Guillaume Dufay (1397-1474)

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01The medieval mindset20190826

Donald Macleod explores the rich and profoundly moving music Dufay planned for observances at the end of his life.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, a historical music researcher and the founder, director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious reputation, examine the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

Dufay set out his funeral obsequies in detail and he regarded his transition to the after-life to be of paramount importance; naturally all such arrangements required some exceptional music.

St. Anthony of Padua Mass – Kyrie
The Binchois Consort
Andrew Kirkman, conductor

Ce jour de l’an
Bernhard Landauer, counter –tenor
Unicorn Ensemble
Michael Posch, director

St. Anthony of Padua Mass – Gloria
The Binchois Consort
Andrew Kirkman, conductor

Quel fronte signorillo
C’est bien raison de devoir essaucier
La Reverdie

Ave Regina caelorum
The Orlando Consort

Missa Ave regina caelorum – Sanctus, Agnus Dei
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Producer: Johannah Smith for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod explores the deeply moving music Dufay selected for his funeral rites.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

01The medieval mindset20190826

Donald Macleod explores the rich and profoundly moving music Dufay planned for observances at the end of his life.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, a historical music researcher and the founder, director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious reputation, examine the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

Dufay set out his funeral obsequies in detail and he regarded his transition to the after-life to be of paramount importance; naturally all such arrangements required some exceptional music.

St. Anthony of Padua Mass – Kyrie
The Binchois Consort
Andrew Kirkman, conductor

Ce jour de l’an
Bernhard Landauer, counter –tenor
Unicorn Ensemble
Michael Posch, director

St. Anthony of Padua Mass – Gloria
The Binchois Consort
Andrew Kirkman, conductor

Quel fronte signorillo
C’est bien raison de devoir essaucier
La Reverdie

Ave Regina caelorum
The Orlando Consort

Missa ave regina caelorum – Sanctus, Agnus Dei
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Producer: Johannah Smith for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod explores the deeply moving music Dufay selected for his funeral rites.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

02A medieval cleric20190827

Donald Macleod explores Dufay’s life as a chorister at one of the most prestigious institutions of the period, Cambrai Cathedral, where he would have learnt the foundations of his craft.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, a historical music researcher and artistic director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious figure, examine the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

Dufay’s training was rigorous, with studies in Latin, grammar and the catechism, as well as learning music, predominantly plainsong for services, so quite how and where he perfected his skill in writing in a polyphonic multi-voiced style is still something of a mystery.

Motet: Apostolo gloriosum
Huelgas Ensemble
Paul Van Nevel, director

Seigneur Leon, vous soyés bienvenus
Continens Paradisi

Missa Sancti Jacobi - Offertorium
La Reverdie

Magnificat tertii et quarti toni
Capella Reial de Catalunya Vocal Ensemble
Jordi Savall, director

Missa Ecce ancilla Domini - Sanctus
Ensemble Gilles Binchois
Dominique Vellard, director

Malheureulx cueur
Blue Heron
Scott Metcalfe, director

Motet: Moribus et genere
Heulgas Ensemble
Paul Van Nevel, director

Donald Macleod explores Dufay\u2019s life as a chorister at the prestigious Cambrai Cathedral.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

02A medieval cleric20190827

Donald Macleod explores Dufay’s life as a chorister at one of the most prestigious institutions of the period, Cambrai cathedral, where he would have learnt the foundations of his craft.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, a historical music researcher and artistic director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious figure, examine the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

Dufay’s training was rigorous, with studies in Latin, grammar and the catechism, as well as learning music, predominantly plainsong for services, so quite how and where he perfected his skill in writing in a polyphonic multi-voiced style is still something of a mystery.

Motet: Apostolo gloriosum
Huelgas Ensemble
Paul van Hevel, director

Seigneur Leon, vous soyés bienvenus
Continens Paradisi

Missa Sancti Jacobi - Offertorium
La Reverdie

Magnificat tertii et quarti toni
Capella Reial de Catalunya Vocal Ensemble
Jordi Savall, director

Mass: Ecce ancilla Domini - Sanctus
Ensemble Gilles Binchois
Dominique Vellard, director

Malheureulx cueur
Blue Heron
Scott Metcalfe, director

Motet: Moribus et genere
Heulgas Ensemble
Paul Van Nevel, director

Donald Macleod explores Dufay\u2019s life as a chorister at the prestigious Cambrai cathedral.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

03The land of the lemon trees20190828

Donald Macleod tells how Guillaume Dufay enchants a noble Italian family and avoids falling foul of warring factions, with music including one of his most famous songs, Vergene Bella.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, a historical music researcher and artistic director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious figure, assess the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

Thanks, presumably, to his reputation preceding his arrival, it isn't too long before Dufay's name is linked with one of the most important noble families in Northern Italy. Then, when another of his employers, no less a personage than the Pope is forcibly expelled from Bologna, the enterprising Dufay is able to use his connections to return to the relative calm of Rome.

Adieu ces bons vins de Lannoys
The Orlando Consort

Missa Sine Nomine - Kyrie & Gloria
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Ballade: Resvelliés-vous et faites chiere lye
Diabolus in Musica
Antoine Guerber, director

Vasilissa ergo gaude
Huelgas Ensemble
Paul van Nevel, director

O Sancte Sebastiane
La Reverdie

Missa Sancti Jacobi - Sanctus, Agnus Dei
Capella Pratensis
Rebecca Stewart

Vergene Bella
The Hilliard Ensemble

La Belle se siet
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Donald Macleod charts Dufay's progress, as the young man crosses the Alps to Italy.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

03The land of the lemon trees20190828

Donald Macleod tells how Guillaume Dufay enchants a noble Italian family and avoids falling foul of warring factions, with music including one of his most famous songs, Vergene Bella.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, a historical music researcher and artistic director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious figure, assess the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

Thanks, presumably, to his reputation preceding his arrival, it isn't too long before Dufay's name is linked with one of the most important noble families in Northern Italy. Then, when another of his employers, no less a personage than the Pope is forcibly expelled from Bologna, the enterprising Dufay is able to use his connections to return to the relative calm of Rome.

Adieu ces bons vins de Lannoys
The Orlando Consort

Missa Sine Nomine - Kyrie & Gloria
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Ballade: Resvelliés-vous et faites chiere lye
Diabolus in Musica
Antoine Guerber, director

Vasilissa ergo gaude
Huelgas Ensemble
Paul van Nevel, director

O Sancte Sebastiane
La Reverdie

Missa Sancti Jacobi - Sanctus, Agnus Dei
Capella Pratensis
Rebecca Stewart

Vergene Bella
The Hilliard Ensemble

La Belle se siet
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Donald Macleod charts Dufay's progress, as the young man crosses the Alps to Italy.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

04Marking the Event20190829

Donald Macleod recounts how the Dufay finds work at the Court of Savoy, an important centre of culture, and writes some exceptional music for the coronation of Pope Eugenius IV.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, an historical music researcher and the artistic director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious figure, assess the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

From the 1430s Dufay's standing and versatility was such that he was able to supply music to one of the great European courts and turn his hand to writing music for the Pope of equal brilliance, seemingly at the drop of a hat.

Ballade: Se la face ay pale
Cut Circle
Jesse Rodin, director

Flos Florum
Ensemble Musica Nova
Lucien Kandel, director

Ecclesiae militantis
Blue Heron
Scott Metcalfe, director

Balsamus et munda cera
Huelgas Ensemble
Paul Van Nevel, director

Supremum est mortalibus bonum
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Ave Maris Stella
Ensemble Musica Nova
Lucien Kandel, director

L’alta tua bellezza
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Salve flos Tusce gentis
Ensemble Musica Nova
Lucien Kandel, director

Donald Macleod follows events in Dufay's life as his Italian sojurn takes a new twist.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

05A maker of music20190830

Donald Macleod considers why Dufay was seen as a practictioner of music, and a glimpse across the centuries into his character, through the only letter of his that survives.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, an historical music researcher and the artistic director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious figure, assess the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

In the concluding part of this week's series Donald and William look at how Dufay's view of his role changed over the years and how the world in which he lived would have understood it.

Ce moys de may
Continens Paradisi

Bon jour, bon mois
Continens Paradisi

Il sera par vous combatu
Cut Circle
Jesse Rodin, director

Missa L’homme armé - Kyrie
Oxford Camerata
Jeremy Summerly, director

S’il est Plaisir
Diabolus in Musica
Antoine Guerber, director

Je me complains
Blue Heron
Scott Metcalfe, director

Par le regard
Diabolus in musica
Antoine Guerber, director

Ave regina caelorum II
Cantica Symphonia
Kees Boeke and Giuseppe Maletto, directors

Sanctus Ave verum corpus
Blue Heron
Scott Metcalfe

Gaude virgo
Ensemble Musica Nova

Donald Macleod considers how Dufay's role as a practioner of music was regarded.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

05A Maker Of Music20190830

Donald Macleod considers why Dufay was seen as a practictioner of music, and a glimpse across the centuries into his character, through the only letter of his that survives.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, an historical music researcher and the artistic director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious figure, assess the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

In the concluding part of this week's series Donald and William look at how Dufay's view of his role changed over the years and how the world in which he lived would have understood it.

Ce moys de may
Continens Paradisi

Bon jour, bon mois
Continens Paradisi

Il sera par vous combatu
Cut Circle
Jesse Rodin, director

Missa L’homme armé - Kyrie
Oxford Camerata
Jeremy Summerly, director

S’il est Plaisir
Diabolus in Musica
Antoine Guerber, director

Je me complains
Blue Heron
Scott Metcalfe, director

Par le regard
Diabolus in musica
Antoine Guerber, director

Ave regina caelorum II
Cantica Symphonia
Kees Boeke and Giuseppe Maletto, directors

Sanctus Ave verum corpus
Blue Heron
Scott Metcalfe

Gaude virgo
Ensemble Musica Nova

Donald Macleod considers how Dufay's role as a practioner of music was regarded.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201904Marking the Event20190829

Donald Macleod recounts how the Dufay finds work at the Court of Savoy, an important centre of culture, and writes some exceptional music for the coronation of Pope Eugenius IV.

The beauty, originality and technical mastery of Guillaume Dufay’s music illustrate why the Florentine ruler Piero de’Medici gave him the epithet “the greatest ornament of our age”. Undoubtedly he is one of the 15th century’s most distinctive voices. He was in his late 70s by the time he died in 1474; a long life by medieval standards. His outstanding talent transported him from an uncertain start in life as the illegitimate son of a servant and an unknown man, to being a musician who was feted at court, and respected by the church and the papacy alike. As his fame spread across Europe, he commanded the admiration of his fellow composers, influencing not only his direct contemporaries but also the generation of composers who succeeded him, among them Johannes Ockeghem.

Donald Macleod is joined by William Lyons, an historical music researcher and the artistic director of the ensemble The Dufay Collective. Pulling together what’s known about Dufay, across the series of five programmes, they build a picture of the man behind this illustrious figure, assess the key relationships he fostered, and consider how his music flourished as he navigated the turbulent political currents of the age.

From the 1430s Dufay's standing and versatility was such that he was able to supply music to one of the great European courts and turn his hand to writing music for the Pope of equal brilliance, seemingly at the drop of a hat.

Ballade: Se la face ay pale
Cut Circle
Jesse Rodin, director

Flos Florum
Ensemble Musica Nova
Lucien Kandel, director

Ecclesiae militantis
Blue Heron
Scott Metcalfe, director

Balsamus et munda cera
Huelgas Ensemble
Paul van Nevel, director

Supremum est mortalibus bonum
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Ave Maris Stella
Ensemble Musica Nova
Lucien Kandel, director

L’alta tua bellezza
Cantica Symphonia
Giuseppe Maletto, director

Salve flos Tusce gentis
Ensemble Musica Nova
Lucien Kandel, director

Donald Macleod follows events in Dufay's life as his Italian sojurn takes a new twist.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.