His Name Was Henry [Radio Scotland]

Episodes

First
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20161213

2016121320171226 (RS)

Denise Mina explores the life of pensioner Henry Summers, who died alone and unnoticed.

When Denise Mina first heard the story of Henry Summers, who was found dead in his Edinburgh flat in 2015 having lain undiscovered for three years, she wanted to know more about who he was and what kind of life he had.

This proves to be quite a challenge as Henry had no known friends or relatives. Journalist John Connell, who reported the story for the Edinburgh Evening News and spoke to Henry's closest neighbour, provides some clues. Henry wore a flat cap and blue jacket, bought a paper and milk at local shops and took the number 35 bus most days. Yet when Denise visits local shops, pubs and cafes to ask after Henry, no-one seems to remember him.

So Denise pursues a different route, looking up official records at ScotlandsPeople with genealogist Dr Bruce Durie, which can tell us where Henry was born, who his parents were, and if he had any brothers, sisters or extended family.

Denise hears Rev Martin Fair describe how he prepares and delivers public health funerals, giving dignity in death to those we know very little about. Andrew Brown of the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer tells Denise what happens to someone's estate when no will or next of kin can be found and Anne Munro of the Pilmeny Development Project explains how big a problem social isolation is amongst elderly residents in Leith.

Henry's death certificate revealed that he was a retired ship's carpenter, so Denise heads to Leith docks to meet maritime historian Dr Eric Graham, who thinks it's possible Henry may have travelled the world with his trade.

And there's a final clue from a BBC Radio Scotland listener who thinks they know where Henry went on the 35 bus every day.

Denise concludes that though Henry lived in solitude he may well have had a full and happy life.

20161213

Denise Mina explores the life of pensioner Henry Summers, who was found dead in his Edinburgh flat in June 2015, having lain undiscovered for three years.

2016121320161218 (RS)

When Denise Mina first heard the story of Henry Summers, who was found dead in his Edinburgh flat in 2015 having lain undiscovered for three years, she wanted to know more about who he was and what kind of life he had.

This proves to be quite a challenge as Henry had no known friends or relatives. Journalist John Connell, who reported the story for the Edinburgh Evening News and spoke to Henry's closest neighbour, provides some clues. Henry wore a flat cap and blue jacket, bought a paper and milk at local shops and took the number 35 bus most days. Yet when Denise visits local shops, pubs and cafes to ask after Henry, no-one seems to remember him.

So Denise pursues a different route, looking up official records at ScotlandsPeople with genealogist Dr Bruce Durie, which can tell us where Henry was born, who his parents were, and if he had any brothers, sisters or extended family.

Denise hears Rev Martin Fair describe how he prepares and delivers public health funerals, giving dignity in death to those we know very little about. Andrew Brown of the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer tells Denise what happens to someone's estate when no will or next of kin can be found and Anne Munro of the Pilmeny Development Project explains how big a problem social isolation is amongst elderly residents in Leith.

Henry's death certificate revealed that he was a retired ship's carpenter, so Denise heads to Leith docks to meet maritime historian Dr Eric Graham, who thinks it's possible Henry may have travelled the world with his trade.

And there's a final clue from a BBC Radio Scotland listener who thinks they know where Henry went on the 35 bus every day.

Denise concludes that though Henry lived in solitude he may well have had a full and happy life.

2016121320161218 (RS)
20170412 (RS)
20170416 (RS)

When Denise Mina first heard the story of Henry Summers, who was found dead in his Edinburgh flat in 2015 having lain undiscovered for three years, she wanted to know more about who he was and what kind of life he had.

This proves to be quite a challenge as Henry had no known friends or relatives. Journalist John Connell, who reported the story for the Edinburgh Evening News and spoke to Henry's closest neighbour, provides some clues. Henry wore a flat cap and blue jacket, bought a paper and milk at local shops and took the number 35 bus most days. Yet when Denise visits local shops, pubs and cafes to ask after Henry, no-one seems to remember him.

So Denise pursues a different route, looking up official records at ScotlandsPeople with genealogist Dr Bruce Durie, which can tell us where Henry was born, who his parents were, and if he had any brothers, sisters or extended family.

Denise hears Rev Martin Fair describe how he prepares and delivers public health funerals, giving dignity in death to those we know very little about. Andrew Brown of the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer tells Denise what happens to someone's estate when no will or next of kin can be found and Anne Munro of the Pilmeny Development Project explains how big a problem social isolation is amongst elderly residents in Leith.

Henry's death certificate revealed that he was a retired ship's carpenter, so Denise heads to Leith docks to meet maritime historian Dr Eric Graham, who thinks it's possible Henry may have travelled the world with his trade.

And there's a final clue from a BBC Radio Scotland listener who thinks they know where Henry went on the 35 bus every day.

Denise concludes that though Henry lived in solitude he may well have had a full and happy life.

Denise Mina explores the life of pensioner Henry Summers, who was found dead in his Edinburgh flat in June 2015, having lain undiscovered for three years.

2016121320170416 (RS)
20170412 (RS)

When Denise Mina first heard the story of Henry Summers, who was found dead in his Edinburgh flat in 2015 having lain undiscovered for three years, she wanted to know more about who he was and what kind of life he had.

This proves to be quite a challenge as Henry had no known friends or relatives. Journalist John Connell, who reported the story for the Edinburgh Evening News and spoke to Henry's closest neighbour, provides some clues. Henry wore a flat cap and blue jacket, bought a paper and milk at local shops and took the number 35 bus most days. Yet when Denise visits local shops, pubs and cafes to ask after Henry, no-one seems to remember him.

So Denise pursues a different route, looking up official records at ScotlandsPeople with genealogist Dr Bruce Durie, which can tell us where Henry was born, who his parents were, and if he had any brothers, sisters or extended family.

Denise hears Rev Martin Fair describe how he prepares and delivers public health funerals, giving dignity in death to those we know very little about. Andrew Brown of the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer tells Denise what happens to someone's estate when no will or next of kin can be found and Anne Munro of the Pilmeny Development Project explains how big a problem social isolation is amongst elderly residents in Leith.

Henry's death certificate revealed that he was a retired ship's carpenter, so Denise heads to Leith docks to meet maritime historian Dr Eric Graham, who thinks it's possible Henry may have travelled the world with his trade.

And there's a final clue from a BBC Radio Scotland listener who thinks they know where Henry went on the 35 bus every day.

Denise concludes that though Henry lived in solitude he may well have had a full and happy life.

When Denise Mina first heard the story of Henry Summers, who was found dead in his Edinburgh flat in 2015 having lain undiscovered for three years, she wanted to know more about who he was and what kind of life he had.

This proves to be quite a challenge as Henry had no known friends or relatives. Journalist John Connell, who reported the story for the Edinburgh Evening News and spoke to Henry's closest neighbour, provides some clues. Henry wore a flat cap and blue jacket, bought a paper and milk at local shops and took the number 35 bus most days. Yet when Denise visits local shops, pubs and cafes to ask after Henry, no-one seems to remember him.

So Denise pursues a different route, looking up official records at ScotlandsPeople with genealogist Dr Bruce Durie, which can tell us where Henry was born, who his parents were, and if he had any brothers, sisters or extended family.

Denise hears Rev Martin Fair describe how he prepares and delivers public health funerals, giving dignity in death to those we know very little about. Andrew Brown of the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer tells Denise what happens to someone's estate when no will or next of kin can be found and Anne Munro of the Pilmeny Development Project explains how big a problem social isolation is amongst elderly residents in Leith.

Henry's death certificate revealed that he was a retired ship's carpenter, so Denise heads to Leith docks to meet maritime historian Dr Eric Graham, who thinks it's possible Henry may have travelled the world with his trade.

And there's a final clue from a BBC Radio Scotland listener who thinks they know where Henry went on the 35 bus every day.

Denise concludes that though Henry lived in solitude he may well have had a full and happy life.

20171226

Denise Mina explores the life of pensioner Henry Summers, who died alone and unnoticed.

When Denise Mina first heard the story of Henry Summers, who was found dead in his Edinburgh flat in 2015 having lain undiscovered for three years, she wanted to know more about who he was and what kind of life he had.

This proves to be quite a challenge as Henry had no known friends or relatives. Journalist John Connell, who reported the story for the Edinburgh Evening News and spoke to Henry's closest neighbour, provides some clues. Henry wore a flat cap and blue jacket, bought a paper and milk at local shops and took the number 35 bus most days. Yet when Denise visits local shops, pubs and cafes to ask after Henry, no-one seems to remember him.

So Denise pursues a different route, looking up official records at ScotlandsPeople with genealogist Dr Bruce Durie, which can tell us where Henry was born, who his parents were, and if he had any brothers, sisters or extended family.

Denise hears Rev Martin Fair describe how he prepares and delivers public health funerals, giving dignity in death to those we know very little about. Andrew Brown of the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer tells Denise what happens to someone's estate when no will or next of kin can be found and Anne Munro of the Pilmeny Development Project explains how big a problem social isolation is amongst elderly residents in Leith.

Henry's death certificate revealed that he was a retired ship's carpenter, so Denise heads to Leith docks to meet maritime historian Dr Eric Graham, who thinks it's possible Henry may have travelled the world with his trade.

And there's a final clue from a BBC Radio Scotland listener who thinks they know where Henry went on the 35 bus every day.

Denise concludes that though Henry lived in solitude he may well have had a full and happy life.