontyne Price (soprano)

    Vienna Philharmonic

    Herbert von Karajan (conductor)

    Dov'e Angelotti... nel pozzo... nel giardino (Tosca, Act 2)

    Tito Gobbi (baritone)

    Giuseppe di Stefano, Franco Calabrese (tenors)

    Maria Callas (soprano)

    Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

    Victor de Sabata (conductor)

    Tosca (Act 3, excerpt)

    Angela Gheorghiu (soprano)

    Roberto Alagna, David Cangelosi (tenors)

    Sorin Coliban (bass)

    Chorus of the Royal Opera House

    Orchestra of the Royal Opera House

    Antonio Pappano (conductor).

  • 03Torre Del Lago *20081224

    Donald Macleod looks at the lifestyle Puccini enjoyed at his home in Torre del Lago. There, away from the glare of publicity, he could compose in peace, play cards, drink rough red wine with the locals and was able to shoot wildfowl on Lake Massaciuccoli.

    Casa mia, casa mia

  • Placido Domingo (tenor)
  • angela gheorghiu (soprano)
  • angelo veccia (baritone)
  • antonio pappano (conductor)
  • chorus of the royal opera house
  • giuseppe di stefano, franco calabrese (tenors)
  • giuseppe sinopoli (conductor)

    mario! mario! mario!... ah, quegli occhi! (tosca, act 1)

  • herbert von karajan (conductor)

    dov'e angelotti... nel pozzo... nel giardino (tosca, act 2)

  • julius rudel (piano)

    l'uccellino

  • leontyne price (soprano)
  • maria callas (soprano)
  • orchestra of la scala, milan
  • orchestra of the royal opera house
  • philharmonia orchestra
  • roberta alexander (soprano)
  • roberto alagna, david cangelosi (tenors)
  • sorin coliban (bass)
  • tan crone (piano)

    recondite armonia (tosca, act 1)

  • tito gobbi (baritone)
  • victor de sabata (conductor)

    tosca (act 3, excerpt)

  • vienna philharmonic

  • 04A Sea Of Misery2013040420150702 (R3)

    Donald Macleod focuses on the exotic sounds Puccini created for Madam Butterfly.

    Donald Macleod explores the exotic soundworld Puccini created for "Madam Butterfly", a tale of love and loss set in the Far East, his final collaboration with the creators of three of his most successful operas, librettists Giacosa and Illica.

    04A Sea Of Misery2013040420150702 (R3)

    Donald Macleod focuses on the exotic sounds Puccini created for Madam Butterfly.

    Donald Macleod explores the exotic soundworld Puccini created for "Madam Butterfly", a tale of love and loss set in the Far East, his final collaboration with the creators of three of his most successful operas, librettists Giacosa and Illica.

    04A Sea Of Misery20171019

    The series on Puccini's heroines turns to the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss Puccini's personal favourite, the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    Based on a play he'd seen in London by David Belasco, Madama Butterfly ended up causing Puccini more heartache than either Tosca or La bohème. At the opening night at La Scala Milan on 17th February 1904 the action on stage was drowned out by the catcalls from the audience. Worse was to come. When the curtain came down at the end there was total silence. Out of all this anguish, what really stands out is Puccini's creation of surely the most heart-breaking and delicate of heroines, Cio-cio San, Madama Butterly.

    Viene la sera (Madama Butterfly, Act 1)
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
    Jonas Kaufman, tenor, B.F. Pinkerton
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano, conductor

    Un bel dì vedremo (Madama Butterfly, Act 2)
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano, conductor

    Finale (Madam Butterfly, Act 2, Part 2)
    Enkelejda Shkosa, mezzo soprano, Suzuki
    Fabio Capitanucci, baritone, Sharpless
    Cristina Reale, mezzo soprano, Kate Pinkerton
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
    Jonas Kaufman, tenor, B.F. Pinkerton
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano, conductor.

    04A Sea Of Misery20171019

    The series on Puccini's heroines turns to the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss Puccini's personal favourite, the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    Based on a play he'd seen in London by David Belasco, Madama Butterfly ended up causing Puccini more heartache than either Tosca or La bohème. At the opening night at La Scala Milan on 17th February 1904 the action on stage was drowned out by the catcalls from the audience. Worse was to come. When the curtain came down at the end there was total silence. Out of all this anguish, what really stands out is Puccini's creation of surely the most heart-breaking and delicate of heroines, Cio-cio San, Madama Butterly.

    Viene la sera (Madama Butterfly, Act 1)
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
    Jonas Kaufman, tenor, B.F. Pinkerton
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano, conductor

    Un bel dì vedremo (Madama Butterfly, Act 2)
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano, conductor

    Finale (Madam Butterfly, Act 2, Part 2)
    Enkelejda Shkosa, mezzo soprano, Suzuki
    Fabio Capitanucci, baritone, Sharpless
    Cristina Reale, mezzo soprano, Kate Pinkerton
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
    Jonas Kaufman, tenor, B.F. Pinkerton
    Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Antonio Pappano, conductor.

    04La Fanciulla Del West *20060727

    On Saturday 10th December 1910, La Fanciulla del West opened at the old Metropolitan Opera House on Broadway. Emmy Destinn sang Minnie, with Caruso opposite her and Toscanini conducting. America lay under Puccini's spell.

    Act 1: Introduction

    La Scala Chorus

    Orchestra of the Teatro alla Scala, Milan

    Lorin Maazel (conductor)

    Act 1: Dove eravamo?/La Posta!

    Minnie....Maria Zampieri (soprano)

    Nick....Sergio Bertocchi (tenor)

    Minatori....Orazio Mori(bass)

    Act 1: Laggiù nel Soledad/Chi cè per farmi I ricci?

    Johnson....Placido Domingo (tenor)

    04La Fanciulla Del West *20060727

    On Saturday 10th December 1910, La Fanciulla del West opened at the old Metropolitan Opera House on Broadway. Emmy Destinn sang Minnie, with Caruso opposite her and Toscanini conducting. America lay under Puccini's spell.

    Act 1: Introduction

    La Scala Chorus

    Orchestra of the Teatro alla Scala, Milan

    Lorin Maazel (conductor)

    Act 1: Dove eravamo?/La Posta!

    Minnie....Maria Zampieri (soprano)

    Nick....Sergio Bertocchi (tenor)

    Minatori....Orazio Mori(bass)

    Act 1: Laggiù nel Soledad/Chi cè per farmi I ricci?

    Johnson....Placido Domingo (tenor)

    04The Belasco Connection20080103

    With Donald Macleod. The two operas Puccini composed to plays by the American dramatist David Belasco showed him to be making real advances in orchestral techniques and the handling of characters. While these developments were largely ignored in the first of them, Madama Butterfly, the premiere of La fanciulla del West was a different story altogether.

    Un bel di vedremo (Madama Butterfly, Act 2)

    Mirella Freni (soprano)

    Vienna Philharmonic

    Herbert von Karajan (conductor)

    Viene le sera...Vogliatemi bene (Madama Butterfly, Act 1)

    Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)

    Datele voi qualche soccorso...Addio fiorito asil (Madama Butterfly, Act 2)

    Robert Kerns (baritone)

    Elke Schary, Christa Ludwig (mezzo-sopranos)

    La fanciulla del West (Act 1 excerpt)

    Mara Zampieri (soprano)

    Placido Domingo (tenor)

    Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

    Lorin Maazel (conductor)

    La fanciulla del West (Act 3 excerpt)

    Juan Pons (baritone)

    Chorus and Orchestra of La Scala, Milan

    05New Directions2013040520150703 (R3)

    The twentieth century saw Puccini moving along new musical and dramatic avenues. Today, Donald Macleod explores some of Puccini's later collaborations with the writer, Giuseppe Adami.

    Donald Macleod explores some of Puccini's later collaborations with writer Giuseppe Adami.

    05Three For One20171020

    The series featuring Puccini 's heroines reaches its conclusion with Il trittico.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano concludes this series exploring Puccini's heroines with Il trittico, three one-act operas and three contrasting female leads, Il tabarro's Giorgetta, Suor Angelica and Lauretta in Gianni Schicchi, for whom he wrote one of the most beautiful, soaring melodies in opera, O mio babbino caro.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking a perfect synthesis between music and action, constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    The success of Puccini's trilogy of one-act operas, Il trittico at its New York premiere in 1918 ended a difficult decade for the composer. He'd started and abandoned several theatrical projects but now, finally, his hunger to embrace a new and modern musical language found expression in these three carefully balanced narratives: the darkly impressionistic Il tabarro follows Giorgetta and Luigi's illicit affair to a shocking conclusion, Puccini's own personal favourite, recounts a moment of truth and its tragic consequences for Suor Angelica and to round the evening off, greedy relatives are outwitted in the fast paced comic opera Gianni Schicchi.

    Ė ben altro il mio sogno (Il tabarro)
    Maria Guleghina, soprano, Giorgetta
    Neil Shicoff, tenor, Luigi
    Carlo Guelfi, baritone, Michele
    Elena Zilio, mezzo soprano, la Frugola
    Enrico Fissore, bass, Il Talpa
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Antonio Pappano, conductor

    Il principe Gualtiero vostro padre....Senza mamma, o bimbo, tu sei morte (Suor Angelica)
    Cristina Gallardo-Domas, soprano, Suor Angelica
    Bernadette Manca di Nissa, contralto, La zia principessa
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Antonio Pappano, conductor

    C'è una persona sola chi ci può consigliare....O mio babbino caro (Gianni Schicchi)
    Roberto Alagna, tenor, Rinuccio
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Lauretta
    José van Dam, baritone, Gianni Schicchi
    Felicity Palmer, soprano, Zita
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Antonio Pappano, conductor.

    05 LAST* Puccini's World20080104

    Donald Macleod explores how the beginning of the 20th century saw Puccini searching for a new dramatic direction. The world around him was changing and he was feeling distinctly out of step. On the one hand he was seen as the successor to Verdi, while on the other his detractors felt his music had no Italian character whatsoever.

    Aranci, ninnoli! Caldi i marroni e caramelle! (La bohÃme, Act 2)

    Chorus of Maggio Musicale Fiorentino and Coro di voci bianche della Scuola di Musica di Fiesole

    Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

    Zubin Mehta (conductor)

    Il Tabarro (excerpt)

    Philharmonia Orchestra

    Antonio Pappano (conductor)

    Nulla!... Silenzio! (Il Tabarro)

    Carlo Guelfi (baritone)

    Perche mai cercate di saper... Bevo al tuo fresco sorriso (La Rondine, Act 2)

    Angela Gheorghiu (soprano)

    Roberto Alagna (tenor)

    Inva Mula (soprano)

    William Matteuzzi (baritone)

    London Voices

    London Symphony Orchestra

    Torture and death of Liu (Turandot, Act 3)

    Montserrrat Caballe (soprano)

    Tom Krause (baritone)

    Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)

    Joan Sutherland (soprano)

    Nicolai Ghiaurov (bass)

    John Alldis Choir

    London Philharmonic Orchestra

    Datemi il testamento!... Ecco la cappellina! (Gianni Schicchi)

    Tito Gobbi (baritone)

    Victoria de los Angeles (soprano)

    Carlo del Monte (tenor)

    Anna Maria Canali (mezzo-soprano)

    Paolo Montarsolo (bass)

    Orchestra of the Rome Opera Theatre

    Gabriele Santini (conductor)

    Oh saro la piu bella (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)

    Mirella Freni (soprano)

    Placido Domingo (tenor)

    Giuseppe Sinopoli (conductor).

    05 LASTNew Directions2013040520150703 (R3)

    Donald Macleod explores some of Puccini's later collaborations with writer Giuseppe Adami.

    The twentieth century saw Puccini moving along new musical and dramatic avenues. Today, Donald Macleod explores some of Puccini's later collaborations with the writer, Giuseppe Adami.

    Donald Macleod explores some of Puccini's later collaborations with writer Giuseppe Adami.

    The twentieth century saw Puccini moving along new musical and dramatic avenues. Today, Donald Macleod explores some of Puccini's later collaborations with the writer, Giuseppe Adami.

    05 LASTNew Directions20130405

    The twentieth century saw Puccini moving along new musical and dramatic avenues. Today, Donald Macleod explores some of Puccini's later collaborations with the writer, Giuseppe Adami.

    Donald Macleod explores some of Puccini's later collaborations with writer Giuseppe Adami.

    05 LASTPuccini's World2008010420081226

    The 20th century saw Puccini searching for a new dramatic direction.

    Donald Macleod explores how the beginning of the 20th century saw Puccini searching for a new dramatic direction. The world around him was changing and he was feeling distinctly out of step. On the one hand he was seen as the successor to Verdi, while on the other his detractors felt his music had no Italian character whatsoever.

    Aranci, ninnoli! Caldi i marroni e caramelle! (La boheme, Act 2)

  • Anna Maria canali (mezzo-soprano)
  • Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)
  • Placido Domingo (tenor)
  • angela gheorghiu (soprano)
  • antonio pappano (conductor)

    nulla!... silenzio! (il tabarro)

  • antonio pappano (conductor)

    perche mai cercate di saper... bevo al tuo fresco sorriso (la rondine, act 2)

  • antonio pappano (conductor)

    torture and death of liu (turandot, act 3)

  • carlo del monte (tenor)
  • carlo guelfi (baritone)
  • chorus of maggio musicale fiorentino and coro di voci bianche della scuola di musica di fiesole
  • gabriele santini (conductor)

    oh saro la piu bella (manon lescaut, act 2)

  • giuseppe sinopoli (conductor)
  • inva mula (soprano)
  • israel philharmonic orchestra
  • joan sutherland (soprano)
  • john alldis choir
  • london philharmonic orchestra
  • london symphony orchestra
  • london voices
  • mirella freni (soprano)
  • montserrrat caballe (soprano)
  • nicolai ghiaurov (bass)
  • orchestra of the rome opera theatre
  • paolo montarsolo (bass)
  • philharmonia orchestra
  • roberto alagna (tenor)
  • tito gobbi (baritone)
  • tom krause (baritone)
  • victoria de los angeles (soprano)
  • william matteuzzi (baritone)
  • zubin mehta (conductor)

    datemi il testamento!... ecco la cappellina! (gianni schicchi)

  • zubin mehta (conductor)

    il tabarro (excerpt)

    Donald Macleod explores how the beginning of the 20th century saw Puccini searching for a new dramatic direction. The world around him was changing and he was feeling distinctly out of step. On the one hand he was seen as the successor to Verdi, while on the other his detractors felt his music had no Italian character whatsoever.

    Aranci, ninnoli! Caldi i marroni e caramelle! (La bohÃme, Act 2)

    Chorus of Maggio Musicale Fiorentino and Coro di voci bianche della Scuola di Musica di Fiesole

    Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

    Zubin Mehta (conductor)

    Il Tabarro (excerpt)

    Philharmonia Orchestra

    Antonio Pappano (conductor)

    Nulla!... Silenzio! (Il Tabarro)

    Carlo Guelfi (baritone)

    Perche mai cercate di saper... Bevo al tuo fresco sorriso (La Rondine, Act 2)

    Angela Gheorghiu (soprano)

    Roberto Alagna (tenor)

    Inva Mula (soprano)

    William Matteuzzi (baritone)

    London Voices

    London Symphony Orchestra

    Torture and death of Liu (Turandot, Act 3)

    Montserrrat Caballe (soprano)

    Tom Krause (baritone)

    Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)

    Joan Sutherland (soprano)

    Nicolai Ghiaurov (bass)

    John Alldis Choir

    London Philharmonic Orchestra

    Datemi il testamento!... Ecco la cappellina! (Gianni Schicchi)

    Tito Gobbi (baritone)

    Victoria de los Angeles (soprano)

    Carlo del Monte (tenor)

    Anna Maria Canali (mezzo-soprano)

    Paolo Montarsolo (bass)

    Orchestra of the Rome Opera Theatre

    Gabriele Santini (conductor)

    Oh saro la piu bella (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)

    Mirella Freni (soprano)

    Placido Domingo (tenor)

    Giuseppe Sinopoli (conductor).

  • 05 LASTPuccini's World *20081226

    The 20th century saw Puccini searching for a new dramatic direction.

    Donald Macleod explores how the beginning of the 20th century saw Puccini searching for a new dramatic direction. The world around him was changing and he was feeling distinctly out of step. On the one hand he was seen as the successor to Verdi, while on the other his detractors felt his music had no Italian character whatsoever.

    Aranci, ninnoli! Caldi i marroni e caramelle! (La boheme, Act 2)

  • Anna Maria canali (mezzo-soprano)
  • Luciano Pavarotti (tenor)
  • Placido Domingo (tenor)
  • angela gheorghiu (soprano)
  • antonio pappano (conductor)

    nulla!... silenzio! (il tabarro)

  • antonio pappano (conductor)

    perche mai cercate di saper... bevo al tuo fresco sorriso (la rondine, act 2)

  • antonio pappano (conductor)

    torture and death of liu (turandot, act 3)

  • carlo del monte (tenor)
  • carlo guelfi (baritone)
  • chorus of maggio musicale fiorentino and coro di voci bianche della scuola di musica di fiesole
  • gabriele santini (conductor)

    oh saro la piu bella (manon lescaut, act 2)

  • giuseppe sinopoli (conductor)
  • inva mula (soprano)
  • israel philharmonic orchestra
  • joan sutherland (soprano)
  • john alldis choir
  • london philharmonic orchestra
  • london symphony orchestra
  • london voices
  • mirella freni (soprano)
  • montserrrat caballe (soprano)
  • nicolai ghiaurov (bass)
  • orchestra of the rome opera theatre
  • paolo montarsolo (bass)
  • philharmonia orchestra
  • roberto alagna (tenor)
  • tito gobbi (baritone)
  • tom krause (baritone)
  • victoria de los angeles (soprano)
  • william matteuzzi (baritone)
  • zubin mehta (conductor)

    datemi il testamento!... ecco la cappellina! (gianni schicchi)

  • zubin mehta (conductor)

    il tabarro (excerpt)

  • 05 LASTThree For One20171020

    The series featuring Puccini 's heroines reaches its conclusion with Il trittico.

    Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano concludes this series exploring Puccini's heroines with Il trittico, three one-act operas and three contrasting female leads, Il tabarro's Giorgetta, Suor Angelica and Lauretta in Gianni Schicchi, for whom he wrote one of the most beautiful, soaring melodies in opera, O mio babbino caro.

    Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking a perfect synthesis between music and action, constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

    Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

    The success of Puccini's trilogy of one-act operas, Il trittico at its New York premiere in 1918 ended a difficult decade for the composer. He'd started and abandoned several theatrical projects but now, finally, his hunger to embrace a new and modern musical language found expression in these three carefully balanced narratives: the darkly impressionistic Il tabarro follows Giorgetta and Luigi's illicit affair to a shocking conclusion, Puccini's own personal favourite, recounts a moment of truth and its tragic consequences for Suor Angelica and to round the evening off, greedy relatives are outwitted in the fast paced comic opera Gianni Schicchi.

    Ė ben altro il mio sogno (Il tabarro)
    Maria Guleghina, soprano, Giorgetta
    Neil Shicoff, tenor, Luigi
    Carlo Guelfi, baritone, Michele
    Elena Zilio, mezzo soprano, la Frugola
    Enrico Fissore, bass, Il Talpa
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Antonio Pappano, conductor

    Il principe Gualtiero vostro padre....Senza mamma, o bimbo, tu sei morte (Suor Angelica)
    Cristina Gallardo-Domas, soprano, Suor Angelica
    Bernadette Manca di Nissa, contralto, La zia principessa
    Philharmonia Orchestra
    Antonio Pappano, conductor

    C'è una persona sola chi ci può consigliare....O mio babbino caro (Gianni Schicchi)
    Roberto Alagna, tenor, Rinuccio
    Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Lauretta
    José van Dam, baritone, Gianni Schicchi
    Felicity Palmer, soprano, Zita
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Antonio Pappano, conductor.

    05 LASTTurandot *20060728

    Donald Macleod recreates the premieres of five different Puccini operas.

    On 25th April 1926, Turandot opened at La Scala. But it was an occasion tinged with melancholy, as the composer had died 18 months earlier leaving his work unfinished. And on this first night, Toscanini declined to perform the completion of the opera supplied by Franco Alfano.

    Act 1: Extracts Popli di Pekino!/Signore, ascolta!

    Liù....Katia Ricciarelli (soprano)

    Calaf....Jose Carreras (tenor)

    Pang....Helmut Wildhaber (tenor)

    Pong....Heinz Zednick (tenor)

    Ping....Robert Kerns (baritone)

    Mandarin....Kurt Rydl (bass)

    Timur....John-Paul Bogart (bass)

    Chorus and Orchestra of the Vienna State Opera

    Lorin Maazel (conductor)

    Act 2: extract Ola, Pang!, Ola, Pong!

    Pong....Heinz Zednik (tenor)

    Act 2: extract: In questa reggia

    Princess Turandot....Eva Marton (soprano)

    Calaf....Jos Carreras (tenor)

    Act 3: extract: Nessun dorma!

    Jos Carreras (tenor)

    Act 3: extract: Principessa di morte!

    05 LASTTurandot *20060728

    Donald Macleod recreates the premieres of five different Puccini operas.

    On 25th April 1926, Turandot opened at La Scala. But it was an occasion tinged with melancholy, as the composer had died 18 months earlier leaving his work unfinished. And on this first night, Toscanini declined to perform the completion of the opera supplied by Franco Alfano.

    Act 1: Extracts Popli di Pekino!/Signore, ascolta!

    Liù....Katia Ricciarelli (soprano)

    Calaf....Jose Carreras (tenor)

    Pang....Helmut Wildhaber (tenor)

    Pong....Heinz Zednick (tenor)

    Ping....Robert Kerns (baritone)

    Mandarin....Kurt Rydl (bass)

    Timur....John-Paul Bogart (bass)

    Chorus and Orchestra of the Vienna State Opera

    Lorin Maazel (conductor)

    Act 2: extract Ola, Pang!, Ola, Pong!

    Pong....Heinz Zednik (tenor)

    Act 2: extract: In questa reggia

    Princess Turandot....Eva Marton (soprano)

    Calaf....Jos Carreras (tenor)

    Act 3: extract: Nessun dorma!

    Jos Carreras (tenor)

    Act 3: extract: Principessa di morte!