Hain And Wigley [Radio Wales]

Episodes

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Broadcast
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20160803 (RW)

Welsh politicians Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley talk to former Conservative leader and ex-foreign secretary William Hague, who now sits across from them in the House of Lords.

Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley talk to former Conservative leader William Hague.

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20160810 (RW)

Welsh politicians Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley talk to former Welsh rugby player John Taylor, who stood against rugby links with South Africa.

Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley talk to former Welsh rugby player John Taylor.

0101William Hague20171119

Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley talk to former Conservative leader William Hague.

02Cerys Matthews20170803

The Peers talk music, politics, culture and Wales with Cerys Matthews.

The peers Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley begin their new series by questioning the musician and broadcaster Cerys Matthews on culture, politics and Wales.
But the former lead singer of Catatonia turns the tables on the politicians by asking them about their policies on globalisation and localism.
Wigley and Hain, former MPs, haven't always see eye to eye. But they do have things in common, and especially an interest in people and their stories.
And because they spend so much of their time in the House of Lords they were anxious not to get stuck inside the Westminster bubble. So the series covers music, acting, culture, surveillance and spying and diplomacy.
And they were delighted to welcome Cerys Matthews, the busker turned international star who was in the vanguard of the 90s Cool Cymru offensive on the British music scene.
Now through her own music, her writing and through her broadcasting on BBC World Service and 6 Music, Cerys celebrates the culture and music of all genres, all eras, and all countries.
Perhaps one of her latest ventures sums up her holistic attitude to the way cultures and genres collide. She's one of the founders of the Good Life Experience, being held again at Hawarden in Flintshire this September. It's a festival that's billed as a mix of music, food, books, ideas, workshops and the great outdoors.

02Michael Sheen20170817

The Peers discuss activism and acting with Hollywood star Michael Sheen.

Will Michael Sheen turn his back on Hollywood to concentrate of community activism in his home town of Port Talbot? This is just one of the questions posed by the Peers Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley when the award-winning actor became their third guest in this series of Hain and Wigley.
And you could forgive Lord Hain for having been a bit sheepish during the interview - because one of Sheen's biggest roles was playing Hain's old boss Tony Blair in a series of TV and cinema films.
But given that they describe Sheen as one of Wales's greatest cultural icons, Hain and Wigley were keen to invite him onto the show to discuss his work on stage and screen. But they also wanted to explore his political and social views which he has been expressing in a series of lectures and interviews. As Dafydd Wigley says: "What is remarkable about Michael Sheen is that while he has been lauded the world over, he has remained true to his roots.".

02Prof Rhodri Jeffreys-jones20170824

The Peers ask surveillance expert Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones: "Who's watching us"?

Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley have both been the subject of state surveillance - Lord Wigley's phone was tapped when MI5 hunted the holiday home arsonists in the 80s, and Lord Hain was watched by British and South African security teams. So the Peers were keen to find out more about the current state of surveillance from Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Carmarthen born and Harlech raised, who is Emeritus Professor of History at Edinburgh University. His new book We Know All About You is subtitled "The story of surveillance in Britain and America" and includes details of both state and private techniques for watching people and organisations. As Lord Wigley says in the programme: "If you thought surveillance was a weapon of the Cold War - or simply in the imagination of thriller writers - think again." Lord Hain describes being told in 2002 that MI5 had held a file on him after he had been under surveillance and told him his had never been regarded as a communist agent. Prof Jeffreys-Jones discusses how there had been a communist witch hunt in the UK in the 50s and after, but that it had been more low key than America's McCarthyism. And he describes modern surveillance as 'spying on a mass scale', with technology helping to ensure that information of many more people can be accessed and stored.

Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley have both been the subject of state surveillance - Lord Wigley's phone was tapped when MI5 hunted the holiday home arsonists in the 80s, and Lord Hain was watched by British and South African security teams.
So the Peers were keen to find out more about the current state of surveillance from Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Carmarthen-born and Harlech raised, Emeritus Professor of History at Edinburgh University.
His new book 'We Know All About You' is subtitled 'The story of surveillance in Britain and America' and includes details of both state and private techniques for watching people and organisations. As Lord Wigley says in the programme: "If you thought surveillance was a weapon of the Cold War - or simply in the imagination of thriller writers - think again." Lord Hain describes being told in 2002 that MI5 had held a file on him after he had been under surveillance and told him his had never been regarded as a communist agent. Prof Jeffreys-Jones discusses how there had been a communist witch hunt in the UK in the 1950s and after, but that it had been more low key than America's McCarthyism.
He describes modern surveillance as 'spying on a mass scale', with technology helping to ensure that information of many more people can be accessed and stored.

The Peers ask surveillance expert Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones: "Who's watching us"?

Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley have both been the subject of state surveillance - Lord Wigley's phone was tapped when MI5 hunted the holiday home arsonists in the 80s, and Lord Hain was watched by British and South African security teams.
So the Peers were keen to find out more about the current state of surveillance from Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Carmarthen-born and Harlech raised, Emeritus Professor of History at Edinburgh University.
His new book 'We Know All About You' is subtitled 'The story of surveillance in Britain and America' and includes details of both state and private techniques for watching people and organisations. As Lord Wigley says in the programme: "If you thought surveillance was a weapon of the Cold War - or simply in the imagination of thriller writers - think again." Lord Hain describes being told in 2002 that MI5 had held a file on him after he had been under surveillance and told him his had never been regarded as a communist agent. Prof Jeffreys-Jones discusses how there had been a communist witch hunt in the UK in the 1950s and after, but that it had been more low key than America's McCarthyism.
He describes modern surveillance as 'spying on a mass scale', with technology helping to ensure that information of many more people can be accessed and stored.

Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley have both been the subject of state surveillance - Lord Wigley's phone was tapped when MI5 hunted the holiday home arsonists in the 80s, and Lord Hain was watched by British and South African security teams. So the Peers were keen to find out more about the current state of surveillance from Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Carmarthen born and Harlech raised, who is Emeritus Professor of History at Edinburgh University. His new book We Know All About You is subtitled "The story of surveillance in Britain and America" and includes details of both state and private techniques for watching people and organisations. As Lord Wigley says in the programme: "If you thought surveillance was a weapon of the Cold War - or simply in the imagination of thriller writers - think again." Lord Hain describes being told in 2002 that MI5 had held a file on him after he had been under surveillance and told him his had never been regarded as a communist agent. Prof Jeffreys-Jones discusses how there had been a communist witch hunt in the UK in the 50s and after, but that it had been more low key than America's McCarthyism. And he describes modern surveillance as 'spying on a mass scale', with technology helping to ensure that information of many more people can be accessed and stored.

02Sir Emyr Jones Parry20170810

The Peers discuss Trump, Brexit and devolution with diplomat Sir Emyr Jones Parry.

Sir Emyr Jones Parry has sat at the top table at some of the great political discussions of our time - as the UK ambassador to NATO and the United Nations and at the Foreign Office.
Now he is questioned by the Peers, Peter Hain and Dafydd Wigley, as they continue their series of interviews for BBC Radio Wales.
Because as Hain and Wigley say in their introduction to the programme, we live in changing times.
With Donald Trump in the White House and the Brexit talks under way, you would be excused for thinking a new world order is emerging.
And Hain and Wigley were anxious to get the views of Sir Emyr whose perspective comes from having had front row seats at some of the major global events for more than a generation.
He was at the heart of diplomacy in Europe, at NATO and in America.
Sir Emyr was also chairman of the All Wales Convention which reviewed Wales's constitutional arrangements so he offered insights on how events beyond Wales might affect this country's future.