Graffiti - Paint And Protest [world Service]

Episodes

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Broadcast
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01Graffiti: Paint and Protest in Europe - The Documentary2016072620160730 (WS)

Aside from the physical landscape, what does graffiti and street art actually change?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. Powerful images and words on walls are creating international headlines. But can breaking one law help to change another? Where should the line be drawn between democracy and vandalism, vandalism and art?

In an era of rapid political, social and economic change, graffiti in Paris and Barcelona has become more prolific – and less tolerated – than ever before. Artists including Blek Le Rat (the “father of stencil graffiti”), Roc Blackblock, Suriani and Vegan Bunnies defend their actions, and discuss whether such “freedom of expression” on walls should have any limits. Presented by Steve Urquhart.

(Photo: People pass by an unfinished street art graffiti made in a stairway by French street artists Zag and Sia in Paris, 1 March 2016. Credit: Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

01Graffiti: Paint and Protest in Europe - The Documentary20160726

Aside from the physical landscape, what does graffiti and street art actually change?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. Powerful images and words on walls are creating international headlines. But can breaking one law help to change another? Where should the line be drawn between democracy and vandalism, vandalism and art?

In an era of rapid political, social and economic change, graffiti in Paris and Barcelona has become more prolific – and less tolerated – than ever before. Artists including Blek Le Rat (the “father of stencil graffiti”), Roc Blackblock, Suriani and Vegan Bunnies defend their actions, and discuss whether such “freedom of expression” on walls should have any limits. Presented by Steve Urquhart.

(Photo: People pass by an unfinished street art graffiti made in a stairway by French street artists Zag and Sia in Paris, 1 March 2016. Credit: Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

01The Documentary20160726

01The Documentary20160726

Aside from the physical landscape, what does graffiti and street art actually change?

01The Documentary20160726

Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. Powerful images and words on walls are creating international headlines. But can breaking one law help to change another? Where should the line be drawn between democracy and vandalism, vandalism and art?

In an era of rapid political, social and economic change, graffiti in Paris and Barcelona has become more prolific – and less tolerated – than ever before. Artists including Blek Le Rat (the “father of stencil graffiti?), Roc Blackblock, Suriani and Vegan Bunnies defend their actions, and discuss whether such “freedom of expression? on walls should have any limits. Presented by Steve Urquhart.

(Photo: People pass by an unfinished street art graffiti made in a stairway by French street artists Zag and Sia in Paris, 1 March 2016. Credit: Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

01The Documentary2016072620160730 (WS)

Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. Powerful images and words on walls are creating international headlines. But can breaking one law help to change another? Where should the line be drawn between democracy and vandalism, vandalism and art?

In an era of rapid political, social and economic change, graffiti in Paris and Barcelona has become more prolific – and less tolerated – than ever before. Artists including Blek Le Rat (the “father of stencil graffiti?), Roc Blackblock, Suriani and Vegan Bunnies defend their actions, and discuss whether such “freedom of expression? on walls should have any limits. Presented by Steve Urquhart.

(Photo: People pass by an unfinished street art graffiti made in a stairway by French street artists Zag and Sia in Paris, 1 March 2016. Credit: Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

Aside from the physical landscape, what does graffiti and street art actually change?

Aside from the physical landscape, what does graffiti and street art actually change?

02Graffiti: Paint and Protest in Brazil - The Documentary2016080220160806 (WS)

What does graffiti and street art actually change?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. In part two Steve Uruqhart meets graffiti writers and street artists from Brazil.

Thousands of angry young Brazilians could not care less about the 2016 Olympics; they would rather paint Rio and São Paulo’s walls with their views about political turmoil, poverty and inequality. Others choose to cover historic buildings with stark, crude lettering known as 'pixação'. Paulo Ito, Panmela Castro, 'Cripta' Djan Ivson and pixação pioneer Marcelo 'Xuim' explain what they are trying to say through their work - whether or not people wish to hear it.

(Photo: Rio street artist Panmela Castro at work with kind permission from Panmela)

02Graffiti: Paint and Protest in Brazil - The Documentary20160802

What does graffiti and street art actually change?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. In part two Steve Uruqhart meets graffiti writers and street artists from Brazil.

Thousands of angry young Brazilians could not care less about the 2016 Olympics; they would rather paint Rio and São Paulo’s walls with their views about political turmoil, poverty and inequality. Others choose to cover historic buildings with stark, crude lettering known as 'pixação'. Paulo Ito, Panmela Castro, 'Cripta' Djan Ivson and pixação pioneer Marcelo 'Xuim' explain what they are trying to say through their work - whether or not people wish to hear it.

(Photo: Rio street artist Panmela Castro at work with kind permission from Panmela)

02The Documentary20160802

02The Documentary20160802

Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. In part two Steve Uruqhart meets graffiti writers and street artists from Brazil.

Thousands of angry young Brazilians could not care less about the 2016 Olympics; they would rather paint Rio and São Paulo’s walls with their views about political turmoil, poverty and inequality. Others choose to cover historic buildings with stark, crude lettering known as 'pixação'. Paulo Ito, Panmela Castro, 'Cripta' Djan Ivson and pixação pioneer Marcelo 'Xuim' explain what they are trying to say through their work - whether or not people wish to hear it.

(Photo: Rio street artist Panmela Castro at work with kind permission from Panmela)

02The Documentary20160802

What does graffiti and street art actually change?

02The Documentary2016080220160806 (WS)

What does graffiti and street art actually change?

Graffiti’s modern role is evolving rapidly. From Europe to Brazil, street artists are displaying their anger about inequality, invisibility, corruption and control. In part two Steve Uruqhart meets graffiti writers and street artists from Brazil.

Thousands of angry young Brazilians could not care less about the 2016 Olympics; they would rather paint Rio and São Paulo’s walls with their views about political turmoil, poverty and inequality. Others choose to cover historic buildings with stark, crude lettering known as 'pixação'. Paulo Ito, Panmela Castro, 'Cripta' Djan Ivson and pixação pioneer Marcelo 'Xuim' explain what they are trying to say through their work - whether or not people wish to hear it.

(Photo: Rio street artist Panmela Castro at work with kind permission from Panmela)

02The Documentary2016080220160806 (WS)

What does graffiti and street art actually change?