Global Business [world Service]

Episodes

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20171104

Insights into the business world from the BBC.

Uganda has taken in more than a million South Sudanese refugees. Many have lost almost everything. So how do they get back on their feet? For some of them the answer is to set up a small business. But doing that in a refugee settlement, when you have no capital and many of your customers have no money, is no easy task.

Yet markets are sprouting up across the refugee settlements of northern Uganda. There are stalls selling eggs, vegetables, mobile phone cards, jeans; and there are even hairdressers and photocopying services in small shacks, where both the refugees and the local Ugandan population can trade.

So how have these places come to existence? How have they grown out of what very recently was untamed African bush land?

As John Murphy discovers, it's a story of entrepreneurship, sacrifice, taking a gamble and simple necessity.

Produced and presented by John Murphy

Photo: 22 year old Aida who sells avocados, onions and bananas, to make money to pay for further education and training.
Credit: BBC

03/09/201120110904

Insights into the business world from the BBC.

28/09/2010

Aamir Khan
Andrew Witty - Ceo Glaxosmithkline
Are CEO's up to the job?

Are CEO's up to the job?20101019

Are CEO's up to the job?20101020

Can Frankfurt Become Europe’s New Financial Capital?

A small German city with a population of under a million has big ambitions. It wants to beat Paris to the top spot of financial centre of Europe. But can the city of Frankfurt attract the international bankers and their support work force when the UK leaves the European Union next year? Several international banks have already confirmed that staff will be moving to Frankfurt. Office space is secured and the international schools say banks are block booking places for pupils. But what will this mean for Frankfurt and its own residents who face soaring rents and property prices? And given a choice would the financial community really choose a regional German city over the French capital? Caroline Bayley heads to Frankfurt to find out.

(Photo: Euro-Monument in Frankfurt)

Can Frankfurt Become Europe’s New Financial Capital?20180303

A small German city with a population of under a million has big ambitions. It wants to beat Paris to the top spot of financial centre of Europe. But can the city of Frankfurt attract the international bankers and their support work force when the UK leaves the European Union next year? Several international banks have already confirmed that staff will be moving to Frankfurt. Office space is secured and the international schools say banks are block booking places for pupils. But what will this mean for Frankfurt and its own residents who face soaring rents and property prices? And given a choice would the financial community really choose a regional German city over the French capital? Caroline Bayley heads to Frankfurt to find out.

(Photo: Euro-Monument in Frankfurt)

CEOs (part 2)

China's Dispossessed (part 1)
Chinese Hare, Indian Tortoise?
Counting The Not For Profits
Dame Barbara Stocking
Doing Business In Russia20111106

Three businessmen tell Peter Day about doing business in Russia.

French Lessons

Growing Pains
Here Comes Indonesia

Hidden Depths

Hidden Depths2010091820100919

London-born Graham Hawkes is the man who has created a submersible vessel that flies through the deepest ocean like a plane.

Peter Day reports from his workshop in California, where he wonders why space exploration makes decades of headlines while it is so hard to get backers for deepsea travel into a world no-one has ever seen.

The story of a submersible vessel that flies through the ocean like a plane

Innovation

Luxury Brands

Mark Anderson
Non Consuming Passion

Off To Market
Operation Robot

Power Play

Power Play2010092120100922

Huge sums are being put into the Intelligent Grid. Peter Day investigates.

Huge hopes (and vast sums of money) are being pinned on the so-called Intelligent Grid: a new network of electricity systems feeding information about supply and demand across the grid all the time. Peter Day asks what's happening to our power supplies, and why.

Professor Michael Porter
Putting the Fizz Back into Catalonia’s Cava

Why Spain’s sparkling fizz, Cava, is seeking to re-invent itself.

If you think of sparkling wine what probably comes to mind is popping corks and Champagne. But what about Cava from Spain? In terms of exports Cava is as big as Champagne, and it is made in the same expensive, time-consuming way. Yet its image in recent years has suffered and it’s now generally thought of as a cheap, less popular alternative to the likes of Prosecco. Most Cava comes from Catalonia, that region in Spain which has been beset by political problems and calls for independence.

For Global Business, John Murphy explores how Cava has become mixed up in Catalonia’s troubled politics, how it is trying to boost its image and how it’s seeking to re-establish itself as a very special bottle of fizz.

Producer: Estelle Doyle

Photo: Desgorging bottles
Credit: Marçal Font / Recaredo

Putting The Fizz Back Into Catalonia’s Cava20180224

Why Spain’s sparkling fizz, Cava, is seeking to re-invent itself.

If you think of sparkling wine what probably comes to mind is popping corks and Champagne. But what about Cava from Spain? In terms of exports Cava is as big as Champagne, and it is made in the same expensive, time-consuming way. Yet its image in recent years has suffered and it’s now generally thought of as a cheap, less popular alternative to the likes of Prosecco. Most Cava comes from Catalonia, that region in Spain which has been beset by political problems and calls for independence.

For Global Business, John Murphy explores how Cava has become mixed up in Catalonia’s troubled politics, how it is trying to boost its image and how it’s seeking to re-establish itself as a very special bottle of fizz.

Producer: Estelle Doyle

Photo: Desgorging bottles
Credit: Marçal Font / Recaredo

Rescuing Ford

Rescuing Ford20101016

Reverse Innovation20120429

Innovation from the developing world.

Singapore (part 1)
Singapore (part 2)
Singapore Start-ups
Small World

The Edge Of Europe20090502

Peter Day takes a close look at Iceland's role in the world economic crisis.

In the third part of this series, Peter Day takes a close look at Iceland's role in the world economic crisis and where it goes from here.

The Fish Farming Revolution

By 2050 the world needs to produce 70% more food and we need to do so using fewer resources and with less damage to the environment.

Peter Morgan travels to Skjervoy in Norway to find out how technologically sophisticated fish farming businesses are increasing the availability and lowering the price of the fish we consume and he hears about the environmental issues that pose a serious challenge to the sector's growth. He also discovers how fish farming is providing employment for people in remote coastal communities -from the Norwegian coastline to Grimsby in the North East of England.

For centuries Grimsby was a thriving fishing town, but the 'Cod Wars' of the 1970s coupled with EU fishing quotas decimated the livelihoods of many of its inhabitants. In recent years, though, the town has created a multi-billion pound seafood processing industry that is - ironically - fuelled by huge amounts of fish imported from Scandinavian countries. Peter talks to people working in the industry in Grimsby and asks whether the locally based National Aquaculture Centre can help Britain replicate Norway's success in fish farming.

Presenter: Peter Morgan
Producer: Ben Carter

Photo: Peter Morgan and aquaculture worker Jan Børre Johansen visiting a fish farm in a Norwegian fjord off the island of Skjervoy
Credit: BBC

The Fish Farming Revolution20180310

By 2050 the world needs to produce 70% more food and we need to do so using fewer resources and with less damage to the environment.

Peter Morgan travels to Skjervoy in Norway to find out how technologically sophisticated fish farming businesses are increasing the availability and lowering the price of the fish we consume and he hears about the environmental issues that pose a serious challenge to the sector's growth. He also discovers how fish farming is providing employment for people in remote coastal communities -from the Norwegian coastline to Grimsby in the North East of England.

For centuries Grimsby was a thriving fishing town, but the 'Cod Wars' of the 1970s coupled with EU fishing quotas decimated the livelihoods of many of its inhabitants. In recent years, though, the town has created a multi-billion pound seafood processing industry that is - ironically - fuelled by huge amounts of fish imported from Scandinavian countries. Peter talks to people working in the industry in Grimsby and asks whether the locally based National Aquaculture Centre can help Britain replicate Norway's success in fish farming.

Presenter: Peter Morgan
Producer: Ben Carter

Photo: Peter Morgan and aquaculture worker Jan Børre Johansen visiting a fish farm in a Norwegian fjord off the island of Skjervoy
Credit: BBC

The Transparency Detectives

Many fees and charges in the investment industry - which, among other things, manages vast pension fund wealth - have been hidden for decades. Lesley Curwen meets the transparency "detectives" intent on bringing reform to a sector that has long shunned it. She asks why the investment industry has been so slow to embrace change and explores the barriers that might still lie ahead. How much money has been unnecessarily spent and how might more transparency alter the shape and structure of the industry? She also hears the stories of the pioneers who are spearheading this new approach. How difficult has the process been for them?

Producer: Rosamund Jones

Photo Credit: Comstock

The Transparency Detectives20180317

Many fees and charges in the investment industry - which, among other things, manages vast pension fund wealth - have been hidden for decades. Lesley Curwen meets the transparency "detectives" intent on bringing reform to a sector that has long shunned it. She asks why the investment industry has been so slow to embrace change and explores the barriers that might still lie ahead. How much money has been unnecessarily spent and how might more transparency alter the shape and structure of the industry? She also hears the stories of the pioneers who are spearheading this new approach. How difficult has the process been for them?

Producer: Rosamund Jones

Photo Credit: Comstock

Two Women

02Are Ceo's Up To The Job?
02Singapore Start-ups - - All Wired Up
2 LASTIt's Only a Game

3It's Only a Game