Episodes

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A View From Beirut: The Impact Of The Saudi-iran Power Struggle2018031720180318 (WS)Unlike its regional neighbours, Lebanon appeared to be entering a period of political and economic stability. But tension is mounting as Saudi Arabia escalates its power struggle with Iran. As Iran continues to exert its influence and defend its interest across the region, there is growing concern about how the conflict might affect the stability of the fragile coalition in Lebanon and the impact on the wider Middle East.

In the run up to the first Parliamentary elections in nearly a decade, Global Questions travels to Beirut to explore its political relationships with its neighbouring countries. What does the crisis mean to the people of Lebanon and do they fear it could lead to an economic and political crisis in the fierce struggle for regional dominance?

Guests:

• Mohammed Alyahya, Senior Fellow at Gulf Research Centre
• Elias Bou Saab, Adviser to President Aoun
• Mohammad Marandi, Professor at the University of Tehran
• Tania Saleh, Singer and Songwriter
• Paula Yacoubian Candidate for the Lebanese Parliamentary elections

Presenter: Zeinab Badawi
Producer: Ben Carter

The regional struggle between Iran and Saudi Arabia and its impact on Lebanon

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Africa The Next Generation: A Force For Change?2018072120180722 (WS)Lagos - Nigeria’s biggest city and its commercial centre. It’s a noisy, vibrant, hectic place, one of the world’s fastest-growing cities and the most populated in Africa. Like most of Africa, the majority of Nigeria’s population is aged under 30. That’s more than 100 million people. And yet, the young are barely visible in the corridors of political power.

With a general election looming early next year, the country’s 75 year-old President Buhari recently signed a new law reducing the age you can run for political office. It gives the young people of Nigeria a bigger platform to drive through much-needed political and social reform. But are they ready and willing to rise to the challenge? And will the older generation of politicians let go of the reins to allow in new ideas and new blood?

This edition of Global Questions comes from the Afe Babalola hall at the University of Lagos. The auditorium is packed full with a young and dynamic audience from across Nigeria, including from the Niger Delta, the capital Abuja, the conservative North East and from Lagos. They’ll be putting their questions to a panel of high-profile leaders and opinion-formers.

Topics for debate include the fight against terrorism, the importance of educating and empowering women and how to combat corruption.

Panel:
Aminu Tambuwal, Governor of Sokoto State in north west Nigeria. He is a former Speaker of the House.

Obiageli Ezekwesili campaigns to free the Chibok girls abducted by Boko Haram. She’s also a former government minister and was Vice President of the World Bank.

Ayisha Osori, a lawyer and author. She wants to overhaul the current political system of patronage and big money.

Samson Itodo started the “Not Too Young To Run” campaign, urging the government to lower the age of political office.

Ebuka Obi-Uchendu, an award-winning Nigerian TV presenter, best known for presenting Rubbin Minds, the influential TV talk show for young Nigerians.

Presenter: Zeinab Badawi
Producer: Sally Abrahams

Is Nigeria's young population ready and willing to push through much-needed reform?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Lagos - Nigeria’s biggest city and its commercial centre. It’s a noisy, vibrant, hectic place, one of the world’s fastest-growing cities and the most populated in Africa. Like most of Africa, the majority of Nigeria’s population is aged under 30. That’s more than 100 million people. And yet, the young are barely visible in the corridors of political power.

With a general election looming early next year, the country’s 75 year-old President Buhari recently signed a new law reducing the age you can run for political office. It gives the young people of Nigeria a bigger platform to drive through much-needed political and social reform. But are they ready and willing to rise to the challenge? And will the older generation of politicians let go of the reins to allow in new ideas and new blood?

This edition of Global Questions comes from the Afe Babalola hall at the University of Lagos. The auditorium is packed full with a young and dynamic audience from across Nigeria, including from the Niger Delta, the capital Abuja, the conservative North East and from Lagos. They’ll be putting their questions to a panel of high-profile leaders and opinion-formers.

Topics for debate include the fight against terrorism, the importance of educating and empowering women and how to combat corruption.

Panel:
Aminu Tambuwal, Governor of Sokoto State in north west Nigeria. He is a former Speaker of the House.

Obiageli Ezekwesili campaigns to free the Chibok girls abducted by Boko Haram. She’s also a former government minister and was Vice President of the World Bank.

Ayisha Osori, a lawyer and author. She wants to overhaul the current political system of patronage and big money.

Samson Itodo started the “Not Too Young To Run” campaign, urging the government to lower the age of political office.

Ebuka Obi-Uchendu, an award-winning Nigerian TV presenter, best known for presenting Rubbin Minds, the influential TV talk show for young Nigerians.

Presenter: Zeinab Badawi
Producer: Sally Abrahams

Is Nigeria's young population ready and willing to push through much-needed reform?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Australia: Is Multiculturalism Failing?2019062220190623 (WS)Multiculturalism was once the dream of many countries around the world, encouraging ethnically diverse cultures to live side by side in harmony. But critics say that dream has failed: that too many communities live separately – pursuing segregation rather than integration, fuelling dangerous resentment. Can you have a multi-racial, multi-faith society, without forcing people of different cultures to assimilate?

Global Questions travels to Sydney, Australia – a young country built on immigration, where many cultures now live together – hailed by its former Prime Minister as the most successful multi-cultural society in the world. But even here there are real tensions, and the world recoiled in revulsion when a self-avowed Australian racist and white supremacist massacred fifty Muslims in Christchurch, New Zealand. It revealed a disturbing underbelly of racism in parts of Australian society.

So in this mobile, globalised world, is multiculturalism failing – and if so, what needs to replace it?

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.

Can you have a multi-racial, multi-faith society, without forcing people to assimilate?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

China On The World Stage2019033120190403 (WS)Global Question travels to Hong Kong to discuss China and its place in the world in 2019. China’s extraordinary economic boom is finally cooling. And it’s locked into a damaging trade war with the United States. Is the Chinese economic miracle grinding to a halt? If so, what will be the impact on the global economy? Could it even trigger another financial crisis? What do China’s slowing growth rate, high debt levels and struggling currency mean for the daily lives of its one billion people, and for those in Hong Kong and around the rest of the world?

Panel:
Susan Thornton - Former US Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs.
Victor Gao - Vice-President of Centre for China and Globalisation in Beijing.
Alvin Yeung - Leader of the Civic Party in Hong Kong,
Parag Khanna - Asia Analyst and Founder of FutureMap.

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.

Global Question is in Hong Kong to discuss China and its place in the world in 2019.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Global Question travels to Hong Kong to discuss China and its place in the world in 2019. China’s extraordinary economic boom is finally cooling. And it’s locked into a damaging trade war with the United States. Is the Chinese economic miracle grinding to a halt? If so, what will be the impact on the global economy? Could it even trigger another financial crisis? What do China’s slowing growth rate, high debt levels and struggling currency mean for the daily lives of its one billion people, and for those in Hong Kong and around the rest of the world?

Panel:
Susan Thornton - Former US Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs.
Victor Gao - Vice-President of Centre for China and Globalisation in Beijing.
Alvin Yeung - Leader of the Civic Party in Hong Kong,
Parag Khanna - Asia Analyst and Founder of FutureMap.

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.

Global Question is in Hong Kong to discuss China and its place in the world in 2019.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Global Question travels to Hong Kong to discuss China and its place in the world in 2019. China’s extraordinary economic boom is finally cooling. And it’s locked into a damaging trade war with the United States. Is the Chinese economic miracle grinding to a halt? If so, what will be the impact on the global economy? Could it even trigger another financial crisis? What do China’s slowing growth rate, high debt levels and struggling currency mean for the daily lives of its one billion people, and for those in Hong Kong and around the rest of the world?

Panel:
Susan Thornton - Former US Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs.
Victor Gao - Vice-President of Centre for China and Globalisation in Beijing.
Alvin Yeung - Leader of the Civic Party in Hong Kong,
Parag Khanna - Asia Analyst and Founder of FutureMap.

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.

Global Question is in Hong Kong to discuss China and its place in the world in 2019.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Coronavirus - Lifting Lockdown2020052320200524 (WS)Around the world lockdowns are being eased, but how are different countries emerging?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

As the Coronavirus continues to take hold, Global Questions invites its international audience to put their questions to a panel of experts. Around the world lockdowns are being eased, with some businesses reopening, and children going back to school. But Covid 19 remains massively contagious, and while getting economies back on their feet is important, it's also crucial to avoid a second spike in infections. So how should politicians balance lives against livelihoods? And if they lift lockdowns too quickly, could they do even more damage to the economy and people's well-being, having to shut them down all over again? How is the world emerging from life under lockdown? Join Zeinab Badawi is joined by Tony Blair, former British Prime Minister and Chair Tony Blair Institute for Global Change, and Paolo Gentiloni, former Italian Prime Minister and European Commissioner for Economy

Producer: Ben Carter

Democracy Versus Prosperity2016052820160529 (WS)We ask if Africa's current growth can deliver political reform and civic freedom - or will Africa end up richer but less free?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

We ask if Africa's current growth can deliver political reform and civic freedom - or will Africa end up richer but less free?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Global Questions2021050120210502 (WS)
20210503 (WS)
After the conviction of a former police offer for the murder of George Floyd a year ago, are America's racial divisions starting to heal, or are they as deep as ever? President Biden says the verdict is a giant step forward, but what more needs to be done in the fight for racial equality and justice in the United States and around the world?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Global Questions: Is Multiculturalism Failing?2019062220190623 (WS)Multiculturalism was once the dream of many countries around the world, encouraging ethnically diverse cultures to live side by side in harmony. But critics say that dream has failed: that too many communities live separately – pursuing segregation rather than integration, fuelling dangerous resentment. Can you have a multi-racial, multi-faith society, without forcing people of different cultures to assimilate?

Global Questions travels to Sydney, Australia – a young country built on immigration, where many cultures now live together – hailed by its former Prime Minister as the most successful multi-cultural society in the world. But even here there are real tensions, and the world recoiled in revulsion when a self-avowed Australian racist and white supremacist massacred fifty Muslims in Christchurch, New Zealand. It revealed a disturbing underbelly of racism in parts of Australian society.

So in this mobile, globalised world, is multiculturalism failing – and if so, what needs to replace it?

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.

Can you have a multi-racial, multi-faith society, without forcing people to assimilate?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Multiculturalism was once the dream of many countries around the world, encouraging ethnically diverse cultures to live side by side in harmony. But critics say that dream has failed: that too many communities live separately – pursuing segregation rather than integration, fuelling dangerous resentment. Can you have a multi-racial, multi-faith society, without forcing people of different cultures to assimilate?

Global Questions travels to Sydney, Australia – a young country built on immigration, where many cultures now live together – hailed by its former Prime Minister as the most successful multi-cultural society in the world. But even here there are real tensions, and the world recoiled in revulsion when a self-avowed Australian racist and white supremacist massacred fifty Muslims in Christchurch, New Zealand. It revealed a disturbing underbelly of racism in parts of Australian society.

So in this mobile, globalised world, is multiculturalism failing – and if so, what needs to replace it?

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.

Can you have a multi-racial, multi-faith society, without forcing people to assimilate?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

India: The Next Superpower?2018092220180923 (WS)After 70 years of independence Global Questions travels to New Delhi to assess India today, where it stands on the international stage and its fast growing economic strength, which some say could help it rival China as a global powerhouse.

India is the world’s largest democracy and politically stable but does it have the potential to be the world’s most influential democracy by the end of the 21st century?

More than half of India’s population, about 600 million, are under 25 years old, with such a young working society what are the challenges that might hold India back from continued growth and modernisation?

Join Zeinab Badawi at Bikaner House in the heart of New Delhi as she brings together an audience drawn from across India, with a high profile panel of political and public figures, to find out if India is set to become the next superpower.

On the panel:

Meenakshi Lekhi – MP and spokesperson BJP
Chhavi Rajawat – Sarpanch, Soda Village Rajasthan
Manu Joseph – Writer and journalist
Binny Bansal – Co-founder and CEO Flipkart
Aditi Mittal – Comedian, writer and actress

Producer: Ben Carter

After 70 years of independence, is India set to be the next superpower?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Is South Africa Afrophobic?2020022920200301 (WS)The recent upsurge in violence against foreigners, mostly from elsewhere in Africa, is raising fears that xenophobic attacks in South Africa are on the rise. With its highly developed economy South Africa remains Africa's biggest magnet for migrants. The South African Government has acknowledged that prejudice is partly to blame for the latest eruption of violence against African migrants and targeting foreign businesses.

Political leaders from across party divides have been accused of tapping into existing anti-African sentiment and have helped create a hostile environment and stoked anti-immigrant sentiment for political gain rather than addressing the issues of poverty and job creation.

But where does this Afrophobic violence have its roots and what does it mean for its relationships with neighbouring countries across the continent?

(Photo: Zeinab Badawi and guests talk about the issue of Afrophobia in Johannesburg. Credit: BBC)

Is prejudice to blame for the violence against African migrants

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Is The Global System Racist?2020061320200614 (WS)Will real structural change come following the death of George Floyd ?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Will real structural change come following the death of George Floyd ?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

The death of George Floyd sent shock waves around the world and has become a catalyst for demands for change. Millions have demonstrated in many different countries, calling for a change not just in policing, but in the way society treats black and ethnic minority people. Why are they so often bottom of the pile in terms of educational opportunity, employment, housing and health? Does what happened in Minneapolis represent a moment in history after which real structural change will come? Or is it just another false dawn, like so many that have come before with protests against racist brutality in America? Zeinab Badawi is joined by Alice Bah Kuhnke and Baratunde Thurston to debate these questions.

Alice Bah Kuhnke was until recently Swedish minister of culture and democracy. She is a member of the green party and one of the few black deputies in the European parliament and has been a fervent critic of a lack of ethnic diversity in EU institutions.

Baratunde Thurston is an American writer, activist and comedian. He wrote the New York Times best seller How to Be Black, he was a producer on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and is currently hosting live on lockdown on his Instagram.

Presenter: Zeinab Badawi
Producer: Ben Carter
Editor: Carey Clark

Will real structural change come following the death of George Floyd ?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

The death of George Floyd sent shock waves around the world and has become a catalyst for demands for change. Millions have demonstrated in many different countries, calling for a change not just in policing, but in the way society treats black and ethnic minority people. Why are they so often bottom of the pile in terms of educational opportunity, employment, housing and health? Does what happened in Minneapolis represent a moment in history after which real structural change will come? Or is it just another false dawn, like so many that have come before with protests against racist brutality in America? Zeinab Badawi is joined by Alice Bah Kuhnke and Baratunde Thurston to debate these questions.

Alice Bah Kuhnke was until recently Swedish minister of culture and democracy. She is a member of the green party and one of the few black deputies in the European parliament and has been a fervent critic of a lack of ethnic diversity in EU institutions.

Baratunde Thurston is an American writer, activist and comedian. He wrote the New York Times best seller How to Be Black, he was a producer on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and is currently hosting live on lockdown on his Instagram.

Presenter: Zeinab Badawi
Producer: Ben Carter
Editor: Carey Clark

Will real structural change come following the death of George Floyd ?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Islam's Place In Politics - Is There One?2016121720161218 (WS)Zeinab Badawi is in Tunisia with a panel of guests, to test the mood on whether Islam should or could be taken out of politics.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Zeinab Badawi is in Tunisia with a panel of guests, to test the mood on whether Islam should or could be taken out of politics.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Islam's Place In Politics Billboard2016121720161218 (WS).

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

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Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Politics And The People: A Divided Europe?20190204Some believe Europe is more divided than ever. After years of austerity and migration, populists are on the rise in countries like Italy, framing politics as a battle between ordinary voters and a corrupt European ‘establishment’. But the continent is also divided over how to move forward in a world where rising economic powerhouses threaten to dominate. Should the 27 remaining nations of the European Union bind themselves together ever more closely, with tighter integration - monetary, economic, political and even military? Or are there insurmountable fault lines between northern Europe, and the southern nations which some say are locked in ‘permanent recession’. Will the richer half of Europe always be bailing out the poorer, stoking up resentment that feeds the rise of populism?

Zeinab Badawi and her panel Hugh Bronson from Germany’s AFD party, Marta Grande from Italy’s 5Star Movement, Anna Maria Corazza Bildt from the European People’s Party and Pauline Bock, a French journalist and political commentator take questions from a local audience.

Producer: Ben Carter

(Image: Audience and Panel in Rome, Credit: Andrea Annessi Mecci)

Zeinab Badawi and guests are in Rome taking questions about the future of Europe

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Putin And Trump - A New Era?20170406Zeinab Badawi asks how the relationship between Trump and Putin will affect the Baltics

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Sexism And Violence Against Women2021040320210404 (WS)This year thousands of people around the world have taken to the streets to denounce violence against women. Global Questions talks to two former female presidents, one from Africa and one from Europe, who've both been trailblazers for women's rights for decades. Mary Robinson, Ireland's first female president, and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former president of Liberia and the first female head of state in Africa, take your questions on why women in so many countries continue to endure sexism and sexual violence, and why change seems so difficult to achieve.

Panel:
Mary Robinson
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

Despite worldwide demonstrations, why is there still sexism and violence against women?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Syria's Refugee Crisis2016031920160320 (WS)Syrian refugees in Jordan question politicians and diplomats in a special debate.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Syrian refugees in Jordan question politicians and diplomats in a special debate.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

The Asean Way2017052020170521 (WS)Political and business leaders from ASEAN countries face questions from an audience

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Trump's \u2018deal Of The Century': The Future For The Israelis And Palestinians20190311The Middle East awaits President Trump's much vaunted peace plan - billed as the 'deal of the century'. But the Palestinians say it was dangerously provocative to declare the disputed city of Jerusalem as the capital, and to move the American Embassy there. A quarter of a century on from the Oslo Accords, what chance is there now of the 'two-state solution', where an independent Palestinian state sits alongside Israel? Having marked the 70th anniversary of its creation, Global Questions travels to Israel to ask what the next 70 years might bring. Ever since its birth, the country has been mired in conflict with the Palestinians and its Arab neighbours. Is further conflict inevitable or could there be a lasting peace that allows the next generation to live without war?

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.

Global Questions discusses the future for the Israelis and Palestinians.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

The Middle East awaits President Trump's much vaunted peace plan - billed as the 'deal of the century'. But the Palestinians say it was dangerously provocative to declare the disputed city of Jerusalem as the capital, and to move the American Embassy there. A quarter of a century on from the Oslo Accords, what chance is there now of the 'two-state solution', where an independent Palestinian state sits alongside Israel? Having marked the 70th anniversary of its creation, Global Questions travels to Israel to ask what the next 70 years might bring. Ever since its birth, the country has been mired in conflict with the Palestinians and its Arab neighbours. Is further conflict inevitable or could there be a lasting peace that allows the next generation to live without war?

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.

Global Questions discusses the future for the Israelis and Palestinians.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Trump's America: A Nation Divided?2017102120171022 (WS)What have voters in South Carolina made of Donald Trump's first year in office?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

What have voters in South Carolina made of Donald Trump's first year in office?

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

Turkey's Role As A Regional Power2019101220191013 (WS)In the last few days Turkey has launched an air and ground offensive in Northern Syria and this unilateral decision has been widely condemned that’s been widely condemned with the European Union urging Turkey to end its offensive. What implications does this have for Turkey’s future role as a power in the region? Zeinab Badawi travels to Istanbul to find out.

Turkey has long been at the crossroads between Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia – a crucial gateway between the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, a nation that is pivotal economically, militarily and strategically. It’s a key member of NATO, but feels undervalued by the United States. It wants membership of the EU, but feels snubbed and spurned by Brussels, despite its help in stemming the flow of Syrian refugees into Europe. So now Turkey is being courted by Eastern powers, Russia and China in particular.

Zeinab and guests will take questions from a local audience.

Panel:

HUSEYIN ALP-TEKIN works at SETA, which is a think tank that supports government thinking on foreign policy

SIR PETER WESTMACOTT is the former UK ambassador to Turkey and the United States

PROFESSOR HURSIT GUNES is a member of the CHP – the main opposition party

SEZIN ONEY is a Turkish journalist and commentator

(Image: Zeinab and panelists taking questions from audience in Istanbul. Credit: BBC)

Despite facing political division, Turkey is forging a new role as a regional powerhouse.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

In the last few days Turkey has launched an air and ground offensive in Northern Syria and this unilateral decision has been widely condemned that’s been widely condemned with the European Union urging Turkey to end its offensive. What implications does this have for Turkey’s future role as a power in the region? Zeinab Badawi travels to Istanbul to find out.

Turkey has long been at the crossroads between Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia – a crucial gateway between the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, a nation that is pivotal economically, militarily and strategically. It’s a key member of NATO, but feels undervalued by the United States. It wants membership of the EU, but feels snubbed and spurned by Brussels, despite its help in stemming the flow of Syrian refugees into Europe. So now Turkey is being courted by Eastern powers, Russia and China in particular.

Zeinab and guests will take questions from a local audience.

Panel:

HUSEYIN ALP-TEKIN works at SETA, which is a think tank that supports government thinking on foreign policy

SIR PETER WESTMACOTT is the former UK ambassador to Turkey and the United States

PROFESSOR HURSIT GUNES is a member of the CHP – the main opposition party

SEZIN ONEY is a Turkish journalist and commentator

(Image: Zeinab and panelists taking questions from audience in Istanbul. Credit: BBC)

Despite facing political division, Turkey is forging a new role as a regional powerhouse.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.

In the last few days Turkey has launched an air and ground offensive in Northern Syria and this unilateral decision has been widely condemned that’s been widely condemned with the European Union urging Turkey to end its offensive. What implications does this have for Turkey’s future role as a power in the region? Zeinab Badawi travels to Istanbul to find out.

Turkey has long been at the crossroads between Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia – a crucial gateway between the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, a nation that is pivotal economically, militarily and strategically. It’s a key member of NATO, but feels undervalued by the United States. It wants membership of the EU, but feels snubbed and spurned by Brussels, despite its help in stemming the flow of Syrian refugees into Europe. So now Turkey is being courted by Eastern powers, Russia and China in particular.

Zeinab and guests will take questions from a local audience.

Panel:

HUSEYIN ALP-TEKIN works at SETA, which is a think tank that supports government thinking on foreign policy

SIR PETER WESTMACOTT is the former UK ambassador to Turkey and the United States

PROFESSOR HURSIT GUNES is a member of the CHP – the main opposition party

SEZIN ONEY is a Turkish journalist and commentator

(Image: Zeinab and panelists taking questions from audience in Istanbul. Credit: BBC)

Despite facing political division, Turkey is forging a new role as a regional powerhouse.

Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.