The Global Philosopher

Episodes

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Do Those on Top Deserve Their Success?20161213

Do Those on Top Deserve Their Success?20161213

Harvard's Michael Sandel asks tough questions of 60 people from around the world.

Do Those on Top Deserve Their Success?20161213

Many people who find themselves on the wrong side of growing inequality feel the system is stacked against them. But who deserves to succeed? Should we reward talent and hard work? If so, what do we do about those left behind? Do they deserve their fate, too? And is talent, in fact, little more than luck? Using a pioneering digital facility at Harvard Business School, Professor Michael Sandel is joined by 60 people from nearly 40 different countries. Together they look for answers to these tough questions; questions which lie behind some of the biggest political stories of the moment.

Audience producer: Louise Coletta

Producer: David Edmonds

Editor: Richard Knight.

Do Those On Top Deserve Their Success?20161213

Many people who find themselves on the wrong side of growing inequality feel the system is stacked against them. But who deserves to succeed? Should we reward talent and hard work? If so, what do we do about those left behind? Do they deserve their fate, too? And is talent, in fact, little more than luck? Using a pioneering digital facility at Harvard Business School, Professor Michael Sandel is joined by 60 people from nearly 40 different countries. Together they look for answers to these tough questions; questions which lie behind some of the biggest political stories of the moment.

Audience producer: Louise Coletta

Producer: David Edmonds

Editor: Richard Knight.

Harvard's Michael Sandel asks tough questions of 60 people from around the world.

Should Borders Matter?20160329

Should Borders Matter?2016032920160516 (R4)

Michael Sandel explores the philosophical justifications made for national borders. Using a pioneering state-of-the-art studio at the Harvard Business School, Professor Sandel is joined by 60 participants from over 30 countries in a truly global digital space.

Is there any moral distinction between a political refugee and an economic migrant? If people have the right to exit a country, why not a right to enter? Do nations have the right to protect the affluence of their citizens? And is there such a thing as a 'national identity'?

These are just some of the questions addressed by Professor Sandel in this first edition of The Global Philosopher.

Audience producer: Louise Coletta

Producer: David Edmonds

Editor: Richard Knight

(Image taken by Rose Lincoln)

Should Borders Matter?2016032920160402 (R4)

Michael Sandel explores the philosophical justifications made for national borders.

Michael Sandel explores the philosophical justifications made for national borders. Using a pioneering state-of-the-art studio at the Harvard Business School, Professor Sandel is joined by 60 participants from over 30 countries in a truly global digital space.

Is there any moral distinction between a political refugee and an economic migrant? If people have the right to exit a country, why not a right to enter? Do nations have the right to protect the affluence of their citizens? And is there such a thing as a 'national identity'?

These are just some of the questions addressed by Professor Sandel in this first edition of The Global Philosopher.

Audience producer: Louise Coletta

Producer: David Edmonds

Editor: Richard Knight

(Image taken by Rose Lincoln)

Should Borders Matter?2016032920160402 (R4)
20160516 (R4)

Michael Sandel explores the philosophical justifications made for national borders.

Michael Sandel explores the philosophical justifications made for national borders. Using a pioneering state-of-the-art studio at the Harvard Business School, Professor Sandel is joined by 60 participants from over 30 countries in a truly global digital space.

Is there any moral distinction between a political refugee and an economic migrant? If people have the right to exit a country, why not a right to enter? Do nations have the right to protect the affluence of their citizens? And is there such a thing as a 'national identity'?

These are just some of the questions addressed by Professor Sandel in this first edition of The Global Philosopher.

Audience producer: Louise Coletta

Producer: David Edmonds

Editor: Richard Knight

(Image taken by Rose Lincoln)

Should the Rich World Pay for Climate Change?20160728

Should the Rich World Pay for Climate Change?20160728

A global audience joins Michael Sandel to discuss the world's response to climate change.

Should the Rich World Pay for Climate Change?20160728

Sixty people from thirty countries join Michael Sandel in a digital studio at Harvard to discuss the philosophical issues underlying the world's response to climate change.

The developed world has caused climate change, belting out greenhouse gases as it became rich (at least, most people think so). But the developing world - huge and growing economies like India and China - is increasingly a big part of the problem.

So who should pay to fix the mess? Is it fair to penalise the developing world as it strives to catch up? Is it acceptable that rich countries be allowed to buy credits, giving them permission to pollute? And is it time to re-think our material aspirations?

Audience producer: Louise Coletta

Producer: David Edmonds

Executive Producer: Richard Knight.

Should The Rich World Pay For Climate Change?20160728

Sixty people from thirty countries join Michael Sandel in a digital studio at Harvard to discuss the philosophical issues underlying the world's response to climate change.

The developed world has caused climate change, belting out greenhouse gases as it became rich (at least, most people think so). But the developing world - huge and growing economies like India and China - is increasingly a big part of the problem.

So who should pay to fix the mess? Is it fair to penalise the developing world as it strives to catch up? Is it acceptable that rich countries be allowed to buy credits, giving them permission to pollute? And is it time to re-think our material aspirations?

Audience producer: Louise Coletta

Producer: David Edmonds

Executive Producer: Richard Knight.

A global audience joins Michael Sandel to discuss the world's response to climate change.

Should there be any limits to free speech?20180206

A global audience joins Harvard's Michael Sandel to discuss the limits to free speech.

Sixty people from around the world join Professor Michael Sandel in a digital studio at Harvard to discuss free speech.

Free speech is a cornerstone of democracy and freedom of expression is regarded as a fundamental human right. But even in democracies there are disputes about the limits to free speech. And most countries have laws restricting free speech, such as libel laws, or laws controlling forms of pornography.

But should limits be placed on free speech? Should people be allowed to say and write whatever they like, even if it is untrue and is deeply offensive to vulnerable individuals or groups? Professor Sandel unpicks the philosophy of free speech.

Audience producer: Louise Coletta
Producer: David Edmonds
Executive Producer: Emma Rippon.

Should There Be Any Limits To Free Speech?2018020620181006 (R4)

A global audience joins Harvard's Michael Sandel to discuss the limits to free speech.

Harvard's Michael Sandel uses pioneering technology to conduct a truly global debate.

Sixty people from around the world join Professor Michael Sandel in a digital studio at Harvard to discuss free speech.

Free speech is a cornerstone of democracy and freedom of expression is regarded as a fundamental human right. But even in democracies there are disputes about the limits to free speech. And most countries have laws restricting free speech, such as libel laws, or laws controlling forms of pornography.

But should limits be placed on free speech? Should people be allowed to say and write whatever they like, even if it is untrue and is deeply offensive to vulnerable individuals or groups? Professor Sandel unpicks the philosophy of free speech.

Audience producer: Louise Coletta
Producer: David Edmonds
Executive Producer: Emma Rippon.