Heinrich Schutz (1585-1672)

Episodes

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Sch\u00fctz By Himself20181224

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of German early Baroque master Heinrich Schütz. Today he dips a toe into the fertile archival territory of Schütz’s own writings.

Unlike many composers from the earlier end of music history, Heinrich Schütz left plenty of documentary traces – letters, petitions, memoranda, appraisals, prefaces, poetry and, in tune with the patronage culture of the times, his fair share of fawning dedications. It’s a body of writings that opens fascinating windows onto the composer’s life and times – and provides plentiful cues for music from one of greatest composers of his age.

Cantate Domino canticum novum, SWV 281 (Cantiones sacrae, Op 4)
Capella Augustana
Matteo Messori, director

O quam tu pulchra es, SWV 265 (Symphoniae Sacrae I)
Tobias Mäthger, Georg Poplutz, tenor
Margret Baumgartl, Karina Müller, violin
Andreas Arend, theorbo
Matthias Müller, violone
Ludger Rémy, organ
Hans-Christoph Rademann, conductor

Wie sehr lieblich und schöne sind doch die Wohnung dein, SWV 181 (Becker-Psalter, Op 5)
Magdalena Kircheis, soprano
Aneta Petrasová, alto
Tobias Mäthger, tenor
Martin Schicketanz, bass
Dresden Chamber Choir
Margret Baumgartl, violin
Matthias Müller, violone
Stefan Maass, theorbo
Michaela Hasselt, organ
Hans-Christoph Rademann, director

Habe deine Lust an dem Herren, SWV 311 (Kleine geistliche Concerte II, Op 9)
Gerlinde Sämann, Isabel Schicketanz, soprano
Stefan Maass, Theorbo
Matthias Müller, viola da gamba
Ludger Rémy, organ and director

Concert in Form einer teutschen Begräbnis-Missa, SWV 279 (Musikalische Exequien)
Mary Seers, Rachel Platt, soprano
Ashley Stafford, countertenor
Frieder Lang, Nicolas Robertson, tenor
Stephen Charlesworth, bass
Lawrence Wallington, bass
The Monteverdi Choir
Alastair Ross, organ
The English Baroque Soloists
John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

Gedenke deinem Knechte an dein Wort, SWV 485 (Psalm 119)
Collegium Vocale Gent
Concerto Palatino
Philippe Herreweghe, conductor

Produced by Chris Barstow for BBC Wales

Dipping a toe into the fertile archival territory of Heinrich Schutz's writings.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

The Long Goodbye20181228

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of German early Baroque master Heinrich Schütz. Today, Schütz attempts to retire – and eventually bids farewell with his Schwanengesang.

Heinrich Schütz lived to be 87 – a pretty creditable age even now, but in the 17th century, extraordinary. As he approached his 60th birthday, his thoughts turned to retirement – and pension arrangements. Unfortunately for Schütz, his then employer, Johann Georg I of Saxony, had different ideas – ideas that involved his celebrated kapellmeister continuing to work in much the same way as before, for an unspecified period of time. In the event, it took a change of leadership to bring about the result Schütz so desired; the old Elector died, and in 1657, with Schütz now a grand old 72, the new Elector, Johann Georg II, assented to new arrangements, involving a pension, permission to leave Dresden, and lighter duties. Schütz, though, didn’t rest on his laurels, and some of his greatest music dates from his last years – including his sparse and powerful setting of the Matthew Passion, and his musical last will and testament, a collection of works he himself titled ‘Swansong’.

Auf dem Gebirge, SWV 396 (Geistliche Chormusik)
David Erler, Alexander Schneider, countertenor
Cappella Sagitariana
Hans-Christoph Rademann, conductor

Feget den alten Sauerteig aus, SWV 404; Saul, Saul, was verfolgst du mich?, SWV 415; Komm, heiliger Geist, SWV 417 (Symphoniae Sacrae III)
Dresdner Barockorchester
Hans-Christoph Rademann, director

Ich danke dem Herrn von ganzem Herzen, SWV 424 (12 Geistliche Gesange, Op 13)
Dresden Chamber Choir
Hans-Christoph Rademann, conductor

Jauchzet dem Herren, alle Welt (Psalm 100), SWV 493
Collegium Vocale Gent
Concerto Palatino
Philippe Herreweghe, conductor

St Matthew Passion, SWV 479 (Und Siehe Da, Der Vorhang Im Tempel Zerreib In Zwei Stück)
Paul Elliott, tenor (Evangelist)
Rogers Covey-Crump, tenor (Pilate)
The Hilliard Ensemble

Mein Seele erhebt den Herren, SWV 494 (‘German Magnificat’)
Collegium Vocale Gent
Concerto Palatino
Philippe Herreweghe, conductor

Produced by Chris Barstow for BBC Wales

Heinrich Schutz attempts to retire \u2013 and eventually bids farewell with his Schwanengesang

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

The Story Of Christmas20181225

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of German early Baroque master Heinrich Schütz. Today we’re off to the Striezelmarkt for a Christmas pastry and a glass of Glühwein.

Christmas in 17th-century Dresden was not for the faint-hearted. Proceedings started at 3am with a signal call from the town watchman, followed by rounds of canon-fire, peals of bells, singing, shawm-playing, more bells, then a military parade – all leading up to the first church service of the day, at 7.30am, with its obligatory hour-long sermon. Schütz’s music must have been a consolation, at least to those who were fortunate enough to do their worshipping at the court chapel. His yuletide masterpiece is The Christmas Story – today’s programme includes a complete performance.

Hodie Christus natus est, SWV 456
Claire Lefilliâtre, Julie Vallée-Gendre, soprano
Renau Tripathi, haut-contre
Hans-Jörg Mammel, tenor
Thomas van Essen, baritone
Etienne Debaisieux, bass
Chamber Choir of Namur
La Fenice
Jean Tubéry, conductor

Warum toben die Heiden, SWV 23 (Psalmen Davids, Op 2)
Cantus Cölln
Concerto Palatino
Konrad Junghänel, director

Ein Kind ist uns geboren, SWV 302 (Kleine geistliche Concerte I)
Dorothee Mields, soprano
David Erler, alto
Georg Poplutz, tenor
Andreas Wolf, bass
Stefan Maass, Theorbo
Matthias Müller, viola da gamba
Ludger Rémy, organ and director

Verbum caro factum est, SWV 314 (Kleine geistliche Concerte II)
Gerlinde Sämann, Isabel Schicketanz, soprano
Stefan Maass, Theorbo
Matthias Müller, viola da gamba
Ludger Rémy, organ and director

Historia, der freuden- und gnadenreichen Geburth Gottes und Marien Sohnes,
Jesu Christi (The Christmas Story), SWV 435
Else Torp, soprano
Adam Riis, Johan Linderoth, tenor
Jakob Bloch Jespersen, bass
Ars Nova Copenhagen
Concerto Copenhagen
Sirius Viols
Paul Hillier, direction

Produced by Chris Barstow for BBC Wales

Celebrating Yuletide, Heinrich Schutz-style

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Venetian Adventures20181226

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of German early-Baroque master Heinrich Schütz. Today we’re in Venice, where Schütz studies with Gabrieli and hobnobs with Monteverdi.

Landgrave Moritz of Hesse-Kassel did the world a great favour when he suggested to his 25-year-old second court organist Heinrich Schütz that he should head south to Venice and learn at the feet of the Italian master of sound in space, Giovanni Gabrieli – a period of study that left an indelible imprint on the German composer’s musical style. Schütz’s first Venetian sojourn, which began in 1609, was well-timed – Gabrieli was in poor health and had only three years to live. Two decades later, Schütz returned to a Venice where Monteverdi was now the musical kingpin, and found that things had changed a good deal since his previous visit. Once again, Schütz eagerly absorbed his new discoveries into his own musical language, with splendid results – among them his first set of Symphoniae Sacrae, published in Venice in 1629.

Jubilate Deo in chordis et organo, SWV 276 (Symphoniae Sacrae I, Op 6)
Tobias Mäthger, Georg Poplutz, tenor
Felix Schwandtke, bass
Friederike Otto, Anna Schall, cornetti
Clemens Schlemmer, dulcian
Andreas Arend, theorbo
Matthias Müller, violone
Ludger Rémy, organ
Hans-Christoph Rademann, conductor

Ride la primavera, SWV 7; Di marmo siete voi, SWV 17; Vasto mar, nel cui seno, SWV 19 (Italian Madrigals, Op 1)
Sette Voci
Armin Bereuter, violone
Julian Behr, chitarrone
Lorenzo Feder, harpsichord (organ)
Peter Kooij, director

Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren, SWV 41; Wie lieblich sind deine Wohnungen, SWV 29; Ich danke dem Herrn von ganzem Herzen, SWV 34 (Psalmen Davids, Op 2)
Cantus Cölln
Concerto Palatino
Konrad Junghänel, director

Fili mi, Absalon, SWV 269 (Symphoniae Sacrae I, Op 6)
Felix Schwandtke, bass
Sebastian Krause, Julian Nagel, Masafumi Sakamoto, Fernando Günther, trombone
Andreas Arend, theorbo
Matthias Müller, violone
Ludger Rémy, organ

In te, Domine, speravi, SWV 259
David Erler, countertenor
Margret Baumgartl, violin
Clemens Schlemmer, dulcian
Andreas Arend, theorbo
Ludger Rémy, organ

Hans-Christoph Rademann, conductor

Es steh Gott auf, SWV 356, (Symphoniae sacrae II, Op 10)
Capella Augustana
Matteo Messori, director

Produced by Chris Barstow for BBC Wales

We are in Venice, where Heinrich Schutz studies with Gabrieli and hobnobs with Monteverdi.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

War20181227

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of German early Baroque master Heinrich Schütz. Today things turn serious, as Schütz is swept up in the convulsions of the 30 Years’ War.

‘War, what is it good for? Absolutely nothin!’ – a sentiment that anyone living in the German states during the 30-year period from 1618 to 1648 would have had no trouble relating to. What began as a little local difficulty at Hradčany Castle in Prague – when Protestant rebels turfed the proposed new Catholic governors of Bohemia out of a third-storey window – gradually escalated into a politically driven, pan-European bloodbath in which, according to some estimates, the German states as a whole lost up to 30 percent of their population. All of this, of course, impacted hugely on musical life – court musical establishments were slimmed down; musicians were laid off, or went unpaid. You can hear the effect in Schütz’s music. His Kleine geistliche Konzerte, from the late 1630s, have an economy of means that may have been necessitated by the austerity of the time but in Schütz’s hands actually serve to intensify the music’s emotional impact.

‘O, Herr, hilf’, SWV 402 (Symphoniae Sacrae III)
Ulrike Hofbauer, Isabel Jantschek, soprano
Georg Poplutz, tenor
Dresdner Barockorchester
Hans-Christoph Rademann, director

Syncharma musicum, SWV 49
Maria Skiba, Heidi Maria Taubert, Dorothea Wagner, soprano
Tobias Hunger, Stephan Gähler, tenor
Cappella Sagittariana Dresden
Norbert Schuster, conductor

Da pacem, Domine’, SWV 465
Cantus Cölln
Musica Fiata
Konrad Junghänel, director

Veni, Sancte Spiritus, SWV 328
Isabel Schicketanz, Gerlinde Sämann, soprano
Georg Poplutz, Tobias Mäthger, tenor
Matthias Müller, viola da gamba
Ludger Rémy, organ and director

O süsser, o freundlicher Herr Jesu Christ, SWV 285
Georg Poplutz, tenor
Ludger Rémy, organ and director

Erhöre mich, wenn ich dich rufe, SWV 289
Dorothee Mields, soprano
Ulrike Hofbauer, soprano
Stefan Maass, theorbo
Matthias Müller, viola da gamba
Ludger Rémy, organ and director

Ist Gott für uns, SWV 329
Gerlinde Sämann, soprano
David Erler, alto
Georg Poplutz, tenor
Tobias Berndt, bass
Stefan Maass, theorbo
Matthias Müller, viola da gamba
Ludger Rémy, organ and director

Ich bin eine rufende Stimme, SWV 383; Verleih uns Frieden genädiglich, SWV 372; Das Wort ward Fleisch, SWV 385; Das ist je gewisslich wah, SWV 388 (Geistliche Chor-Music)
Bach Collegium Japan
Masaaki Suzuki, conductor

Danket dem Herren, denn er ist freundlich, SWV 45 (Psalmen Davids, Op 2)
Cantus Cölln
Concerto Palatino
Konrad Junghänel, director

Produced by Chris Barstow for BBC Wales

Heinrich Schutz is swept up in the convulsions of the Thirty Years' War

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.