Happily Ever After

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Anthony Horowitz2012020620130624

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the first programme, writer Anthony Horowitz discusses Roald Dahl's badly-parented Matilda, and considers how normal dysfunctional family life probably is. However, despite this, he argues that it is essential for all of us to have some sense of family. He reflects on how his own place in his rather eccentric and sometimes unhappy family led to his escape into books, and his creative success.

First broadcast in February 2012.

Anthony Horowitz explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the first programme, writer Anthony Horowitz discusses Roald Dahl's badly-parented Matilda, and considers how normal dysfunctional family life probably is. However, despite this, he argues that it is essential for all of us to have some sense of family. He reflects on how his own place in his rather eccentric and sometimes unhappy family led to his escape into books, and his creative success.

First broadcast in February 2012.

Anthony Horowitz explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the first programme, writer Anthony Horowitz discusses Roald Dahl's badly-parented Matilda, and considers how normal dysfunctional family life probably is. However, despite this, he argues that it is essential for all of us to have some sense of family. He reflects on how his own place in his rather eccentric and sometimes unhappy family led to his escape into books, and his creative success.

First broadcast in February 2012.

Anthony Horowitz explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the first programme, writer Anthony Horowitz discusses Roald Dahl's badly-parented Matilda, and considers how normal dysfunctional family life probably is. However, despite this, he argues that it is essential for all of us to have some sense of family. He reflects on how his own place in his rather eccentric and sometimes unhappy family led to his escape into books, and his creative success.

First broadcast in February 2012.

Anthony Horowitz explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the first programme, writer Anthony Horowitz discusses Roald Dahl's badly-parented Matilda, and considers how normal dysfunctional family life probably is. However, despite this, he argues that it is essential for all of us to have some sense of family. He reflects on how his own place in his rather eccentric and sometimes unhappy family led to his escape into books, and his creative success.

First broadcast in February 2012.

Anthony Horowitz explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

explores family dysfunction through Roald Dahl's Matilda.

02Anne Fine2012020720130625

Anne Fine gives a feminist view of the nostalgia for our favourite childhood books.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger Who Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger That Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

gives a feminist view of the nostalgia for our favourite childhood books.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger Who Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger That Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger Who Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

First broadcast in February 2012.

Anne Fine gives a feminist view of the nostalgia for our favourite childhood books.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger That Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger Who Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

First broadcast in February 2012.

Anne Fine gives a feminist view of the nostalgia for our favourite childhood books.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger That Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

gives a feminist view of the nostalgia for our favourite childhood books.

gives a feminist view of the nostalgia for our favourite childhood books.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger Who Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In the second programme of the series, writer Anne Fine examines family life in Judith Kerr's classic The Tiger That Came to Tea from a feminist perspective. She argues that our nostalgia for the books from our childhood mean that today's children are continually presented with outdated stereotypes of gender roles which no longer reflect today's society - a fact which, she believes, children find it hard to discern themselves.

03Trish Cooke2012020820130626

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature. They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the third programme of the series, children's author Trish Cooke examines the relevance of ""self identification"" in the books she read as a child and children's books today. With Dominican parents and nine siblings from both the West Indies and the UK, British born Trish asks how the Ladybird reading series Peter and Jane - about white, middle class families - impacted on how she saw herself as a black child growing up on a Bradford council estate in the 1960s. Trish compares the families in her first reading books with the families in her own books and asks how important is it for a child to see their culture reflected in the books they read.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In the third programme of the series, children's author Trish Cooke examines the relevance of "self identification" in the books she read as a child and children's books today. With Dominican parents and nine siblings from both the West Indies and the UK, British born Trish asks how the Ladybird reading series Peter and Jane - about white, middle class families - impacted on how she saw herself as a black child growing up on a Bradford council estate in the 1960s. Trish compares the families in her first reading books with the families in her own books and asks how important is it for a child to see their culture reflected in the books they read.

Trish Cooke explores the importance of children's books reflecting different cultures.

04Julia Eccleshare2012020920130627

discusses Jacqueline Wilson's thoroughly modern fairytales.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature. They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the fourth programme of the series, writer, broadcaster and lecturer Julia Eccleshare looks at Jacqueline Wilson's The Illustrated Mum.

Although Wilson was appointed Children's Laureate in 2005 in recognition of her work, for the first twenty years of her career her books were treated with caution by many parents who dismissed them as social realism and unsuitable for children. Julia explores the possibility that, instead of breaking the rules of ""happily ever after"", Jacqueline Wilson is actually telling thoroughly modern fairy stories which reflect the social/economic upheavals of today, in the same way that our original fairy stories reflected the problems of their times.

Julia goes on to examine our continuing need for such fairy tales, which help to teach children not to be frightened by the world.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In this series of 5 essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature. They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

Although Wilson was appointed Children's Laureate in 2005 in recognition of her work, for the first twenty years of her career her books were treated with caution by many parents who dismissed them as social realism and unsuitable for children. Julia explores the possibility that, instead of breaking the rules of "happily ever after", Jacqueline Wilson is actually telling thoroughly modern fairy stories which reflect the social/economic upheavals of today, in the same way that our original fairy stories reflected the problems of their times.

Julia Eccleshare discusses Jacqueline Wilson's thoroughly modern fairytales.

04Julia Eccleshare2012020920130627

Julia Eccleshare discusses Jacqueline Wilson's thoroughly modern fairytales.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature. They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the fourth programme of the series, writer, broadcaster and lecturer Julia Eccleshare looks at Jacqueline Wilson's The Illustrated Mum.

Although Wilson was appointed Children's Laureate in 2005 in recognition of her work, for the first twenty years of her career her books were treated with caution by many parents who dismissed them as social realism and unsuitable for children. Julia explores the possibility that, instead of breaking the rules of ""happily ever after"", Jacqueline Wilson is actually telling thoroughly modern fairy stories which reflect the social/economic upheavals of today, in the same way that our original fairy stories reflected the problems of their times.

Julia goes on to examine our continuing need for such fairy tales, which help to teach children not to be frightened by the world.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In this series of 5 essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature. They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

Although Wilson was appointed Children's Laureate in 2005 in recognition of her work, for the first twenty years of her career her books were treated with caution by many parents who dismissed them as social realism and unsuitable for children. Julia explores the possibility that, instead of breaking the rules of "happily ever after", Jacqueline Wilson is actually telling thoroughly modern fairy stories which reflect the social/economic upheavals of today, in the same way that our original fairy stories reflected the problems of their times.

05 LASTMichael Rosen2012021020130628

considers the changing role of the family in children's literature.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the fifth programme of the series, writer and broadcaster Michael Rosen explores the part that children's literature plays in the ongoing conversation we have about parenting and childcare. Looking at The History of the Fairchild Family by Mrs Sherwood, Michael considers that this story, popular in the early nineteenth century, was renowned at the time for its realistic portrayal of childhood but is now viewed as an example of an out-dated didactic style of parenting. He goes on to explore how the portrayal of the fictional parent has so altered that children's books are increasingly full of moments where the balance of power has shifted in the child's favour. A fact which, he believes, illustrates how differently modern society now sees the parental role.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In this series of 5 essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

05 LASTMichael Rosen2012021020130628

considers the changing role of the family in children's literature.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the fifth programme of the series, writer and broadcaster Michael Rosen explores the part that children's literature plays in the ongoing conversation we have about parenting and childcare. Looking at The History of the Fairchild Family by Mrs Sherwood, Michael considers that this story, popular in the early nineteenth century, was renowned at the time for its realistic portrayal of childhood but is now viewed as an example of an out-dated didactic style of parenting. He goes on to explore how the portrayal of the fictional parent has so altered that children's books are increasingly full of moments where the balance of power has shifted in the child's favour. A fact which, he believes, illustrates how differently modern society now sees the parental role.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In this series of 5 essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

Michael Rosen considers the changing role of the family in children's literature.

Michael Rosen considers the changing role of the family in children's literature.

In this series of five essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.

They use it as a focal point to explore the changing portrayal of the family in children's books, and consider both what it tells us about the society it reflects, and how relevant it is to determining a young generation's attitudes to the future.

In the fifth programme of the series, writer and broadcaster Michael Rosen explores the part that children's literature plays in the ongoing conversation we have about parenting and childcare. Looking at The History of the Fairchild Family by Mrs Sherwood, Michael considers that this story, popular in the early nineteenth century, was renowned at the time for its realistic portrayal of childhood but is now viewed as an example of an out-dated didactic style of parenting. He goes on to explore how the portrayal of the fictional parent has so altered that children's books are increasingly full of moments where the balance of power has shifted in the child's favour. A fact which, he believes, illustrates how differently modern society now sees the parental role.

First broadcast in February 2012.

In this series of 5 essays, contemporary children's authors and editors each look at a fictional family from children's literature.