A History Of Private Life

Episodes

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A History Of Private Life: Discussion

A History Of Private Life: Discussion20090928

Tom Sutcliffe chairs a discussion programme about the meaning of home today.

Tom Sutcliffe chairs a discussion with historian Amanda Vickery, Simon Jenkins of the National Trust, anthropologist Daniel Miller and sociologist Elizabeth Silva.

Responding to Amanda Vickery's new series about the history of private life, they debate the meaning of home today.

Together they look at the concerns which have dominated life inside the home for hundreds of years.

Why are tussles over who rules the roost a persistent theme? Are modern homes increasingly atomised, separated from local communities and housing an army of home-workers and divorcing couples unable to afford to sell their houses? Or are they predominantly a safe refuge from which householders can show off their exquisite taste and treasured possessions, while leading harmonious and socially integrated lives?

The panel examine which of these and many other views might shape how historians of the future will view the private lives we lead at the beginning of the 21st century.

A History Of Private Life: Discussion20090928

Tom Sutcliffe chairs a discussion programme about the meaning of home today.

Tom Sutcliffe chairs a discussion with historian Amanda Vickery, Simon Jenkins of the National Trust, anthropologist Daniel Miller and sociologist Elizabeth Silva.

Responding to Amanda Vickery's new series about the history of private life, they debate the meaning of home today.

Together they look at the concerns which have dominated life inside the home for hundreds of years.

Why are tussles over who rules the roost a persistent theme? Are modern homes increasingly atomised, separated from local communities and housing an army of home-workers and divorcing couples unable to afford to sell their houses? Or are they predominantly a safe refuge from which householders can show off their exquisite taste and treasured possessions, while leading harmonious and socially integrated lives?

The panel examine which of these and many other views might shape how historians of the future will view the private lives we lead at the beginning of the 21st century.

Tom Sutcliffe chairs a discussion programme about the meaning of home today.

01The Bed2009092820121214 (BBC7)

The historian reveals the hidden history of home over four hundred years: the very heart of private life - the matrimonial bed.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

The series begins at the very heart of private life: in the deep comfort of the matrimonial bed, curtains drawn round the four-poster.

What happened next is revealed by 16th-century diaries - 'curtain lectures', in which the wife gave her husband a good talking to, and the pleasure of making up afterwards.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The very heart of private life, as illustrated by extracts from 16th-century diaries.

01The Bed2009092820090928 (BBC7)
20170123 (BBC7)
20170124 (BBC7)
20121214 (BBC7)
20141215 (BBC7)
20141216 (BBC7)

The hidden history of home, starting with the very heart of private life - the marital bed

Historian Amanda Vickery reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years, beginning with the very heart of private life - the marital bed.

The hidden history of home, starting with the very heart of private life - the marital bed

Historian Amanda Vickery reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years, beginning with the very heart of private life - the marital bed.

The historian reveals the hidden history of home over four hundred years: the very heart of private life - the matrimonial bed.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

The series begins at the very heart of private life: in the deep comfort of the matrimonial bed, curtains drawn round the four-poster.

What happened next is revealed by 16th-century diaries - 'curtain lectures', in which the wife gave her husband a good talking to, and the pleasure of making up afterwards.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The very heart of private life, as illustrated by extracts from 16th-century diaries.

02Things That Go Bump In The Night2009092920121217 (BBC7)

The historian reveals the hidden history of home over four hundred years: how the home protected from dark forces outside.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Outside the home, dark forces gathered: witches and ghosts, who came through the windows and doors at night and threatened people in bed.

Testimonials from witchcraft trials reveal people's darkest fears and fantasies about what happened outside at night, and how their homes protected them.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Witchcraft trials reveal people's darkest fears and how their homes protected them.

02Things That Go Bump In The Night2009092920090929 (BBC7)
20170124 (BBC7)
20170125 (BBC7)
20121217 (BBC7)
20141216 (BBC7)
20141217 (BBC7)

How the home protected from dark forces outside.

How the home protected people from dark forces outside. Historian Amanda Vickery on the hidden history of home over 400 years.

How the home protected from dark forces outside.

How the home protected people from dark forces outside. Historian Amanda Vickery on the hidden history of home over 400 years.

The historian reveals the hidden history of home over four hundred years: how the home protected from dark forces outside.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Outside the home, dark forces gathered: witches and ghosts, who came through the windows and doors at night and threatened people in bed.

Testimonials from witchcraft trials reveal people's darkest fears and fantasies about what happened outside at night, and how their homes protected them.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Witchcraft trials reveal people's darkest fears and how their homes protected them.

03The State In Miniature2009093020121219 (BBC7)

The historian reveals the hidden history of home over four hundred years: the home as a microcosm of social order.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

The hierarchy within the home was supposed to reflect the well-ordered society outside it.

That was the theory, anyway.

But what do letters and diaries from the 16th and 17th centuries tell us about who was really in charge?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

03The State In Miniature2009093020090930 (BBC7)
20170125 (BBC7)
20170126 (BBC7)
20121219 (BBC7)
20141217 (BBC7)
20141218 (BBC7)

The home as a microcosm of social order.

The home as a microcosm of social order. Historian Amanda Vickery reveals the hidden history of the home over 400 years.

The home as a microcosm of social order.

The home as a microcosm of social order. Historian Amanda Vickery reveals the hidden history of the home over 400 years.

The historian reveals the hidden history of home over four hundred years: the home as a microcosm of social order.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

The hierarchy within the home was supposed to reflect the well-ordered society outside it.

That was the theory, anyway.

But what do letters and diaries from the 16th and 17th centuries tell us about who was really in charge?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

04Into The Closet20091001
04Into The Closet2009100120121221 (BBC7)
20141218 (BBC7)
20141219 (BBC7)

- a place for prayer, music and safety.

A place for prayer, music and safety. Historian Amanda Vickery reveals the hidden history of the home over 400 years.

The historian reveals the hidden history of home over four hundred years. The closet - a place for prayer, music and safety.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

By the 17th century, privacy meant withdrawing into a closet - a tiny private space in the corner of a room.

There people could pray, read, play music and escape from the rest of the household.

For women, it was often their only private space, as revealed by the shocking diary of a woman married to a psychopath, who managed to lock herself into her closet to escape from him.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

By the 17th century, privacy meant withdrawing into a closet - literally.

04Into The Closet20091007

04Into The Closet *2009100120121221 (BBC7)

The historian reveals the hidden history of home over four hundred years. The closet - a place for prayer, music and safety.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

By the 17th century, privacy meant withdrawing into a closet - a tiny private space in the corner of a room.

There people could pray, read, play music and escape from the rest of the household.

For women, it was often their only private space, as revealed by the shocking diary of a woman married to a psychopath, who managed to lock herself into her closet to escape from him.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

By the 17th century, privacy meant withdrawing into a closet - literally.

04The Closet20091001 (BBC7)
20170126 (BBC7)
20170127 (BBC7)

- a place for prayer, music and safety.

A place for prayer, music and safety. Historian Amanda Vickery reveals the hidden history of the home over 400 years.

05Every Man's Home Is His Castle20091002

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Elaborate rituals of locking up at night protected the house from burglars.

Records from Old Bailey trials reveal how widespread burglary was, and how the law enshrined that, 'the Englishman's home is his castle'.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

05Every Man's Home Is His Castle2009100220091002 (BBC7)
20170127 (BBC7)
20170128 (BBC7)
20121224 (BBC7)
20141219 (BBC7)
20141220 (BBC7)

Elaborate rituals of locking up at night protected the house from burglars.

Elaborate rituals of locking up at night, plus records of Old Bailey trials. Amanda Vickery's hidden history of the home over 400 years.

Elaborate rituals of locking up at night protected the house from burglars.

Elaborate rituals of locking up at night, plus records of Old Bailey trials. Amanda Vickery's hidden history of the home over 400 years.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Records from Old Bailey trials reveal how widespread burglary was, and how the law enshrined that, 'the Englishman's home is his castle'.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Elaborate rituals of locking up at night protected houses from burglars. With revelations from records of Old Bailey trials.

06All My Life Is A Struggle With Dirt20091005

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

The endless struggle against dirt, vermin and decay, and a song which has never been recorded before, The Housewife's Lament.

How women came to see laundry and the linen cupboard as part of their moral mission, caring for their families and also keeping the household morally pure.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

How women came to see laundry and the linen cupboard as part of their moral mission.

06All My Life Is A Struggle With Dirt2009100520091005 (BBC7)
20170130 (BBC7)
20170131 (BBC7)
20121226 (BBC7)
20141222 (BBC7)
20141223 (BBC7)

Women's struggle to clean and care for their families in a household moral mission.

Women's struggle to clean and care for their families in a household moral mission. Amanda Vickery's hidden history of the home.

Women's struggle to clean and care for their families in a household moral mission.

Women's struggle to clean and care for their families in a household moral mission. Amanda Vickery's hidden history of the home.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

The endless struggle against dirt, vermin and decay, and a song which has never been recorded before, The Housewife's Lament.

How women came to see laundry and the linen cupboard as part of their moral mission, caring for their families and also keeping the household morally pure.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

How women came to see laundry and the linen cupboard as part of their moral mission.

Endless struggles against dirt, vermin and decay. How women cleaned and cared for their families in a household moral mission.

07Pots And Pans20091006

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Why do pots and pans matter?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

07Pots And Pans2009100620091006 (BBC7)
20170131 (BBC7)
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20121228 (BBC7)
20141223 (BBC7)
20141224 (BBC7)

What do letters and diaries tell us about running the home in the 16th and 17th centuries? Why do pots and pans matter?

What do letters and diaries tell us about running the home in the 16th and 17th centuries?

What do letters and diaries tell us about running the home in the 16th and 17th centuries?

What do letters and diaries tell us about running the home in the 16th and 17th centuries? Why do pots and pans matter?

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Why do pots and pans matter?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

08Kitchen Physic20091007

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

From rabies to madness and piles, the housewives of the past were expected to concoct medicines which would cure any condition.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Housewives of the past were expected to concoct medicines which would cure any condition.

08Kitchen Physic2009100720091007 (BBC7)
20170201 (BBC7)
20170202 (BBC7)
20130102 (BBC7)
20141224 (BBC7)
20141225 (BBC7)

Historian Amanda reveals housewives were once expected to concoct cure-all medicines.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

From rabies to madness and piles, the housewives of the past were expected to concoct medicines which would cure any condition.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda reveals housewives were once expected to concoct cure-all medicines.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

From rabies to madness and piles, the housewives of the past were expected to concoct medicines which would cure any condition.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Housewives of the past were expected to concoct medicines which would cure any condition.

09Ornamenting The Home20091008

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Sewing was believed to be part of a wife's essential duty in the 17th and 18th century, and also a way of keeping women at home safely occupied.

If you were sewing you couldn't be wandering about or reading novels.

But a fascinating diary by a woman who suffered from depression reveals that sewing could also give meaning to life and act as a valuable therapy.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Sewing was believed to be part of a wife's essential duty in the 17th and 18th century.

09Ornamenting The Home2009100820130107 (BBC7)
20141225 (BBC7)
20141226 (BBC7)
20170202 (BBC7)
20170203 (BBC7)

Sewing was a housewife's duty and also acted as valuable therapy.

Exploring life at home in the past, historian Amanda Vickery reveals sewing was a housewife's duty and also acted as valuable therapy.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Sewing was believed to be part of a wife's essential duty in the 17th and 18th century, and also a way of keeping women at home safely occupied.

If you were sewing you couldn't be wandering about or reading novels.

But a fascinating diary by a woman who suffered from depression reveals that sewing could also give meaning to life and act as a valuable therapy.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Sewing was believed to be part of a wife's essential duty in the 17th and 18th century.

Exploring life at home in the past, historian Amanda reveals sewing was a housewife's duty and also acted as valuable therapy.

10Mistress And Servants2009100920130109 (BBC7)
20141226 (BBC7)
20141227 (BBC7)
20170203 (BBC7)
20170204 (BBC7)

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

The fascinating household diaries of Elizabeth Shackleton, trying to run a house in Lancashire with a floating population of unreliable and drunken servants.

Elizabeth cared for a young serving girl, and treated her like the daughter she never had.

But the girl turned on her, and abandoned her.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The household diaries of Elizabeth Shackleton, trying to run a house in Lancashire.

The perils of running a house in Lancashire with unreliable servants.

Historian Amanda Vickery on the perils of running a house in Lancashire with unreliable servants. From Elizabeth Shackleton's diaries.

Historian Amanda on the perils of running a house in Lancashire with unreliable servants. From Elizabeth Shackleton's diaries.

10Mistress And Servants20091015

11Tea20091012

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

Thanks to the introduction of tea in the 18th century, even people who were not rich and who did not have servants could afford to entertain.

The home was opened up to inspection; suddenly people were arriving to judge your china, your curtains, and your manners.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Thanks to the introduction of tea, even people who were not rich could afford to entertain.

11Tea2009101220091012 (BBC7)
20170206 (BBC7)
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20130111 (BBC7)
20141229 (BBC7)
20141230 (BBC7)

Thanks to the introduction of tea, even people who were not rich could afford to entertain

Historian Amanda Vickery reveals how tea's arrival in the 18th century meant that everyone, rich or poor, could afford to entertain at home.

Thanks to the introduction of tea, even people who were not rich could afford to entertain

Historian Amanda Vickery reveals how tea's arrival in the 18th century meant that everyone, rich or poor, could afford to entertain at home.

Historian Amanda reveals how tea's arrival in the 18th century meant everyone, rich or poor, could afford to entertain at home.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

Thanks to the introduction of tea in the 18th century, even people who were not rich and who did not have servants could afford to entertain.

The home was opened up to inspection; suddenly people were arriving to judge your china, your curtains, and your manners.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

11Tea20091016

12Domestic Harmony2009101320091013 (BBC7)
20170207 (BBC7)
20170208 (BBC7)
20130114 (BBC7)
20141230 (BBC7)
20141231 (BBC7)

Historian Amanda Vickery reveals the importance of family music-making at home, and the chances it created for finding a partner.

The importance of music-making at home, and the chances it created for finding a partner.

Historian Amanda Vickery reveals the importance of family music-making at home, and the chances it created for finding a partner.

Historian Amanda reveals the importance of family music-making at home - and the chances it created for finding a partner.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

Family music-making was a way of creating domestic harmony, and it was your best chance of finding a partner.

Includes the diary of one hapless bachelor who falls for one girl after another upon hearing them sing and play at musical evenings.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Family music-making was a way of creating domestic harmony.

The importance of music-making at home, and the chances it created for finding a partner.

12Domestic Harmony20091013

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

Family music-making was a way of creating domestic harmony, and it was your best chance of finding a partner.

Includes the diary of one hapless bachelor who falls for one girl after another upon hearing them sing and play at musical evenings.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Family music-making was a way of creating domestic harmony.

12Domestic Harmony20091019

13Men At Home20091014

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

Not everyone adhered to polite etiquette - these are the stories of family 'black sheep', and how embarrassing they were.

And the moving diary of life with an alcoholic husband, who brought his servants back with him from the alehouse and trashed the parlour.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Not everyone adhered to polite etiquette - these are the stories of family 'black sheep'.

13Men At Home2009101420091014 (BBC7)
20170208 (BBC7)
20170209 (BBC7)
20130116 (BBC7)
20141231 (BBC7)

The stories of family 'black sheep'. Not everyone adhered to polite etiquette.

In her hidden home history, Amanda Vickery reveals the stories of family 'black sheep'. Not everyone adhered to polite etiquette.

In her hidden home history, Amanda Vickery reveals the stories of family 'black sheep'. Not everyone adhered to polite etiquette.

In her hidden home history, Amanda reveals the stories of family 'black sheep'. Not everyone adhered to polite etiquette.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

Not everyone adhered to polite etiquette - these are the stories of family 'black sheep', and how embarrassing they were.

And the moving diary of life with an alcoholic husband, who brought his servants back with him from the alehouse and trashed the parlour.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Not everyone adhered to polite etiquette - these are the stories of family 'black sheep'.

13Men At Home20091020

14Illicit Guests20091021

14Illicit Guests2009102120091015 (BBC7)
20170209 (BBC7)
20170210 (BBC7)

Stories from adultery cases involving women sneaking lovers into the house.

Historian Amanda Vickery shares stories from adultery cases of women sneaking lovers into houses, spied on by their prying servants.

14Secrets At Home - Illicit Guests2009101520130118 (BBC7)

Historian Amanda shares stories from adultery cases of women sneaking lovers into houses, spied on by their prying servants.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

Stories from adultery cases about women sneaking lovers into the house and how impossible it was to keep anything from prying servants, who were literally peering through the keyhole.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Stories from adultery cases about women sneaking lovers into the house.

14Secrets At Home - Illicit Guests20091015

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

Stories from adultery cases about women sneaking lovers into the house and how impossible it was to keep anything from prying servants, who were literally peering through the keyhole.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Stories from adultery cases about women sneaking lovers into the house.

15Domestic Violence2009101620091016 (BBC7)
20170210 (BBC7)
20170211 (BBC7)
20130121 (BBC7)
20150102 (BBC7)

Amanda Vickery reveals the dark side of private life, and how the home became a trap.

Continuing her hidden history, Amanda Vickery reveals the dark side of private life, and how the home became a trap.

Continuing her hidden history, Amanda Vickery reveals the dark side of private life, and how the home became a trap.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

The dark side of private life, and how home became a trap.

The moving diary of Ellen Weeton, who was duped into marriage with a man who abused her, keeping her locked up in a back room and forbidding her access to their daughter.

What were her options for escape?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

15Domestic Violence20091016

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Visitors - and new codes of politeness.

As visiting begins in the 18th century, so the home is opened up for inspection.

The dark side of private life, and how home became a trap.

The moving diary of Ellen Weeton, who was duped into marriage with a man who abused her, keeping her locked up in a back room and forbidding her access to their daughter.

What were her options for escape?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

15Domestic Violence20091022

16Servants2009101920091019 (BBC7)
20170213 (BBC7)
20170214 (BBC7)
20130123 (BBC7)
20150105 (BBC7)
20150106 (BBC7)

Amanda Vickery goes below stairs to find out about domestic workers in a household.

Historian Amanda Vickery goes below stairs to find out about domestic workers in a household, many without a bed of their own.

Historian Amanda Vickery goes below stairs to find out about domestic workers in a household, many without a bed of their own.

Historian Amanda goes below stairs to find out about domestic workers in a household - many without a bed of their own.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Many servants in the 18th century didn't even have a bed of their own, sleeping in passageways or across their masters' doors like guard dogs.

And maids were notoriously vulnerable to sexually predatory men, to their master's droit de seigneur.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Many servants in the 18th century didn't even have a bed of their own.

Amanda Vickery goes below stairs to find out about domestic workers in a household.

16Servants20091019

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Many servants in the 18th century didn't even have a bed of their own, sleeping in passageways or across their masters' doors like guard dogs.

And maids were notoriously vulnerable to sexually predatory men, to their master's droit de seigneur.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Many servants in the 18th century didn't even have a bed of their own.

16Servants20091023

17Bachelors20091020
17Bachelors2009102020091020 (BBC7)
20170214 (BBC7)
20170215 (BBC7)
20130125 (BBC7)
20150106 (BBC7)
20150107 (BBC7)

Historian Amanda Vickery investigates the complicated arrangements that limited a man's search for a suitable wife.

The complicated arrangements that limited a man's search for a suitable wife.

Historian Amanda Vickery investigates the complicated arrangements that limited a man's search for a suitable wife.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

In the 17th and 18th century, bachelorhood was supposed to be a temporary state best solved by marriage.

This programme tells the poignant and hilarious story of law student Dudley Ryder and his search for a wife.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The poignant and hilarious story of law student Dudley Ryder and his search for a wife.

Historian Amanda investigates the complicated arrangements that limited a man's search for a suitable wife.

The complicated arrangements that limited a man's search for a suitable wife.

17Bachelors20091026

17Bachelors *20091020

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

In the 17th and 18th century, bachelorhood was supposed to be a temporary state best solved by marriage.

This programme tells the poignant and hilarious story of law student Dudley Ryder and his search for a wife.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The poignant and hilarious story of law student Dudley Ryder and his search for a wife.

18Spinsters20091021
18Spinsters2009102120091021 (BBC7)
20170215 (BBC7)
20170216 (BBC7)
20130128 (BBC7)
20150107 (BBC7)
20150108 (BBC7)

What 18th-century home life held for spinsters. As many as one in five women never married

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind. But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Probably as many as one in five women never married in 18th-century England. What about their story? What did the comforts of home mean for them? Prof Vickery tells the story of one admirable and disabled spinster, whose letters she discovered in a record office in Reading.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

What 18th-century home life held for spinsters. As many as one in five women never married

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind. But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Probably as many as one in five women never married in 18th-century England. What about their story? What did the comforts of home mean for them? Prof Vickery tells the story of one admirable and disabled spinster, whose letters she discovered in a record office in Reading.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Probably as many as one in five women never married in 18th-century England.

What about their story? What did the comforts of home mean for them? Prof Vickery tells the story of one admirable and disabled spinster, whose letters she discovered in a record office in Reading.

Amanda Vickery tells the story of an admirable and disabled spinster.

18Spinsters20091027

18Spinsters *20091021

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Probably as many as one in five women never married in 18th-century England.

What about their story? What did the comforts of home mean for them? Prof Vickery tells the story of one admirable and disabled spinster, whose letters she discovered in a record office in Reading.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Amanda Vickery tells the story of an admirable and disabled spinster.

19Widows20091022
19Widows2009102220091022 (BBC7)
20170216 (BBC7)
20170217 (BBC7)
20130130 (BBC7)
20150108 (BBC7)
20150109 (BBC7)

How the richest widow in 18th-century England spent her late husband's coal fortune.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind. But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Widows had enormous status and power in the 18th century. And for some women, the death of a spouse was a fairytale release. This programme tells the story of the richest widow in England, Elizabeth Montagu, and how she spent her late husband's coal fortune.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind. But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Widows had enormous status and power in the 18th century. And for some women, the death of a spouse was a fairytale release. This programme tells the story of the richest widow in England, Elizabeth Montagu, and how she spent her late husband's coal fortune.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Widows had enormous status and power in the 18th century.

And for some women, the death of a spouse was a fairytale release.

This programme tells the story of the richest widow in England, Elizabeth Montagu, and how she spent her late husband's coal fortune.

How the richest widow in 18th-century England spent her late husband's coal fortune.

19Widows20091028

19Widows *20091022

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

Widows had enormous status and power in the 18th century.

And for some women, the death of a spouse was a fairytale release.

This programme tells the story of the richest widow in England, Elizabeth Montagu, and how she spent her late husband's coal fortune.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

How the richest widow in 18th-century England spent her late husband's coal fortune.

20Two Widowers2009102920091023 (BBC7)
20170217 (BBC7)
20170218 (BBC7)

The story of two different widowers and their desperate search for a new wife.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind. But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

The story of two different widowers and their desperate search for a new wife, based on original material from two unusual sets of diaries which Prof Vickery found in Lincoln.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

20Widowers20091023
20Widowers2009102320130201 (BBC7)

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind. But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

The story of two different widowers and their desperate search for a new wife, based on original material from two unusual sets of diaries which Prof Vickery found in Lincoln.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

The story of two different widowers and their desperate search for a new wife.

20Widowers20091029

20Widowers *20091023

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

When we think of the history of home, the cosy experiences of the nuclear family spring easiest to mind.

But what of those who had no family or home of their own?

The story of two different widowers and their desperate search for a new wife, based on original material from two unusual sets of diaries which Prof Vickery found in Lincoln.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The story of two different widowers and their desperate search for a new wife.

21Magnificence20091026
21Magnificence2009102620091026 (BBC7)
20170220 (BBC7)
20170221 (BBC7)
20130204 (BBC7)
20150112 (BBC7)
20150113 (BBC7)

One celebrity divorce was quite the scandal, because the husband was the prime minister.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of a celebrity divorce - a huge scandal, because the husband was the prime minister. The question then, as now, was what was the woman going to walk away with?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

One celebrity divorce was quite the scandal, because the husband was the prime minister.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of a celebrity divorce - a huge scandal, because the husband was the prime minister. The question then, as now, was what was the woman going to walk away with?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of a celebrity divorce - a huge scandal, because the husband was the prime minister.

The question then, as now, was what was the woman going to walk away with?

The story of a celebrity divorce - a scandal, because the husband was the prime minister.

21Magnificence20091030

21Magnificence *20091026

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of a celebrity divorce - a huge scandal, because the husband was the prime minister.

The question then, as now, was what was the woman going to walk away with?

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The story of a celebrity divorce - a scandal, because the husband was the prime minister.

22Taste20091027
22Taste2009102720091027 (BBC7)
20170221 (BBC7)
20170222 (BBC7)
20130206 (BBC7)
20150113 (BBC7)
20150114 (BBC7)

The story of an 18th-century couple who spend life doing up their magnificent houses.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Taste - and the making of a marriage. The story of an 18th-century couple, the Graftons - fashionable, rich, and deeply in love - who spend life together doing up their magnificent houses.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The story of an 18th-century couple who spend life doing up their magnificent houses.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Taste - and the making of a marriage. The story of an 18th-century couple, the Graftons - fashionable, rich, and deeply in love - who spend life together doing up their magnificent houses.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Taste - and the making of a marriage.

The story of an 18th-century couple, the Graftons - fashionable, rich, and deeply in love - who spend life together doing up their magnificent houses.

22Taste20091102

22Taste *20091027

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Taste - and the making of a marriage.

The story of an 18th-century couple, the Graftons - fashionable, rich, and deeply in love - who spend life together doing up their magnificent houses.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The story of an 18th-century couple who spend life doing up their magnificent houses.

23Science And Nature At Home20091028
23Science And Nature At Home2009102820091028 (BBC7)
20170222 (BBC7)
20170223 (BBC7)
20130208 (BBC7)
20150114 (BBC7)
20150115 (BBC7)

How eccentric homes reflected wider 18th-century ideas about science and nature.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

A room constructed entirely of feathers, a hermitage in the garden of a Lincolnshire vicarage, Alexander Pope's grotto - how eccentric homes reflected wider 18th-century ideas about science and nature.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

How eccentric homes reflected wider 18th-century ideas about science and nature.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

A room constructed entirely of feathers, a hermitage in the garden of a Lincolnshire vicarage, Alexander Pope's grotto - how eccentric homes reflected wider 18th-century ideas about science and nature.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

23Science And Nature At Home20091103

23Science And Nature At Home *20091028

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

A room constructed entirely of feathers, a hermitage in the garden of a Lincolnshire vicarage, Alexander Pope's grotto - how eccentric homes reflected wider 18th-century ideas about science and nature.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

How eccentric homes reflected wider 18th-century ideas about science and nature.

24Courtship And Setting Up Home20091029
24Courtship And Setting Up Home2009102920091029 (BBC7)
20170223 (BBC7)
20170224 (BBC7)
20130211 (BBC7)
20150115 (BBC7)
20150116 (BBC7)

Two 18th-century marriages, and how the husbands prepared new houses for their bride.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of two 18th-century marriages and how the husbands prepared new houses for their bride. One got it right, the other destroyed any chance of a happy partnership.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Two 18th-century marriages, and how the husbands prepared new houses for their bride.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of two 18th-century marriages and how the husbands prepared new houses for their bride. One got it right, the other destroyed any chance of a happy partnership.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of two 18th-century marriages and how the husbands prepared new houses for their bride.

One got it right, the other destroyed any chance of a happy partnership.

24Courtship And Setting Up Home20091104

24Courtship And Setting Up Home *20091029

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

The story of two 18th-century marriages and how the husbands prepared new houses for their bride.

One got it right, the other destroyed any chance of a happy partnership.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Two 18th-century marriages and how the husbands prepared new houses for their bride.

25Neat And Not Too Showy20091030

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Moving into the 19th century, Prof Vickery explores the homes of people lower down the social scale and their ideas about how they wanted them to look.

She draws on a series of funny and revealing letters which she discovered in the archive of a wallpaper company.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The homes of 19th-century people lower down the social scale.

25Neat And Not Too Showy2009103020091030 (BBC7)
20170224 (BBC7)
20170225 (BBC7)
20130212 (BBC7)
20150116 (BBC7)
20150117 (BBC7)

How people lower down the social scale responded to the idea of taste.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Moving into the 19th century, Prof Vickery explores the homes of people lower down the social scale and their ideas about how they wanted them to look. She draws on a series of funny and revealing letters which she discovered in the archive of a wallpaper company.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

How people lower down the social scale responded to the idea of taste.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century. Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Moving into the 19th century, Prof Vickery explores the homes of people lower down the social scale and their ideas about how they wanted them to look. She draws on a series of funny and revealing letters which she discovered in the archive of a wallpaper company.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

These days we take it for granted that the home is a place of refuge in which we express our true self; that idea was an invention of the 18th century.

Prof Vickery explores the invention of taste, and the role of interior decor in creating both social prestige and a successful marriage.

Moving into the 19th century, Prof Vickery explores the homes of people lower down the social scale and their ideas about how they wanted them to look.

She draws on a series of funny and revealing letters which she discovered in the archive of a wallpaper company.

The homes of 19th-century people lower down the social scale.

25Neat And Not Too Showy20091105

26Education In The Moral Home2009110220091102 (BBC7)
20150120 (BBC7)
20170227 (BBC7)
20170228 (BBC7)
20130213 (BBC7)
20150119 (BBC7)

Amanda Vickery assesses 19th-century learning at home through both mother and child.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Until the late-19th century, home was the only schoolroom many British children were to experience, especially if they were girls. But was domestic education really so inferior to formal schooling? Drawing on diaries she has discovered, Prof Vickery explores home education from the perspective of both mother and child.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Amanda Vickery assesses 19th-century learning at home through both mother and child.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Until the late-19th century, home was the only schoolroom many British children were to experience, especially if they were girls. But was domestic education really so inferior to formal schooling? Drawing on diaries she has discovered, Prof Vickery explores home education from the perspective of both mother and child.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Until the late-19th century, home was the only schoolroom many British children were to experience, especially if they were girls.

But was domestic education really so inferior to formal schooling? Drawing on diaries she has discovered, Prof Vickery explores home education from the perspective of both mother and child.

Prof Vickery explores home education from the perspective of mother and child.

26Education In The Moral Home20091102

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Until the late-19th century, home was the only schoolroom many British children were to experience, especially if they were girls.

But was domestic education really so inferior to formal schooling? Drawing on diaries she has discovered, Prof Vickery explores home education from the perspective of both mother and child.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Prof Vickery explores home education from the perspective of mother and child.

26Education In The Moral Home20091106

27The Garden Indoors20091103

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

By the mid-19th century, the majority of the British population lived in filthy polluted towns.

Yet the Victorians contrived increasingly ingenious ways to domesticate nature, capturing ferns and sea anemones under glass in their parlours.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The Victorians contrived increasingly ingenious ways to domesticate nature.

27The Garden Indoors2009110320091103 (BBC7)
20150120 (BBC7)
20150121 (BBC7)
20170228 (BBC7)
20170301 (BBC7)
20130214 (BBC7)

The Victorians contrived increasingly ingenious ways to domesticate nature.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

By the mid-19th century, the majority of the British population lived in filthy polluted towns. Yet the Victorians contrived increasingly ingenious ways to domesticate nature, capturing ferns and sea anemones under glass in their parlours.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

The Victorians contrived increasingly ingenious ways to domesticate nature.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

By the mid-19th century, the majority of the British population lived in filthy polluted towns. Yet the Victorians contrived increasingly ingenious ways to domesticate nature, capturing ferns and sea anemones under glass in their parlours.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

By the mid-19th century, the majority of the British population lived in filthy polluted towns.

Yet the Victorians contrived increasingly ingenious ways to domesticate nature, capturing ferns and sea anemones under glass in their parlours.

27The Garden Indoors20091109

28Exporting The Home20091104
28Exporting The Home2009110420091104 (BBC7)
20150121 (BBC7)
20150122 (BBC7)
20170301 (BBC7)
20170302 (BBC7)
20130215 (BBC7)

Exploring the homes the British struggled to create in India during the age of empire.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Prof Vickery explores the kind of homes the British struggled to create in India, using the diaries and letters of colonial settlers.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Prof Vickery explores the kind of homes the British struggled to create in India, using the diaries and letters of colonial settlers.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Prof Vickery explores the kind of homes the British struggled to create in India.

28Exporting The Home20091110

28Exporting The Home *20091104

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

Prof Vickery explores the kind of homes the British struggled to create in India, using the diaries and letters of colonial settlers.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Prof Vickery explores the kind of homes the British struggled to create in India.

29Dunroamin20091105
29Dunroamin2009110520091105 (BBC7)
20150122 (BBC7)
20150123 (BBC7)
20170302 (BBC7)
20170303 (BBC7)
20130218 (BBC7)

Historian Amanda Vickery listens to the experiences of those who moved out of the cities.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

The roots of the suburb lie very deep; but for snobs and bohemians, the adjective 'suburban' has always been the ultimate put-down. Prof Vickery listens to the experiences of those who moved there.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

The roots of the suburb lie very deep; but for snobs and bohemians, the adjective 'suburban' has always been the ultimate put-down. Prof Vickery listens to the experiences of those who moved there.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

The roots of the suburb lie very deep; but for snobs and bohemians, the adjective 'suburban' has always been the ultimate put-down.

Prof Vickery listens to the experiences of those who moved there.

Prof Vickery listens to the experiences of those who moved to the suburbs.

29Dunroamin20091111

29Dunroamin *20091105

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

The roots of the suburb lie very deep; but for snobs and bohemians, the adjective 'suburban' has always been the ultimate put-down.

Prof Vickery listens to the experiences of those who moved there.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Prof Vickery listens to the experiences of those who moved to the suburbs.

30Alternative Homes20091112

30 LASTAlternative Homes2009110620130219 (BBC7)
20091106 (BBC7)
20150123 (BBC7)
20150124 (BBC7)
20170303 (BBC7)
20170304 (BBC7)

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

'Home means a place to go to when you are in trouble. A place sadly altered by war. A place to glorify when away and rely on always...' So reported one woman to the Mass Observation survey. Prof Vickery explores the enduring pull of a home of one's own.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

'Home means a place to go to when you are in trouble.

A place sadly altered by war.

A place to glorify when away and rely on always...' So reported one woman to the Mass Observation survey.

Prof Vickery explores the enduring pull of a home of one's own.

Historian Amanda Vickery reflects on the enduring pull of a home of one's own.

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years. She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before. Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission. Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

'Home means a place to go to when you are in trouble. A place sadly altered by war. A place to glorify when away and rely on always...' So reported one woman to the Mass Observation survey. Prof Vickery explores the enduring pull of a home of one's own.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

30 LASTAlternative Homes20091106

Historian Amanda Vickery presents a series which reveals the hidden history of home over 400 years.

She draws on first-hand accounts from letters and diaries, many of which have never been heard before.

Including songs which have been specially recorded for the series.

Homes were exposed to huge forces of change in the 19th and 20th century, responding to industrialisation, pollution, and the imperial mission.

Prof Vickery explores how they remained idealised havens in a heartless, dirty world.

'Home means a place to go to when you are in trouble.

A place sadly altered by war.

A place to glorify when away and rely on always...' So reported one woman to the Mass Observation survey.

Prof Vickery explores the enduring pull of a home of one's own.

Readers: Deborah Findlay, John Sessions, Madeleine Brolly and Simon Tcherniak.

Singers: Gwyneth Herbert and Thomas Guthrie, with David Owen Norris at the keyboard.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.