Global Beats [World Service]

Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
Americana - Part One2016020620160207 (WS)Meet Heidi Feek, Whiskey Shivers, Haas Kowert Tice - new stars of American roots music

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Americana - Part Two2016030520160306 (WS)An exploration of the latest and sweetest reinventions of American roots music

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

An Audience With Richard Bona2016082020160821 (WS)\u201cSimply one of the most talented dudes on this planet\u201d, meet musician Richard Bona

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Angola2018031720180318 (WS)Angolans love to dance, whether it is the super smooth sexy moves of Kizomba pair dancing, or the fast, rhythmic street moves of Kuduro. Global Beats talks to one of the kings of Kizomba, C4 Pedro, and hears an exclusive acoustic rendition of one of his latest hits, and to Titica, one of Angola's most popular Kuduro stars.

Titica's name hit the headlines across the world in 2011 when she was named best Kuduro artist of the year. This was despite the fact that she is transsexual, and Angola is a Catholic country in which homosexuality is illegal.

Irina Vasconcelos is Angola's first and possibly only female rock singer. Her voice is sublime.

Then there's hiphop - Eva RapDiva is the country's biggest female rapper and reverses the traditional order of things, rapping whilst male artists sing the melodies in her songs.

MCKappa shot to fame for the wrong reasons - a young man was killed by security forces for repeating the lyrics of one of his songs. MCKappa and his fellow rapper and collaborator, Ikonoklasta, have become human rights activists and campaigners.

Toty Sa'med's music is inspired by the Semba songs of the '70s, and he reveals why he has started composing songs in Kimbundu, a language which fewer and fewer people speak in Angola.

The programme is presented by Daniel Nascimento who is the host of one of Angola's most popular TV music shows.

(Photo: Irina Vasconcelos. Credit: BBC)

Music from Angolan artists including C4 Pedro, Titica, Eva RapDiva and Toty Sa'med

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Angolans love to dance, whether it is the super smooth sexy moves of Kizomba pair dancing, or the fast, rhythmic street moves of Kuduro. Global Beats talks to one of the kings of Kizomba, C4 Pedro, and hears an exclusive acoustic rendition of one of his latest hits, and to Titica, one of Angola's most popular Kuduro stars.

Titica's name hit the headlines across the world in 2011 when she was named best Kuduro artist of the year. This was despite the fact that she is transsexual, and Angola is a Catholic country in which homosexuality is illegal.

Irina Vasconcelos is Angola's first and possibly only female rock singer. Her voice is sublime.

Then there's hiphop - Eva RapDiva is the country's biggest female rapper and reverses the traditional order of things, rapping whilst male artists sing the melodies in her songs.

MCKappa shot to fame for the wrong reasons - a young man was killed by security forces for repeating the lyrics of one of his songs. MCKappa and his fellow rapper and collaborator, Ikonoklasta, have become human rights activists and campaigners.

Toty Sa'med's music is inspired by the Semba songs of the '70s, and he reveals why he has started composing songs in Kimbundu, a language which fewer and fewer people speak in Angola.

The programme is presented by Daniel Nascimento who is the host of one of Angola's most popular TV music shows.

(Photo: Irina Vasconcelos. Credit: BBC)

Music from Angolan artists including C4 Pedro, Titica, Eva RapDiva and Toty Sa'med

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Argentina2018121520181216 (WS)Presenter Sofia Trucco, herself a musician and part of the all-women trio Fémina, introduces a varied and enticing selection of Argentine musical talent.

The show kicks off with sublime acapella singing from duo Perota Chingó. The two women owe their flourishing career to an amateur video which went viral of them singing at sunset on a beach.

Sofia Trucco belongs to a group of artists who are re-discovering Argentina’s folk and indigenous music and bringing it to a new generation and to the dancefloor, thanks to electronic remixes. From this group, she’ll be talking to Chancha via Circuito, Uji, King Coya and Dat Garcia.

Argentina’s most famous musical export is tango, and Global Beats will be hearing music from innovative tango pianist and composer, Diego Schissi. Rock, which has dominated Argentina’s popular music scene in recent decades, is represented by Los Espiritus, who are refreshing the genre with eclectic sounds and lyrics which speak to the everyday experiences of Argentines struggling with a yo-yoing economy.

Then there’s the equally genre-busting Morbo y Mambo: kraut, electro, dub, afro-funk according to their website – you decide! And finally, the extraordinary Hungría. Math rock was not much of a thing in Buenos Aires until these music school graduates started improvising on guitar, drum and loop and playing intriguing and rather brilliant games with rhythm.

(Photo: Sofia Trucco. Credit: BBC)

December's edition of Global Beats is the first of a three part series from South America.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Berlin2017071520170716 (WS)A journey through multicultural Berlin and its vibrant, varied music scene

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

A journey through multicultural Berlin and its vibrant, varied music scene

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Brazil: New Musical Voices2019011920190120 (WS)Maria Beraldo is a Brazilian singer, composer, clarinet player and LGBTQ activist. She released her first solo album, Cavala, in May 2018, to critical acclaim. For this Brazilian edition of Global Beats, Maria presents seven of her fellow musical artists, chosen for their strong voices, both musically and politically.

Elza Soares is an icon in Brazilian music. Now in her 80s, she recently won a latin grammy and is an inspiration to younger musicians both because of the way she continues to innovate musically, but also because of her outspokenness when it comes to black and minority rights.

Luedji Luna and Xenia França are both from Bahia, in the north east of Brazil, a region strongly influenced by African culture. Both are now based in white-dominated São Paulo, and both are acutely conscious of their position as black female role models, as they experience a surge of enthusiasm for their (very different) music. Luedji Luna’s sound is more instantly recognisable as Brazilian, whereas Xenia França is more heavily influenced by stars from the USA.

As Bahias e a Cozinha Mineira may be unique anywhere. The two lead singers of the group, Raquel Virgínia and Assucena Assucena are both transgender women, whose voices and song writing styles complement each other perfectly. Their song Jaqueta Amarela, which describes the pain of wanting to be loved, instead of being seen as a freak or a sex object, has been a hit in Brazil.

Liniker is firmly rooted in the tradition of Brazilian Soul music. She says she realised she had a powerful voice when her singing made fellow students at drama school cry! Like Raquel Virgínia and Assucena Assucena, she is a transgender woman and black, and says it is inevitable that she finds herself at the heart of the current debate on social rights.

At 21 years old Sofia Freire has already released two well received albums. She comes from a family of writers and her songs are her interpretations of favourite poems, many of them by women, and she sees this and her decision to perform solo as feminist gestures.

Johnny Hooker is heavily influenced by David Bowie and Mick Jagger, as well as Freddy Mercury, Madonna and Brazil’s own Caetano Veloso. He is also adored by Brazil’s gay community.

Photo: As Bahias e a Cozinha Mineira with Maria Beraldo (second from left). Credit: BBC

Brazilian musician Maria Beraldo presents her pick of Brazil's strong new musical voices.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Colombia2017052020170521 (WS)Natalio Cosoy shares his pick of the new crop of Colombian artists

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Natalio Cosoy shares his pick of the new crop of Colombian artists

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Edinburgh Festival2016091720160918 (WS)Music from Anna Meredith, Danish String Quartet, Antonio Forcione and Sarah Jane Morris

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Global Djs2017091620170917 (WS)DJ Edward Adoo talks to his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

DJ Edward Adoo talks to his fellow DJs about what people are dancing to

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Gospel2016071620160717 (WS)Rita Ray plays some of the best new Gospel tunes from around the world, and finds out why Gospel has such enduring appeal.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Rita Ray plays some of the best new Gospel tunes from around the world, and finds out why Gospel has such enduring appeal.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Gqom2018102020181021 (WS)
20190216 (WS)
20190217 (WS)
Gqom, pronounced with a Zulu click at the beginning, roughly translates as the sound of a kick drum being struck. It’s also the name of a sparse, dark, hypnotic genre of electronic music. Made in the townships of Durban, South Africa, on basic software and distributed via taxi drivers, over the last few years gqom has caught the ears of DJs and ravers in some of the coolest clubs in Berlin, New York and London.

Emily Dust, a London-based DJ who fell in love with gqom at first listen, travels to Durban to meet the artists who created it and who are taking it forward, including Naked Boys, DJ Lag, Griffit Vigo and Distruction Boyz.

Initially dismissed by some of South Africa’s musical gatekeepers, today gqom artists have toured the world and conquered the airwaves at home. Gqom’s global success is inspiring the next generation of Durban producers to push the sound in new directions, both commercially and at the cutting edge of underground music.

(Photo: Gqom artists TLC Fam with Emily Dust.)

Emily Dust visits Durban, South Africa, home of the sparse, dark, hypnotic genre 'gqom'.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Heavy Metal In Finland2018081820180819 (WS)This month Global Beats dons ear defenders and dives into the world of heavy metal. Heavy-metal music, with its distorted guitar sounds, emphatic rhythms and dense bass and drum is incredibly popular in Nordic countries.

In Finland there are more heavy-metal musicians per capita than in any other nation on earth, and the country seems to have a real love affair with this genre of music. Finnish presenter Ida Kiljander takes us to Tuska one of her country’s biggest metal festivals, to meet bands including Finland’s Moonsorrow, Sweden’s Bombus and the headlining French band Gojira.

Ida explores why such a dark genre of music is so popular: is it because of Finland’s long, cold winters? She is also fascinated by how this style of music that appears to be so violent and aggressive seems to encourage a very peaceful and harmonious fan base.

Producer: Penny Boreham

(Photo: Mikko Häkkinen, vocalist with Finnish band Crimfall. Credit: Erno Karjalainen, Govus Oy)

Global Beats visits Finland and dives into the world of heavy metal.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Iran2017121620171217 (WS)Music from Iran featuring Golnar Shahyar, Shahin Najafi, Kayhan Kalhor, Sote, and Melanie

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Music from Iran featuring Golnar Shahyar, Shahin Najafi, Kayhan Kalhor, Sote, and Melanie

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Japan2017011420170115 (WS)Join Nick Luscombe as he concludes our Global Beats East Asia season with a musical feast from Japan.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Join Nick Luscombe as he concludes our Global Beats East Asia season with a musical feast from Japan.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Lebanon2018021720180218 (WS)Beirut has long been considered one of the brightest lights of the Middle East. Once famous for artists such as the cult singer Fairuz, the city is now remarkably prosperous music-wise.

Presenter Khansa, a multidisciplinary queer artist, faces Beirut traffic to seek out some of its most interesting musicians, including Yasmine Hamdan, Zeid Hamdan, The Great Departed and Liliane Chlela. They reveal incredible diversity and prove the constant renovation of a scene known for its edgy creators.

From Khansa’s investigation, we find out that pop music, traditional Lebanese song writing and experimental artists are sharing the same spaces and delivering exciting music to the local audience.

(Photo: Yasmine Hamdan. Credit: Rodrigo Pinto)

Multidisciplinary queer artist Khansa introduces Beirut's edgy alternative music scene

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

London International2016010220160103 (WS)Rita Ray presents live performances from global musicians making music in London.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Rita Ray presents live performances from global musicians making music in London.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Making It Big2017061720170618 (WS)Global Beats is at MIDEM, in France, asking what musicians need to do to make it big.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Moscow2018051920180520 (WS)This month's Global Beats is the first of two from Moscow, a city whose contemporary culture is all too often eclipsed by international politics. Presenter Jamie Coomarasamy, a former BBC Moscow Correspondent and long-time Russian music lover, steps away from diplomatic spats to hear from Moscow's new generation of musicians and songwriters.

Rap is hugely popular in Russia right now and one of the most interesting rappers is Mnogoznaal. He comes originally from the Komi Republic in the far north of the country, and speaks out in his lyrics about social problems including poverty and drug addiction amongst Komi's youth.

There’s also ambient electronica, punk-jazz, and a trip down the rabbit hole to the heart of Moscow's rave culture.

(Photo: Russian rapper Mnogoznaal. Credit: Jon Wiltshire)

Jamie Coomarasamy discovers the latest ambient electronica, punk jazz and Russky rap.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Moscow 22018061620180617 (WS)This, the second part of Global Beats' exploration of Moscow's underground music scene, focuses on the impact of Russia’s relationship with the rest of the world on its music. At a time of heightened tension between Russia and the West, what do Russian musicians make of Russia's isolation? How do international tensions affect their work?

Featured musicians include self-styled horror hiphop duo IC3PEAK, who caused a stir in Russia with a video celebrating LGBTQ love.

In contrast to their dark, brooding sound, Lala Salimova's music is sunny and danceable: she thinks this is thanks to her Azerbaijani roots.

Anton Maskeliade invites presenter James Coomarasamy into the music school he has set up to pass on his skills in electronic production, and takes him to a performance of a piece composed by one of his students, Jenny Nedosekina, for a classical ensemble. She releases her electronic music under the name Jekka.

Contemporary classical composer Alexander Manotskov explains that in Russia there is no boundary between classical and other genres, and, as if to prove the point, another featured artist on the programme, pop artist Kate NV, cites her greatest influence as English classical composer Cornelius Cardew.

(Photo: Russian horror hiphop duo IC3PEAK. Credit: IC3PEAK)

Jamie Coomarasamy is in Moscow again, meeting artists including horror hiphop duo IC3PEAK

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Music For Film2018042120180422 (WS)Our experience of watching a film is as much shaped by the music as the words and images. The music creates an atmosphere, adds a special magical element to lift a scene, illuminates aspects of the story and cements our memories of the film as a whole.

Presenter Tommy Pearson is steeped in this subject and in ‘Global Beats’ he talks to a variety of composers and commentators from around the world about this form of musical storytelling.

We hear about the intense collaboration between the composer and the film’s director.The film adaptation of the famous Nigerian novel ‘Half of A Yellow Sun’ created a close working relationship between Nigerian director/screen writer, Biyi Bandele and composer Ben Onono. We hear them discuss how the music accentuated the storytelling.

We also learn how the writer/director of the Iranian film, ‘The President’ was inspired to write his film after hearing music written by Indian composer, Tajdar Junaid. That music became a guiding narrative for the film. Also, the first woman to win an oscar for her film music, British composer Rachel Portman, reveals how she went about devising original music that would complement the period style of the adaptation of Jane Austen’s ‘Emma’.

(Photo: Tajdar Junaid. Credit: Ramanuj Das)

This month's Global Beats explores the music that moves us when we watch the movies.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Music From Spain2016061820160619 (WS)New musical talent from Spain including indie band Vetusta Morla, Bigott, and Zahara

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Musical Identities20160418How does globalisation affect the identity of musicians and their music?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Musical Identities2016043020160501 (WS)As the globe contracts, we will end up with less and less musical diversity?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

New Labels2018072120180722 (WS)When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions of potential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Then there’s Glitterbeat, with offices in Ljubljana and Berlin, which releases everything from the raw sound of King Ayisoba from Ghana and psychedelia from Turkey to minimalist and ambient records. Or Erased Tapes, which has become a byword amongst aficionados for introducing an intriguing range of avant-garde meditative sounds by young and old artists from USA, Europe and Japan.

Presenter Max Reinhardt will be meeting the minds behind these labels (and several more) to hear about the records they are promoting, their fresh thinking and the role they play today in supporting artists and as curators in a world awash with hot and cold running music, accessible 24 hours a day, from every source we can currently devise.

(Photo: Samy Ben Redjeb, the mind behind Analog Africa, which re-releases music from the 1960s, 70s and 80s. Credit: Ferhat Bouda)

The minds behind new record labels, their music and the thinking that supports artists.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions of potential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Then there’s Glitterbeat, with offices in Ljubljana and Berlin, which releases everything from the raw sound of King Ayisoba from Ghana and psychedelia from Turkey to minimalist and ambient records. Or Erased Tapes, which has become a byword amongst aficionados for introducing an intriguing range of avant-garde meditative sounds by young and old artists from USA, Europe and Japan.

Presenter Max Reinhardt will be meeting the minds behind these labels (and several more) to hear about the records they are promoting, their fresh thinking and the role they play today in supporting artists and as curators in a world awash with hot and cold running music, accessible 24 hours a day, from every source we can currently devise.

(Photo: Samy Ben Redjeb, the mind behind Analog Africa, which re-releases music from the 1960s, 70s and 80s. Credit: Ferhat Bouda)

The minds behind new record labels, their music and the thinking that supports artists.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Pakistan2019042020190421 (WS)Farah Karim presents seven new musical talents from Pakistan in genres ranging from rap to qawwali, and from folk to rock.

Pakistan’s musical scene is thriving, and becoming increasingly diverse. Sponsorship by major brands such as Coke, Nescafe and Levis has given the country’s music a real boost, as up and coming musicians are given the chance to perform on TV supported by superb house bands and some of best musical directors.

A ripple of excitement has also been caused by the reforming of Junoon, Pakistan’s most successful rock band of all time.

Artists featured in this programme include Natasha Baig, one of Pakistan’s freshest and best singer song writers; Lyari Underground, rappers from Karachi’s Lyari district, known as the Compton of Pakistan; and Garam Anday, a brand new female duo whose first song is a brazen, humorous attack on men behaving badly.

Then there's Meesha Shafi, a successful model and actress, whose beautiful, sultry voice finds expression in her first solo release, Mein; Jimmy Khan, who cooks up a feel-good Americana-influenced storm with traditional Pakistani instruments; and Zain & Zohaib Ali, brothers in their twenties, which is very young to be already gaining a reputation in the world of qawwali, Islamic devotional music.

Last but not least, Mehdi Maloof is famous for just one highly original song. It’s called ‘A Dirty Building’ and it’s about the dilapidated Karachi apartment block he used to live in.

Photo: Zohaib Ali. Credit: BBC

Farah Karim presents new musical talent from Pakistan, ranging from rap to qawwali.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Then there's Meesha Shafi, a successful model and actress, whose beautiful, sultry voice finds expression in her first solo release, Mein; Jimmy Khan, who cooks up a feel-good Americana-influenced storm with traditional Pakistani instruments; and Zain & Zohaib Ali, brothers in their twenties, which is very young to be already gaining a reputation in the world of qawwali, Islamic devotional music.

Farah Karim presents seven new musical talents from Pakistan in genres ranging from rap to qawwali, and from folk to rock.

Pakistan’s musical scene is thriving, and becoming increasingly diverse. Sponsorship by major brands such as Coke, Nescafe and Levis has given the country’s music a real boost, as up and coming musicians are given the chance to perform on TV supported by superb house bands and some of best musical directors.

A ripple of excitement has also been caused by the reforming of Junoon, Pakistan’s most successful rock band of all time.

Artists featured in this programme include Natasha Baig, one of Pakistan’s freshest and best singer song writers; Lyari Underground, rappers from Karachi’s Lyari district, known as the Compton of Pakistan; and Garam Anday, a brand new female duo whose first song is a brazen, humorous attack on men behaving badly.

Then there's Meesha Shafi, a successful model and actress, whose beautiful, sultry voice finds expression in her first solo release, Mein; Jimmy Khan, who cooks up a feel-good Americana-influenced storm with traditional Pakistani instruments; and Zain & Zohaib Ali, brothers in their twenties, which is very young to be already gaining a reputation in the world of qawwali, Islamic devotional music.

Last but not least, Mehdi Maloof is famous for just one highly original song. It’s called ‘A Dirty Building’ and it’s about the dilapidated Karachi apartment block he used to live in.

Photo: Zohaib Ali. Credit: BBC

Farah Karim presents new musical talent from Pakistan, ranging from rap to qawwali.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Farah Karim presents seven new musical talents from Pakistan in genres ranging from rap to qawwali, and from folk to rock.

Pakistan’s musical scene is thriving, and becoming increasingly diverse. Sponsorship by major brands such as Coke, Nescafe and Levis has given the country’s music a real boost, as up and coming musicians are given the chance to perform on TV supported by superb house bands and some of best musical directors.

A ripple of excitement has also been caused by the reforming of Junoon, Pakistan’s most successful rock band of all time.

Artists featured in this programme include Natasha Baig, one of Pakistan’s freshest and best singer song writers; Lyari Underground, rappers from Karachi’s Lyari district, known as the Compton of Pakistan; and Garam Anday, a brand new female duo whose first song is a brazen, humorous attack on men behaving badly.

Then there's Meesha Shafi, a successful model and actress, whose beautiful, sultry voice finds expression in her first solo release, Mein; Jimmy Khan, who cooks up a feel-good Americana-influenced storm with traditional Pakistani instruments; and Zain & Zohaib Ali, brothers in their twenties, which is very young to be already gaining a reputation in the world of qawwali, Islamic devotional music.

Last but not least, Mehdi Maloof is famous for just one highly original song. It’s called ‘A Dirty Building’ and it’s about the dilapidated Karachi apartment block he used to live in.

Photo: Zohaib Ali. Credit: BBC

Farah Karim presents new musical talent from Pakistan, ranging from rap to qawwali.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Peru2019031620190317 (WS)Meet the talented group of young DJs and producers behind Peru’s captivating tropical bass sound.

Deltatron and Tribilin Sound have been mining Peru’s rich musical archives and creating new highly danceable chicha and cumbia-based tracks. Shushupe uses her own field recordings of the Peruvian Amazon, and of folk musicians and every day hubbub, to create her unique sound. Their music is proving highly popular, and not just in Peru: Deltatron now spends half his time Dj-ing in clubs around the world.

The music reflects a new pride in all things Peruvian. As Deltatron puts it, his middle class parents were listening to music from the US and Europe and thought the best thing to aspire to was leaving the country, but he disagrees: Peru is a paradise, with everything you could want, including amazing music.

It’s not just producers who are riding this wave of optimism – and making feel good danceable music inspired by the past. Bands such as Olaya Sound System, La Mente, Hit La Rosa and La Nueve Invasion are also a major part of the movement and each of these has recorded a session exclusively for Global Beats.

Produced and presented by Catherine Fellows.

(Photo: Peruvian DJ and producer Shushupe. Credit: Catherine Fellows)

Meet the talented young DJs and producers behind Peru's captivating tropical bass sound.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Philippines2016121720161218 (WS)In the second of three programmes from East Asia, Nadine Jacinto discovers some of the most exciting new Filipino music.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Psychedelia2016052120160522 (WS)A celebration of psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

A celebration of psychedelia, the music genre born in the purple haze of the late 60s

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Reggae2017041520170416 (WS)Reggae has travelled as far as South Korea, Israel, UK and Senegal. How and why?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Reggae has travelled as far as South Korea, Israel, UK and Senegal. How and why?

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Sauti Za Busara2017021820170219 (WS)The pick from one of Africa's best music festivals - Sauti za Busara, in Zanzibar

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

The pick from one of Africa's best music festivals - Sauti za Busara, in Zanzibar

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Sauti Za Busara2017031820170319 (WS)Stunning highlights from the Sauti za Busara festival in Zanzibar

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Stunning highlights from the Sauti za Busara festival in Zanzibar

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Scotland2017081920170820 (WS)Vic Galloway is joined at the Edinburgh Festival by six of the most exciting up-and-coming bands performing there.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Senegal2018012020180121 (WS)Senegal has produced some of Africa's most successful musicians, including Youssou Ndour, Baaba Maal, Ismael Lo and Orchestra Baobab. But what about now? Is the country still generating exceptional musical talent?

Presenter Mayeni Jones travels to Dakar to meet artists including Aida Samb, a young woman from a musical dynasty who is breathing new life into the traditional Senegalese Mbalax sound, and Ibaaku, one of the country's few experimental electronic musicians and an influential figure in the hip hop scene.
There's also band of four brothers and one sister Takeifa. Maah Keita stands out in several ways - she has albinism, and is a campaigner for albino rights and empowerment, and she also claims to be the only female bass player in Senegal.

(Photo: Senegalese rock band Takeifa. Credit: Youri Lenquette)

Mayeni Jones is in Dakar to meet Senegalese artists including band of siblings Takeifa

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Ska2016041620160417 (WS)David Amanor talks to ska bands The Melbourne Ska Orchestra, Locomondo and The Skatalites

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

David Amanor talks to ska bands The Melbourne Ska Orchestra, Locomondo and The Skatalites

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

South Korea2016111920161120 (WS)
20181118 (WS)
20181117 (WS)
Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

South Korea is famous for K-pop, slick girl and boy bands with millions of fans around the world and now a multi-million dollar industry. But South Korea also has a vibrant independent music scene, with bands playing every genre of music you can think of, and, as Global Beats discovers, increasingly seeking their own distinctly Korean sound.

Presenter Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now, including rapper Yoonmirae who is giving Beyonce a run for her money with gorgeous R&B anthems and has collaborated with husband Tiger JK to produce some of her country’s biggest hip hop hits.

Danpyunsun and the Sailors (pictured) are as different from a perfectly coiffed and polished K-pop act as it’s possible to imagine, with a wild haired frontman making prog-folk magic on guitar, accompanied by a furious violinist and off-piste percussion. Jambinai and Jeong Ga Ak Hoe bring traditional Korean instruments roaring into the future, playing them with the gusto of a rock bass guitarist.

Neon Bunny samples old Korean songs, turning them into hypnotic, electronic melodies. Goonam have a vintage, trippy sound, which is winning fans at home and at festivals overseas, and last, but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly are an award winning indie band who perform a stripped down version of one of the their most beautiful songs, exclusively for Global Beats, which you can watch on this site.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

South Korea is famous for K-pop, slick girl and boy bands with millions of fans around the world and now a multi-million dollar industry. But South Korea also has a vibrant independent music scene, with bands playing every genre of music you can think of, and, as Global Beats discovers, increasingly seeking their own distinctly Korean sound.

Presenter Bernie Cho introduces our pick of the freshest, most exciting artists in Korea right now, including rapper Yoonmirae who is giving Beyonce a run for her money with gorgeous R&B anthems and has collaborated with husband Tiger JK to produce some of her country’s biggest hip hop hits.

Danpyunsun and the Sailors (pictured) are as different from a perfectly coiffed and polished K-pop act as it’s possible to imagine, with a wild haired frontman making prog-folk magic on guitar, accompanied by a furious violinist and off-piste percussion. Jambinai and Jeong Ga Ak Hoe bring traditional Korean instruments roaring into the future, playing them with the gusto of a rock bass guitarist.

Neon Bunny samples old Korean songs, turning them into hypnotic, electronic melodies. Goonam have a vintage, trippy sound, which is winning fans at home and at festivals overseas, and last, but not least, 3rd Line Butterfly are an award winning indie band who perform a stripped down version of one of the their most beautiful songs, exclusively for Global Beats, which you can watch on this site.

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Tanzanian Hip Hop2016101520171119 (WS)
20171118 (WS)
20161016 (WS)
Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Hip Hop Tanzanian style and its transformation into Bongo Flava and Singeli

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Wonderful Women2017102120171022 (WS)Astonishing female talent from the last three years of Global Beats

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.

Astonishing female talent from the last three years of Global Beats

Global Beats showcases some of the best and most inventive up and coming musicians from around the world.