An Handel Enjoyed The Support Of Several Patrons During His Career, Particularly In The Early Years

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012005050920050516d this week Donald Macleod looks at the music the composer wrote in connection with these supporters.

When Handel arrived in Rome in 1707, ecclesiastics and noble families controlled the machinery of patronage, and it was in these circles that Handel would find admirers, among them, the rich and influential Cardinal Pamphili.

Dixit Dominus (extract)

Choir and Orchestra of Westminster Abbey

Simon Preston (conductor)

Il trionfo del tempo e del disinganno (extract)

Deborah YORK (soprano)

Gemma Bertagnolli (soprano)

Sara Mingardo (alto)

Nicholas Sears (tenor)

Concerto Italiano

Rinaldo Alessandrini (director)

Delirio Amoroso, Aria, Per te lasciai la luce

Magdalena Kozena (soprano)

Les Musiciens du Louvre

Marc Minkowski (conductor).

George Frideric Handel (1685 - 1759)

1/5. Handel enjoyed the support of several patrons during his career, particularly in the early years, and this week Donald Macleod looks at the music the composer wrote in connection with these supporters.

George Enescu (1881 - 1955)

1/5. Romania to Paris

Donald Macleod looks at the life and work of George Enescu, who died 50 years ago this week. A violin prodigy, Enescu's fame during his lifetime rested on his career as a virtuoso performer. But by his late teens he had already won royal patronage as a composer, in 1899 writing two works that proved a turning point in his music: a violin sonata and an impressive Octet.

Impressions d'Enfance, Vieux mendiant and Ruisselet au fond du jardin

Anne Solomon (violin)

Dominic Saunders (piano)

Second Violin Sonata, extract MVTIII

Adelina Oprean (violin)

Justin Oprean (piano)

Octet, orchestral version

Kremerata Baltica

Gidon Kremer (director)