Glass Half Full

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01A Global Population Of Nine Billion Is Sustainable20170419

Fi Glover pits optimists against pessimists in a debate on population growth.

Should we stop worrying about our growing global population and look forward to an age of abundance and prosperity?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists She asks not only what they think about population growth, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Best-selling author and documentary maker Johan Norberg is an optimist, seeing positives wherever he looks. Population growth has coincided with a huge increase in prosperity and education levels, setting free our natural instinct to innovate. He believes technological advances will allow us to feed the extra mouths and clean up the planet.

Robin Maynard, a veteran campaigner and strategist and now chief executive of the charity Population Matters, has a very different view. He considers that even the current population is unsustainable, using one-and-a-half times the planet's resource limit, and adding billions more people will cause disastrous damage to the Earth's ecosystems.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - statistician Professor David Spiegelhalter, Philosophy Professor Sarah Conly, and Joel Kibazo (former Director of the African development Bank).

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

01A Global Population Of Nine Billion Is Sustainable2017041920170422 (R4)

Should we stop worrying about our growing global population and look forward to an age of abundance and prosperity?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists She asks not only what they think about population growth, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Best-selling author and documentary maker Johan Norberg is an optimist, seeing positives wherever he looks. Population growth has coincided with a huge increase in prosperity and education levels, setting free our natural instinct to innovate. He believes technological advances will allow us to feed the extra mouths and clean up the planet.

Robin Maynard, a veteran campaigner and strategist and now chief executive of the charity Population Matters, has a very different view. He considers that even the current population is unsustainable, using one-and-a-half times the planet's resource limit, and adding billions more people will cause disastrous damage to the Earth's ecosystems.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - statistician Professor David Spiegelhalter, Philosophy Professor Sarah Conly, and Joel Kibazo (former Director of the African development Bank).

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

Fi Glover pits optimists against pessimists in a debate on population growth.

Should we stop worrying about our growing global population and look forward to an age of abundance and prosperity?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists She asks not only what they think about population growth, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Best-selling author and documentary maker Johan Norberg is an optimist, seeing positives wherever he looks. Population growth has coincided with a huge increase in prosperity and education levels, setting free our natural instinct to innovate. He believes technological advances will allow us to feed the extra mouths and clean up the planet.

Robin Maynard, a veteran campaigner and strategist and now chief executive of the charity Population Matters, has a very different view. He considers that even the current population is unsustainable, using one-and-a-half times the planet's resource limit, and adding billions more people will cause disastrous damage to the Earth's ecosystems.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - statistician Professor David Spiegelhalter, Philosophy Professor Sarah Conly, and Joel Kibazo (former Director of the African development Bank).

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

01Digital Technology Is Making Children's Lives Richer2017042620170429 (R4)

Is nostalgia for the past and fear of the future preventing us from recognising the huge benefits of digital technology for children?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about the effect digital technology has on children, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Baroness Martha Lane Fox, an invincible optimist and tech entrepreneur, says children are naturally predisposed to learn, and digital technology provides endless opportunities for development. She considers that we romanticise traditional childhoods spent outside in the fresh air but, in reality, children must tap the social and educational potential of tablets and smart phones if they are to be prepared for life in our digital world.

Andrew Keen, an entrepreneur himself as well as being one of the most influential pessimistic commentators on the digital age, takes the opposite view. He believes our children are immersed in digital media before they can walk, stunting their development, damaging their health, and making them less able to interact with real-life people. He says the internet monetises every aspect of our children's lives, their personal data harvested for the use of governments and corporations.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - Professor Sugata Mitra, educationalist Sue Palmer, and technology expert and presenter Julia Hardy.

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

Fi Glover pits optimists against pessimists in a debate on digital technology and children

Is nostalgia for the past and fear of the future preventing us from recognising the huge benefits of digital technology for children?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about the effect digital technology has on children, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Baroness Martha Lane Fox, an invincible optimist and tech entrepreneur, says children are naturally predisposed to learn, and digital technology provides endless opportunities for development. She considers that we romanticise traditional childhoods spent outside in the fresh air but, in reality, children must tap the social and educational potential of tablets and smart phones if they are to be prepared for life in our digital world.

Andrew Keen, an entrepreneur himself as well as being one of the most influential pessimistic commentators on the digital age, takes the opposite view. He believes our children are immersed in digital media before they can walk, stunting their development, damaging their health, and making them less able to interact with real-life people. He says the internet monetises every aspect of our children's lives, their personal data harvested for the use of governments and corporations.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - Professor Sugata Mitra, educationalist Sue Palmer, and technology expert and presenter Julia Hardy.

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

01Gender Equality Is Within Reach2017041220170415 (R4)

Is ingrained negativity preventing us from seeing that full gender equality is just around the corner?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the Women of the World festival at the Southbank Centre, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about gender equality, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

We have made extraordinary strides towards gender equality - the pay gap is shrinking, female representation in parliament and in business is growing and, all over the world, legislation is coming into force that safeguards women's rights. These are the views of optimist and best-selling sociologist Dr Michael Kimmel.

On the other hand, violence against women is on the rise in the UK, men still dominate politics and the judiciary and there are still more CEOs called John leading FTSE 100 companies than women! Historian Hannah Dawson brings us back down to earth.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - MP Harriet Harman, best-selling Turkish author Elif Shafak, and sociologist Catherine Hakim.

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

Fi Glover pits optimists against pessimists in a debate on gender equality.

01We Can Look Forward To A Healthier Future2017040520170408 (R4)

Are we heading towards a golden age of medicine, or is public health a ticking time bomb?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of both pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about the future of health, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

We are all healthier and living longer and new technology will empower us and bring about a new healthcare revolution. So claims optimist Professor Tony Young, a practising surgeon who leads innovation for NHS England.

Pessimist Dr Richard Smith, former editor of the British Medical Journal, counters that sedentary lifestyles, poor diets and over-medication are damaging our health. Obesity and dementia are soaring and caring for these patients may be beyond our capabilities.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - Dr Helen Stokes-Lampard (Chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners), Professor Kevin Fenton (Public Health England National Director for Health and Wellbeing), and Vivienne Parry (broadcaster and Head of Engagement at Genomics England).

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

0104Digital Technology Is Making Children's Lives Richer20170426

Fi Glover pits optimists against pessimists in a debate on digital technology and children

Is nostalgia for the past and fear of the future preventing us from recognising the huge benefits of digital technology for children?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about the effect digital technology has on children, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Baroness Martha Lane Fox, an invincible optimist and tech entrepreneur, says children are naturally predisposed to learn, and digital technology provides endless opportunities for development. She considers that we romanticise traditional childhoods spent outside in the fresh air but, in reality, children must tap the social and educational potential of tablets and smart phones if they are to be prepared for life in our digital world.

Andrew Keen, an entrepreneur himself as well as being one of the most influential pessimistic commentators on the digital age, takes the opposite view. He believes our children are immersed in digital media before they can walk, stunting their development, damaging their health, and making them less able to interact with real-life people. He says the internet monetises every aspect of our children's lives, their personal data harvested for the use of governments and corporations.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - Professor Sugata Mitra, educationalist Sue Palmer, and technology expert and presenter Julia Hardy.

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

Is nostalgia for the past and fear of the future preventing us from recognising the huge benefits of digital technology for children?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about the effect digital technology has on children, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Baroness Martha Lane Fox, an invincible optimist and tech entrepreneur, says children are naturally predisposed to learn, and digital technology provides endless opportunities for development. She considers that we romanticise traditional childhoods spent outside in the fresh air but, in reality, children must tap the social and educational potential of tablets and smart phones if they are to be prepared for life in our digital world.

Andrew Keen, an entrepreneur himself as well as being one of the most influential pessimistic commentators on the digital age, takes the opposite view. He believes our children are immersed in digital media before they can walk, stunting their development, damaging their health, and making them less able to interact with real-life people. He says the internet monetises every aspect of our children's lives, their personal data harvested for the use of governments and corporations.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - Professor Sugata Mitra, educationalist Sue Palmer, and technology expert and presenter Julia Hardy.

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.