Home Sweet Home [The Essay]

Episodes

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0120200309

The writer and journalist Madeleine Bunting begins a new series some of the physical, social and emotional dimensions of what we call home. In this edition, she reflects on the huge changes that have been unfolding in the meaning of ‘home’ in recent years – exemplified by an Iron Age hut in the Hebrides and the little house with the pointy roof that indicates ‘home’ on computer screens.

Madeleine Bunting begins a new series examining the many dimensions of what we call home.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

0220200310

In her series reflecting on different dimensions of home, the writer and journalist Madeleine Bunting turns her attention to homesickness. In the American Civil War, soldiers were believed to have died of it. 17th-century Swiss mercenaries were prone to it, particularly when they heard the Swiss horn played; and generations of British children were expected to toughen it out in boarding schools, where learning to endure homesickness almost became part of a national strategy.

Writer Madeleine Bunting reflects on some astonishing instances of homesickness.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

0320200311

In the third part of her series, the writer and journalist Madeleine Bunting explores what it means to have no place to call home. An estimated 70 million people around the world are believed to be homeless – and millions more live in such poor accommodation that in practical terms, they too fall into that category. Madeleine recalls her own experience of homelessness as a child and how her mother, trying to make a home for her children in someone else’s basement, was given new hope by a passing traveller woman.

Madeleine Bunting reflects on the emotional fallout of not having a place to call home.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

0420200312

The writer and journalist Madeleine Bunting continues her series with an exploration of a concept that can be both deeply personal and highly political. She reflects on the dramatic new significance ‘homeland’ took on in the wake of the 9/11 attacks in New York, when President George W Bush created the Department of Homeland Security. And she offers some fascinating glimpses of how indigenous Australians treat their homeland in a way which turns Western perceptions of the idea on its head.

Madeleine Bunting considers the personal and political facets of a controversial concept.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

0520200313

In the final episode of her series, the writer and journalist Madeleine Bunting asks what the home of the future may look like. As cyberspace colonizes more of our living space, are we in for a dystopian nightmare – one where we have almost no reason to leave our homes because everything we need and care about is there at the touch of a button? Or can new ways of living together give the idea of a cosy and convivial home a new lease of life?

In the final part of her series, Madeleine Bunting imagines the home of the future.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.

0520200313

In the final episode of her series, the writer and journalist Madeleine Bunting asks what the home of the future may look like. As cyberspace colonizes more of our living space, are we in for a dystopian nightmare – one where we have almost no reason to leave our homes because everything we need and care about is there at the touch of a button? Or can new ways of living together give the idea of a cosy and convivial home a new lease of life?

In the final part of her series, Madeleine Bunting imagines the home of the future.

Essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond.