Heart And Soul Gathering [Heart And Soul] [World Service]

Episodes

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Buddhism In Cambodia2019113020191201 (WS)Cambodia has been a Buddhist country since the 13th century, apart from a period under the Khmer Rouge. 95% of the population identify as Buddhist. For the BBC World Service, journalist and blogger, Kounila Keo, brings together young people in Phnom Penh, to hear what they think of the way Buddhism is developing in Southeast Asia and what kind of Buddhism they want in their country. We have a panel of young Buddhists, together with a live audience, at Factory in Phnom Penh, to discuss issues such as violence, identity, healing, the position of women and gender.

How much do young people see other countries such as Japan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Thailand, as exemplar of a Buddhist way of life? How much should monks be engaging with the outside world? To what extent should modern monks stay in the pagodas, purifying the religion and protecting Buddhism for future generations? In what way can Buddhist principles help the development of Cambodia both economically and socially?

Our panel and audience explore questions such as these and ask how Buddhism can be relevant in the lives of young people today. How do world events affect both their Buddhist and Cambodian identity?

Producer: Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

(Photo: A Cambodian woman prays before statues of Buddha at a pagoda in Phnom Penh. Credit: Getty Images/ TANG CHHIN SOTHY)

How is Buddhism developing in Cambodia?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Cambodia has been a Buddhist country since the 13th Century, apart from a period under the Khmer Rouge. Ninety-five per cent of the population identify as Buddhist. Journalist and blogger, Kounila Keo, brings together young people in Phnom Penh, to hear what they think of the way Buddhism is developing in South East Asia and what kind of Buddhism they want in their country. We have a panel of young Buddhists, together with a live audience, at Factory in Phnom Penh, to discuss issues such as violence, identity, healing, the position of women and gender.

How much do young people see other countries such as Japan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Thailand, as exemplar of a Buddhist way of life? How much should monks be engaging with the outside world? To what extent should modern monks stay in the pagodas, purifying the religion and protecting Buddhism for future generations? In what way can Buddhist principles help the development of Cambodia both economically and socially?

Our panel and audience explore questions such as these and ask how Buddhism can be relevant in the lives of young people today. How do world events affect both their Buddhist and Cambodian identity?

Producer: Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

(Photo: A Cambodian woman prays before statues of Buddha at a pagoda in Phnom Penh. Credit: Tang Chhin Sothy/Getty Images)

How is Buddhism developing in Cambodia?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Cambodia has been a Buddhist country since the 13th Century, apart from a period under the Khmer Rouge. Ninety-five per cent of the population identify as Buddhist. Journalist and blogger, Kounila Keo, brings together young people in Phnom Penh, to hear what they think of the way Buddhism is developing in South East Asia and what kind of Buddhism they want in their country. We have a panel of young Buddhists, together with a live audience, at Factory in Phnom Penh, to discuss issues such as violence, identity, healing, the position of women and gender.

How much do young people see other countries such as Japan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Thailand, as exemplar of a Buddhist way of life? How much should monks be engaging with the outside world? To what extent should modern monks stay in the pagodas, purifying the religion and protecting Buddhism for future generations? In what way can Buddhist principles help the development of Cambodia both economically and socially?

Our panel and audience explore questions such as these and ask how Buddhism can be relevant in the lives of young people today. How do world events affect both their Buddhist and Cambodian identity?

Producer: Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

(Photo: A Cambodian woman prays before statues of Buddha at a pagoda in Phnom Penh. Credit: Tang Chhin Sothy/Getty Images)

How is Buddhism developing in Cambodia?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Heart And Soul Gathering: Birmingham, Alabama2018091520180916 (WS)Fifty years after the death of Rev Dr Martin Luther King, and in the era of campaigns such as Black Lives Matter, how are black churches relevant in the fight for social justice today?

Two-time Emmy Award winning presenter Sherri Jackson asks a local audience and a panel of speakers about the role of Christianity in America's new civil rights movements.

Sherri is joined by the next generation of activists and by those who were part of the original civil rights movement at 16th Street Baptist Church, an iconic city location which survived a 1963 bombing by members of the Ku Klux Klan and the murder of four young girls.
Taking part in the discussion is the Rev Dr Bernard Lafayette, a civil rights activist and authority on non-violent social change, who was with Dr King on the day he was assassinated; Tef Poe, rapper and activist; Rev Eva Melton, activist, minister, and community organiser; Rev Arthur Price, the pastor of 16th Street Baptist Church; Laveeda Morgan Battle, lawyer, and member of St Paul United Methodist church; student and young activist Justin Smith.

Producer: Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Photo: L-R Rev Eva Melton, Tef Poe, Rev Dr Bernard Lafayette, Sherri Jackson, Justin Smith, Laveeda Morgan Battle, Rev Arthur Price. Credit: BBC

What role do black churches have in the fight for social justice today?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Religion and climate change in Nairobi20190706

For the BBC World Service, Nairobi based journalist and broadcaster Ciru Muriuki brings together young people of different faiths, together with a live audience, at the National Museum in Nairobi, Kenya, to hear what people want from their religious leaders and hear how faith motivates their activism.

We’ll hear from young people in Kenya who are putting themselves on the front lines of the battle to save the planet. Some are helping farmers and communities find sustainable ways to earn income; others are picking plastic out of the sea and marching to get attention from those in power. Some say their faith compels them to protect wildlife and care for all living beings; others say energies would be better put into forcing high polluting countries to change their ways while in Kenya the focus should be on development, education and relieving poverty.
In a continent that is experiencing the effects of climate change disproportionately compared to many parts of the world, how should religious leaders of every faith be mobilizing their communities?

Producer: Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Photo: Hundreds of people with placards take part in demonstration in Nairobi calling for climate change justice for Africa.
Credit: SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images

How can religion help in the fight against climate change and protect the environment?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Religion and climate change in Nairobi2019070620190707 (WS)

For the BBC World Service, Nairobi based journalist and broadcaster Ciru Muriuki brings together young people of different faiths, together with a live audience, at the National Museum in Nairobi, Kenya, to hear what people want from their religious leaders and hear how faith motivates their activism.

We’ll hear from young people in Kenya who are putting themselves on the front lines of the battle to save the planet. Some are helping farmers and communities find sustainable ways to earn income; others are picking plastic out of the sea and marching to get attention from those in power. Some say their faith compels them to protect wildlife and care for all living beings; others say energies would be better put into forcing high polluting countries to change their ways while in Kenya the focus should be on development, education and relieving poverty.
In a continent that is experiencing the effects of climate change disproportionately compared to many parts of the world, how should religious leaders of every faith be mobilizing their communities?

Producer: Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Photo: Hundreds of people with placards take part in demonstration in Nairobi calling for climate change justice for Africa.
Credit: SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images

How can religion help in the fight against climate change and protect the environment?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Religion And Climate Change In Nairobi2019070620190707 (WS)For the BBC World Service, Nairobi based journalist and broadcaster Ciru Muriuki brings together young people of different faiths, together with a live audience, at the National Museum in Nairobi, Kenya, to hear what people want from their religious leaders and hear how faith motivates their activism.

We’ll hear from young people in Kenya who are putting themselves on the front lines of the battle to save the planet. Some are helping farmers and communities find sustainable ways to earn income; others are picking plastic out of the sea and marching to get attention from those in power. Some say their faith compels them to protect wildlife and care for all living beings; others say energies would be better put into forcing high polluting countries to change their ways while in Kenya the focus should be on development, education and relieving poverty.
In a continent that is experiencing the effects of climate change disproportionately compared to many parts of the world, how should religious leaders of every faith be mobilizing their communities?

Producer: Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Photo: Hundreds of people with placards take part in demonstration in Nairobi calling for climate change justice for Africa.
Credit: SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images

How can religion help in the fight against climate change and protect the environment?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Photo: Hundreds of people with placards take part in demonstration in Nairobi calling for climate change justice for Africa.
Credit: SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Young Catholics2018111020181111 (WS)The BBC’s Nuala McGovern is with an audience and panel of speakers to ask what the next generation of Catholics want from their Church.

We are at the Teatro Flaiano in Rome, for Heart and Soul Gathering, as Bishops from all over the world gather with the Pope at the Vatican for a special meeting, or Synod, on Catholicism and the young.

In March, over three hundred people aged between 16-29, plus fifteen thousand more on social media, came together in Rome, to say what is important to them and their faith. Heart and Soul Gathering continues that conversation and adds to the voices being heard now at the Synod.

We bring together Catholics from across the globe, from countries such as Nigeria, Brazil and Samoa, to discuss their views on issues such as sexuality, leadership in the Church, and the role of women. How should the church engage with its young people? What are the priorities for young Catholics?

This special Heart and Soul Gathering from the BBC World Service is the second programme in a series of faith-based community discussions.

Produced by Louise Clarke-Rowbotham for the BBC World Service.

Nuala McGovern is in Rome to hear what young Catholics want from their Church

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

The BBC’s Nuala McGovern is with an audience and panel of speakers to ask what the next generation of Catholics want from their Church.

We are at the Teatro Flaiano in Rome, for Heart and Soul Gathering, as Bishops from all over the world gather with the Pope at the Vatican for a special meeting, or Synod, on Catholicism and the young.

In March, over three hundred people aged between 16-29, plus fifteen thousand more on social media, came together in Rome, to say what is important to them and their faith. Heart and Soul Gathering continues that conversation and adds to the voices being heard now at the Synod.

We bring together Catholics from across the globe, from countries such as Nigeria, Brazil and Samoa, to discuss their views on issues such as sexuality, leadership in the Church, and the role of women. How should the church engage with its young people? What are the priorities for young Catholics?

This special Heart and Soul Gathering from the BBC World Service is the second programme in a series of faith-based community discussions.

Produced by Louise Clarke-Rowbotham for the BBC World Service.

Nuala McGovern is in Rome to hear what young Catholics want from their Church

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Young Muslims in France20190330

The BBC World Service is in the city to hear youthful voices with a variety of views on their faith.

Islam is the second largest religion in France. In a nation that separates state and religion what does a French Muslim identity look like? In this unique and timely programme, Heart and Soul Gathering on the BBC World Service, hears from a group of young Muslims with a variety of different faith perspectives and backgrounds. Together with a studio audience, they discuss personal faith and experience.

Presented by Somaya Nasr and Produced by Louise Clarke-Rowbotham for the BBC World Service.

Image: A young woman takes a photograph with a smartphone outside The Grande Mosque in Paris. Credit: Getty/ZAKARIA ABDELKAFI / Contributor

Young people in Paris discuss what it\u2019s like to be young, French and Muslim

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Young Muslims in France2019033020190331 (WS)

The BBC World Service is in the city to hear youthful voices with a variety of views on their faith.

Islam is the second largest religion in France. In a nation that separates state and religion what does a French Muslim identity look like? In this unique and timely programme, Heart and Soul Gathering on the BBC World Service, hears from a group of young Muslims with a variety of different faith perspectives and backgrounds. Together with a studio audience, they discuss personal faith and experience.

Presented by Somaya Nasr and Produced by Louise Clarke-Rowbotham for the BBC World Service.

Image: A young woman takes a photograph with a smartphone outside The Grande Mosque in Paris. Credit: Getty/ZAKARIA ABDELKAFI / Contributor

Young people in Paris discuss what it\u2019s like to be young, French and Muslim

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

03Marriage In Israel2019011220190113 (WS)Many young Jewish people living in Israel feel religion has too big an influence over their private lives. Numerous aspects of life are governed by a council made up of orthodox rabbis called the Rabbinate. They decide who is and isn't Jewish and by extension who can and can't marry.

Supporters of the organisation say this helps preserve Jewish identity. Critics say it means thousands of people who are not deemed 'Jewish enough' can't marry each other, forcing couples to leave the country to have a ceremony that will be recognised by the authorities when they return home.

The religious monopoly on marriage also means Jews cannot marry non-Jews and as the council of orthodox rabbis rule on divorce for every married couple in Israel, many say this disadvantages women.

Tim Franks is with a live audience and a panel of guests to discuss whether the Rabbinate should be stripped of its monopoly, or whether the current rules protect the identity and values of the Jewish faith.

This special Heart and Soul Gathering from the BBC World Service is the third programme in a series of faith-based community discussions.

Produced by Louise Clarke-Rowbotham.

Photo credit: Jewish Wedding Ring - Godong/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Why is religious marriage the only option in Israel?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

04Heart And Soul Gathering: Young Muslims In France2019033020190331 (WS)The BBC World Service is in the city to hear youthful voices with a variety of views on their faith.

Islam is the second largest religion in France. In a nation that separates state and religion what does a French Muslim identity look like? In this unique and timely programme, Heart and Soul Gathering on the BBC World Service, hears from a group of young Muslims with a variety of different faith perspectives and backgrounds. Together with a studio audience, they discuss personal faith and experience.

Presented by Somaya Nasr and Produced by Louise Clarke-Rowbotham for the BBC World Service.

Image: A young woman takes a photograph with a smartphone outside The Grande Mosque in Paris. Credit: Getty/ZAKARIA ABDELKAFI / Contributor

Young people in Paris discuss what it's like to be young, French and Muslim

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.