Global Beats [world Service]

Episodes

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20140517

20140517

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

2014051720140518 (WS)

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from...

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

2014051720140518 (WS)

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from...

2014062120140622 (WS)

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from...

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

2014062120140622 (WS)

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from...

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

2014071920140720 (WS)

Rafael Estefania showcases Latin American musical talent, featuring artists from Brazil...

Rafael Estefania showcases Latin American musical talent, featuring artists from Brazil, Colombia, Panama, Mexico and Chile.

2014071920140720 (WS)

Rafael Estefania showcases Latin American musical talent, featuring artists from Brazil...

Rafael Estefania showcases Latin American musical talent, featuring artists from Brazil, Colombia, Panama, Mexico and Chile.

2014081620140817 (WS)

Cross-Cultural Collaborations: Wonderful music made by artists from different tradition...

Cross-Cultural Collaborations: Wonderful music made by artists from different traditions coming together to create new sounds.

2014081620140817 (WS)

Cross-Cultural Collaborations: Wonderful music made by artists from different traditions coming together to create new sounds.

Cross-Cultural Collaborations: Wonderful music made by artists from different tradition...

2014092020140921 (WS)

This month Rafael Estefania travels to Mexico City in search of the new musical talent that is emerging in the metropolis.

This month Rafael Estefania travels to Mexico City in search of the new musical talent...

2014101820141019 (WS)

This month Global Beats offers a varied selection of songs from Africa, recorded especi...

20141018

This month Global Beats offers a varied selection of songs from Africa, recorded especially for the BBC.

2014101820141019 (WS)

This month Global Beats offers a varied selection of songs from Africa, recorded especially for the BBC.

This month Global Beats offers a varied selection of songs from Africa, recorded especi...

A Capella2015051620150517 (WS)

The power of the human voice and singing in a cappella featuring US sensation Pentatonix

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month’s edition on Global Beats is dedicated to the human voice. A cappella, or singing without instruments, goes way back in time, and has versions all over the world. It’s also alive and well and being practised right now in weird and wonderful ways by modern musicians.

Presented by Max Reinhardt, the programme includes unaccompanied singing from the UK, Kazakhstan, Senegal, Cuba and Estonia. It also features Pentatonix, five singers from the US, whose vocal acrobatics recently won them a coveted Grammy award.

***In the programme Almat Abishev was wrongly described as a professor. He is a lecturer and dean of faculty at the Kazakh Kurmangazy Conservatory.

Also, the Kazakh group Art Vocal does still exist, but has changed the style of music it performs.***

(Photo: Kazakh a cappella group Vid Men, who came to fame via the country’s version of XFactor, courtesy of Vid Men)

A Capella2015051620150520 (WS)

The power of the human voice and singing in a cappella featuring US sensation Pentatonix

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month’s edition on Global Beats is dedicated to the human voice. A cappella, or singing without instruments, goes way back in time, and has versions all over the world. It’s also alive and well and being practised right now in weird and wonderful ways by modern musicians.

Presented by Max Reinhardt, the programme includes unaccompanied singing from the UK, Kazakhstan, Senegal, Cuba and Estonia. It also features Pentatonix, five singers from the US, whose vocal acrobatics recently won them a coveted Grammy award.

***In the programme Almat Abishev was wrongly described as a professor. He is a lecturer and dean of faculty at the Kazakh Kurmangazy Conservatory.

Also, the Kazakh group Art Vocal does still exist, but has changed the style of music it performs.***

(Photo: Kazakh a cappella group Vid Men, who came to fame via the country’s version of XFactor, courtesy of Vid Men)

A Capella20150516

The power of the human voice and singing in a cappella featuring US sensation Pentatonix

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month’s edition on Global Beats is dedicated to the human voice. A cappella, or singing without instruments, goes way back in time, and has versions all over the world. It’s also alive and well and being practised right now in weird and wonderful ways by modern musicians.

Presented by Max Reinhardt, the programme includes unaccompanied singing from the UK, Kazakhstan, Senegal, Cuba and Estonia. It also features Pentatonix, five singers from the US, whose vocal acrobatics recently won them a coveted Grammy award.

***In the programme Almat Abishev was wrongly described as a professor. He is a lecturer and dean of faculty at the Kazakh Kurmangazy Conservatory.

Also, the Kazakh group Art Vocal does still exist, but has changed the style of music it performs.***

(Photo: Kazakh a cappella group Vid Men, who came to fame via the country’s version of XFactor, courtesy of Vid Men)

Africa2014101820141019 (WS)

Music from Ghanaian rapper M.Anifest, Nigerian pop diva Omawumi, Aziza Brahim and more

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

We are joined by the highly creative wordsmiths M.Anifest from Ghana and Tumi from South Africa, whose conscious rap uses lyrics to challenge and delight. Both seek out superb musicians to work with and to learn from. Plus, two artists from the Sahara - Aziza Brahim from western Sahara performs a song from her latest album, Soutak, which has been highly acclaimed by critics.

We are also joined by Songhai Blues whose members fled northern Mali when the area was overrun by extremist rebels and music was banned. They have subsequently been discovered by the British musician and impresario Damon Albarn and have been pleasing audiences in the UK with their bluesy desert rock.

Lala Njava from Madagascar whose deep and highly distinctive vocal technique derives from the traditional music from the south of her country. Now she lives in Brussels, and her sound is rich with jazz and other contemporary and international influences.

We hear from Omawumi, a Nigerian pop diva with a difference. Not only does she have a fantastic voice, but she is a witty and bold critic of her society. The song she performs for Global Beats is an irresistibly packaged appeal for honesty and action on incest. Also from Nigeria, Villy, is a very new talent doing exciting things with Afrobeat.

And, in Rwanda we hear the simple acoustic charm of The Good Ones. The musicians, who play whatever they can find - including a pair of boots - are winning fans with songs that feel fresh and from the heart. Their success means they may soon need to give up their day jobs, which include farming, driving and teaching.

(Photo: From left to right, Nigerian pop diva Omawumi, Ghanaian rapper M.Anisfest and Aziza Brahim from western Sahara. BBC copyright)

Africa20141018

Music from Ghanaian rapper M.Anifest, Nigerian pop diva Omawumi, Aziza Brahim and more

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

We are joined by the highly creative wordsmiths M.Anifest from Ghana and Tumi from South Africa, whose conscious rap uses lyrics to challenge and delight. Both seek out superb musicians to work with and to learn from. Plus, two artists from the Sahara - Aziza Brahim from western Sahara performs a song from her latest album, Soutak, which has been highly acclaimed by critics.

We are also joined by Songhai Blues whose members fled northern Mali when the area was overrun by extremist rebels and music was banned. They have subsequently been discovered by the British musician and impresario Damon Albarn and have been pleasing audiences in the UK with their bluesy desert rock.

Lala Njava from Madagascar whose deep and highly distinctive vocal technique derives from the traditional music from the south of her country. Now she lives in Brussels, and her sound is rich with jazz and other contemporary and international influences.

We hear from Omawumi, a Nigerian pop diva with a difference. Not only does she have a fantastic voice, but she is a witty and bold critic of her society. The song she performs for Global Beats is an irresistibly packaged appeal for honesty and action on incest. Also from Nigeria, Villy, is a very new talent doing exciting things with Afrobeat.

And, in Rwanda we hear the simple acoustic charm of The Good Ones. The musicians, who play whatever they can find - including a pair of boots - are winning fans with songs that feel fresh and from the heart. Their success means they may soon need to give up their day jobs, which include farming, driving and teaching.

(Photo: From left to right, Nigerian pop diva Omawumi, Ghanaian rapper M.Anisfest and Aziza Brahim from western Sahara. BBC copyright)

Americana - Part One2016020620160207 (WS)

Meet Heidi Feek, Whiskey Shivers, Haas Kowert Tice - new stars of American roots music

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats travels to Nashville, Tennessee, to record some of the best new American roots music. Max Reinhardt meets brand new country diva Heidi Feek, unstoppable bluegrass boys Whiskey Shivers and Haas Kowert Tice, who blend American folk with contemporary classical. Part one of two episodes.

(Photo: Bluegrass band Whiskey Shivers. Credit: Geoff Duncan)

Meet Heidi Feek, Whiskey Shivers, Haas Kowert Tice - new stars of American roots music

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats travels to Nashville, Tennessee, to record some of the best new American roots music. Max Reinhardt meets brand new country diva Heidi Feek, unstoppable bluegrass boys Whiskey Shivers and Haas Kowert Tice, who blend American folk with contemporary classical. Part one of two episodes.

(Photo: Bluegrass band Whiskey Shivers. Credit: Geoff Duncan)

Americana - Part Two2016030520160306 (WS)

An exploration of the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Max Reinhardt explores the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music. The featured artists all sound compellingly fresh – and yet they have a powerful timelessness, evoking much of the richness of the past. Valerie June is now based in New York, but she is a southern girl with gospel, motown and blues in her blood. She has called her unique sound 'organic moonshine roots music'. Son Little is also a unique new voice on the Americana scene – a voice that stopped R'n'B legend Mavis Staples in her tracks. She said that when she heard him first "I just had to be still, his voice hit me like a lightning bolt".

Ellis Swan's other worldly reworked folk tales and murder ballads are unsettling, but incredibly seductive. Sierra Ferrell is inspired by popular songs from the 19th Century, many of which she picked up as she busked her way around the southern states. Finally, and in contrast to the previous solo singer-songwriters, the Darnell Boys are a band of brothers and others who cook up a deep dark storm of foot stomping bluegrass.

(Photo: Valerie June)

An exploration of the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Max Reinhardt explores the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music. The featured artists all sound compellingly fresh – and yet they have a powerful timelessness, evoking much of the richness of the past. Valerie June is now based in New York, but she is a southern girl with gospel, motown and blues in her blood. She has called her unique sound 'organic moonshine roots music'. Son Little is also a unique new voice on the Americana scene – a voice that stopped R'n'B legend Mavis Staples in her tracks. She said that when she heard him first "I just had to be still, his voice hit me like a lightning bolt".

Ellis Swan's other worldly reworked folk tales and murder ballads are unsettling, but incredibly seductive. Sierra Ferrell is inspired by popular songs from the 19th Century, many of which she picked up as she busked her way around the southern states. Finally, and in contrast to the previous solo singer-songwriters, the Darnell Boys are a band of brothers and others who cook up a deep dark storm of foot stomping bluegrass.

(Photo: Valerie June)

An Audience with Richard Bona2016082020160821 (WS)

\u201cSimply one of the most talented dudes on this planet\u201d, meet musician Richard Bona

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Cameroonian Richard Bona is described as one of the most electrifying and brilliant artists from Africa – from anywhere in fact. The legendary Quincy Jones, who has produced Bona's latest album, Heritage, describes him as “simply one of the most talented dudes on this planet”.

Richard Bona will be playing a selection of tunes from Heritage, and from his back catalogue, in an exclusive Global Beats session at the BBC's Maida Vale studios. He will be in conversation with presenter Bola Mosuro and taking questions from a studio audience about his life in Cameroon and the US and his extraordinary musical career.

In a change to its usual format, Global Beats is this month devoting the whole programme to a single outstanding musician.

Picture: Richard Bona, Credit: AFP/Getty Images

An Audience with Richard Bona20160820

\u201cSimply one of the most talented dudes on this planet\u201d, meet musician Richard Bona

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Cameroonian Richard Bona is described as one of the most electrifying and brilliant artists from Africa – from anywhere in fact. The legendary Quincy Jones, who has produced Bona's latest album, Heritage, describes him as “simply one of the most talented dudes on this planet”.

Richard Bona will be playing a selection of tunes from Heritage, and from his back catalogue, in an exclusive Global Beats session at the BBC's Maida Vale studios. He will be in conversation with presenter Bola Mosuro and taking questions from a studio audience about his life in Cameroon and the US and his extraordinary musical career.

In a change to its usual format, Global Beats is this month devoting the whole programme to a single outstanding musician.

Picture: Richard Bona, Credit: AFP/Getty Images

An Audience with Richard Bona20160820

An Audience with Richard Bona2016082020160821 (WS)

“Simply one of the most talented dudes on this planet?, meet musician Richard Bona

An Audience with Richard Bona20160820

Cameroonian Richard Bona is described as one of the most electrifying and brilliant artists from Africa – from anywhere in fact. The legendary Quincy Jones, who has produced Bona's latest album, Heritage, describes him as “simply one of the most talented dudes on this planet?.

Richard Bona will be playing a selection of tunes from Heritage, and from his back catalogue, in an exclusive Global Beats session at the BBC's Maida Vale studios. He will be in conversation with presenter Bola Mosuro and taking questions from a studio audience about his life in Cameroon and the US and his extraordinary musical career.

In a change to its usual format, Global Beats is this month devoting the whole programme to a single outstanding musician.

Picture: Richard Bona, Credit: AFP/Getty Images

An Audience With Richard Bona2016082020160821 (WS)

Cameroonian Richard Bona is described as one of the most electrifying and brilliant artists from Africa – from anywhere in fact. The legendary Quincy Jones, who has produced Bona's latest album, Heritage, describes him as “simply one of the most talented dudes on this planet?

Richard Bona will be playing a selection of tunes from Heritage, and from his back catalogue, in an exclusive Global Beats session at the BBC's Maida Vale studios. He will be in conversation with presenter Bola Mosuro and taking questions from a studio audience about his life in Cameroon and the US and his extraordinary musical career.

In a change to its usual format, Global Beats is this month devoting the whole programme to a single outstanding musician.

Picture: Richard Bona, Credit: AFP/Getty Images

“Simply one of the most talented dudes on this planet?, meet musician Richard Bona

Angola20180318 ()

Daniel Nascimento speaks to and hears music from Angolan artists C4 Pedro, Neru Americano, Titica, Eva RapDiva and Toty Sa'med.

Angola20180317

Daniel Nascimento speaks to and hears music from Angolan artists C4 Pedro, Neru Americano, Titica, Eva RapDiva and Toty Sa'med.

Angola20180317

Music from Angolan artists including C4 Pedro, Titica, Eva RapDiva and Toty Sa'med

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Angola2018031720180318 (WS)

Music from Angolan artists including C4 Pedro, Titica, Eva RapDiva and Toty Sa'med

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Angolans love to dance, whether it is the super smooth sexy moves of Kizomba pair dancing, or the fast, rhythmic street moves of Kuduro. Global Beats talks to one of the kings of Kizomba, C4 Pedro, and hears an exclusive acoustic rendition of one of his latest hits, and to Titica, one of Angola's most popular Kuduro stars.

Titica's name hit the headlines across the world in 2011 when she was named best Kuduro artist of the year. This was despite the fact that she is transsexual, and Angola is a Catholic country in which homosexuality is illegal.

Irina Vasconcelos is Angola's first and possibly only female rock singer. Her voice is sublime.

Then there's hiphop - Eva RapDiva is the country's biggest female rapper and reverses the traditional order of things, rapping whilst male artists sing the melodies in her songs.

MCKappa shot to fame for the wrong reasons - a young man was killed by security forces for repeating the lyrics of one of his songs. MCKappa and his fellow rapper and collaborator, Ikonoklasta, have become human rights activists and campaigners.

Toty Sa'med's music is inspired by the Semba songs of the '70s, and he reveals why he has started composing songs in Kimbundu, a language which fewer and fewer people speak in Angola.

The programme is presented by Daniel Nascimento who is the host of one of Angola's most popular TV music shows.

(Photo: Irina Vasconcelos. Credit: BBC)

Angola20180317

Music from Angolan artists including C4 Pedro, Titica, Eva RapDiva and Toty Sa'med

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Angolans love to dance, whether it is the super smooth sexy moves of Kizomba pair dancing, or the fast, rhythmic street moves of Kuduro. Global Beats talks to one of the kings of Kizomba, C4 Pedro, and hears an exclusive acoustic rendition of one of his latest hits, and to Titica, one of Angola's most popular Kuduro stars.

Titica's name hit the headlines across the world in 2011 when she was named best Kuduro artist of the year. This was despite the fact that she is transsexual, and Angola is a Catholic country in which homosexuality is illegal.

Irina Vasconcelos is Angola's first and possibly only female rock singer. Her voice is sublime.

Then there's hiphop - Eva RapDiva is the country's biggest female rapper and reverses the traditional order of things, rapping whilst male artists sing the melodies in her songs.

MCKappa shot to fame for the wrong reasons - a young man was killed by security forces for repeating the lyrics of one of his songs. MCKappa and his fellow rapper and collaborator, Ikonoklasta, have become human rights activists and campaigners.

Toty Sa'med's music is inspired by the Semba songs of the '70s, and he reveals why he has started composing songs in Kimbundu, a language which fewer and fewer people speak in Angola.

The programme is presented by Daniel Nascimento who is the host of one of Angola's most popular TV music shows.

(Photo: Irina Vasconcelos. Credit: BBC)

Asia's Rising Stars2014051720140518 (WS)

The up and coming musicians from Vietnam, China, India, Burma, Malaysia and Indonesia

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats kicks off in Asia, and includes musicians from Vietnam, China, India, Burma, Malaysia and Indonesia. Klantink, for example, are winners of Indonesia’s national TV talent show. They wowed audiences with their joyful energy and creative use of improvised instruments. Yet they started life in poverty as street performers.

Others have very different stories. Le Cat Trong Ly from Vietnam gave up her classical music studies to mine her country’s folk tradition. Yuna, from Malaysia, counts herself lucky as a Muslim woman to have been encouraged to express herself and develop her talents. Yuna now divides her time between Kuala Lumpur and Los Angeles – she is the first Malaysian artist to be breaking into the US pop market. Suhail Yusuf Khan has played the Indian stringed instrument - the sarangi - since childhood, but he collaborates with Adi Balani to create electronic trip-hop with a uniquely Indian flavour.

(Photo: From left to right, Suhail Yusuf Khan and Aditya Balani from India, Le Cat Trong Ly from Vietnam, Wawan of group Klantink from Indonesia)

Asia's Rising Stars20140517

The up and coming musicians from Vietnam, China, India, Burma, Malaysia and Indonesia

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats kicks off in Asia, and includes musicians from Vietnam, China, India, Burma, Malaysia and Indonesia. Klantink, for example, are winners of Indonesia’s national TV talent show. They wowed audiences with their joyful energy and creative use of improvised instruments. Yet they started life in poverty as street performers.

Others have very different stories. Le Cat Trong Ly from Vietnam gave up her classical music studies to mine her country’s folk tradition. Yuna, from Malaysia, counts herself lucky as a Muslim woman to have been encouraged to express herself and develop her talents. Yuna now divides her time between Kuala Lumpur and Los Angeles – she is the first Malaysian artist to be breaking into the US pop market. Suhail Yusuf Khan has played the Indian stringed instrument - the sarangi - since childhood, but he collaborates with Adi Balani to create electronic trip-hop with a uniquely Indian flavour.

(Photo: From left to right, Suhail Yusuf Khan and Aditya Balani from India, Le Cat Trong Ly from Vietnam, Wawan of group Klantink from Indonesia)

Berlin2017071520170716 (WS)

A journey through multicultural Berlin and its vibrant, varied music scene

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

German DJ and music blogger Barbara Hallama takes us on a musical journey through multicultural Berlin, and proves that there is more to the city's scene than techno and electronic music. She drops in to the Peace by Peace Festival set up by two Berlin musicians with Eritrean roots, visits the former headquarters of East Germany's national radio, now taken over by recording artists, and ventures into outlying neighbourhoods now being colonised by creatives priced out of the gentrified centre.

Featured musicians include Fetsum and Grossstadtgeflüster, both performers at Peace by Peace, electronic artists Perera Elsewhere and Nisse, and Oum Shatt, whose sound is influenced by Greek rembetika blues. There's also the danceable punk of Judith Holofernes, and a taste of Berlin´s feminist hip hop scene courtesy of Sookee.

Photo: Grossstadtgeflüster Credit: Rafael Estefania

Berlin20170715

A journey through multicultural Berlin and its vibrant, varied music scene

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

German DJ and music blogger Barbara Hallama takes us on a musical journey through multicultural Berlin, and proves that there is more to the city's scene than techno and electronic music. She drops in to the Peace by Peace Festival set up by two Berlin musicians with Eritrean roots, visits the former headquarters of East Germany's national radio, now taken over by recording artists, and ventures into outlying neighbourhoods now being colonised by creatives priced out of the gentrified centre.

Featured musicians include Fetsum and Grossstadtgeflüster, both performers at Peace by Peace, electronic artists Perera Elsewhere and Nisse, and Oum Shatt, whose sound is influenced by Greek rembetika blues. There's also the danceable punk of Judith Holofernes, and a taste of Berlin´s feminist hip hop scene courtesy of Sookee.

Photo: Grossstadtgeflüster Credit: Rafael Estefania

Berlin20170716

Barbara Hallama takes us on a journey through multicultural Berlin and its vibrant, varied music scene.

German DJ and music blogger Barbara Hallama takes us on a musical journey through multicultural Berlin, and proves that there is more to the city's scene than techno and electronic music. She drops in to the Peace by Peace Festival set up by two Berlin musicians with Eritrean roots, visits the former headquarters of East Germany's national radio, now taken over by recording artists, and ventures into outlying neighbourhoods now being colonised by creatives priced out of the gentrified centre.

Featured musicians include Fetsum and Grossstadtgeflüster, both performers at Peace by Peace, electronic artists Perera Elsewhere and Nisse, and Oum Shatt, whose sound is influenced by Greek rembetika blues. There's also the danceable punk of Judith Holofernes, and a taste of Berlin´s feminist hip hop scene courtesy of Sookee.

Photo: Grossstadtgeflüster Credit: Rafael Estefania

Berlin20170716

Barbara Hallama takes us on a journey through multicultural Berlin and its vibrant, varied music scene.

German DJ and music blogger Barbara Hallama takes us on a musical journey through multicultural Berlin, and proves that there is more to the city's scene than techno and electronic music. She drops in to the Peace by Peace Festival set up by two Berlin musicians with Eritrean roots, visits the former headquarters of East Germany's national radio, now taken over by recording artists, and ventures into outlying neighbourhoods now being colonised by creatives priced out of the gentrified centre.

Featured musicians include Fetsum and Grossstadtgeflüster, both performers at Peace by Peace, electronic artists Perera Elsewhere and Nisse, and Oum Shatt, whose sound is influenced by Greek rembetika blues. There's also the danceable punk of Judith Holofernes, and a taste of Berlin´s feminist hip hop scene courtesy of Sookee.

Photo: Grossstadtgeflüster Credit: Rafael Estefania

Best Clubbing Anthems2015032220150325 (WS)

The best global clubbing anthems, as nominated by DJs around the world

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

In January we looked at Africa’s Club Anthems with DJs sharing the tracks that are hot right now in Africa’s best night clubs. This month, as befits our name, we are going Global. DJs from Denmark, Brazil, Russia, Thailand, Spain, Lebanon and Kyrgyzstan tell us about the clubbing scene in their countries and share tracks that are guaranteed to fill the dancefloors where they are. The presenter is DJ Edu.

(Photo: From left to right, DJ Manazas Ocho, Club crowd, DJ Augusto Olivani. Credit: Eduardo Magalhaes)

Best Clubbing Anthems20150322

The best global clubbing anthems, as nominated by DJs around the world

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

In January we looked at Africa’s Club Anthems with DJs sharing the tracks that are hot right now in Africa’s best night clubs. This month, as befits our name, we are going Global. DJs from Denmark, Brazil, Russia, Thailand, Spain, Lebanon and Kyrgyzstan tell us about the clubbing scene in their countries and share tracks that are guaranteed to fill the dancefloors where they are. The presenter is DJ Edu.

(Photo: From left to right, DJ Manazas Ocho, Club crowd, DJ Augusto Olivani. Credit: Eduardo Magalhaes)

Colombia20170520

Natalio Cosoy shares his pick of the new crop of Colombian artists and talks to them about the state of their nation.

Colombia2017052020170521 (WS)

Natalio Cosoy shares his pick of the new crop of Colombian artists

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Colombia is home to some of the most popular music in the world, most notably Cumbia, a sultry, hypnotic rhythm that is almost impossible not to dance to. Natalio Cosoy shares his pick of the new crop of artists and talks to them about the state of their nation. After 50 years ravaged by conflict between the Farc left wing rebels and government forces, peace is finally in sight.

Featured musicians include Jeihhco and C15, a hip hop outfit who are using their music to galvanise the youth of Medellin, once the base for one of the biggest drug cartels in the world.

Masilva, is a self-styled ‘electrovador’ – electro-troubadour in English. He sees himself as a socially conscious artist and prides himself on his wide ranging musical borrowings, from Colombia and beyond.

Cumbia gets a dub make-over from Mario Galeano’s Frente Cumbiero. The Rolling Ruanas take a modern twist on the folk music of the Andes, and Nelda Piña, who has spent her long life keeping alive the distinctive vocal style of the Carribean coast region, now performs with the fresh young Bogotá Orquesta Afrobeat. Finally, Herencia de Timbiquí, from the Pacific Coast, reflect on the essence and the future of the country.

(Photo: Colombian hip hop artist Jeihhco Credit: Natalio Cosoy, BBC)

Colombia20170520

Natalio Cosoy shares his pick of the new crop of Colombian artists

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Colombia is home to some of the most popular music in the world, most notably Cumbia, a sultry, hypnotic rhythm that is almost impossible not to dance to. Natalio Cosoy shares his pick of the new crop of artists and talks to them about the state of their nation. After 50 years ravaged by conflict between the Farc left wing rebels and government forces, peace is finally in sight.

Featured musicians include Jeihhco and C15, a hip hop outfit who are using their music to galvanise the youth of Medellin, once the base for one of the biggest drug cartels in the world.

Masilva, is a self-styled ‘electrovador’ – electro-troubadour in English. He sees himself as a socially conscious artist and prides himself on his wide ranging musical borrowings, from Colombia and beyond.

Cumbia gets a dub make-over from Mario Galeano’s Frente Cumbiero. The Rolling Ruanas take a modern twist on the folk music of the Andes, and Nelda Piña, who has spent her long life keeping alive the distinctive vocal style of the Carribean coast region, now performs with the fresh young Bogotá Orquesta Afrobeat. Finally, Herencia de Timbiquí, from the Pacific Coast, reflect on the essence and the future of the country.

(Photo: Colombian hip hop artist Jeihhco Credit: Natalio Cosoy, BBC)

Cross-Cultural Collaborations2014081620140817 (WS)

Music made by artists from different traditions coming together to create new sounds

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats continues to showcase up and coming musical talent from around the world. Presenter Max Reinhardt explores the unique music that can result when artists from different traditions come together to create new sounds. As a broadcaster, event curator and director, Max’s musical life has focused on bringing together contrasting and diverse musical traditions.

Max speaks to a range of different musicians including Lokkhi Terra – a Cuban/Bangladeshi group who are collaborating with Nigerian Afrobeats star Dele Sosimi. Meanwhile, Breton fiddle player Jacky Molard and his quartet join forces with Foune Diarra and her trio from Mali to spectacular effect. Other featured artists include Family Atlantica – a group that mix musical traditions from Venezuela, the Caribbean and West Africa – and Syrian kanoun player Maya Youssef who teams up with English cellist Laura Moody and singer songwriter Ana Silvera.

Max also hears from a musical project that pairs taegum-playing Hyelim Kim from South Korea with renowned British singer and producer, Ghostpoet. Meanwhile, Arc Dreaming combines contemporary classical music with songs from an indigenous clan in Queensland called Nunukul Kunjeil. The programme also features the magical sound of strings with Catrin Finch’s harp making award-winning music with the kora of Seckou Keita.

Picture: Maya Youssef Playing the Kanun

Cross-Cultural Collaborations20140816

Music made by artists from different traditions coming together to create new sounds

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats continues to showcase up and coming musical talent from around the world. Presenter Max Reinhardt explores the unique music that can result when artists from different traditions come together to create new sounds. As a broadcaster, event curator and director, Max’s musical life has focused on bringing together contrasting and diverse musical traditions.

Max speaks to a range of different musicians including Lokkhi Terra – a Cuban/Bangladeshi group who are collaborating with Nigerian Afrobeats star Dele Sosimi. Meanwhile, Breton fiddle player Jacky Molard and his quartet join forces with Foune Diarra and her trio from Mali to spectacular effect. Other featured artists include Family Atlantica – a group that mix musical traditions from Venezuela, the Caribbean and West Africa – and Syrian kanoun player Maya Youssef who teams up with English cellist Laura Moody and singer songwriter Ana Silvera.

Max also hears from a musical project that pairs taegum-playing Hyelim Kim from South Korea with renowned British singer and producer, Ghostpoet. Meanwhile, Arc Dreaming combines contemporary classical music with songs from an indigenous clan in Queensland called Nunukul Kunjeil. The programme also features the magical sound of strings with Catrin Finch’s harp making award-winning music with the kora of Seckou Keita.

Picture: Maya Youssef Playing the Kanun

Cuban Overture2015081520150816 (WS)
20150819 (WS)

Music from Havana's best new artists including La Reyna y La Real, Eme Alfonso and more.

Cuba has an astonishing new generation of experimental musicians, eager to be heard by the wider world. Gilles Peterson travels to Havana to uncover its diverse new music scene, including hip hop, jazz, fusion and son.

Cuba is poised for enormous change, following a series of discussions between Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro. Both countries are re-opening embassies in each other’s capitals. But what effect will this have on its musicians? While Cuban artists are finding it easier to tour, making music in Cuba remains difficult. A high-speed internet service is not yet widely available, so records from the US and Europe are exchanged on USB sticks.

DJ and producer Gilles Peterson uncovers the unique music that is made when young Cuban musicians fuse worldwide influences with a distinctly Cuban sound. He talks to La Reyna y La Real, a hip hop duo who address issues facing Cuban women over beats sampling salsa and cha cha cha. They perform their song Let The Rice Burn.

Eme Alfonso performs with her parents Carlos Alfonso and Ele Valdes as Sintesis, one of Cuba’s most successful bands of the 80s and 90s. Eme’s own songs draw from the music she discovered while touring the world and Havana street sounds.

Giles talks to El Niño y La Verdad, 26-year-old bandleader and self-professed “champion of 100% popular dance music? Yissy Garcia is a percussionist and leader of jazz ensemble Broadband. She premieres a new track called Breaking News - a tribute to Cuban radio. And, Dayme Arocena, 23-year-old jazz singer and choir leader, records a session live from Havana’s legendary Egrem Studios.

(Photo: Eme Alfonso of the Cuban band Sintesis. Credit: Joseph Ros)

Cuban Overture2015081520150816 (WS)

Music from Havana's best new artists including La Reyna y La Real, Eme Alfonso and more.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Cuba has an astonishing new generation of experimental musicians, eager to be heard by the wider world. Gilles Peterson travels to Havana to uncover its diverse new music scene, including hip hop, jazz, fusion and son.

Cuba is poised for enormous change, following a series of discussions between Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro. Both countries are re-opening embassies in each other’s capitals. But what effect will this have on its musicians? While Cuban artists are finding it easier to tour, making music in Cuba remains difficult. A high-speed internet service is not yet widely available, so records from the US and Europe are exchanged on USB sticks.

DJ and producer Gilles Peterson uncovers the unique music that is made when young Cuban musicians fuse worldwide influences with a distinctly Cuban sound. He talks to La Reyna y La Real, a hip hop duo who address issues facing Cuban women over beats sampling salsa and cha cha cha. They perform their song Let The Rice Burn.

Eme Alfonso performs with her parents Carlos Alfonso and Ele Valdes as Sintesis, one of Cuba’s most successful bands of the 80s and 90s. Eme’s own songs draw from the music she discovered while touring the world and Havana street sounds.

Giles talks to El Niño y La Verdad, 26-year-old bandleader and self-professed “champion of 100% popular dance music”. Yissy Garcia is a percussionist and leader of jazz ensemble Broadband. She premieres a new track called Breaking News - a tribute to Cuban radio. And, Dayme Arocena, 23-year-old jazz singer and choir leader, records a session live from Havana’s legendary Egrem Studios.

(Photo: Eme Alfonso of the Cuban band Sintesis. Credit: Joseph Ros)

Cuban Overture2015081520150819 (WS)

Music from Havana's best new artists including La Reyna y La Real, Eme Alfonso and more.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Cuba has an astonishing new generation of experimental musicians, eager to be heard by the wider world. Gilles Peterson travels to Havana to uncover its diverse new music scene, including hip hop, jazz, fusion and son.

Cuba is poised for enormous change, following a series of discussions between Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro. Both countries are re-opening embassies in each other’s capitals. But what effect will this have on its musicians? While Cuban artists are finding it easier to tour, making music in Cuba remains difficult. A high-speed internet service is not yet widely available, so records from the US and Europe are exchanged on USB sticks.

DJ and producer Gilles Peterson uncovers the unique music that is made when young Cuban musicians fuse worldwide influences with a distinctly Cuban sound. He talks to La Reyna y La Real, a hip hop duo who address issues facing Cuban women over beats sampling salsa and cha cha cha. They perform their song Let The Rice Burn.

Eme Alfonso performs with her parents Carlos Alfonso and Ele Valdes as Sintesis, one of Cuba’s most successful bands of the 80s and 90s. Eme’s own songs draw from the music she discovered while touring the world and Havana street sounds.

Giles talks to El Niño y La Verdad, 26-year-old bandleader and self-professed “champion of 100% popular dance music”. Yissy Garcia is a percussionist and leader of jazz ensemble Broadband. She premieres a new track called Breaking News - a tribute to Cuban radio. And, Dayme Arocena, 23-year-old jazz singer and choir leader, records a session live from Havana’s legendary Egrem Studios.

(Photo: Eme Alfonso of the Cuban band Sintesis. Credit: Joseph Ros)

Cuban Overture20150815

Music from Havana's best new artists including La Reyna y La Real, Eme Alfonso and more.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Cuba has an astonishing new generation of experimental musicians, eager to be heard by the wider world. Gilles Peterson travels to Havana to uncover its diverse new music scene, including hip hop, jazz, fusion and son.

Cuba is poised for enormous change, following a series of discussions between Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro. Both countries are re-opening embassies in each other’s capitals. But what effect will this have on its musicians? While Cuban artists are finding it easier to tour, making music in Cuba remains difficult. A high-speed internet service is not yet widely available, so records from the US and Europe are exchanged on USB sticks.

DJ and producer Gilles Peterson uncovers the unique music that is made when young Cuban musicians fuse worldwide influences with a distinctly Cuban sound. He talks to La Reyna y La Real, a hip hop duo who address issues facing Cuban women over beats sampling salsa and cha cha cha. They perform their song Let The Rice Burn.

Eme Alfonso performs with her parents Carlos Alfonso and Ele Valdes as Sintesis, one of Cuba’s most successful bands of the 80s and 90s. Eme’s own songs draw from the music she discovered while touring the world and Havana street sounds.

Giles talks to El Niño y La Verdad, 26-year-old bandleader and self-professed “champion of 100% popular dance music”. Yissy Garcia is a percussionist and leader of jazz ensemble Broadband. She premieres a new track called Breaking News - a tribute to Cuban radio. And, Dayme Arocena, 23-year-old jazz singer and choir leader, records a session live from Havana’s legendary Egrem Studios.

(Photo: Eme Alfonso of the Cuban band Sintesis. Credit: Joseph Ros)

Edinburgh Festival20160917

Edinburgh Festival20160917

Each year Edinburgh hosts the biggest arts festival in the world and, not surprisingly, music is a big component. Global Beats brings a selection of some of the best, newest, most varied and international musical acts performing at the Festival. Presenter Vic Galloway introduces talent from Japan, Russia, Ukraine, Denmark, USA, Italy, England and Scotland.

Anna Meredith, winner of Scottish Album of the Year 2016, headlines the show, which was recorded in front of a live audience of festival goers. Performers also include: The Danish String Quartet; Italian guitar virtuoso Antonio Forcione in a new collaboration with British singer Sarah Jane Morris; and American cabaret singer, Lady Rizo.

(Photo: Lady Rizo on stage at the Edinburgh Festival 2016)

Edinburgh Festival2016091720160918 (WS)

Music from Anna Meredith, Danish String Quartet, Antonio Forcione and Sarah Jane Morris

Each year Edinburgh hosts the biggest arts festival in the world and, not surprisingly, music is a big component. Global Beats brings a selection of some of the best, newest, most varied and international musical acts performing at the Festival. Presenter Vic Galloway introduces talent from Japan, Russia, Ukraine, Denmark, USA, Italy, England and Scotland.

Anna Meredith, winner of Scottish Album of the Year 2016, headlines the show, which was recorded in front of a live audience of festival goers. Performers also include: The Danish String Quartet; Italian guitar virtuoso Antonio Forcione in a new collaboration with British singer Sarah Jane Morris; and American cabaret singer, Lady Rizo.

(Photo: Lady Rizo on stage at the Edinburgh Festival 2016)

Edinburgh Festival2016091720160918 (WS)

Music from Anna Meredith, Danish String Quartet, Antonio Forcione and Sarah Jane Morris

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Each year Edinburgh hosts the biggest arts festival in the world and, not surprisingly, music is a big component. Global Beats brings a selection of some of the best, newest, most varied and international musical acts performing at the Festival. Presenter Vic Galloway introduces talent from Japan, Russia, Ukraine, Denmark, USA, Italy, England and Scotland.

Anna Meredith, winner of Scottish Album of the Year 2016, headlines the show, which was recorded in front of a live audience of festival goers. Performers also include: The Danish String Quartet; Italian guitar virtuoso Antonio Forcione in a new collaboration with British singer Sarah Jane Morris; and American cabaret singer, Lady Rizo.

(Photo: Lady Rizo on stage at the Edinburgh Festival 2016)

Edinburgh Festival20160917

Music from Anna Meredith, Danish String Quartet, Antonio Forcione and Sarah Jane Morris

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Each year Edinburgh hosts the biggest arts festival in the world and, not surprisingly, music is a big component. Global Beats brings a selection of some of the best, newest, most varied and international musical acts performing at the Festival. Presenter Vic Galloway introduces talent from Japan, Russia, Ukraine, Denmark, USA, Italy, England and Scotland.

Anna Meredith, winner of Scottish Album of the Year 2016, headlines the show, which was recorded in front of a live audience of festival goers. Performers also include: The Danish String Quartet; Italian guitar virtuoso Antonio Forcione in a new collaboration with British singer Sarah Jane Morris; and American cabaret singer, Lady Rizo.

(Photo: Lady Rizo on stage at the Edinburgh Festival 2016)

Edinburgh Festival2016091720160918 (WS)

Music from Anna Meredith, Danish String Quartet, Antonio Forcione and Sarah Jane Morris

Ghana2014062120140622 (WS)

Ghanaian artists Efya, Kyekyeku, Yaa Pono, Ayisoba and Cwesi Oteng perform for us

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform songs especially for the BBC and talk about what inspires them in Ghana and beyond. Efya, queen of Afro pop, was discovered through a talent show, and recently nominated for the World Music Awards. Kyekyeku is giving a modern twist to traditional palm wine music and making Ghanaians chuckle with his witty lyrics. There’s also Yaa Pono, with a unique rocking rap, and Ayisoba, with his distinctive gruff voice and northern style, plus gospel artist Cwesi Oteng.

The programme is presented by Rita Ray, respected London DJ and authority on African music, who is originally from Ghana herself.

(Photo: From left to right, Efya, Kyekyeku and Wiyaala, Ghana's rising musical talent. BBC copyright)

Ghana20140621

Ghanaian artists Efya, Kyekyeku, Yaa Pono, Ayisoba and Cwesi Oteng perform for us

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform songs especially for the BBC and talk about what inspires them in Ghana and beyond. Efya, queen of Afro pop, was discovered through a talent show, and recently nominated for the World Music Awards. Kyekyeku is giving a modern twist to traditional palm wine music and making Ghanaians chuckle with his witty lyrics. There’s also Yaa Pono, with a unique rocking rap, and Ayisoba, with his distinctive gruff voice and northern style, plus gospel artist Cwesi Oteng.

The programme is presented by Rita Ray, respected London DJ and authority on African music, who is originally from Ghana herself.

(Photo: From left to right, Efya, Kyekyeku and Wiyaala, Ghana's rising musical talent. BBC copyright)

Ghana20150919

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform for the BBC.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ghana2015091920150920 (WS)

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform for the BBC.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ghana2015091920150923 (WS)

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform for the BBC.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats: Americana - Part One20160206

Global Beats: Americana - Part One20160206

Global Beats travels to Nashville, Tennessee, to record some of the best new American roots music. Max Reinhardt meets brand new country diva Heidi Feek, unstoppable bluegrass boys Whiskey Shivers and Haas Kowert Tice, who blend American folk with contemporary classical. Part one of two episodes.

(Photo: Bluegrass band Whiskey Shivers. Credit: Geoff Duncan)

Global Beats: Americana - Part One2016020620160207 (WS)

Meet Heidi Feek, Whiskey Shivers, Haas Kowert Tice - new stars of American roots music

Global Beats travels to Nashville, Tennessee, to record some of the best new American roots music. Max Reinhardt meets brand new country diva Heidi Feek, unstoppable bluegrass boys Whiskey Shivers and Haas Kowert Tice, who blend American folk with contemporary classical. Part one of two episodes.

(Photo: Bluegrass band Whiskey Shivers. Credit: Geoff Duncan)

Global Beats: Americana - Part One2016020620160207 (WS)

Meet Heidi Feek, Whiskey Shivers, Haas Kowert Tice - new stars of American roots music

Global Beats: Americana - Part Two20160305

Global Beats: Americana - Part Two2016030520160306 (WS)

An exploration of the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music

Global Beats: Americana - Part Two20160305

Max Reinhardt explores the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music. The featured artists all sound compellingly fresh – and yet they have a powerful timelessness, evoking much of the richness of the past. Valerie June is now based in New York, but she is a southern girl with gospel, motown and blues in her blood. She has called her unique sound 'organic moonshine roots music'. Son Little is also a unique new voice on the Americana scene – a voice that stopped R'n'B legend Mavis Staples in her tracks. She said that when she heard him first "I just had to be still, his voice hit me like a lightning bolt".

Ellis Swan's other worldly reworked folk tales and murder ballads are unsettling, but incredibly seductive. Sierra Ferrell is inspired by popular songs from the 19th Century, many of which she picked up as she busked her way around the southern states. Finally, and in contrast to the previous solo singer-songwriters, the Darnell Boys are a band of brothers and others who cook up a deep dark storm of foot stomping bluegrass.

(Photo: Valerie June)

Global Beats: Americana - Part Two2016030520160306 (WS)

Max Reinhardt explores the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music. The featured artists all sound compellingly fresh – and yet they have a powerful timelessness, evoking much of the richness of the past. Valerie June is now based in New York, but she is a southern girl with gospel, motown and blues in her blood. She has called her unique sound 'organic moonshine roots music'. Son Little is also a unique new voice on the Americana scene – a voice that stopped R'n'B legend Mavis Staples in her tracks. She said that when she heard him first "I just had to be still, his voice hit me like a lightning bolt".

Ellis Swan's other worldly reworked folk tales and murder ballads are unsettling, but incredibly seductive. Sierra Ferrell is inspired by popular songs from the 19th Century, many of which she picked up as she busked her way around the southern states. Finally, and in contrast to the previous solo singer-songwriters, the Darnell Boys are a band of brothers and others who cook up a deep dark storm of foot stomping bluegrass.

(Photo: Valerie June)

An exploration of the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music

Global Beats: Ghana20140621

Global Beats: Ghana2014062120140622 (WS)

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform songs especially for the BBC and talk about what inspires them in Ghana and beyond. Efya, queen of Afro pop, was discovered through a talent show, and recently nominated for the World Music Awards. Kyekyeku is giving a modern twist to traditional palm wine music and making Ghanaians chuckle with his witty lyrics. There’s also Yaa Pono, with a unique rocking rap, and Ayisoba, with his distinctive gruff voice and northern style, plus gospel artist Cwesi Oteng.

The programme is presented by Rita Ray, respected London DJ and authority on African music, who is originally from Ghana herself.

(Photo: From left to right, Efya, Kyekyeku and Wiyaala, Ghana's rising musical talent. BBC copyright)

Global Beats: Ghana2014062120140622 (WS)

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform songs especially for the BBC and talk about what inspires them in Ghana and beyond. Efya, queen of Afro pop, was discovered through a talent show, and recently nominated for the World Music Awards. Kyekyeku is giving a modern twist to traditional palm wine music and making Ghanaians chuckle with his witty lyrics. There’s also Yaa Pono, with a unique rocking rap, and Ayisoba, with his distinctive gruff voice and northern style, plus gospel artist Cwesi Oteng.

The programme is presented by Rita Ray, respected London DJ and authority on African music, who is originally from Ghana herself.

(Photo: From left to right, Efya, Kyekyeku and Wiyaala, Ghana's rising musical talent. BBC copyright)

Global Beats: Ghana20150919

Global Beats: Ghana20150919

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform for the BBC and tell Rita Ray what inspires them in Ghana and beyond.

(Photo: From left to right, Efya, Kyekyeku and Wiyaala, Ghana's rising musical talent)

Global Beats: Ghana2015091920150920 (WS)
20150923 (WS)

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform for the BBC.

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform for the BBC and tell Rita Ray what inspires them in Ghana and beyond.

(Photo: From left to right, Efya, Kyekyeku and Wiyaala, Ghana's rising musical talent)

Global Beats: Ghana2015091920150920 (WS)

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform for the BBC.

Global Beats: Ghana2015091920150923 (WS)

Seven up-and-coming Ghanaian musicians perform for the BBC.

Global Beats: India20151107

Global Beats: India20151107

Global Beats explores India's lively independent music scene, from folk to funk, beatboxing to devotional bhajans - and everything in between.

The artists featured in this week's episode are: The Barmer Boys, Minute of Decay, Hanita Bhambri Collective, Fiddler's Green, Sapta, Tajdar Junaid, and Vasuda Sharma of Sharma + The Besharams.

Pictured: Minute of Decay from Manipur in north-east India. Photo credit: Rafael Estefania

Global Beats: India2015110720151108 (WS)

Global Beats explores India's lively independent music scene, from folk to funk.

Global Beats explores India's lively independent music scene, from folk to funk, beatboxing to devotional bhajans - and everything in between.

The artists featured in this week's episode are: The Barmer Boys, Minute of Decay, Hanita Bhambri Collective, Fiddler's Green, Sapta, Tajdar Junaid, and Vasuda Sharma of Sharma + The Besharams.

Pictured: Minute of Decay from Manipur in north-east India. Photo credit: Rafael Estefania

Global Beats: India2015110720151108 (WS)

Global Beats explores India's lively independent music scene, from folk to funk.

Global Beats: Psychedelia20160521

Global Beats: Psychedelia2016052120160522 (WS)

A celebration of psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s

Global Beats: Psychedelia20160521

We celebrate psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s, and characterised by albums like The Beatles' Sgt Pepper, bands like Pink Floyd and songs like Cloud 9 by the Temptations. It swept the world from Nigeria to Cambodia and has never really gone far away as a musical flavour that artists such as Prince or DeLa Soul have loved to revel in.

We hear from the current wave of psychedelic artists from right across the planet, including Graveola from Belo Horizonte in Brazil and The Dwarfs of East Agouza from Cairo in Egypt. Presenter Max Reinhardt finds out why psychedelia seems to be forever in a state of frenzied reincarnation.

(Photo: TCIC by Fabrice Bourgelle)

Global Beats: Psychedelia2016052120160522 (WS)

We celebrate psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s, and characterised by albums like The Beatles' Sgt Pepper, bands like Pink Floyd and songs like Cloud 9 by the Temptations. It swept the world from Nigeria to Cambodia and has never really gone far away as a musical flavour that artists such as Prince or DeLa Soul have loved to revel in.

We hear from the current wave of psychedelic artists from right across the planet, including Graveola from Belo Horizonte in Brazil and The Dwarfs of East Agouza from Cairo in Egypt. Presenter Max Reinhardt finds out why psychedelia seems to be forever in a state of frenzied reincarnation.

(Photo: TCIC by Fabrice Bourgelle)

A celebration of psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s

Global Beats: Ska20151017

Global Beats: Ska2015101720151018 (WS)

David Amanor talks to ska bands from as far afield as Japan, Australia and Chile.

Global Beats: Ska2015101720151021 (WS)

David Amanor talks to ska bands from as far afield as Japan, Australia and Chile.

Global Beats: Ska20151017

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. It is full of energy and is guaranteed to lift the spirits. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor is known to many World Service listeners as the presenter of the BBC program Fifth Floor. But what most people do not know is that he used to play guitar for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness. He knows a thing or two about Ska and discovers it is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

We hear from an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

Global Beats: Ska2015101720151018 (WS)
20151021 (WS)

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. It is full of energy and is guaranteed to lift the spirits. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor is known to many World Service listeners as the presenter of the BBC program Fifth Floor. But what most people do not know is that he used to play guitar for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness. He knows a thing or two about Ska and discovers it is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

We hear from an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

David Amanor talks to ska bands from as far afield as Japan, Australia and Chile.

Global Beats: Ska20160416

Global Beats: Ska2016041620160417 (WS)

David Amanor talks to ska bands The Melbourne Ska Orchestra, Locomondo and The Skatalites

Global Beats: Ska20160416

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor, former guitarist for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness, discovers Ska is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

He talks to an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska Orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

Global Beats: Ska2016041620160417 (WS)

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor, former guitarist for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness, discovers Ska is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

He talks to an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska Orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

David Amanor talks to ska bands The Melbourne Ska Orchestra, Locomondo and The Skatalites

Global DJs2017091620170917 (WS)

DJ Edward Adoo talks to his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

We go clubbing with DJ Edward Adoo manning the decks. He talks to some of the most cutting edge and influential of his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to in their part of the world and why, and shares those tracks with you.

Countries on the list include Venezuela and South Korea - how easy or necessary is it to keep on dancing when your society is in crisis, or when Kim Jong Un is making threatening moves just across the border? Victor Porfidio talks to us from Caracas, but hasn't been able to play there for six months, and
DJ Bowlcut in Seoul says Life Goes On, which is the title of his new track...

Also in the programme: DJ Yasmine from Nazareth, who is introducing Arab Israeli clubbers to sounds from around the world, including Germany, Chile, Angola and Armenia; the Fake Shamans, a duo from Pakistan who fell in love with house while studying in London; Keyzuz who is challenging Ghana's highlife and Afrobeats fans with electrifying electro sets; Marko Freidl from Croatia, which has, arguably, taken over from Ibiza as the clubbing capital of Europe, and finally, Lolja Nordic who is determined to stand with Russia's beleaguered LGBTQ community and host parties celebrating diversity.

(Photo: Keyzuz from Ghana manning the decks. Credit: Kobe Subramaniam)

Global DJs20170916

DJ Edward Adoo talks to his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

We go clubbing with DJ Edward Adoo manning the decks. He talks to some of the most cutting edge and influential of his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to in their part of the world and why, and shares those tracks with you.

Countries on the list include Venezuela and South Korea - how easy or necessary is it to keep on dancing when your society is in crisis, or when Kim Jong Un is making threatening moves just across the border? Victor Porfidio talks to us from Caracas, but hasn't been able to play there for six months, and
DJ Bowlcut in Seoul says Life Goes On, which is the title of his new track...

Also in the programme: DJ Yasmine from Nazareth, who is introducing Arab Israeli clubbers to sounds from around the world, including Germany, Chile, Angola and Armenia; the Fake Shamans, a duo from Pakistan who fell in love with house while studying in London; Keyzuz who is challenging Ghana's highlife and Afrobeats fans with electrifying electro sets; Marko Freidl from Croatia, which has, arguably, taken over from Ibiza as the clubbing capital of Europe, and finally, Lolja Nordic who is determined to stand with Russia's beleaguered LGBTQ community and host parties celebrating diversity.

(Photo: Keyzuz from Ghana manning the decks. Credit: Kobe Subramaniam)

Global Djs20170916

DJ Edward Adoo talks to some of his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to in their part of the world and why.

We go clubbing with DJ Edward Adoo manning the decks. He talks to some of the most cutting edge and influential of his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to in their part of the world and why, and shares those tracks with you.

Countries on the list include Venezuela and South Korea - how easy or necessary is it to keep on dancing when your society is in crisis, or when Kim Jong Un is making threatening moves just across the border? Victor Porfidio talks to us from Caracas, but hasn't been able to play there for six months, and
DJ Bowlcut in Seoul says Life Goes On, which is the title of his new track...

Also in the programme: DJ Yasmine from Nazareth, who is introducing Arab Israeli clubbers to sounds from around the world, including Germany, Chile, Angola and Armenia; the Fake Shamans, a duo from Pakistan who fell in love with house while studying in London; Keyzuz who is challenging Ghana's highlife and Afrobeats fans with electrifying electro sets; Marko Freidl from Croatia, which has, arguably, taken over from Ibiza as the clubbing capital of Europe, and finally, Lolja Nordic who is determined to stand with Russia's beleaguered LGBTQ community and host parties celebrating diversity.

(Photo: Keyzuz from Ghana manning the decks. Credit: Kobe Subramaniam)

We go clubbing with DJ Edward Adoo manning the decks. He talks to some of the most cutting edge and influential of his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to in their part of the world and why, and sharing those tracks with you.

Countries on the list include Venezuela and Turkey - how easy or necessary is it to keep on dancing when your society is in crisis? And then there is Croatia, which has, arguably, taken over from Ibiza as the clubbing capital of Europe.

Global Djs20170916

DJ Edward Adoo talks to some of his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to in their part of the world and why.

We go clubbing with DJ Edward Adoo manning the decks. He talks to some of the most cutting edge and influential of his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to in their part of the world and why, and sharing those tracks with you.

Countries on the list include Venezuela and Turkey - how easy or necessary is it to keep on dancing when your society is in crisis? And then there is Croatia, which has, arguably, taken over from Ibiza as the clubbing capital of Europe.

We go clubbing with DJ Edward Adoo manning the decks. He talks to some of the most cutting edge and influential of his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to in their part of the world and why, and shares those tracks with you.

Countries on the list include Venezuela and South Korea - how easy or necessary is it to keep on dancing when your society is in crisis, or when Kim Jong Un is making threatening moves just across the border? Victor Porfidio talks to us from Caracas, but hasn't been able to play there for six months, and
DJ Bowlcut in Seoul says Life Goes On, which is the title of his new track...

Also in the programme: DJ Yasmine from Nazareth, who is introducing Arab Israeli clubbers to sounds from around the world, including Germany, Chile, Angola and Armenia; the Fake Shamans, a duo from Pakistan who fell in love with house while studying in London; Keyzuz who is challenging Ghana's highlife and Afrobeats fans with electrifying electro sets; Marko Freidl from Croatia, which has, arguably, taken over from Ibiza as the clubbing capital of Europe, and finally, Lolja Nordic who is determined to stand with Russia's beleaguered LGBTQ community and host parties celebrating diversity.

(Photo: Keyzuz from Ghana manning the decks. Credit: Kobe Subramaniam)

Gospel20160716

Gospel20160716

Rita Ray plays some of the best new Gospel tunes from around the world, and finds out why Gospel has such enduring appeal.

Gospel2016071620160717 (WS)

Rita Ray plays some of the best new Gospel tunes from around the world, and finds out why Gospel has such enduring appeal.

Gospel20160716

Rita Ray plays some of the best new Gospel tunes from around the world, and finds out why Gospel has such enduring appeal.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Gospel2016071620160717 (WS)

Rita Ray plays some of the best new Gospel tunes from around the world, and finds out why Gospel has such enduring appeal.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Gospel2016071620160717 (WS)

Rita Ray plays some of the best new Gospel tunes from around the world, and finds out why Gospel has such enduring appeal.

Gqom20181020

Emily Dust visits Durban, South Africa, home of the sparse, dark, hypnotic genre 'gqom'.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Gqom2018102020181021 (WS)

Emily Dust visits Durban, South Africa, home of the sparse, dark, hypnotic genre 'gqom'.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Heavy Metal in Finland2018081820180819 (WS)

Global Beats visits Finland and dives into the world of heavy metal.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month Global Beats dons ear defenders and dives into the world of heavy metal. Heavy-metal music, with its distorted guitar sounds, emphatic rhythms and dense bass and drum is incredibly popular in Nordic countries.

In Finland there are more heavy-metal musicians per capita than in any other nation on earth, and the country seems to have a real love affair with this genre of music. Finnish presenter Ida Kiljander takes us to Tuska one of her country’s biggest metal festivals, to meet bands including Finland’s Moonsorrow, Sweden’s Bombus and the headlining French band Gojira.

Ida explores why such a dark genre of music is so popular: is it because of Finland’s long, cold winters? She is also fascinated by how this style of music that appears to be so violent and aggressive seems to encourage a very peaceful and harmonious fan base.

Producer: Penny Boreham

(Photo: Mikko Häkkinen, vocalist with Finnish band Crimfall. Credit: Erno Karjalainen, Govus Oy)

Heavy Metal in Finland20180818

Global Beats visits Finland and dives into the world of heavy metal.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month Global Beats dons ear defenders and dives into the world of heavy metal. Heavy-metal music, with its distorted guitar sounds, emphatic rhythms and dense bass and drum is incredibly popular in Nordic countries.

In Finland there are more heavy-metal musicians per capita than in any other nation on earth, and the country seems to have a real love affair with this genre of music. Finnish presenter Ida Kiljander takes us to Tuska one of her country’s biggest metal festivals, to meet bands including Finland’s Moonsorrow, Sweden’s Bombus and the headlining French band Gojira.

Ida explores why such a dark genre of music is so popular: is it because of Finland’s long, cold winters? She is also fascinated by how this style of music that appears to be so violent and aggressive seems to encourage a very peaceful and harmonious fan base.

Producer: Penny Boreham

(Photo: Mikko Häkkinen, vocalist with Finnish band Crimfall. Credit: Erno Karjalainen, Govus Oy)

Hip Hop Feministas20151205

Hip Hop Feministas20151205

Candace Piette talks to bold and talented young female rappers from Guatemala, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Costa Rica and Ecuador.

Hip Hop Feministas2015120520151206 (WS)

Candace Piette talks to bold and talented young female rappers from Guatemala, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Costa Rica and Ecuador.

Hip Hop Feministas20151205

Candace Piette talks to bold and talented young female rappers from Guatemala, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Costa Rica and Ecuador.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Hip Hop Feministas2015120520151206 (WS)

Candace Piette talks to bold and talented young female rappers from Guatemala, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Costa Rica and Ecuador.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Hip Hop Feministas2015120520151206 (WS)

Candace Piette talks to bold and talented young female rappers from Guatemala, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Costa Rica and Ecuador.

India2015110720151108 (WS)

Global Beats explores India's lively independent music scene, from folk to funk.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats explores India's lively independent music scene, from folk to funk, beatboxing to devotional bhajans - and everything in between.

The artists featured in this week's episode are: The Barmer Boys, Minute of Decay, Hanita Bhambri Collective, Fiddler's Green, Sapta, Tajdar Junaid, and Vasuda Sharma of Sharma + The Besharams.

Pictured: Minute of Decay from Manipur in north-east India. Photo credit: Rafael Estefania

India20151107

Global Beats explores India's lively independent music scene, from folk to funk.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats explores India's lively independent music scene, from folk to funk, beatboxing to devotional bhajans - and everything in between.

The artists featured in this week's episode are: The Barmer Boys, Minute of Decay, Hanita Bhambri Collective, Fiddler's Green, Sapta, Tajdar Junaid, and Vasuda Sharma of Sharma + The Besharams.

Pictured: Minute of Decay from Manipur in north-east India. Photo credit: Rafael Estefania

Iran20171216

Music from Iran featuring Golnar Shahyar, Shahin Najafi, Kayhan Kalhor, Sote, and Melanie

Hear music from Iran, including composer and kamancheh player Kayhan Kahlor, one of the country's most talented performers and innovators when it comes to classical Persian music.

There is electronic artist Sote, who returned to Tehran five years ago and who has set up the cutting edge SET festival of electronic music in the Iranian capital.

We meet Golnar Shahyar, a talented jazz singer based in Vienna. She says women's voices - the singing of her mother and grandmother which filled her childhood - are probably her greatest inspiration. She cannot perform in Iran because women are forbidden from singing in public there.

And, in stark musical contrast, Shahin Najafi, a musician whose uncompromisingly critical lyrics have caused him to have a fatwa issued against him.

The presenter is Sahar Zand.

(Photo: Golnar Shahyar. Credit: Ina Aydogan)

Iran20171216

Music from Iran featuring Golnar Shahyar, Shahin Najafi, Kayhan Kalhor, Sote, and Melanie

Hear music from Iran, including composer and kamancheh player Kayhan Kahlor, one of the country's most talented performers and innovators when it comes to classical Persian music.

There is electronic artist Sote, who returned to Tehran five years ago and who has set up the cutting edge SET festival of electronic music in the Iranian capital.

We meet Golnar Shahyar, a talented jazz singer based in Vienna. She says women's voices - the singing of her mother and grandmother which filled her childhood - are probably her greatest inspiration. She cannot perform in Iran because women are forbidden from singing in public there.

And, in stark musical contrast, Shahin Najafi, a rapper whose uncompromisingly critical lyrics have caused him to have a fatwa issued against him.

(Photo: Golnar Shahyar. Credit: Ina Aydogan)

Iran2017121620171217 (WS)

Music from Iran featuring Golnar Shahyar, Shahin Najafi, Kayhan Kalhor, Sote, and Melanie

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Hear music from Iran, including composer and kamancheh player Kayhan Kahlor, one of the country's most talented performers and innovators when it comes to classical Persian music.

There is electronic artist Sote, who returned to Tehran five years ago and who has set up the cutting edge SET festival of electronic music in the Iranian capital.

We meet Golnar Shahyar, a talented jazz singer based in Vienna. She says women's voices - the singing of her mother and grandmother which filled her childhood - are probably her greatest inspiration. She cannot perform in Iran because women are forbidden from singing in public there.

And, in stark musical contrast, Shahin Najafi, a musician whose uncompromisingly critical lyrics have caused him to have a fatwa issued against him.

The presenter is Sahar Zand.

(Photo: Golnar Shahyar. Credit: Ina Aydogan)

Iran20171216

Music from Iran featuring Golnar Shahyar, Shahin Najafi, Kayhan Kalhor, Sote, and Melanie

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Hear music from Iran, including composer and kamancheh player Kayhan Kahlor, one of the country's most talented performers and innovators when it comes to classical Persian music.

There is electronic artist Sote, who returned to Tehran five years ago and who has set up the cutting edge SET festival of electronic music in the Iranian capital.

We meet Golnar Shahyar, a talented jazz singer based in Vienna. She says women's voices - the singing of her mother and grandmother which filled her childhood - are probably her greatest inspiration. She cannot perform in Iran because women are forbidden from singing in public there.

And, in stark musical contrast, Shahin Najafi, a musician whose uncompromisingly critical lyrics have caused him to have a fatwa issued against him.

The presenter is Sahar Zand.

(Photo: Golnar Shahyar. Credit: Ina Aydogan)

Japan2017011420170115 (WS)

Join Nick Luscombe as he concludes our Global Beats East Asia season with a musical feast from Japan.

Japan20170114

Join Nick Luscombe as he concludes our Global Beats East Asia season with a musical feast from Japan.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Japan2017011420170115 (WS)

Join Nick Luscombe as he concludes our Global Beats East Asia season with a musical feast from Japan.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Latin America2014071920140720 (WS)

A showcase of musical talent featuring Ava, Dona Onete, rapper Ana Tijoux, Sicotropico

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ava, from Brazil, has a timeless, soulful voice which sends shivers down the spine and is evocative of old time jazz divas. Dona Onete, who is in her 70s, and also from Brazil, has a much more rural, earthy sound and is passionate about bringing the very danceable rhythms of her Para region to a wider audience.

Then there is Ana Tijoux, a Chilean rapper whose acute, often political, lyrics, and combining of hiphop and latin beats, is winning her fans all over the world.

There is also energizing and inventive rock from Colombian band Sicotropico, and a very new Bluegrass trio from Mexico – Ocean’s Acoustic.

Lucas Santtana and Curumin (both from Brazil) and Cienfue, from Panama, all demonstrate in different ways how the new generation of Latin American artists are drawing on both the rich musical heritage of their region and contemporary urban and electronic sounds to create compelling new music.

(Photo: From left to right, Ana Tijoux, Omar Sanchez, Cienfue)

Latin America20140719

A showcase of musical talent featuring Ava, Dona Onete, rapper Ana Tijoux, Sicotropico

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ava, from Brazil, has a timeless, soulful voice which sends shivers down the spine and is evocative of old time jazz divas. Dona Onete, who is in her 70s, and also from Brazil, has a much more rural, earthy sound and is passionate about bringing the very danceable rhythms of her Para region to a wider audience.

Then there is Ana Tijoux, a Chilean rapper whose acute, often political, lyrics, and combining of hiphop and latin beats, is winning her fans all over the world.

There is also energizing and inventive rock from Colombian band Sicotropico, and a very new Bluegrass trio from Mexico – Ocean’s Acoustic.

Lucas Santtana and Curumin (both from Brazil) and Cienfue, from Panama, all demonstrate in different ways how the new generation of Latin American artists are drawing on both the rich musical heritage of their region and contemporary urban and electronic sounds to create compelling new music.

(Photo: From left to right, Ana Tijoux, Omar Sanchez, Cienfue)

Lebanon

Beirut has long been considered one of the brightest lights of the Middle East. Once famous for artists such as the cult singer Fairuz, the city is now remarkably prosperous music-wise.

Presenter Khansa, a multidisciplinary queer artist, faces Beirut traffic to seek out some of its most interesting musicians, including Yasmine Hamdan, Zeid Hamdan, The Great Departed and Liliane Chlela. They reveal incredible diversity and prove the constant renovation of a scene known for its edgy creators.

From Khansa’s investigation, we find out that pop music, traditional Lebanese song writing and experimental artists are sharing the same spaces and delivering exciting music to the local audience.

(Photo: Yasmine Hamdan. Credit: Rodrigo Pinto)

Lebanon20180217

Beirut has long been considered one of the brightest lights of the Middle East. Once famous for artists such as the cult singer Fairuz, the city is now remarkably prosperous music-wise.

Presenter Khansa, a multidisciplinary queer artist, faces Beirut traffic to seek out some of its most interesting musicians, including Yasmine Hamdan, Zeid Hamdan, The Great Departed and Liliane Chlela. They reveal incredible diversity and prove the constant renovation of a scene known for its edgy creators.

From Khansa’s investigation, we find out that pop music, traditional Lebanese song writing and experimental artists are sharing the same spaces and delivering exciting music to the local audience.

(Photo: Yasmine Hamdan. Credit: Rodrigo Pinto)

Lebanon20180217

Multidisciplinary queer artist Khansa introduces Beirut's edgy alternative music scene.

Beirut has long been considered one of the brightest lights of the Middle East. Once famous for artists such as the cult singer Fairuz, the city is now remarkably prosperous music-wise.

Presenter Khansa, a multidisciplinary queer artist, faces Beirut traffic to seek out some of its most interesting musicians, including Yasmine Hamdan, Zeid Hamdan, The Great Departed and Liliane Chlela. They reveal incredible diversity and prove the constant renovation of a scene known for its edgy creators.

From Khansa’s investigation, we find out that pop music, traditional Lebanese song writing and experimental artists are sharing the same spaces and delivering exciting music to the local audience.

(Photo: Yasmine Hamdan. Credit: Rodrigo Pinto)

Lebanon2018021720180218 (WS)

Multidisciplinary queer artist Khansa introduces Beirut's edgy alternative music scene

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Beirut has long been considered one of the brightest lights of the Middle East. Once famous for artists such as the cult singer Fairuz, the city is now remarkably prosperous music-wise.

Presenter Khansa, a multidisciplinary queer artist, faces Beirut traffic to seek out some of its most interesting musicians, including Yasmine Hamdan, Zeid Hamdan, The Great Departed and Liliane Chlela. They reveal incredible diversity and prove the constant renovation of a scene known for its edgy creators.

From Khansa’s investigation, we find out that pop music, traditional Lebanese song writing and experimental artists are sharing the same spaces and delivering exciting music to the local audience.

(Photo: Yasmine Hamdan. Credit: Rodrigo Pinto)

Lebanon20180217

Multidisciplinary queer artist Khansa introduces Beirut's edgy alternative music scene

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Beirut has long been considered one of the brightest lights of the Middle East. Once famous for artists such as the cult singer Fairuz, the city is now remarkably prosperous music-wise.

Presenter Khansa, a multidisciplinary queer artist, faces Beirut traffic to seek out some of its most interesting musicians, including Yasmine Hamdan, Zeid Hamdan, The Great Departed and Liliane Chlela. They reveal incredible diversity and prove the constant renovation of a scene known for its edgy creators.

From Khansa’s investigation, we find out that pop music, traditional Lebanese song writing and experimental artists are sharing the same spaces and delivering exciting music to the local audience.

(Photo: Yasmine Hamdan. Credit: Rodrigo Pinto)

Lisbon2014122120141224 (WS)

Lisbon and its musical heritage featuring Lula Pena, Antonio Zambujo, Buraka Som Sistema

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Lisbon is one of the musically most manifold capital cities of Europe. Multiple influences date back up to 1000 years. Connections lead to Africa, Brazil and India, but also to England and the USA. Music pulsates in Lisbon, from the traditional and dramatic ‘Fado’ to the contemporary ‘Kuduro’ – a strain of Angolan dance music that combines electronic music with Caribbean inflections, born in the late 1980s. Musicians, such as the modern fadist and guitar player Lula Pena, the post-bossa nova Antonio Zambujo, and the incandescent Buraka Som Sistema, echo this rich musical landscape.

(Photo: From left to right, Brank Buraka Som Sistema, Sara Tavares, Carminho. BBC copyright)

Lisbon20141221

Lisbon and its musical heritage featuring Lula Pena, Antonio Zambujo, Buraka Som Sistema

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Lisbon is one of the musically most manifold capital cities of Europe. Multiple influences date back up to 1000 years. Connections lead to Africa, Brazil and India, but also to England and the USA. Music pulsates in Lisbon, from the traditional and dramatic ‘Fado’ to the contemporary ‘Kuduro’ – a strain of Angolan dance music that combines electronic music with Caribbean inflections, born in the late 1980s. Musicians, such as the modern fadist and guitar player Lula Pena, the post-bossa nova Antonio Zambujo, and the incandescent Buraka Som Sistema, echo this rich musical landscape.

(Photo: From left to right, Brank Buraka Som Sistema, Sara Tavares, Carminho. BBC copyright)

London International20160102

London International20160102

London is home to people from just about every country on the planet, and (not surprisingly) they bring their music with them. Some come here specifically because of London’s rich musical heritage, its amazing musicians in all genres, its music schools and performance venues, not to mention the studios and record companies.

Amazing things can happen when musicians from different backgrounds get together, and one of our featured groups, Paprika, combines outstanding players from Romania and Serbia – two nationalities who don’t usually get together. The six members met in London.

Ganga Thapa is using London as a base from which to tell the world about Nepalese music. He came to London from Kathmandu seven years ago and his band, Namlo, is made up of musicians from several different countries.

Another of our London International bands, Afrik Bawantu, is led by Afla Sackey from Ghana. His sound is distinctly West African, but it also has a cosmopolitan feel, drawing on London’s underground club scene.

Katy Carr sounds like a name that could only have come from Britain, but in fact Katy has Polish roots and that is what inspires her musically. She writes what sound like traditional Polish folk songs but they have a distinctly contemporary twist.

Kuljit Bhamra is a tabla player coming out of the Punjabi community in London’s Southall district, and something of a British institution, but his collaboration with Somali musicians is very recent. For Global Beats he performs with Somali oud player Said Hussein, singer Farxiya Fiska and dhol drummer Bobby Panesar – it’s a fusion between musicians from two of London’s largest ethnic groups which, says Kuljit, would only have happened here.

From Iran, we have Mehdi Ganjvar playing the santur - a stringed instrument of the hammered dulcimer family - accompanied by singer Samin Heydari. They'll also be telling Rita Ray about what it's like to make music and negotiate censorship in Iran.

Our final act is a brand new experimental outfit with roots in jazz and classical music. NBOC, New Born Outcry, brings together a British trombonist with Afro-Caribbean roots and a Canadian trumpet player, who combine virtuoso live brass with cutting edge electronica.

(Photo: Courtney Brown (left) and Jay Phelps of NBOC. Credit: BBC)

London International2016010220160103 (WS)

Rita Ray presents live performances from global musicians making music in London.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

London is home to people from just about every country on the planet, and (not surprisingly) they bring their music with them. Some come here specifically because of London’s rich musical heritage, its amazing musicians in all genres, its music schools and performance venues, not to mention the studios and record companies.

Amazing things can happen when musicians from different backgrounds get together, and one of our featured groups, Paprika, combines outstanding players from Romania and Serbia – two nationalities who don’t usually get together. The six members met in London.

Ganga Thapa is using London as a base from which to tell the world about Nepalese music. He came to London from Kathmandu seven years ago and his band, Namlo, is made up of musicians from several different countries.

Another of our London International bands, Afrik Bawantu, is led by Afla Sackey from Ghana. His sound is distinctly West African, but it also has a cosmopolitan feel, drawing on London’s underground club scene.

Katy Carr sounds like a name that could only have come from Britain, but in fact Katy has Polish roots and that is what inspires her musically. She writes what sound like traditional Polish folk songs but they have a distinctly contemporary twist.

Kuljit Bhamra is a tabla player coming out of the Punjabi community in London’s Southall district, and something of a British institution, but his collaboration with Somali musicians is very recent. For Global Beats he performs with Somali oud player Said Hussein, singer Farxiya Fiska and dhol drummer Bobby Panesar – it’s a fusion between musicians from two of London’s largest ethnic groups which, says Kuljit, would only have happened here.

From Iran, we have Mehdi Ganjvar playing the santur - a stringed instrument of the hammered dulcimer family - accompanied by singer Samin Heydari. They'll also be telling Rita Ray about what it's like to make music and negotiate censorship in Iran.

Our final act is a brand new experimental outfit with roots in jazz and classical music. NBOC, New Born Outcry, brings together a British trombonist with Afro-Caribbean roots and a Canadian trumpet player, who combine virtuoso live brass with cutting edge electronica.

[Photo: Courtney Brown (left) and Jay Phelps of NBOC. Credit: BBC]

London International20160102

Rita Ray presents live performances from global musicians making music in London.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

London is home to people from just about every country on the planet, and (not surprisingly) they bring their music with them. Some come here specifically because of London’s rich musical heritage, its amazing musicians in all genres, its music schools and performance venues, not to mention the studios and record companies.

Amazing things can happen when musicians from different backgrounds get together, and one of our featured groups, Paprika, combines outstanding players from Romania and Serbia – two nationalities who don’t usually get together. The six members met in London.

Ganga Thapa is using London as a base from which to tell the world about Nepalese music. He came to London from Kathmandu seven years ago and his band, Namlo, is made up of musicians from several different countries.

Another of our London International bands, Afrik Bawantu, is led by Afla Sackey from Ghana. His sound is distinctly West African, but it also has a cosmopolitan feel, drawing on London’s underground club scene.

Katy Carr sounds like a name that could only have come from Britain, but in fact Katy has Polish roots and that is what inspires her musically. She writes what sound like traditional Polish folk songs but they have a distinctly contemporary twist.

Kuljit Bhamra is a tabla player coming out of the Punjabi community in London’s Southall district, and something of a British institution, but his collaboration with Somali musicians is very recent. For Global Beats he performs with Somali oud player Said Hussein, singer Farxiya Fiska and dhol drummer Bobby Panesar – it’s a fusion between musicians from two of London’s largest ethnic groups which, says Kuljit, would only have happened here.

From Iran, we have Mehdi Ganjvar playing the santur - a stringed instrument of the hammered dulcimer family - accompanied by singer Samin Heydari. They'll also be telling Rita Ray about what it's like to make music and negotiate censorship in Iran.

Our final act is a brand new experimental outfit with roots in jazz and classical music. NBOC, New Born Outcry, brings together a British trombonist with Afro-Caribbean roots and a Canadian trumpet player, who combine virtuoso live brass with cutting edge electronica.

[Photo: Courtney Brown (left) and Jay Phelps of NBOC. Credit: BBC]

London International2016010220160103 (WS)

Rita Ray presents live performances from global musicians making music in London.

London is home to people from just about every country on the planet, and (not surprisingly) they bring their music with them. Some come here specifically because of London’s rich musical heritage, its amazing musicians in all genres, its music schools and performance venues, not to mention the studios and record companies.

Amazing things can happen when musicians from different backgrounds get together, and one of our featured groups, Paprika, combines outstanding players from Romania and Serbia – two nationalities who don’t usually get together. The six members met in London.

Ganga Thapa is using London as a base from which to tell the world about Nepalese music. He came to London from Kathmandu seven years ago and his band, Namlo, is made up of musicians from several different countries.

Another of our London International bands, Afrik Bawantu, is led by Afla Sackey from Ghana. His sound is distinctly West African, but it also has a cosmopolitan feel, drawing on London’s underground club scene.

Katy Carr sounds like a name that could only have come from Britain, but in fact Katy has Polish roots and that is what inspires her musically. She writes what sound like traditional Polish folk songs but they have a distinctly contemporary twist.

Kuljit Bhamra is a tabla player coming out of the Punjabi community in London’s Southall district, and something of a British institution, but his collaboration with Somali musicians is very recent. For Global Beats he performs with Somali oud player Said Hussein, singer Farxiya Fiska and dhol drummer Bobby Panesar – it’s a fusion between musicians from two of London’s largest ethnic groups which, says Kuljit, would only have happened here.

From Iran, we have Mehdi Ganjvar playing the santur - a stringed instrument of the hammered dulcimer family - accompanied by singer Samin Heydari. They'll also be telling Rita Ray about what it's like to make music and negotiate censorship in Iran.

Our final act is a brand new experimental outfit with roots in jazz and classical music. NBOC, New Born Outcry, brings together a British trombonist with Afro-Caribbean roots and a Canadian trumpet player, who combine virtuoso live brass with cutting edge electronica.

(Photo: Courtney Brown (left) and Jay Phelps of NBOC. Credit: BBC)

London International2016010220160103 (WS)

Rita Ray presents live performances from global musicians making music in London.

Making It Big20170617

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

There, we’ll be meeting seven up and coming musicians who are being put through their paces and given expert advice in everything from choreographing stage shows to doing press interviews and using social media.

The musicians include M.Anifest from Ghana, Shakka from UK, Geoffroy from Canada and Prateek Kuhad from India.

They’ll be performing for us and discussing the different challenges they face, including language and specific cultural references. How do you retain your uniqueness, and yet appeal to everyone?

Making It Big20170617

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

There, we’ll be meeting seven up and coming musicians who are being put through their paces and given expert advice in everything from choreographing stage shows to doing press interviews and using social media.

The musicians include M.Anifest from Ghana, Shakka from UK, Geoffroy from Canada and Prateek Kuhad from India.

They’ll be performing for us and discussing the different challenges they face, including language and specific cultural references. How do you retain your uniqueness, and yet appeal to everyone?

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

There, we’ll be meeting seven up and coming musicians who are being put through their paces and given expert advice in everything from choreographing stage shows to doing press interviews and using social media.

The musicians include M.Anifest from Ghana, Shakka from UK, Geoffroy from Canada and Prateek Kuhad from India.

They’ll be performing for us and discussing the different challenges they face, including language and specific cultural references. How do you retain your uniqueness, and yet appeal to everyone?

Making it Big2017061720170618 (WS)

Global Beats is at MIDEM, in France, asking what musicians need to do to make it big.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

There, we’ll be meeting seven up and coming musicians who are being put through their paces and given expert advice in everything from choreographing stage shows to doing press interviews and using social media.

The musicians include M.Anifest from Ghana, Shakka from UK, Geoffroy from Canada and Prateek Kuhad from India.

They’ll be performing for us and discussing the different challenges they face, including language and specific cultural references. How do you retain your uniqueness, and yet appeal to everyone?

Making it Big20170617

Global Beats is at MIDEM, in France, asking what musicians need to do to make it big.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats is at MIDEM (Marche International de la Musique) in France, an international trade fair for the music industry.

There, we’ll be meeting seven up and coming musicians who are being put through their paces and given expert advice in everything from choreographing stage shows to doing press interviews and using social media.

The musicians include M.Anifest from Ghana, Shakka from UK, Geoffroy from Canada and Prateek Kuhad from India.

They’ll be performing for us and discussing the different challenges they face, including language and specific cultural references. How do you retain your uniqueness, and yet appeal to everyone?

Mexico2014092020140921 (WS)

Mexico City's emerging musical talent including Eptos One, Zo\u00e9, Caloncho, Julieta Venegas

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Mexico City is fast becoming the melting pot for all Latin American artists and the local music scene is renowned as one of the richest and most diverse in the region. We listen to the sharp lyrics of rapper Eptos One and his dark take on Mexico’s current situation; the rock anthems of Zoé, Mexico’s biggest rock band; and the laid back summer sounds of happy go lucky artist Caloncho. Plus, we talk to the diva of Mexican pop, Julieta Venegas; and Centavrus is in the studio to make electronic regional music.

Rafael heads to cafes, galleries, squares, concerts, recording studios and even taxis to talk to some of the most promising bands of the Mexican music scene - from the revival of 1970s Sonido Gallo Negro, to the slick alternative pop of Hello Seahorse and the indie rock of Little Jesus.

Mexico20140920

Mexico City's emerging musical talent including Eptos One, Zo\u00e9, Caloncho, Julieta Venegas

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Mexico City is fast becoming the melting pot for all Latin American artists and the local music scene is renowned as one of the richest and most diverse in the region. We listen to the sharp lyrics of rapper Eptos One and his dark take on Mexico’s current situation; the rock anthems of Zoé, Mexico’s biggest rock band; and the laid back summer sounds of happy go lucky artist Caloncho. Plus, we talk to the diva of Mexican pop, Julieta Venegas; and Centavrus is in the studio to make electronic regional music.

Rafael heads to cafes, galleries, squares, concerts, recording studios and even taxis to talk to some of the most promising bands of the Mexican music scene - from the revival of 1970s Sonido Gallo Negro, to the slick alternative pop of Hello Seahorse and the indie rock of Little Jesus.

Moscow2018051920180520 (WS)

Jamie Coomarasamy discovers the latest ambient electronica, punk jazz and Russky rap.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month's Global Beats is the first of two from Moscow, a city whose contemporary culture is all too often eclipsed by international politics. Presenter Jamie Coomarasamy, a former BBC Moscow Correspondent and long-time Russian music lover, steps away from diplomatic spats to hear from Moscow's new generation of musicians and songwriters.

Rap is hugely popular in Russia right now and one of the most interesting rappers is Mnogoznaal. He comes originally from the Komi Republic in the far north of the country, and speaks out in his lyrics about social problems including poverty and drug addiction amongst Komi's youth.

There’s also ambient electronica, punk-jazz, and a trip down the rabbit hole to the heart of Moscow's rave culture.

(Photo: Russian rapper Mnogoznaal. Credit: Jon Wiltshire)

Moscow2018051920180520 (WS)

Jamie Coomarasamy discovers the latest ambient electronica, punk jazz and Russky rap.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month's Global Beats is the first of two from Moscow, a city whose contemporary culture is all too often eclipsed by international politics. Presenter Jamie Coomarasamy, a former BBC Moscow Correspondent and long-time Russian music lover, steps away from diplomatic spats to hear from Moscow's new generation of musicians and songwriters.

Rap is hugely popular in Russia right now and one of the most interesting rappers is Mnogoznaal. He comes originally from the Komi Republic in the far north of the country, and speaks out in his lyrics about social problems including poverty and drug addiction amongst Komi's youth.

There’s also ambient electronica, punk-jazz, and a trip down the rabbit hole to the heart of Moscow's rave culture.

(Photo: Russian rapper Mnogoznaal. Credit: Jon Wiltshire)

The first of two visits to Moscow, a city whose contemporary culture is all too often eclipsed by international politics.

This month's Global Beats is the first of two from Moscow, a city whose contemporary culture is all too often eclipsed by international politics. Presenter Jamie Coomarasamy, a former BBC Moscow Correspondent and long-time Russian music lover, steps away from diplomatic spats to hear from Moscow's new generation of musicians and songwriters.

He discovers which genres are thriving and why, and meets some of the most inventive exponents. Rap is hugely popular in Russia right now and one of the most interesting rappers is Mnogoznaal. He comes originally from the Komi Republic in the far north of the country, and speaks out in his lyrics about social problems including poverty and drug addiction amongst Komi's youth.

There’s also ambient electronica, punk-jazz, and a trip down the rabbit hole to the heart of Moscow's rave culture.

Moscow2018061620180617 (WS)

Jamie Coomarasamy is in Moscow again, looking at the impact of Russia\u2019s relationship with the rest of the world on its music.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

In this, the second part of Global Beats' exploration of Moscow's underground music scene, we focus on the impact of Russia’s relationship with the rest of the world on its music. At a time of heightened tension between Russia and the West, what do Russian musicians, composers and record labels make of Russia's isolation? How do international tensions affect their work? And does it feature in their music?

Featured musicians include contemporary classical composers Alexander Manotskov and Jenny Nedosekina who lament the fact that Russia is no longer perceived as a great cultural powerhouse, and Kate Shilonosova – known as Kate NV – who is hoping that her post-punk band will get a warm reception during a UK tour.
Presented by Jamie Coomarasamy.

Moscow 22018061620180617 (WS)

Jamie Coomarasamy is in Moscow again, meeting artists including horror hiphop duo IC3PEAK

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This, the second part of Global Beats' exploration of Moscow's underground music scene, focuses on the impact of Russia’s relationship with the rest of the world on its music. At a time of heightened tension between Russia and the West, what do Russian musicians make of Russia's isolation? How do international tensions affect their work?

Featured musicians include self-styled horror hiphop duo IC3PEAK, who caused a stir in Russia with a video celebrating LGBTQ love.

In contrast to their dark, brooding sound, Lala Salimova's music is sunny and danceable: she thinks this is thanks to her Azerbaijani roots.

Anton Maskeliade invites presenter James Coomarasamy into the music school he has set up to pass on his skills in electronic production, and takes him to a performance of a piece composed by one of his students, Jenny Nedosekina, for a classical ensemble. She releases her electronic music under the name Jekka.

Contemporary classical composer Alexander Manotskov explains that in Russia there is no boundary between classical and other genres, and, as if to prove the point, another featured artist on the programme, pop artist Kate NV, cites her greatest influence as English classical composer Cornelius Cardew.

(Photo: Russian horror hiphop duo IC3PEAK. Credit: IC3PEAK)

Music for Film2018042120180422 (WS)

This month's Global Beats explores the music that moves us when we watch the movies.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Our experience of watching a film is as much shaped by the music as the words and images. The music creates an atmosphere, adds a special magical element to lift a scene, illuminates aspects of the story and cements our memories of the film as a whole.

Presenter Tommy Pearson is steeped in this subject and in ‘Global Beats’ he talks to a variety of composers and commentators from around the world about this form of musical storytelling.

We hear about the intense collaboration between the composer and the film’s director.The film adaptation of the famous Nigerian novel ‘Half of A Yellow Sun’ created a close working relationship between Nigerian director/screen writer, Biyi Bandele and composer Ben Onono. We hear them discuss how the music accentuated the storytelling.

We also learn how the writer/director of the Iranian film, ‘The President’ was inspired to write his film after hearing music written by Indian composer, Tajdar Junaid. That music became a guiding narrative for the film. Also, the first woman to win an oscar for her film music, British composer Rachel Portman, reveals how she went about devising original music that would complement the period style of the adaptation of Jane Austen’s ‘Emma’.

(Photo: Tajdar Junaid. Credit: Ramanuj Das)

Music for Film20180421

This month's Global Beats explores the music that moves us when we watch the movies.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Our experience of watching a film is as much shaped by the music as the words and images. The music creates an atmosphere, adds a special magical element to lift a scene, illuminates aspects of the story and cements our memories of the film as a whole.

Presenter Tommy Pearson is steeped in this subject and in ‘Global Beats’ he talks to a variety of composers and commentators from around the world about this form of musical storytelling.

We hear about the intense collaboration between the composer and the film’s director.The film adaptation of the famous Nigerian novel ‘Half of A Yellow Sun’ created a close working relationship between Nigerian director/screen writer, Biyi Bandele and composer Ben Onono. We hear them discuss how the music accentuated the storytelling.

We also learn how the writer/director of the Iranian film, ‘The President’ was inspired to write his film after hearing music written by Indian composer, Tajdar Junaid. That music became a guiding narrative for the film. Also, the first woman to win an oscar for her film music, British composer Rachel Portman, reveals how she went about devising original music that would complement the period style of the adaptation of Jane Austen’s ‘Emma’.

(Photo: Tajdar Junaid. Credit: Ramanuj Das)

Music For Film2018042120180422 (WS)

This month's Global Beats explores the music that moves us when we watch the movies.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Our experience of watching a film is as much shaped by the music as the words and images. The music creates an atmosphere, adds a special magical element to lift a scene, illuminates aspects of the story and cements our memories of the film as a whole.

Presenter Tommy Pearson is steeped in this subject and in ‘Global Beats’ he talks to a variety of composers and commentators from around the world about this form of musical storytelling.

We hear about the intense collaboration between the composer and the film’s director.The film adaptation of the famous Nigerian novel ‘Half of A Yellow Sun’ created a close working relationship between Nigerian director/screen writer, Biyi Bandele and composer Ben Onono. We hear them discuss how the music accentuated the storytelling.

We also learn how the writer/director of the Iranian film, ‘The President’ was inspired to write his film after hearing music written by Indian composer, Tajdar Junaid. That music became a guiding narrative for the film. Also, the first woman to win an oscar for her film music, British composer Rachel Portman, reveals how she went about devising original music that would complement the period style of the adaptation of Jane Austen’s ‘Emma’.

(Photo: Tajdar Junaid. Credit: Ramanuj Das)

Music For Film20180421

This month's Global Beats explores the music that moves us when we watch the movies.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Our experience of watching a film is as much shaped by the music as the words and images. The music creates an atmosphere, adds a special magical element to lift a scene, illuminates aspects of the story and cements our memories of the film as a whole.

Presenter Tommy Pearson is steeped in this subject and in ‘Global Beats’ he talks to a variety of composers and commentators from around the world about this form of musical storytelling.

We hear about the intense collaboration between the composer and the film’s director.The film adaptation of the famous Nigerian novel ‘Half of A Yellow Sun’ created a close working relationship between Nigerian director/screen writer, Biyi Bandele and composer Ben Onono. We hear them discuss how the music accentuated the storytelling.

We also learn how the writer/director of the Iranian film, ‘The President’ was inspired to write his film after hearing music written by Indian composer, Tajdar Junaid. That music became a guiding narrative for the film. Also, the first woman to win an oscar for her film music, British composer Rachel Portman, reveals how she went about devising original music that would complement the period style of the adaptation of Jane Austen’s ‘Emma’.

That’s Global Beats - exploring the music that moves us when when we watch the movies.

Music from Small Islands2015071820150719 (WS)

Rita Ray talks to eight musical acts from small islands

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Rita Ray talks to musicians from islands as far afield as the North Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean.

The artists featured in the programme are: Asgeir from Iceland, Ahamada Smis from the Comoros, Chassol from Martinique, Fara from Orkney, Lucy from Okinawa, Maya Kamaty from Reunion, Monsieur Doumani from Cyprus, and Narasirato from the Solomon Islands.

(Photo: Narasirato. Credit: Julen Esteban-Pretel)

Music from Small Islands2015071820150722 (WS)

Rita Ray talks to eight musical acts from small islands

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Rita Ray talks to musicians from islands as far afield as the North Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean.

The artists featured in the programme are: Asgeir from Iceland, Ahamada Smis from the Comoros, Chassol from Martinique, Fara from Orkney, Lucy from Okinawa, Maya Kamaty from Reunion, Monsieur Doumani from Cyprus, and Narasirato from the Solomon Islands.

(Photo: Narasirato. Credit: Julen Esteban-Pretel)

Music from Small Islands20150718

Rita Ray talks to eight musical acts from small islands

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Rita Ray talks to musicians from islands as far afield as the North Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean.

The artists featured in the programme are: Asgeir from Iceland, Ahamada Smis from the Comoros, Chassol from Martinique, Fara from Orkney, Lucy from Okinawa, Maya Kamaty from Reunion, Monsieur Doumani from Cyprus, and Narasirato from the Solomon Islands.

(Photo: Narasirato. Credit: Julen Esteban-Pretel)

Music from Spain2016061820160619 (WS)

New musical talent from Spain including indie band Vetusta Morla, Bigott, and Zahara

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Presenter Rafael Estefania finds out how new Spanish artists are taking the country’s traditions, such as Flamenco, into the future. He discovers how Spanish bands are positioning themselves vis-a-vis the flood of popular music from the US and Britain, which dominates the Spanish charts.

Featuring artists - Vetusta Morla, arguably Spain’s biggest indie band; Bigott, an eccentric innovator, known for his zany English lyrics; Fuel Fandango, Electronic-Flamenco duo making waves beyond Spain; El Nino de Elche, classical Flamenco singer taking the genre in new experimental directions; Zenet, old-style crooner bringing latin romance to new audiences; Iseo, very new singer songwriter and definitely one to watch; Zahara, after a big hit with Universal, this independent minded artist has left the commercial mainstream and is going it alone.

(Photo: Zahara with her guitar. Credit: Rafael Estefania)

Music from Spain20160618

New musical talent from Spain including indie band Vetusta Morla, Bigott, and Zahara

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Presenter Rafael Estefania finds out how new Spanish artists are taking the country’s traditions, such as Flamenco, into the future. He discovers how Spanish bands are positioning themselves vis-a-vis the flood of popular music from the US and Britain, which dominates the Spanish charts.

Featuring artists - Vetusta Morla, arguably Spain’s biggest indie band; Bigott, an eccentric innovator, known for his zany English lyrics; Fuel Fandango, Electronic-Flamenco duo making waves beyond Spain; El Nino de Elche, classical Flamenco singer taking the genre in new experimental directions; Zenet, old-style crooner bringing latin romance to new audiences; Iseo, very new singer songwriter and definitely one to watch; Zahara, after a big hit with Universal, this independent minded artist has left the commercial mainstream and is going it alone.

(Photo: Zahara with her guitar. Credit: Rafael Estefania)

Music From Spain2016061820160619 (WS)

Presenter Rafael Estefania finds out how new Spanish artists are taking the country’s traditions, such as Flamenco, into the future. He discovers how Spanish bands are positioning themselves vis-a-vis the flood of popular music from the US and Britain, which dominates the Spanish charts.

Featuring artists - Vetusta Morla, arguably Spain’s biggest indie band; Bigott, an eccentric innovator, known for his zany English lyrics; Fuel Fandango, Electronic-Flamenco duo making waves beyond Spain; El Nino de Elche, classical Flamenco singer taking the genre in new experimental directions; Zenet, old-style crooner bringing latin romance to new audiences; Iseo, very new singer songwriter and definitely one to watch; Zahara, after a big hit with Universal, this independent minded artist has left the commercial mainstream and is going it alone.

(Photo: Zahara with her guitar. Credit: Rafael Estefania)

New musical talent from Spain including indie band Vetusta Morla, Bigott, and Zahara

Musical Identities20160418

Musical Identities20160418

As part of the Identity Season this edition of Global Beats features musicians affected by migration and cross-fertilisation of cultures and ideas.

Now that musicians from anywhere in the world can access hip hop from Venezuela or the songs of the Canadian Inuit online, what does that mean for the identity of music and musicians? Can the music of a Kora player born in Glasgow be as good as that of a Kora player from Mali, or a folk fiddle player from Glasgow? Is there a danger that as the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Presenter Nikki Bedi will be joined by Eska, a Londoner with Zimbabwean roots who is being hailed as one of Britain’s most exciting new singer songwriters. Also on the programme, Brazilian percussionist Adriano Adewale, who has collaborated with numerous musicians from around the world, and Don Kipper, an award-winning seven piece band specialising in Klezmer and traditional music from Greece and Turkey.

(Photo: Don Kipper and band)

Musical Identities20160418

As part of the Identity Season this edition of Global Beats features musicians affected by migration and cross-fertilisation of cultures and ideas.

Now that musicians from anywhere in the world can access hip hop from Venezuela or the songs of the Canadian Inuit online, what does that mean for the identity of music and musicians? Can the music of a Kora player born in Glasgow be as good as that of a Kora player from Mali, or a folk fiddle player from Glasgow? Is there a danger that as the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Presenter Nikki Bedi will be joined by Eska, a Londoner with Zimbabwean roots who is being hailed as one of Britain’s most exciting new singer songwriters. Also on the programme, Brazilian percussionist Adriano Adewale, who has collaborated with numerous musicians from around the world, and Don Kipper, an award-winning seven piece band specialising in Klezmer and traditional music from Greece and Turkey.

(Photo: Don Kipper and band)

Musical Identities20160418

How does globalisation affect the identity of musicians and their music?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

As part of the Identity Season this edition of Global Beats features musicians affected by migration and cross-fertilisation of cultures and ideas.

Now that musicians from anywhere in the world can access hip hop from Venezuela or the songs of the Canadian Inuit online, what does that mean for the identity of music and musicians? Can the music of a Kora player born in Glasgow be as good as that of a Kora player from Mali, or a folk fiddle player from Glasgow? Is there a danger that as the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Presenter Nikki Bedi will be joined by Eska, a Londoner with Zimbabwean roots who is being hailed as one of Britain’s most exciting new singer songwriters. Also on the programme, Brazilian percussionist Adriano Adewale, who has collaborated with numerous musicians from around the world, and Don Kipper, an award-winning seven piece band specialising in Klezmer and traditional music from Greece and Turkey.

(Photo: Don Kipper and band)

Musical Identities20160430

Musical Identities20160430

As part of the Identity Season this edition of Global Beats features musicians affected by migration and cross-fertilisation of cultures and ideas.

Now that musicians from anywhere in the world can access hip hop from Venezuela or the songs of the Canadian Inuit online, what does that mean for the identity of music and musicians? Can the music of a Kora player born in Glasgow be as good as that of a Kora player from Mali, or a folk fiddle player from Glasgow? Is there a danger that as the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Presenter Nikki Bedi will be joined by Eska, a Londoner with Zimbabwean roots who is being hailed as one of Britain’s most exciting new singer songwriters. Also on the programme, Brazilian percussionist Adriano Adewale, who has collaborated with numerous musicians from around the world, and Don Kipper, an award-winning seven piece band specialising in Klezmer and traditional music from Greece and Turkey.

(Photo: Don Kipper and band)

Musical Identities2016043020160501 (WS)

As the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

As part of the Identity Season this edition of Global Beats features musicians affected by migration and cross-fertilisation of cultures and ideas.

Now that musicians from anywhere in the world can access hip hop from Venezuela or the songs of the Canadian Inuit online, what does that mean for the identity of music and musicians? Can the music of a Kora player born in Glasgow be as good as that of a Kora player from Mali, or a folk fiddle player from Glasgow? Is there a danger that as the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Presenter Nikki Bedi will be joined by Eska, a Londoner with Zimbabwean roots who is being hailed as one of Britain’s most exciting new singer songwriters. Also on the programme, Brazilian percussionist Adriano Adewale, who has collaborated with numerous musicians from around the world, and Don Kipper, an award-winning seven piece band specialising in Klezmer and traditional music from Greece and Turkey.

(Photo: Don Kipper and band)

Musical Identities2016043020160501 (WS)

As the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

As part of the Identity Season this edition of Global Beats features musicians affected by migration and cross-fertilisation of cultures and ideas.

Now that musicians from anywhere in the world can access hip hop from Venezuela or the songs of the Canadian Inuit online, what does that mean for the identity of music and musicians? Can the music of a Kora player born in Glasgow be as good as that of a Kora player from Mali, or a folk fiddle player from Glasgow? Is there a danger that as the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Presenter Nikki Bedi will be joined by Eska, a Londoner with Zimbabwean roots who is being hailed as one of Britain’s most exciting new singer songwriters. Also on the programme, Brazilian percussionist Adriano Adewale, who has collaborated with numerous musicians from around the world, and Don Kipper, an award-winning seven piece band specialising in Klezmer and traditional music from Greece and Turkey.

(Photo: Don Kipper and band)

Musical Identities20160430

As the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

As part of the Identity Season this edition of Global Beats features musicians affected by migration and cross-fertilisation of cultures and ideas.

Now that musicians from anywhere in the world can access hip hop from Venezuela or the songs of the Canadian Inuit online, what does that mean for the identity of music and musicians? Can the music of a Kora player born in Glasgow be as good as that of a Kora player from Mali, or a folk fiddle player from Glasgow? Is there a danger that as the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Presenter Nikki Bedi will be joined by Eska, a Londoner with Zimbabwean roots who is being hailed as one of Britain’s most exciting new singer songwriters. Also on the programme, Brazilian percussionist Adriano Adewale, who has collaborated with numerous musicians from around the world, and Don Kipper, an award-winning seven piece band specialising in Klezmer and traditional music from Greece and Turkey.

(Photo: Don Kipper and band)

Musical Identities2016043020160501 (WS)

As the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

New Labels2018072120180722 (WS)

Max Reinhardt meets the minds behind new record labels to hear about their music and the fresh thinking that supports artists.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions of potential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Then there’s Glitterbeat, with offices in Ljubljana and Berlin, which releases everything from the raw sound of King Ayisoba from Ghana and psychedelia from Turkey to minimalist and ambient records. Or Erased Tapes, which has become a byword amongst aficionados for introducing an intriguing range of avant-garde meditative sounds by young and old artists from USA, Europe and Japan.

Presenter Max Reinhardt will be meeting the minds behind these labels (and several more) to hear about the records they are promoting, their fresh thinking and the role they play today in supporting artists and as curators in a world awash with hot and cold running music, accessible 24 hours a day, from every source we can currently devise.

New Labels2018072120180722 (WS)

The minds behind new record labels, their music and the thinking that supports artists.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions of potential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Then there’s Glitterbeat, with offices in Ljubljana and Berlin, which releases everything from the raw sound of King Ayisoba from Ghana and psychedelia from Turkey to minimalist and ambient records. Or Erased Tapes, which has become a byword amongst aficionados for introducing an intriguing range of avant-garde meditative sounds by young and old artists from USA, Europe and Japan .

Presenter Max Reinhardt will be meeting the minds behind these labels (and several more) to hear about the records they are promoting, their fresh thinking and the role they play today in supporting artists and as curators in a world awash with hot and cold running music, accessible 24 hours a day, from every source we can currently devise.

(Photo: Samy Ben Redjeb, the mind behind Analog Africa, which re-releases music from the 1960s, 70s and 80s. Credit: Ferhat Bouda)

New Labels2018072120180722 (WS)

The minds behind new record labels, their music and the thinking that supports artists.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions of potential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Then there’s Glitterbeat, with offices in Ljubljana and Berlin, which releases everything from the raw sound of King Ayisoba from Ghana and psychedelia from Turkey to minimalist and ambient records. Or Erased Tapes, which has become a byword amongst aficionados for introducing an intriguing range of avant-garde meditative sounds by young and old artists from USA, Europe and Japan .

Presenter Max Reinhardt will be meeting the minds behind these labels (and several more) to hear about the records they are promoting, their fresh thinking and the role they play today in supporting artists and as curators in a world awash with hot and cold running music, accessible 24 hours a day, from every source we can currently devise.

(Photo: Samy Ben Redjeb, the mind behind Analog Africa, which re-releases music from the 1960s, 70s and 80s. Credit: Ferhat Bouda)

New Labels20180721

The minds behind new record labels, their music and the thinking that supports artists.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions of potential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Then there’s Glitterbeat, with offices in Ljubljana and Berlin, which releases everything from the raw sound of King Ayisoba from Ghana and psychedelia from Turkey to minimalist and ambient records. Or Erased Tapes, which has become a byword amongst aficionados for introducing an intriguing range of avant-garde meditative sounds by young and old artists from USA, Europe and Japan .

Presenter Max Reinhardt will be meeting the minds behind these labels (and several more) to hear about the records they are promoting, their fresh thinking and the role they play today in supporting artists and as curators in a world awash with hot and cold running music, accessible 24 hours a day, from every source we can currently devise.

(Photo: Samy Ben Redjeb, the mind behind Analog Africa, which re-releases music from the 1960s, 70s and 80s. Credit: Ferhat Bouda)

New Labels20180721

The minds behind new record labels, their music and the thinking that supports artists.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions of potential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Then there’s Glitterbeat, with offices in Ljubljana and Berlin, which releases everything from the raw sound of King Ayisoba from Ghana and psychedelia from Turkey to minimalist and ambient records. Or Erased Tapes, which has become a byword amongst aficionados for introducing an intriguing range of avant-garde meditative sounds by young and old artists from USA, Europe and Japan .

Presenter Max Reinhardt will be meeting the minds behind these labels (and several more) to hear about the records they are promoting, their fresh thinking and the role they play today in supporting artists and as curators in a world awash with hot and cold running music, accessible 24 hours a day, from every source we can currently devise.

(Photo: Samy Ben Redjeb, the mind behind Analog Africa, which re-releases music from the 1960s, 70s and 80s. Credit: Ferhat Bouda)

New sounds from the Middle East2015041820150419 (WS)

Soul, jazz and electronic music from a range of new artists

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month, Global Beats focuses on the music of the Middle East as the BBC World Service programme continues to showcase up-and-coming musical talent from around the world.

Ester Rada is an Israeli, originally from Ethiopia, who shot to prominence in the last two years with a heady mix of soul and Ethio-jazz. She performs one of her favourite songs, Out, which is all about the days when everything just goes wrong.

The band Mashrou' Leila from Lebanon is another highly successful new act. The lead singer, who is openly gay, sings a song for Global Beats which pokes fun at the misconception that gay men can somehow lure others who are straight into homosexuality.

The programme also hears from Ajam, a London-based group passionately committed to keeping the traditional popular music of Iran alive and Yousra, a young Egyptian singer-songwriter, enjoying the openness to alternative music that has come to her country since the revolution.

Collaborating in the Middle East can be difficult, as 47Soul can affirm. The band’s members come from Palestine, Israel, Jordan and Syria and it is easier for them to come together to perform in Europe than in their own countries, but this does not deter them. Their celebratory sound is winning fans across borders.

Other featured artists include Egyptian Maurice Louca, an electronic composer who is now working with Middle Eastern musicians, and Amani Yahya, a female rapper from Yemen who is a torchbearer for women's freedom.

Image: Maurice Louca

New sounds from the Middle East2015041820150422 (WS)

Soul, jazz and electronic music from a range of new artists

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month, Global Beats focuses on the music of the Middle East as the BBC World Service programme continues to showcase up-and-coming musical talent from around the world.

Ester Rada is an Israeli, originally from Ethiopia, who shot to prominence in the last two years with a heady mix of soul and Ethio-jazz. She performs one of her favourite songs, Out, which is all about the days when everything just goes wrong.

The band Mashrou' Leila from Lebanon is another highly successful new act. The lead singer, who is openly gay, sings a song for Global Beats which pokes fun at the misconception that gay men can somehow lure others who are straight into homosexuality.

The programme also hears from Ajam, a London-based group passionately committed to keeping the traditional popular music of Iran alive and Yousra, a young Egyptian singer-songwriter, enjoying the openness to alternative music that has come to her country since the revolution.

Collaborating in the Middle East can be difficult, as 47Soul can affirm. The band’s members come from Palestine, Israel, Jordan and Syria and it is easier for them to come together to perform in Europe than in their own countries, but this does not deter them. Their celebratory sound is winning fans across borders.

Other featured artists include Egyptian Maurice Louca, an electronic composer who is now working with Middle Eastern musicians, and Amani Yahya, a female rapper from Yemen who is a torchbearer for women's freedom.

Image: Maurice Louca

New sounds from the Middle East20150418

Soul, jazz and electronic music from a range of new artists

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month, Global Beats focuses on the music of the Middle East as the BBC World Service programme continues to showcase up-and-coming musical talent from around the world.

Ester Rada is an Israeli, originally from Ethiopia, who shot to prominence in the last two years with a heady mix of soul and Ethio-jazz. She performs one of her favourite songs, Out, which is all about the days when everything just goes wrong.

The band Mashrou' Leila from Lebanon is another highly successful new act. The lead singer, who is openly gay, sings a song for Global Beats which pokes fun at the misconception that gay men can somehow lure others who are straight into homosexuality.

The programme also hears from Ajam, a London-based group passionately committed to keeping the traditional popular music of Iran alive and Yousra, a young Egyptian singer-songwriter, enjoying the openness to alternative music that has come to her country since the revolution.

Collaborating in the Middle East can be difficult, as 47Soul can affirm. The band’s members come from Palestine, Israel, Jordan and Syria and it is easier for them to come together to perform in Europe than in their own countries, but this does not deter them. Their celebratory sound is winning fans across borders.

Other featured artists include Egyptian Maurice Louca, an electronic composer who is now working with Middle Eastern musicians, and Amani Yahya, a female rapper from Yemen who is a torchbearer for women's freedom.

Image: Maurice Louca

New Talent at Glastonbury2015062720150628 (WS)

The eight finalists in Glastonbury Festival\u2019s Emerging Talent Competition 2015

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

They were chosen from thousands of new bands and singer-songwriters and will all perform at the Glastonbury Festival. The eight performers range in style from hip-hop and electro-pop to Afrobeat and folk, and include two lead singers of Ghanaian descent.

The overall winner of the Emerging Talent Competition 2015 is Declan McKenna. His winning song, Brazil, has a distinctly global outlook and a maturity which is extraordinary given that he is just 16 years old. He had to take time out from revising for his school GCSE exams to speak to Global Beats. The programme is presented by BBC Radio 1's Huw Stephens who is known for championing new artists.

(Photo: Courtesy of Declan McKenna)

New Talent at Glastonbury2015062720150701 (WS)

The eight finalists in Glastonbury Festival\u2019s Emerging Talent Competition 2015

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

They were chosen from thousands of new bands and singer-songwriters and will all perform at the Glastonbury Festival. The eight performers range in style from hip-hop and electro-pop to Afrobeat and folk, and include two lead singers of Ghanaian descent.

The overall winner of the Emerging Talent Competition 2015 is Declan McKenna. His winning song, Brazil, has a distinctly global outlook and a maturity which is extraordinary given that he is just 16 years old. He had to take time out from revising for his school GCSE exams to speak to Global Beats. The programme is presented by BBC Radio 1's Huw Stephens who is known for championing new artists.

(Photo: Courtesy of Declan McKenna)

New Talent at Glastonbury20150627

The eight finalists in Glastonbury Festival\u2019s Emerging Talent Competition 2015

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

They were chosen from thousands of new bands and singer-songwriters and will all perform at the Glastonbury Festival. The eight performers range in style from hip-hop and electro-pop to Afrobeat and folk, and include two lead singers of Ghanaian descent.

The overall winner of the Emerging Talent Competition 2015 is Declan McKenna. His winning song, Brazil, has a distinctly global outlook and a maturity which is extraordinary given that he is just 16 years old. He had to take time out from revising for his school GCSE exams to speak to Global Beats. The programme is presented by BBC Radio 1's Huw Stephens who is known for championing new artists.

(Photo: Courtesy of Declan McKenna)

Philippines2016121720161218 (WS)

In the second of three programmes from East Asia, Nadine Jacinto discovers some of the most exciting new Filipino music.

Philippines20161217

In the second of three programmes from East Asia, Nadine Jacinto discovers some of the most exciting new Filipino music.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Philippines2016121720161218 (WS)

In the second of three programmes from East Asia, Nadine Jacinto discovers some of the most exciting new Filipino music.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Psychedelia2016052120160522 (WS)

A celebration of psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

We celebrate psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s, and characterised by albums like The Beatles' Sgt Pepper, bands like Pink Floyd and songs like Cloud 9 by the Temptations. It swept the world from Nigeria to Cambodia and has never really gone far away as a musical flavour that artists such as Prince or DeLa Soul have loved to revel in.

We hear from the current wave of psychedelic artists from right across the planet, including Graveola from Belo Horizonte in Brazil and The Dwarfs of East Agouza from Cairo in Egypt. Presenter Max Reinhardt finds out why psychedelia seems to be forever in a state of frenzied reincarnation.

(Photo: TCIC by Fabrice Bourgelle)

Psychedelia20160521

A celebration of psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

We celebrate psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s, and characterised by albums like The Beatles' Sgt Pepper, bands like Pink Floyd and songs like Cloud 9 by the Temptations. It swept the world from Nigeria to Cambodia and has never really gone far away as a musical flavour that artists such as Prince or DeLa Soul have loved to revel in.

We hear from the current wave of psychedelic artists from right across the planet, including Graveola from Belo Horizonte in Brazil and The Dwarfs of East Agouza from Cairo in Egypt. Presenter Max Reinhardt finds out why psychedelia seems to be forever in a state of frenzied reincarnation.

(Photo: TCIC by Fabrice Bourgelle)

Reggae2017041520170416 (WS)

Reggae has travelled as far as South Korea, Israel, UK and Senegal. How and why?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

The magnetic younger brother of Ska and Rocksteady, reggae with its heavy bass vibrations was irresistible when it appeared in the late 1960s in Jamaica. It would go on to become one of the most loved music genres around the world. .

Reggae musicians sang of the enslavement, poverty, oppression, and resistance which coloured Jamaica's history. Its conscious lyrics are just as important as its sound, as typified by the master, Bob Marley.

David Amanor explores just how far Reggae has travelled with musicians such as South Korean outfit Oriental Showcus who've just released their debut album, a youthful band from Mozambique who ironically go by the name of Gran'ma. The Hempolics from the UK treat us to a master class in how they produce their very particular sound, and Israeli group Ana RF bring a very distinctive Middle Eastern flavour to their brand of reggae. Plus a young artist from Senegal, Dread Vivas, tells us why his love of reggae spurred him on to learn to speak English so that he could really connect with the sentiments expressed in the music he loves.

Credit: A closeup of a red, black, green and yellow pattern, Credit: Getty Images

Reggae20170415

Reggae has travelled as far as South Korea, Israel, UK and Senegal. How and why?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

The magnetic younger brother of Ska and Rocksteady, reggae with its heavy bass vibrations was irresistible when it appeared in the late 1960s in Jamaica. It would go on to become one of the most loved music genres around the world. .

Reggae musicians sang of the enslavement, poverty, oppression, and resistance which coloured Jamaica's history. Its conscious lyrics are just as important as its sound, as typified by the master, Bob Marley.

David Amanor explores just how far Reggae has travelled with musicians such as South Korean outfit Oriental Showcus who've just released their debut album, a youthful band from Mozambique who ironically go by the name of Gran'ma. The Hempolics from the UK treat us to a master class in how they produce their very particular sound, and Israeli group Ana RF bring a very distinctive Middle Eastern flavour to their brand of reggae. Plus a young artist from Senegal, Dread Vivas, tells us why his love of reggae spurred him on to learn to speak English so that he could really connect with the sentiments expressed in the music he loves.

Credit: A closeup of a red, black, green and yellow pattern, Credit: Getty Images

Reggae2017041520170416 (WS)

The magnetic younger brother of Ska and Rocksteady, reggae with its heavy bass vibrations was irresistible when it appeared in the late 1960s in Jamaica. It would go on to become one of the most loved music genres around the world..

Reggae musicians sang of the enslavement, poverty, oppression, and resistance which coloured Jamaica's history. Its conscious lyrics are just as important as its sound, as typified by the master, Bob Marley.

David Amanor explores just how far Reggae has travelled with musicians such as South Korean outfit Oriental Showcus who've just released their debut album, a youthful band from Mozambique who ironically go by the name of Gran'ma. The Hempolics from the UK treat us to a master class in how they produce their very particular sound, and Israeli group Ana RF bring a very distinctive Middle Eastern flavour to their brand of reggae. Plus a young artist from Senegal, Dread Vivas, tells us why his love of reggae spurred him on to learn to speak English so that he could really connect with the sentiments expressed in the music he loves.

Credit: A closeup of a red, black, green and yellow pattern, Credit: Getty Images

Rock2014111620141119 (WS)

music from The Wanton Bishops, Dakha Brakha, Baby Metal and Geomungo Factory

Rita Ray presents some of the most exciting and newest rock from some of the most unlikely places. The Wanton Bishops for example are from Beirut, but their musical homeland is the southern states of the US. They recently made a pilgrimage tour to Texas which was filmed for a documentary.

There is also a growing rock scene in India, as well as Angola, where musicians and fans alike find it the best way of expressing the violence they have lived through and the anger and frustration they often feel.

Dakha Brakha is an all-female Ukrainian band fast winning fans with a highly inventive, high energy sound which often includes rock elements. Rock tends to dominated by men, but in Japan Baby Metal is a somewhat bizarre but very popular combination of cute girl trio and heavy metal.

Also in the programme, two examples from opposite corners of the globe – Finland and Korea – of rock sounds produced by instruments not traditionally associated with rock. Geomungo Factory from South Korea create a totally modern rock sound with ancient Korean zithers. Alamaailman Vasarat (which translates as Hammers of the Underworld) produce their avant garde rock with saxophones, clarinets, percussion, cellos, pump organ and grand piano. There is no guitar in sight!

Rock2014111620141119 (WS)

Rock music from The Wanton Bishops, Dakha Brakha, Baby Metal and Geomungo Factory

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Rita Ray presents some of the most exciting and newest rock from some of the most unlikely places. The Wanton Bishops for example are from Beirut, but their musical homeland is the southern states of the US. They recently made a pilgrimage tour to Texas which was filmed for a documentary.

There is also a growing rock scene in India, as well as Angola, where musicians and fans alike find it the best way of expressing the violence they have lived through and the anger and frustration they often feel.

Dakha Brakha is an all-female Ukrainian band fast winning fans with a highly inventive, high energy sound which often includes rock elements. Rock tends to dominated by men, but in Japan Baby Metal is a somewhat bizarre but very popular combination of cute girl trio and heavy metal.

Also in the programme, two examples from opposite corners of the globe – Finland and Korea – of rock sounds produced by instruments not traditionally associated with rock. Geomungo Factory from South Korea create a totally modern rock sound with ancient Korean zithers. Alamaailman Vasarat (which translates as Hammers of the Underworld) produce their avant garde rock with saxophones, clarinets, percussion, cellos, pump organ and grand piano. There is no guitar in sight!

Rock20141116

Rock music from The Wanton Bishops, Dakha Brakha, Baby Metal and Geomungo Factory

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Rita Ray presents some of the most exciting and newest rock from some of the most unlikely places. The Wanton Bishops for example are from Beirut, but their musical homeland is the southern states of the US. They recently made a pilgrimage tour to Texas which was filmed for a documentary.

There is also a growing rock scene in India, as well as Angola, where musicians and fans alike find it the best way of expressing the violence they have lived through and the anger and frustration they often feel.

Dakha Brakha is an all-female Ukrainian band fast winning fans with a highly inventive, high energy sound which often includes rock elements. Rock tends to dominated by men, but in Japan Baby Metal is a somewhat bizarre but very popular combination of cute girl trio and heavy metal.

Also in the programme, two examples from opposite corners of the globe – Finland and Korea – of rock sounds produced by instruments not traditionally associated with rock. Geomungo Factory from South Korea create a totally modern rock sound with ancient Korean zithers. Alamaailman Vasarat (which translates as Hammers of the Underworld) produce their avant garde rock with saxophones, clarinets, percussion, cellos, pump organ and grand piano. There is no guitar in sight!

Sauti Za Busara2015022220150225 (WS)

February\u2019s edition of Global Beats comes from Zanzibar's music festival

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

February's edition of Global Beats comes from the Sauti Za Busara festival in Zanzibar.

Now in its twelfth year, Sauti Za Busara has gained a reputation as one of Africa's best and most respected music events.

All the music is live, and, as Global Beats presenter Rita Ray found out, artists are keen to be chosen to perform: they see it is a badge of honour and proof of their musicianship.

This year's line-up includes Tcheka from Cape Verde, Liza Kamikazi from Rwanda, Djmawi Africa from Algeria and The Brother Moves On from South Africa.

Tanzanian Bongo Flava man of the moment, Alikiba, also headlines, and a music festival in Zanzibar wouldn't be complete without Taarab master Mohamed Ilyas.

(Photo: Rita Ray and Thais Diarra, an afro-soul singer from Switzerland, Mali and Senegal)

Sauti Za Busara20150222

February\u2019s edition of Global Beats comes from Zanzibar's music festival

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

February's edition of Global Beats comes from the Sauti Za Busara festival in Zanzibar.

Now in its twelfth year, Sauti Za Busara has gained a reputation as one of Africa's best and most respected music events.

All the music is live, and, as Global Beats presenter Rita Ray found out, artists are keen to be chosen to perform: they see it is a badge of honour and proof of their musicianship.

This year's line-up includes Tcheka from Cape Verde, Liza Kamikazi from Rwanda, Djmawi Africa from Algeria and The Brother Moves On from South Africa.

Tanzanian Bongo Flava man of the moment, Alikiba, also headlines, and a music festival in Zanzibar wouldn't be complete without Taarab master Mohamed Ilyas.

(Photo: Rita Ray and Thais Diarra, an afro-soul singer from Switzerland, Mali and Senegal)

Sauti za Busara2017021820170219 (WS)

The pick from one of Africa\u2019s best music festivals - Sauti za Busara, in Zanzibar

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats heads to one of Africa’s best music festivals - Sauti Za Busara, in Zanzibar. The festival returns after a year’s absence with a stunning line-up including artists from Cameroon, Reunion, Somaliland, Kenya, Malawi, Ghana, Morocco, the Seychelles, and of course Tanzania. Presenter Rita Ray, will be talking to our pick of the bunch, and bringing you the best of the stage performances, and all the atmosphere as well.

(Photo: Grace Barbe)

Sauti za Busara20170218

The pick from one of Africa\u2019s best music festivals - Sauti za Busara, in Zanzibar

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Beats heads to one of Africa’s best music festivals - Sauti Za Busara, in Zanzibar. The festival returns after a year’s absence with a stunning line-up including artists from Cameroon, Reunion, Somaliland, Kenya, Malawi, Ghana, Morocco, the Seychelles, and of course Tanzania. Presenter Rita Ray, will be talking to our pick of the bunch, and bringing you the best of the stage performances, and all the atmosphere as well.

(Photo: Grace Barbe)

Sauti Za Busara2017021820170219 (WS)

The pick from one of Africa’s best music festivals - Sauti za Busara, in Zanzibar

Global Beats heads to one of Africa’s best music festivals - Sauti Za Busara, in Zanzibar. The festival returns after a year’s absence with a stunning line-up including artists from Cameroon, Reunion, Somaliland, Kenya, Malawi, Ghana, Morocco, the Seychelles, and of course Tanzania. Presenter Rita Ray, will be talking to our pick of the bunch, and bringing you the best of the stage performances, and all the atmosphere as well.

(Photo: Grace Barbe)

Sauti Za Busara20170318

This month, Rita Ray presents the second of two programmes of stunning highlights from the Sauti za Busara festival in Zanzibar.

Sauti za Busara2017031820170319 (WS)

Stunning highlights from the Sauti za Busara festival in Zanzibar

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

The second of two programmes featuring African artists performing at this year’s Sauti Za Busara festival, this edition of Global Beats is an acoustic treat.

We asked some of our favourites to record songs especially for us in the idyllic setting of Zanzibar’s Stonetown.

They include Karyna Gomes from Guinea Bissau, who has a voice as seductive and free flowing as liquid honey; Bluesman Roland Tchakounte from Cameroon who is spine-tingling in this stripped back incarnation; and Rajab Suleiman, a kanun player from Zanzibar who is refreshing the island’s traditional taraab music, partly by returning to a purely acoustic sound.

(Photo: Karyna Gomes and her band)

Sauti za Busara20170318

Stunning highlights from the Sauti za Busara festival in Zanzibar

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

The second of two programmes featuring African artists performing at this year’s Sauti Za Busara festival, this edition of Global Beats is an acoustic treat.

We asked some of our favourites to record songs especially for us in the idyllic setting of Zanzibar’s Stonetown.

They include Karyna Gomes from Guinea Bissau, who has a voice as seductive and free flowing as liquid honey; Bluesman Roland Tchakounte from Cameroon who is spine-tingling in this stripped back incarnation; and Rajab Suleiman, a kanun player from Zanzibar who is refreshing the island’s traditional taraab music, partly by returning to a purely acoustic sound.

(Photo: Karyna Gomes and her band)

Sauti Za Busara2017031820170319 (WS)

This month, Rita Ray presents the second of two programmes of stunning highlights from the Sauti za Busara festival in Zanzibar.

The second of two programmes featuring African artists performing at this year’s Sauti Za Busara festival, this edition of Global Beats is an acoustic treat.

We asked some of our favourites to record songs especially for us in the idyllic setting of Zanzibar’s Stonetown.

They include Karyna Gomes from Guinea Bissau, who has a voice as seductive and free flowing as liquid honey; Bluesman Roland Tchakounte from Cameroon who is spine-tingling in this stripped back incarnation; and Rajab Suleiman, a kanun player from Zanzibar who is refreshing the island’s traditional taraab music, partly by returning to a purely acoustic sound.

(Photo: Karyna Gomes and her band)

Scotland20170819

Vic Galloway is joined at the Edinburgh Festival by six of the most exciting up-and-coming bands performing there.

This month, Global Beats comes from the Edinburgh Festival and is packed with Scottish talent. Presenter Vic Galloway will be joined by six of the most exciting, cutting edge up and coming bands who will be performing for a live audience of festival goers. The musicians have wide influences and demonstrate just how varied and international Scotland’s music scene is right now.

Scotland2017081920170820 (WS)

Vic Galloway is joined at the Edinburgh Festival by six of the most exciting up-and-coming bands performing there.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month, Global Beats comes from the Edinburgh Festival and is packed with Scottish talent. Presenter Vic Galloway will be joined by six of the most exciting, cutting edge up and coming bands who will be performing for a live audience of festival goers. The musicians have wide influences and demonstrate just how varied and international Scotland’s music scene is right now.

Scotland20170819

Vic Galloway is joined at the Edinburgh Festival by six of the most exciting up-and-coming bands performing there.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

This month, Global Beats comes from the Edinburgh Festival and is packed with Scottish talent. Presenter Vic Galloway will be joined by six of the most exciting, cutting edge up and coming bands who will be performing for a live audience of festival goers. The musicians have wide influences and demonstrate just how varied and international Scotland’s music scene is right now.

Senegal20180120

Mayeni Jones is in Dakar to meet Senegalese artists including band of siblings Takeifa

Senegal has produced some of Africa's most successful musicians, including Youssou Ndour, Baaba Maal, Ismael Lo and Orchestra Baobab. But what about now? Is the country still generating exceptional musical talent?

Presenter Mayeni Jones travels to Dakar to meet artists including Aida Samb, a young woman from a musical dynasty who is breathing new life into the traditional Senegalese Mbalax sound, and Ibaaku, one of the country's few experimental electronic musicians and an influential figure in the hip hop scene.
There's also band of four brothers and one sister Takeifa. Maah Keita stands out in several ways - she has albinism, and is a campaigner for albino rights and empowerment, and she also claims to be the only female bass player in Senegal.

(Photo: Senegalese rock band Takeifa. Credit: Youri Lenquette)

Senegal2018012020180121 (WS)

Mayeni Jones is in Dakar to meet Senegalese artists including band of siblings Takeifa

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Senegal has produced some of Africa's most successful musicians, including Youssou Ndour, Baaba Maal, Ismael Lo and Orchestra Baobab. But what about now? Is the country still generating exceptional musical talent?

Presenter Mayeni Jones travels to Dakar to meet artists including Aida Samb, a young woman from a musical dynasty who is breathing new life into the traditional Senegalese Mbalax sound, and Ibaaku, one of the country's few experimental electronic musicians and an influential figure in the hip hop scene.
There's also band of four brothers and one sister Takeifa. Maah Keita stands out in several ways - she has albinism, and is a campaigner for albino rights and empowerment, and she also claims to be the only female bass player in Senegal.

(Photo: Senegalese rock band Takeifa. Credit: Youri Lenquette)

Senegal20180120

Mayeni Jones is in Dakar to meet Senegalese artists including band of siblings Takeifa

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Senegal has produced some of Africa's most successful musicians, including Youssou Ndour, Baaba Maal, Ismael Lo and Orchestra Baobab. But what about now? Is the country still generating exceptional musical talent?

Presenter Mayeni Jones travels to Dakar to meet artists including Aida Samb, a young woman from a musical dynasty who is breathing new life into the traditional Senegalese Mbalax sound, and Ibaaku, one of the country's few experimental electronic musicians and an influential figure in the hip hop scene.
There's also band of four brothers and one sister Takeifa. Maah Keita stands out in several ways - she has albinism, and is a campaigner for albino rights and empowerment, and she also claims to be the only female bass player in Senegal.

(Photo: Senegalese rock band Takeifa. Credit: Youri Lenquette)

Ska2015101720151018 (WS)

David Amanor talks to ska bands from as far afield as Japan, Australia and Chile.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. It is full of energy and is guaranteed to lift the spirits. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor is known to many World Service listeners as the presenter of the BBC program Fifth Floor. But what most people do not know is that he used to play guitar for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness. He knows a thing or two about Ska and discovers it is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

We hear from an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

Ska2015101720151021 (WS)

David Amanor talks to ska bands from as far afield as Japan, Australia and Chile.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. It is full of energy and is guaranteed to lift the spirits. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor is known to many World Service listeners as the presenter of the BBC program Fifth Floor. But what most people do not know is that he used to play guitar for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness. He knows a thing or two about Ska and discovers it is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

We hear from an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

Ska20151017

David Amanor talks to ska bands from as far afield as Japan, Australia and Chile.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. It is full of energy and is guaranteed to lift the spirits. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor is known to many World Service listeners as the presenter of the BBC program Fifth Floor. But what most people do not know is that he used to play guitar for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness. He knows a thing or two about Ska and discovers it is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

We hear from an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

Ska2016041620160417 (WS)

David Amanor talks to ska bands The Melbourne Ska Orchestra, Locomondo and The Skatalites

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor, former guitarist for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness, discovers Ska is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

He talks to an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska Orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

Ska20160416

David Amanor talks to ska bands The Melbourne Ska Orchestra, Locomondo and The Skatalites

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ska is one of the most infectious musical genres around. Originating in 1950s Jamaica, in the run up to the country’s independence, its celebratory vibe and trademark back-beat gives it a real feel-good factor. The genre has had several revivals over the years such as the 2-Tone movement in the UK during the late 1970s and what is known as the Third Wave in the USA in the 1990s. So who is playing Ska now?

David Amanor, former guitarist for 2-Tone Ska band The Selecter, which experienced international success in the 1970s and 1980s, along with bands like The Specials, The Beat and Madness, discovers Ska is still very much alive and well in places you might not expect.

He talks to an all-female Ska band from Japan, who met playing in their high-school brass band. The Melbourne Ska Orchestra began life trying to set a world record for the biggest number of brass players on one stage. Since then they have toured the world and just released their second album. Locomondo from Athens bring a distinctly Greek feel to their Ska, incorporating traditional instruments and melodic lines. We also catch up with The Skatalites, one of the original Jamaican pioneers of Ska music.

(Photo: Oreskaband, all-female ska band from Japan)

South Korea2016111920161120 (WS)

Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now.

South Korea20161119

South Korea2016111920161120 (WS)

Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

South Korea is famous for K-pop, slick girl and boy bands with millions of fans around the world and now a multi-million dollar industry. But South Korea also has a vibrant independent music scene, with bands playing every genre of music you can think of, and, as Global Beats discovers, increasingly seeking their own distinctly Korean sound.

Presenter Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now, including rapper Yoonmirae who is giving Beyonce a run for her money with gorgeous R&B anthems and has collaborated with husband Tiger JK to produce some of her country’s biggest hip hop hits.

Danpyunsun and the Sailors (pictured) are as different from a perfectly coiffed and polished K-pop act as it’s possible to imagine, with a wild haired frontman making prog-folk magic on guitar, accompanied by a furious violinist and off-piste percussion. Jambinai and Jeong Ga Ak Hoe bring traditional Korean instruments roaring into the future, playing them with the gusto of a rock bass guitarist.

Neon Bunny samples old Korean songs, turning them into hypnotic, electronic melodies. Goonam have a vintage, trippy sound, which is winning fans at home and at festivals overseas, and last, but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly are an award winning indie band who perform a stripped down version of one of the their most beautiful songs, exclusively for Global Beats, which you can watch on this site.

South Korea20161119

Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

South Korea is famous for K-pop, slick girl and boy bands with millions of fans around the world and now a multi-million dollar industry. But South Korea also has a vibrant independent music scene, with bands playing every genre of music you can think of, and, as Global Beats discovers, increasingly seeking their own distinctly Korean sound.

Presenter Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now, including rapper Yoonmirae who is giving Beyonce a run for her money with gorgeous R&B anthems and has collaborated with husband Tiger JK to produce some of her country’s biggest hip hop hits.

Danpyunsun and the Sailors (pictured) are as different from a perfectly coiffed and polished K-pop act as it’s possible to imagine, with a wild haired frontman making prog-folk magic on guitar, accompanied by a furious violinist and off-piste percussion. Jambinai and Jeong Ga Ak Hoe bring traditional Korean instruments roaring into the future, playing them with the gusto of a rock bass guitarist.

Neon Bunny samples old Korean songs, turning them into hypnotic, electronic melodies. Goonam have a vintage, trippy sound, which is winning fans at home and at festivals overseas, and last, but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly are an award winning indie band who perform a stripped down version of one of the their most beautiful songs, exclusively for Global Beats, which you can watch on this site.

South Korea2016111920161120 (WS)

is famous for K-pop, slick girl and boy bands with millions of fans around the world and now a multi-million dollar industry. But South Korea also has a vibrant independent music scene, with bands playing every genre of music you can think of, and, as Global Beats discovers, increasingly seeking their own distinctly Korean sound.

Presenter Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now, including rapper Yoonmirae who is giving Beyonce a run for her money with gorgeous R&B anthems and has collaborated with husband Tiger JK to produce some of her country’s biggest hip hop hits.

Danpyunsun and the Sailors (pictured) are as different from a perfectly coiffed and polished K-pop act as it’s possible to imagine, with a wild haired frontman making prog-folk magic on guitar, accompanied by a furious violinist and off-piste percussion. Jambinai and Jeong Ga Ak Hoe bring traditional Korean instruments roaring into the future, playing them with the gusto of a rock bass guitarist.

Neon Bunny samples old Korean songs, turning them into hypnotic, electronic melodies. Goonam have a vintage, trippy sound, which is winning fans at home and at festivals overseas, and last, but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly are an award winning indie band who perform a stripped down version of one of the their most beautiful songs, exclusively for Global Beats, which you can watch on this site.

Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now.

South Korea2016111920161120 (WS)

South Korea is famous for K-pop, slick girl and boy bands with millions of fans around the world and now a multi-million dollar industry. But South Korea also has a vibrant independent music scene, with bands playing every genre of music you can think of, and, as Global Beats discovers, increasingly seeking their own distinctly Korean sound.

Presenter Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now, including rapper Yoonmirae who is giving Beyonce a run for her money with gorgeous R&B anthems and has collaborated with husband Tiger JK to produce some of her country’s biggest hip hop hits.

Danpyunsun and the Sailors (pictured) are as different from a perfectly coiffed and polished K-pop act as it’s possible to imagine, with a wild haired frontman making prog-folk magic on guitar, accompanied by a furious violinist and off-piste percussion. Jambinai and Jeong Ga Ak Hoe bring traditional Korean instruments roaring into the future, playing them with the gusto of a rock bass guitarist.

Neon Bunny samples old Korean songs, turning them into hypnotic, electronic melodies. Goonam have a vintage, trippy sound, which is winning fans at home and at festivals overseas, and last, but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly are an award winning indie band who perform a stripped down version of one of the their most beautiful songs, exclusively for Global Beats, which you can watch on this site.

Tanzanian Hip Hop20161015
Tanzanian Hip Hop20161015

Presenter Salim Kikeke takes a journey into Tanzanian hip hop, tracing its transformation into Bongo Flava, which incorporates hip hop, Indian filmi, taraab, muzik wa dansi, dancehall beats and its latest development into Singeli.

He talks to Dully Sykes and producer P Funk from Bongo Records, as well as prominent and upcoming artists including Fid Q and Vanessa Mdee.

The term Bongo Flava is derived from the Swahili word "ubongo", meaning brains. The genre has fans way beyond Tanzania, with the most popular artists beginning to perform in African countries like South Africa, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, as well as Europe and America.

(Photo: Tanzanian artists Pink (L) and (R) Vanessa Mdee)

Tanzanian Hip Hop2016101520161016 (WS)

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Presenter Salim Kikeke takes a journey into Tanzanian hip hop, tracing its transformation into Bongo Flava, which incorporates hip hop, Indian filmi, taraab, muzik wa dansi, dancehall beats and its latest development into Singeli.

He talks to Dully Sykes and producer P Funk from Bongo Records, as well as prominent and upcoming artists including Fid Q and Vanessa Mdee.

The term Bongo Flava is derived from the Swahili word "ubongo", meaning brains. The genre has fans way beyond Tanzania, with the most popular artists beginning to perform in African countries like South Africa, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, as well as Europe and America.

(Photo: Tanzanian artists Pink (L) and (R) Vanessa Mdee)

Tanzanian Hip Hop2016101520171118 (WS)

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Presenter Salim Kikeke takes a journey into Tanzanian hip hop, tracing its transformation into Bongo Flava, which incorporates hip hop, Indian filmi, taraab, muzik wa dansi, dancehall beats and its latest development into Singeli.

He talks to Dully Sykes and producer P Funk from Bongo Records, as well as prominent and upcoming artists including Fid Q and Vanessa Mdee.

The term Bongo Flava is derived from the Swahili word "ubongo", meaning brains. The genre has fans way beyond Tanzania, with the most popular artists beginning to perform in African countries like South Africa, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, as well as Europe and America.

(Photo: Tanzanian artists Pink (L) and (R) Vanessa Mdee)

Tanzanian Hip Hop2016101520171119 (WS)

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Presenter Salim Kikeke takes a journey into Tanzanian hip hop, tracing its transformation into Bongo Flava, which incorporates hip hop, Indian filmi, taraab, muzik wa dansi, dancehall beats and its latest development into Singeli.

He talks to Dully Sykes and producer P Funk from Bongo Records, as well as prominent and upcoming artists including Fid Q and Vanessa Mdee.

The term Bongo Flava is derived from the Swahili word "ubongo", meaning brains. The genre has fans way beyond Tanzania, with the most popular artists beginning to perform in African countries like South Africa, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, as well as Europe and America.

(Photo: Tanzanian artists Pink (L) and (R) Vanessa Mdee)

Tanzanian Hip Hop20161015

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Presenter Salim Kikeke takes a journey into Tanzanian hip hop, tracing its transformation into Bongo Flava, which incorporates hip hop, Indian filmi, taraab, muzik wa dansi, dancehall beats and its latest development into Singeli.

He talks to Dully Sykes and producer P Funk from Bongo Records, as well as prominent and upcoming artists including Fid Q and Vanessa Mdee.

The term Bongo Flava is derived from the Swahili word "ubongo", meaning brains. The genre has fans way beyond Tanzania, with the most popular artists beginning to perform in African countries like South Africa, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, as well as Europe and America.

(Photo: Tanzanian artists Pink (L) and (R) Vanessa Mdee)

Tanzanian Hip Hop2016101520161016 (WS)

Presenter Salim Kikeke takes a journey into Tanzanian hip hop, tracing its transformation into Bongo Flava, which incorporates hip hop, Indian filmi, taraab, muzik wa dansi, dancehall beats and its latest development into Singeli.

He talks to Dully Sykes and producer P Funk from Bongo Records, as well as prominent and upcoming artists including Fid Q and Vanessa Mdee.

The term Bongo Flava is derived from the Swahili word "ubongo", meaning brains. The genre has fans way beyond Tanzania, with the most popular artists beginning to perform in African countries like South Africa, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, as well as Europe and America.

(Photo: Tanzanian artists Pink (L) and (R) Vanessa Mdee)

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Tanzanian Hip Hop20171118

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Presenter Salim Kikeke takes a journey into Tanzanian hip hop, tracing its transformation into Bongo Flava, which incorporates hip hop, Indian filmi, taraab, muzik wa dansi, dancehall beats and its latest development into Singeli.

He talks to Dully Sykes and producer P Funk from Bongo Records, as well as prominent and upcoming artists including Fid Q and Vanessa Mdee.

The term Bongo Flava is derived from the Swahili word "ubongo", meaning brains. The genre has fans way beyond Tanzania, with the most popular artists beginning to perform in African countries like South Africa, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, as well as Europe and America.

(Photo: Tanzanian artists Pink (L) and (R) Vanessa Mdee)

The Best Nightclub in Africa2015011820150121 (WS)

DJ Edu speaks to DJs across Africa to find the biggest club tunes across the continent

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

World renowned DJ and BBC 1Xtra presenter DJ Edu is on a journey to find the best nightclub in Africa. He speaks to DJs across the continent about the biggest club tunes in their country and what these say about clubbing and people getting richer in Africa.

DJ Edu hears from the first female DJ in Ethiopia, DJ Yemi, from Uganda’s DJ Rachael, Morocco’s DJ Van, Angola’s Djeff Afrozila, Egyptian DJ Fadi - from duo Aly & Fila - DJ T-Man from Botswana, DJ Creejay from Zambia and Kenya’s biggest band at the moment - Sauti Sol. Hear the tracks that are getting Africans on their feet in clubs. And, tell us what you are dancing to, using the hashtag #ClubAfricaBBC.

This programme is part of the BBC’s Richer World season.

TRACKS PLAYED ON THIS PROGRAMME

Tufike Apa – Gazza (Namibia)

Patoranking – Girlie O (Nigeria)

DJ Van featuring O.B. - This is Marrakesh (Morocco)

DJ Van - INASS INASS (Morocco)

DJ Gouveia - Ambuye (Botswana)

Teddy Afro - Be 70Derega (Ethiopia)

Silvastone feat. Yemi Alade – Loving My Baby (Sierra Leone / Ghana)

Madtraxx ft Kora & Ndegz - Skamaress (Kenya)

Sauti Sol - Sura Yako (Kenya)

Sauti Sol - Mbinguni (Kenya)

Amro Diab - Habibi Ya Nour-Al-Ain (Egypt)

Aly & Fila - Altitude Compensation - (Egypt)

TLDREAMZ featuring Djeff Afrozila - Undi Da Ki Panha (Angola)

DJ Malvado e Kadu - Atchu Tchutcha (Angola)

Irene Ntale - Stay With Me (Uganda)

Davido & Olamide - Shoki (Nigeria)

Santuri Safari, featuring Joel Sebunjo and Esa Williams -“Kanekasi” (Uganda)

Dr Chameleone - Wale Wale (Uganda)

Zone Fam - Contolola (Zambia)

Roberto -Ama-Rulah (Zambia)

DJ Clock ft Beatenberg - Pluto (Remember You) -- (South Africa)

The Best Nightclub in Africa20150118

DJ Edu speaks to DJs across Africa to find the biggest club tunes across the continent

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

World renowned DJ and BBC 1Xtra presenter DJ Edu is on a journey to find the best nightclub in Africa. He speaks to DJs across the continent about the biggest club tunes in their country and what these say about clubbing and people getting richer in Africa.

DJ Edu hears from the first female DJ in Ethiopia, DJ Yemi, from Uganda’s DJ Rachael, Morocco’s DJ Van, Angola’s Djeff Afrozila, Egyptian DJ Fadi - from duo Aly & Fila - DJ T-Man from Botswana, DJ Creejay from Zambia and Kenya’s biggest band at the moment - Sauti Sol. Hear the tracks that are getting Africans on their feet in clubs. And, tell us what you are dancing to, using the hashtag #ClubAfricaBBC.

This programme is part of the BBC’s Richer World season.

TRACKS PLAYED ON THIS PROGRAMME

Tufike Apa – Gazza (Namibia)

Patoranking – Girlie O (Nigeria)

DJ Van featuring O.B. - This is Marrakesh (Morocco)

DJ Van - INASS INASS (Morocco)

DJ Gouveia - Ambuye (Botswana)

Teddy Afro - Be 70Derega (Ethiopia)

Silvastone feat. Yemi Alade – Loving My Baby (Sierra Leone / Ghana)

Madtraxx ft Kora & Ndegz - Skamaress (Kenya)

Sauti Sol - Sura Yako (Kenya)

Sauti Sol - Mbinguni (Kenya)

Amro Diab - Habibi Ya Nour-Al-Ain (Egypt)

Aly & Fila - Altitude Compensation - (Egypt)

TLDREAMZ featuring Djeff Afrozila - Undi Da Ki Panha (Angola)

DJ Malvado e Kadu - Atchu Tchutcha (Angola)

Irene Ntale - Stay With Me (Uganda)

Davido & Olamide - Shoki (Nigeria)

Santuri Safari, featuring Joel Sebunjo and Esa Williams -“Kanekasi” (Uganda)

Dr Chameleone - Wale Wale (Uganda)

Zone Fam - Contolola (Zambia)

Roberto -Ama-Rulah (Zambia)

DJ Clock ft Beatenberg - Pluto (Remember You) -- (South Africa)

Wonderful Women20171021

As part of the 100 Women season, Global Beats looks at some of the astonishing female talent we've featured in the last 3 years.

As part of the 100 Women season, Global Beats looks at some of the astonishing female talent we've featured in the last three years.

Featured musicians are Le Cat Trong Ly from Vietnam, Ava from Brazil, Amani Yahya from Yemen, Karyna Gomez from Guinea Bissau, Anita Tijoux from Chile, Nana Yaa from Ghana, Valerie June from the USA and, last but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly from South Korea.

(Photo: Nana Yaa with Global Beats presenter Rita Ray. Credit: BBC)

Wonderful Women2017102120171022 (WS)

Astonishing female talent from the last three years of Global Beats

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

As part of the 100 Women season, Global Beats looks at some of the astonishing female talent we've featured in the last three years.

Featured musicians are Le Cat Trong Ly from Vietnam, Ava from Brazil, Amani Yahya from Yemen, Karyna Gomez from Guinea Bissau, Anita Tijoux from Chile, Nana Yaa from Ghana, Valerie June from the USA and, last but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly from South Korea.

(Photo: Nana Yaa with Global Beats presenter Rita Ray. Credit: BBC)

Wonderful Women20171021

Astonishing female talent from the last three years of Global Beats

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

As part of the 100 Women season, Global Beats looks at some of the astonishing female talent we've featured in the last three years.

Featured musicians are Le Cat Trong Ly from Vietnam, Ava from Brazil, Amani Yahya from Yemen, Karyna Gomez from Guinea Bissau, Anita Tijoux from Chile, Nana Yaa from Ghana, Valerie June from the USA and, last but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly from South Korea.

(Photo: Nana Yaa with Global Beats presenter Rita Ray. Credit: BBC)