How The World Changed Music

Episodes

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Haisai Ojisan - Hey Old Man!2019032320190324 (WS)

Haisai Ojisan, or ‘Hey old man!’ was released in 1972, by Shoukichi Kina, a musician who grew up under American military occupation on the pacific Island of Okinawa, scene of one of the bloodiest battles of WW2. Kina wrote this song when he was just thirteen years-old and still performs it for adoring audiences today. Simon Zagorski-Thomas talks to researcher and musician David Hughes, about the cultural, political and musical story that underscores this catchy pop hit.

Produced by Rami Tzabar for BBC World Service.

Image: Record label artwork, BBC

The story behind the 1970s Okinawan pop hit Haisai Ojisan or \u2018Hey Old Man'

Discover how global events and technological forces helped to shape modern music

Mbube - The Lion2019031620190317 (WS)

‘Mbube’ or the Lion by Solomon Linda’s Original Evening Birds is a track that grew from a half-improvised two minute song recorded in Johannesburg in the 1930s and then, through a series of cultural misappropriations, was rewritten into a worldwide hit – Wimoweh or The Lion Sleeps Tonight. It later became part of Disney’s huge international Lion King phenomenon. But did any of the money make it back to Linda and his family?

Produced by Rami Tzabar for BBC World Service.

Image: Record label artwork, BBC

The story behind the original South African song Mbube, known as the Lion Sleeps Tonight

Discover how global events and technological forces helped to shape modern music