Home Planet

Richard Daniel chairs the interactive environmental programme in which he and his guests deal with listener's questions and concerns.

Call 0870 010 0400

home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Home Planet, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL

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Episodes

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20100105

20100105

The first recorded proposal for a Severn Barrage was in 1849 - not to produce electricity but to produce a large, reliable, harbour. Since then many different ideas have been put forward for using the huge tidal drop of the Severn Estuary to produce electricity. None have so far been built and this week you want to know the panel's views on why this might be.

There's also the many and varied techniques that birds use to see into water, and how fish spot them coming. Is it possible to exploit the ocean's dead zones to produce valuable crops? And just how is it that electricity knows to stick to the cable and not electrocute the birds so cheekily perched upon them?

We also hear the results of the survey of the impact of fireworks on roosting birds.

On the panel are marine biologist Helen Scales, ornithologist Graham Appleton and Professor Philip Stott, environmental scientist of the University of London. If you have any comments on the topics discussed or any questions you might want to put to future programmes, please do let us know.

20100112

20100112

We have a heady mix of energy, biology and a little bit of physics this week. First for the energy. You want to know if the ultra-green claims made for wood pellet burners really stand up to scrutiny. And then there's the issue of demand. Unless we have accurate ways of predicting future energy demand then any discussion on energy production is more or less pointless. At least that's what one listener contends, and the panel chews over the idea.

Next up is the biology. Why do birds eat seeds that pass through their gut unchanged and what happens to us if we eat the same seeds? And what was the extraordinary worm that was seen emerging from a Nepalese praying mantis, which then flew away unharmed?

For the physics one listener wants to know why a bottle of water he picked up from an icy car froze solid in a matter of seconds. Is there a simple explanation or does he have superhuman powers?

Tackling this eclectic mix are ecologist Dr Lynn Dicks of Cambridge University, planning expert Professor Yvonne Rydin of University College, London and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

20110201

The darkest hour is just before dawn, but is it also the coldest. One listener has measured the temperature at that time and found a dawn chill. Why might that be the case?

We're all encouraged to use low energy light bulbs, but has the change from less efficient incandescent bulbs reduced the nation's electricity bill? Are we at risk of squandering our supplies of helium gas?

Does more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere really mean a warmer world and how do you measure their capacity to trap heat in the first place?

Answering the questions this week are science writer Dr Jo Baker of the journal Nature; Mike Hulme, Professor of Climate Change at the University of East Anglia and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20110208
20110208

On a clear night the Moon can dominate the sky. Mostly an almost eerie white, it can also take on a reddish or even golden hue. But, one Home Planet listener wants to know, was the cause of the apple green ring she saw around it one winter's evening?

Continuing the astronomical theme, you ask why does the light in January seem that bit clearer than murky December days? Also, what is the likely impact of growing fields of Elephant grass on British farms? And can the panel name any species that have gone extinct in recent years where their disappearance cannot be attributed to human activity?

On the panel this week are astronomer Dr Carolin Crawford of Cambridge University; Professor Andrew Watkinson, Director of Living with Environmental Change and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20110222
20110222

We waste, so we are told, up to 40% of the food we buy. Huge mountains of rotting vegetables, veritable lakes of sour milk. And at the same time food prices have reached an historic high. Some commentators even suggest that the unrest in Egypt was in part due to the high cost of basic ingredients. This week you ask whether part of the solution to feeding the world lies in reducing the amount of food we throw away.

Folklore suggests coppiced trees live forever but, you ask, can this really be the case? Where do grasses hide their flowers, why do crop plants become sterile over time? And how high is or was the highest mountain ever to have existed on Earth?

On the panel this week are Human Geographer Professor Sue Buckingham of Brunel University; Professor Denis Murphy, plant geneticist from the University of Glamorgan and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20110809

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

20110816

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

20111129

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Discussing listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

20111206

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Discussing listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

20111213

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Discussing listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

20111220

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Discussing listeners' questions about the world and our impact upon it.

Are Our Seasons Changing?20111227

This year some magnolias bloomed again in the autumn and other plants such as rhubarb are also showing some particularly unseasonable behaviour.

This week one listener wants to know whether this means our seasons are changing, and what might be the probable impact of such a change. You also want to know whether seabirds are taking valuable fish out of the nets of fishermen, or is it we humans doing the same to gulls, auks and gannets? Why do planets always end up orbiting around their star's equator? And what are the mysterious coronal holes that appear in the Sun's atmosphere?

On the panel this week are astronomer Dr Carolin Crawford of Cambridge University; Professor Andrew Watkinson, Director of Living with Environmental Change; and Professor Philip Stott and environmental scientist of the University of London.

The programme is presented by Richard Daniel.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Do second flushes of spring blooms signal changing seasons?

Dead Birds And Hibernating Flies20110215
Dead Birds And Hibernating Flies20110215

Many animals hide away during the cold winter months, surviving on their stores of fat as they await the spring. Bats roost in caves and attics; hedgehogs hide in their hibernaculae; adders hunker down in disused rabbit burrows. But where, one listener wants to know, do flies and bluebottles go each winter?

As the next generation of genetically modified crops emerge from the world's laboratories, you ask how do we know just what's in them and what might be the environmental impacts of their widespread use?

You also ask why do flying geese honk and why, when millions of birds must die each year, do we so rarely find their corpses?

On the Home Planet panel for this week are ecologist Dr Lynn Dicks of Cambridge University; Graham Appleton of the British Trust for Ornithology and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

What Has Happened To The Lapwings?20120103

Fifty or so years ago, winter fields used to be alive with huge flocks of lapwings filling the air with their distinctive "pee-wit" cry? But no more, as one listener laments on this week's Home Planet. Where have these birds gone, have they moved to friendlier climes or have their numbers crashed for other reasons? Why, you ask, do different animals live for such different lengths of time? And what can we learn about human longevity from them?

And why do dogs insist on rolling in the myriad of unpleasant things they find in fields, and then come home so proud of their new smell?

On the panel this week are ecologist Dr Lynn Dicks of Cambridge University, naturalist Derek Moore and Professor Philip Stott an environmental scientist from the University of London.

The programme is presented by Richard Daniel.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Why are there so few lapwings left in the UK?

010120020212

Richard Daniel chairs the interactive environmental programme in which he and his guests deal with listener's questions and concerns.

Call 0870 010 0400

home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Home Planet, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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Richard Daniel presents the programme in which listener's set the agenda with questions about the environment and the developing world.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panelists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panelists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panelists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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Richard Daniel chairs a debate about your queries, concerns and fears about and for the environment.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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Richard Daniel is joined by a panel of specialists to discuss listener's questions about the environment and the developing world.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

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A weekly programme about the environment and international development, in which informed panellists discuss listeners' concerns about the world in which we live.

Chaired by Richard Daniel

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

Richard Daniel and his team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

The effects of scallop dredging and how long does it take for the local flora and fauna to recover?

What is the probably cause of a growth seen by a listener at the base of a woodpecker's bill?

What Can Be Done To Reduce The Nuisance From Seagulls Moving Into Urban Areas?

Would Be Possible To Produce Cheap Flat Pack Nest Boxes For Mass Distribution?

Is The Weakening Of The Atlantic Conveyor Responsible For The Dramatic Decline In The Numbers Of European Eels?

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On the panel are Dr Ros Taylor of Kingston University; Professor Denis Murphy, of the University of Glamorgan; and Professor Philip Stott, Environmental Scientist at the University of London.

Is planting German oaks in British woods likely to be a problem?

Has anyone shown the relationship between individual wealth and the emission of greenhouse gases?

Why do cold oceans support more life than warm seas?

Can we plant more forests to reduce the risk of flooding?

Do large animals have bigger cells than smaller ones, or do they have more of the same size?

Plus a request for your observations of House Martins - have they returned in 2009 and have they bred successfully?

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Ggiven the vast number of different beetle species on Earth, do we not live in the age of the beetle? And if so, what was the beetle that surprised one listener by nipping him on the toe?

Why does the Moon always point the same face towards the Earth and why does it appear that the bright side of the Moon does not always point towards the Sun?

And finally, what can or should be done about the vast numbers of plastic bags consumed by the agricultural industry?

On the panel are astronomer Dr Carolin Crawford of the University of Cambridge, soil scientist Dr Chris Collins of the University of Reading and entomologist Richard Jones.

As always we want to hear your comments on the topics discussed and any questions you might want to put to future programmes.

Don't forget we want to hear your observations of House Martins; have they returned this year and when, and have they bred successfully?

Richard Daniel and his team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

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We all know that mighty oaks spring from tiny acorns, and that some trees can reach a truly massive girth.

Why then, asks one listener, are so many urban trees planted in girdles of concrete with no room to expand? Are they doomed to die as they outgrow their constraints, or do the planters know something we don't about tree growth?

Have you ever sat in your car at a traffic light thinking that there has to be a better way to manage traffic? One listener writes to ask whether it would be possible to coordinate traffic control measures to ease vehicles through congested areas, reducing carbon emissions at the same time.

Sticking with carbon dioxide release, why is it that, despite huge amounts pouring into our atmosphere, global temperatures have gone down over the last seven years?

If you have spent any time on Britain's south coast this year you may have noticed huge growths of seaweed blanketing beaches, mudflats and harbours.

Rather than letting it rot, could it be harvested and put to good use as fertiliser or fuel for biodigesters? And when does planting forests cause more problems than it solves?

Teasing these questions apart are Prof Philip Stott, forestry expert Dr Anna Lawrence, and Prof Andrew Watkinson, the chair of Living With Environmental Change.

As always we want to hear your comments on the topics discussed and any questions you might want to put to future programmes.

Don't forget we want to hear your observations of House Martins; have they returned this year and when, and have they bred successfully?

Richard Daniel and his team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

161020090908

Our planet is peppered with great valleys and depressions, many of which are both arid and below sea level.

We are concerned that rising sea levels will threaten coastal populations, so could we not kill two birds with one stone by pumping sea water into, say, the Great African Rift Valley? It could also generate power by running the water through hydro-electric turbines.

Once done, the once-arid areas would be overflowing with sea water, good for algae but not for the majority of land grown crops.

So could genetic engineering step in to produce salt tolerant plants able to feast on this bounty/

Plus a discussion of the world's distribution of oxygen, tackling invasive plants by targeting their friendly funghi and how much we can allow scepticism to stifle action on climate change.

On the panel are Prof Sue Buckingham, Director of Centre for Human Geography at Brunel University, planet geneticist Prof Denis Murphy of the University of Glamorgan, and Prof Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

As always we want to hear listeners' comments on the topics discussed and any questions to put to future programmes.

Don't forget we want to hear your observations of House Martins; have they returned this year and when, and have they bred successfully?

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Wood is, according to many, one of the greenest fuels available.

If more trees are planted to replace those burnt for heat then it has a very small carbon footprint.

Yet burning wood can also produce large amounts of noxious smoke, some elements of which can cause major health problems.

So how can these two observations be reconciled? Are we swapping low carbon for high pollution?

And what about aircraft contrails? They are visible from almost all parts of the planet, so are they blocking out sunlight and having an effect on global temperatures? Then there's the story of acid rain: did it really go away? Plus concerns over carbon capture and storage, and what causes the mysterious lights reported during earthquakes?

On the panel are Dr Lynn Dicks, Ehsan Masood and Pro Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

As always we want to hear your comments on the topics discussed and any questions you might want to put to future programmes.

Don't forget we want to hear your observations of House Martins.

Have they returned this year and when, and have they bred successfully?

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Sea levels are rising.

Its a slow rise on a human scale but inexorable.

Within a few decades we are likely to see significant amounts of coastal land disappear.

But just what will this mean for the ecology of the Earth.

Will a more watery world have a radically different climate? Will it become a soggier place to live overall?

A wetter world might make it harder to get around but until that happens, one Home Planet listener wants to put trucks and lorries under curfew to reduce the congestion on our busy roads.

Is this a good idea and will it really make it easier to travel?

We return to the thorny issue of disposing of unwanted wood.

Isn't it, asks one listener, a good idea to bury it in landfill and lock the carbon it contains safely away from the atmosphere? And we look again at hemp.

It seems that much has happened in the few short weeks since we last discussed the potential of this plant.

On the panel are planning expert Professor Yvonne Rydin, sustainable development specialist Dr Ros Taylor and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about rising sea levels.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

'Eagled-eyed' implies an ability to spot objects at a great distance, but perhaps a more extraordinary skill is shown by another bird of prey, the osprey.

It can spot fish underwater despite the reflected glare of the African Sun, and then pick them off with pinpoint accuracy.

We find out how they manage such a feat and whether we humans could learn a trick or two from them.

Ospreys also use all four limbs - two wings and two legs - to pursue and then grab their prey but what is so special about the number four.

Why do all land vertebrates have four limbs?

We also feature a round up of our warm, wet and windy autumn, the key environmental issues.

And puzzle over why, when we have the same technological know how, Californians can buy powerful and versatile electric cars that are unavailable to the British consumer.

On the panel are planning expert Professor Yvonne Rydin; sustainable development specialist Dr Ros Taylor and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

Richard Daniel and the team look at how the osprey has an amazing ability to spot prey.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

Richard Daniel and his team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

Richard Daniel and his team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

Richard Daniel and his team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

Richard Daniel and his team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

The focus is on energy and climate change.

Starting with a question about carbon dioxide in the atmosphere - is there a point when it will reach saturation and emitting any more of the gas will not have any effect? Nuclear power is being offered as a solution to reducing carbon dioxide emissions but how efficient is it? And if it produces waste heat, doesn't that add to the problems of a warming planet?

Then there's the recently revived idea of whether vegetarians produce less greenhouse gas than meat-eaters.

Are sea level rises really such a problem when we have centuries of experience building sea defences? And what caused the ebb and flow of ice ages in historical times?

On the panel are development expert Prof Sue Buckingham of Brunel University; geologist and energy specialist Dr Nick Riley of the British Geological Survey; and Prof Andrew Watkinson, director of Living with Environmental Change.

Richard Daniel and guests discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

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Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.

Richard Daniel and his team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

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The new series kicks off with a remarkable revelation about how our minds might be controlled by parasites within our brains.

Are we really just vehicles for their survival? Inundation by the sea is often portrayed as the end to any agricultural soil.

Yet many parts of the world successfully grow all sorts of crops on land reclaimed from the sea.

Is the salination really as serious as it is made out to be? Why does wood buried deep inside a living tree emerge in so many different colours, and do hibernating animals have some mechanism to stop their limbs seizing up after months of inactivity? Why, too, is the Richter scale logarithmic and is there something special about logs that allows us to understand them more easily?

Join Richard Daniel and his guests - ecologist Dr Lynn Dicks of Cambridge University, forest ecologist Dr Nick Brown of Oxford University and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

The series kicks off with a revelation about how our minds may be controlled by parasites.

180220100309

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

180320100316

Each year anglers await the annual salmon run.

Thousands of magnificent fish forsake the bounty of the sea and head inland to their ancestral spawning grounds.

But as any keen fisherman will tell you, some mature salmon are there to be caught from the spring time onwards.

This week on Home Planet, you ask why a small number of salmon make the trek up river months before their fellow fish.

If the advantage is so great, why don't they all do it? Then there's the mysterious black and white bird seen but not identified in Dorset; what is it and why does it have such unusual markings? Why, you ask, do chimpanzees still exist when there cousins, us humans, have clearly outstripped them in evolutionary terms? What happens underneath a frozen river as the tides ebb and flow beneath? And we continue the discussion on collecting wild plants and animals; just when is it acceptable to kill a specimen for science?

Join Richard Daniel and his guests marine biologist Dr Helen Scales; conservationist Derek Moore and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

180420100323

Climate change is one of the most complex, and controversial, topics in science at the moment.

We take a long, hard look at the realities of climate change: what's known and, more importantly, where the uncertainties lie.

What will the farmers of the future be planting? Will their crops be subtle variations of the ones we see today or, you ask, is there something surprising waiting in the wings to feed the world's growing population? As technology improves it will produce more efficient energy sources and less power hungry devices.

So is it really going to cost trillions of pounds to ameliorate the effects of climate change? And how much electricity could we generate if we put a tiny hydroelectric plant in every body of moving water in the country?

Join Richard Daniel and his guests, climate change expert Prof Mike Hulme, environment scientist Dr Ros Taylor and plant geneticist Prof Denis Murphy.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

180520100330

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

180620100406

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

180720100413

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

180820100420

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

180920100427
181020100504

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

1811 LAST20100511

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world and our impact on it.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

190120100713

Over the past few thousand years human beings have made dramatic changes to the face of Planet Earth.

Farmland has replaced forest; river valleys dammed and cities grown up to house our growing populations.

We've gathered resources and spread our waste, excavated giant holes and crisscrossed the ground with all manner of construction.

It's clear that we have had a huge impact but working out the scale of that impact and what can be done about it is often difficult, and occasionally counter intuitive.

Home Planet is where you can get some answers.

Our panel of experts will scour latest research to answer the questions you put on science; wildlife, the environment, sustainability, conservation and almost anything else you can think of.

If you have a query you want to put to the panel you can do so via the website www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/homeplanet.

It's your chance to get your questions answered, so do get in touch.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

190220100720

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Producers: Nick Patrick and Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

190320100727

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Producers: Nick Patrick and Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

190420100803
190520100810

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Producers: Nick Patrick and Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

190620100817

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

190720100824

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the natural world.

200120101102

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

200220101109

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

200320101116

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

200420101123

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

200520101130

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

200620101207

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

200720101214

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

200820101221

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

200920101228

Animals that live in the depths of the ocean have to tolerate near total darkness, enormous pressures and temperatures hovering around freezing.

The darkness is because light can't penetrate deep water; the pressure because of the enormous mass of water pressing down from above.

But what about the cold? This week one listener asks, if squeezing gases makes them hot, why are the ocean depths so chilly?

Is the high density of modern agricultural crops taking on the role played by rainforests and how do fossil hunters know when they have a new species or just an odd example of a well known organism.

And out of the archives comes an extraordinary recording, the sound of a living leaf struggling to suck in water.

Answering the questions in this week's programme are marine biologist Dr Helen Scales; Dr Nick Brown, a forest ecologist from Oxford University and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Can crops replace rainforest? And life in the ocean depths.

201020110104

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

201120110111

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

201220110118

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

201320110125

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

201420110201

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

201520110208

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Contact:

Home Planet

BBC Radio 4

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL

Or email home.planet@bbc.co.uk

Or telephone: 08700 100 400

Presenter: Richard Daniel

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

201620110215
2017 LAST20110222
210120110628

Programme answering listeners' questions about planet Earth and man's impact upon it.

210220110705

Have you ever wondered why the branches of a tree rarely touch the ground? Why a spike of ice grew vertically from a frozen tumbler? Or whether the claims made for energy saving light bulbs stand up to scrutiny? Home Planet is the programme that invites your observations and queries about the world around us and challenges our panel of experts to explain what's going on.

This week listeners want to know how the giant wandering albatross survives the ferocious storms of a Southern Ocean winter.

To unravel some of the myths surrounding poverty and environmental degradation.

And why a mob of crows turned on and killed one of their own.

Answering these and other questions this week are Graham Appleton of the British Trust for Ornithology, Ros Taylor, development specialist from Kingston University and Professor Philip Stott, an environmental scientist from the University of London.

The programme is presented by Richard Daniel.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Have you ever wondered why the branches of a tree rarely touch the ground?

210320110712

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The Home Planet team discuss listeners' questions about the world and our impact upon it.

2104Bees, Moths And Snowdrop Bulbs20110719

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

2105Clouds, Boats And Pond Life20110726

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.

2106Rustling Leaves And Coppiced Verges20110802

Richard Daniel and the team discuss listener's questions about our world and our impact upon it.

Producer: Toby Murcott

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The team discuss listeners' questions about our world and our impact upon it.