Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924) [Composer Of The Week]

Episodes

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Broadcast
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01A step forward2017101620191021 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today it's Manon Lescaut, a woman whose love of pleasure and the good life ultimately leads to her destruction.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì, Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, Puccini was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly pushing the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - which include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

It was his third opera, Manon Lescaut that marked a significant turning point for Puccini. After three years of hard graft, working with a succession of librettists on this adaptation of Abbé Provost's novel, when it was premiered in Turin in 1893, the critics were universal in their praise, citing in particular the quality of the vocal writing.

In quelle trine morbide (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)
Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano

Cortese damigella...Donna non vidi mai (Manon Lescaut, Act 1)
Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
Yusif Eyvazov, tenor, Des Grieux
Munich Radio Orchestra
Marco Armiliato, conductor

Minuet (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)
John Fryatt, tenor, Dancing Master
Kurt Rydl, bass, Geronte
Mirella Freni, soprano, Manon
Chorus of Royal Opera House
Philharmonia Orchestra
Giuseppe Sinopoli, conductor

Act 4 (Manon Lescaut)
Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
Yusif Eyvazov, tenor, Des Grieux
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano, conductor.

Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano, starting with Manon Lescaut.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

01A step forward20171016

Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano, starting with Manon Lescaut.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

02The Bohemians2017101720191022 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss Puccini's vivid evocation of student life, La Bohème, and the characters of the fragile embroiderer, Mimì and the flamboyant Musetta.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, Puccini was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

Set in the Latin Quarter of Paris, and premiered in 1896, La Bohème was the first of a series of highly successful collaborations with the writers Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica.

Mi chiamano Mimì (La Bohème, Act 1)
Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
Berlin Philharmonic
Herbert von Karajan, conductor

Musetta's Waltz (La Bohème, Act 2)
Michel Sénechal, tenor, Alcindoro
Elizabeth Harwood, soprano, Musetta
Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
Nicolai Ghiaurov, bass, Colline
Rolando Panerai, baritone, Marcello
Gianni Maffei, actor, Schaunard
Chorus of Deutsche Oper, Berlin
Berlin Philharmonic
Herbert von Karajan, conductor

Act 3 (La Bohème)
Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
Luciano Pavarotti, tenor, Rodolfo
Rolando Panerai, baritone, Marcello
Chorus of Deutsche Oper, Berlin
Berlin Philharmonic
Herbert von Karajan, conductor.

Donald Macleod turns his focus on Puccini's heroines to La Boheme's Mimi and Musetta.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

02The Bohemians20171017

Donald Macleod turns his focus on Puccini's heroines to La Boheme's Mimi and Musetta.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

03A Roman truth2017101820191023 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss one of the most passionate and complex of characters, Tosca.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì, Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

Now firmly established as an internationally acclaimed figure, there was a lot of hype surrounding a new opera by Puccini. But when Tosca was first heard in Rome on 14th January 1900, the audience simply didn't get what they were hearing. They were confused. Where, they asked was the melody?

Vissi d'arte (Tosca, Act 2)
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Tosca
Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Antonio Pappano, director

Tre sbirri, una carrozza (Tosca, Act 1)
Ruggero Raimondi, baritone, Scarpia
David Cangelosi, tenor, Spoletta
Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Antonio Pappano, director

Act 3 (Tosca)
Gwynne Howell, bass, Carceriere
Roberto Alagna, tenor, Cavaradossi
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Tosca
David Cangelosi, tenor, Spoletta
Sorin Coliban, bass, Sciarrone
Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Antonio Pappano, director.

Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano turns to a tale of passion and revenge, Tosca.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

03A Roman truth20171018

Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano turns to a tale of passion and revenge, Tosca.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

04A sea of misery2017101920191024 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss Puccini's personal favourite, the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

Based on a play he'd seen in London by David Belasco, Madama Butterfly ended up causing Puccini more heartache than either Tosca or La bohème. At the opening night at La Scala Milan on 17th February 1904 the action on stage was drowned out by the catcalls from the audience. Worse was to come. When the curtain came down at the end there was total silence. Out of all this anguish, what really stands out is Puccini's creation of surely the most heart-breaking and delicate of heroines, Cio-cio San, Madama Butterly.

Viene la sera (Madama Butterfly, Act 1)
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
Jonas Kaufman, tenor, B.F. Pinkerton
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano, conductor

Un bel dì vedremo (Madama Butterfly, Act 2)
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano, conductor

Finale (Madam Butterfly, Act 2, Part 2)
Enkelejda Shkosa, mezzo soprano, Suzuki
Fabio Capitanucci, baritone, Sharpless
Cristina Reale, mezzo soprano, Kate Pinkerton
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
Jonas Kaufman, tenor, B.F. Pinkerton
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano, conductor.

Donald Macleod's focus on Puccini's heroines turns to the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

04A sea of misery20171019

Donald Macleod's focus on Puccini's heroines turns to the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

05Three for One2017102020191025 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano concludes this series exploring Puccini's heroines with Il trittico, three one-act operas and three contrasting female leads, Il tabarro's Giorgetta, Suor Angelica and Lauretta in Gianni Schicchi, for whom he wrote one of the most beautiful, soaring melodies in opera, O mio babbino caro.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking a perfect synthesis between music and action, constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

The success of Puccini's trilogy of one-act operas, Il trittico at its New York premiere in 1918 ended a difficult decade for the composer. He'd started and abandoned several theatrical projects but now, finally, his hunger to embrace a new and modern musical language found expression in these three carefully balanced narratives: the darkly impressionistic Il tabarro follows Giorgetta and Luigi's illicit affair to a shocking conclusion, Puccini's own personal favourite, recounts a moment of truth and its tragic consequences for Suor Angelica and to round the evening off, greedy relatives are outwitted in the fast paced comic opera Gianni Schicchi.

Ė ben altro il mio sogno (Il tabarro)
Maria Guleghina, soprano, Giorgetta
Neil Shicoff, tenor, Luigi
Carlo Guelfi, baritone, Michele
Elena Zilio, mezzo soprano, la Frugola
Enrico Fissore, bass, Il Talpa
London Symphony Orchestra
Antonio Pappano, conductor

Il principe Gualtiero vostro padre.....Senza mamma, o bimbo, tu sei morte (Suor Angelica)
Cristina Gallardo-Domas, soprano, Suor Angelica
Bernadette Manca di Nissa, contralto, La zia principessa
Philharmonia Orchestra
Antonio Pappano, conductor

C'è una persona sola chi ci può consigliare.....O mio babbino caro (Gianni Schicchi)
Roberto Alagna, tenor, Rinuccio
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Lauretta
José van Dam, baritone, Gianni Schicchi
Felicity Palmer, soprano, Zita
London Symphony Orchestra
Antonio Pappano, conductor.

Donald Macleod concludes his look at Puccini 's heroines with Il trittico.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

05Three for One20171020

Donald Macleod concludes his look at Puccini 's heroines with Il trittico.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201701A Step Forward2017101620191021 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today it's Manon Lescaut, a woman whose love of pleasure and the good life ultimately leads to her destruction.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì, Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, Puccini was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly pushing the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - which include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

It was his third opera, Manon Lescaut that marked a significant turning point for Puccini. After three years of hard graft, working with a succession of librettists on this adaptation of Abbé Provost's novel, when it was premiered in Turin in 1893, the critics were universal in their praise, citing in particular the quality of the vocal writing.

In quelle trine morbide (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)
Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano

Cortese damigella...Donna non vidi mai (Manon Lescaut, Act 1)
Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
Yusif Eyvazov, tenor, Des Grieux
Munich Radio Orchestra
Marco Armiliato, conductor

Minuet (Manon Lescaut, Act 2)
John Fryatt, tenor, Dancing Master
Kurt Rydl, bass, Geronte
Mirella Freni, soprano, Manon
Chorus of Royal Opera House
Philharmonia Orchestra
Giuseppe Sinopoli, conductor

Act 4 (Manon Lescaut)
Anna Netrebko, soprano, Manon
Yusif Eyvazov, tenor, Des Grieux
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano, conductor.

Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano, starting with Manon Lescaut.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201702The Bohemians2017101720191022 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss Puccini's vivid evocation of student life, La Bohème, and the characters of the fragile embroiderer, Mimì and the flamboyant Musetta.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, Puccini was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

Set in the Latin Quarter of Paris, and premiered in 1896, La Bohème was the first of a series of highly successful collaborations with the writers Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica.

Mi chiamano Mimì (La Bohème, Act 1)
Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
Berlin Philharmonic
Herbert von Karajan, conductor

Musetta's Waltz (La Bohème, Act 2)
Michel Sénechal, tenor, Alcindoro
Elizabeth Harwood, soprano, Musetta
Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
Nicolai Ghiaurov, bass, Colline
Rolando Panerai, baritone, Marcello
Gianni Maffei, actor, Schaunard
Chorus of Deutsche Oper, Berlin
Berlin Philharmonic
Herbert von Karajan, conductor

Act 3 (La Bohème)
Mirella Freni, soprano, Mimì
Luciano Pavarotti, tenor, Rodolfo
Rolando Panerai, baritone, Marcello
Chorus of Deutsche Oper, Berlin
Berlin Philharmonic
Herbert von Karajan, conductor.

Donald Macleod turns his focus on Puccini's heroines to La Boheme's Mimi and Musetta.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201703A Roman Truth2017101820191023 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss one of the most passionate and complex of characters, Tosca.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì, Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

Now firmly established as an internationally acclaimed figure, there was a lot of hype surrounding a new opera by Puccini. But when Tosca was first heard in Rome on 14th January 1900, the audience simply didn't get what they were hearing. They were confused. Where, they asked was the melody?

Vissi d'arte (Tosca, Act 2)
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Tosca
Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Antonio Pappano, director

Tre sbirri, una carrozza (Tosca, Act 1)
Ruggero Raimondi, baritone, Scarpia
David Cangelosi, tenor, Spoletta
Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Antonio Pappano, director

Act 3 (Tosca)
Gwynne Howell, bass, Carceriere
Roberto Alagna, tenor, Cavaradossi
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Tosca
David Cangelosi, tenor, Spoletta
Sorin Coliban, bass, Sciarrone
Chorus and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Antonio Pappano, director.

Puccini's heroines with Sir Antonio Pappano turns to a tale of passion and revenge, Tosca.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201704A Sea Of Misery2017101920191024 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano, traces the developmental line of Puccini's meticulously crafted dramatic heroines. Today they discuss Puccini's personal favourite, the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking to perfect the synthesis between music and action, while constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

Based on a play he'd seen in London by David Belasco, Madama Butterfly ended up causing Puccini more heartache than either Tosca or La bohème. At the opening night at La Scala Milan on 17th February 1904 the action on stage was drowned out by the catcalls from the audience. Worse was to come. When the curtain came down at the end there was total silence. Out of all this anguish, what really stands out is Puccini's creation of surely the most heart-breaking and delicate of heroines, Cio-cio San, Madama Butterly.

Viene la sera (Madama Butterfly, Act 1)
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
Jonas Kaufman, tenor, B.F. Pinkerton
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano, conductor

Un bel dì vedremo (Madama Butterfly, Act 2)
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano, conductor

Finale (Madam Butterfly, Act 2, Part 2)
Enkelejda Shkosa, mezzo soprano, Suzuki
Fabio Capitanucci, baritone, Sharpless
Cristina Reale, mezzo soprano, Kate Pinkerton
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Butterfly
Jonas Kaufman, tenor, B.F. Pinkerton
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Antonio Pappano, conductor.

Donald Macleod's focus on Puccini's heroines turns to the tragic geisha, Madama Butterfly.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201705Three For One2017102020191025 (R3)

Donald Macleod, in conversation with Sir Antonio Pappano concludes this series exploring Puccini's heroines with Il trittico, three one-act operas and three contrasting female leads, Il tabarro's Giorgetta, Suor Angelica and Lauretta in Gianni Schicchi, for whom he wrote one of the most beautiful, soaring melodies in opera, O mio babbino caro.

Manon Lescaut, Mimì,Tosca, Madama Butterfly and Suor Angelica are women who capture our hearts and connect directly with our emotions. Recorded at the Royal Opera House, seated beneath several striking portraits of the composer, Tony dips into the scores to show how Puccini created these unforgettable characters and how with each one, he was seeking a perfect synthesis between music and action, constantly looking to push the boundaries of his musical language.

Born in 1858 in Lucca into a dynasty of musicians, Puccini was destined to be a church composer. That all changed when at age of 18, he walked to Pisa to see Verdi's Aida. It proved to be a formative experience. In that moment, he determined to become a man of the theatre, writing music exclusively for the stage. He went on to produce a dozen operas in fulfilment of that ambition - the last of them left incomplete at his death in 1924 - include La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly, still the cornerstones of any opera house's repertory.

The success of Puccini's trilogy of one-act operas, Il trittico at its New York premiere in 1918 ended a difficult decade for the composer. He'd started and abandoned several theatrical projects but now, finally, his hunger to embrace a new and modern musical language found expression in these three carefully balanced narratives: the darkly impressionistic Il tabarro follows Giorgetta and Luigi's illicit affair to a shocking conclusion, Puccini's own personal favourite, recounts a moment of truth and its tragic consequences for Suor Angelica and to round the evening off, greedy relatives are outwitted in the fast paced comic opera Gianni Schicchi.

Ė ben altro il mio sogno (Il tabarro)
Maria Guleghina, soprano, Giorgetta
Neil Shicoff, tenor, Luigi
Carlo Guelfi, baritone, Michele
Elena Zilio, mezzo soprano, la Frugola
Enrico Fissore, bass, Il Talpa
London Symphony Orchestra
Antonio Pappano, conductor

Il principe Gualtiero vostro padre....Senza mamma, o bimbo, tu sei morte (Suor Angelica)
Cristina Gallardo-Domas, soprano, Suor Angelica
Bernadette Manca di Nissa, contralto, La zia principessa
Philharmonia Orchestra
Antonio Pappano, conductor

C'è una persona sola chi ci può consigliare....O mio babbino caro (Gianni Schicchi)
Roberto Alagna, tenor, Rinuccio
Angela Gheorghiu, soprano, Lauretta
José van Dam, baritone, Gianni Schicchi
Felicity Palmer, soprano, Zita
London Symphony Orchestra
Antonio Pappano, conductor.

Donald Macleod concludes his look at Puccini 's heroines with Il trittico.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.