How To Survive In Space [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Into Orbit - Science Special2015123020151231 (WS)

How science, engineering and medicine are trying to understand how to stay alive in space

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Forty years ago the Apollo-Soyuz mission, with its symbolic handshake between American and Russian astronauts, became one of the most significant political events of its time – heralding the beginning of international co-operation in the human exploration of space. If we want humans to properly explore the cosmos then we have to learn how stay alive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong has been delivering the 2015 London Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures on how to survive in space, and for the BBC World Service he begins a two part investigation into the extraordinary ways that science, engineering and medicine come together to get that fragile human life safely into space. He explores what we need to do to prepare for much longer duration space flights that probe deeper into our solar system and perhaps even beyond.

Kevin begins by taking us on a journey from planet Earth to escape earth’s gravity into Low Earth Orbit and to the International Space Station, which many see as a training ground for human survival in the harsh vacuum of space. Kevin hears from astronauts, aerospace engineers on how the International Space Station is helping to stretch the limits of our understanding of human physiology and survival in a way that no experiment back on Earth could.

(Photo: An astronaut in space. Credit: Nasa)

01Into Orbit - Science Special20151230

How science, engineering and medicine are trying to understand how to stay alive in space

.

Forty years ago the Apollo-Soyuz mission, with its symbolic handshake between American and Russian astronauts, became one of the most significant political events of its time – heralding the beginning of international co-operation in the human exploration of space. If we want humans to properly explore the cosmos then we have to learn how stay alive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong has been delivering the 2015 London Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures on how to survive in space, and for the BBC World Service he begins a two part investigation into the extraordinary ways that science, engineering and medicine come together to get that fragile human life safely into space. He explores what we need to do to prepare for much longer duration space flights that probe deeper into our solar system and perhaps even beyond.

Kevin begins by taking us on a journey from planet Earth to escape earth’s gravity into Low Earth Orbit and to the International Space Station, which many see as a training ground for human survival in the harsh vacuum of space. Kevin hears from astronauts, aerospace engineers on how the International Space Station is helping to stretch the limits of our understanding of human physiology and survival in a way that no experiment back on Earth could.

(Photo: An astronaut in space. Credit: Nasa)

01Science Special2015123020151231 (WS)

How science, engineering and medicine are trying to understand how to stay alive in space

Forty years ago the Apollo-Soyuz mission, with its symbolic handshake between American and Russian astronauts, became one of the most significant political events of its time – heralding the beginning of international co-operation in the human exploration of space. If we want humans to properly explore the cosmos then we have to learn how stay alive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong has been delivering the 2015 London Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures on how to survive in space, and for the BBC World Service he begins a two part investigation into the extraordinary ways that science, engineering and medicine come together to get that fragile human life safely into space. He explores what we need to do to prepare for much longer duration space flights that probe deeper into our solar system and perhaps even beyond.

Kevin begins by taking us on a journey from planet Earth to escape earth’s gravity into Low Earth Orbit and to the International Space Station, which many see as a training ground for human survival in the harsh vacuum of space. Kevin hears from astronauts, aerospace engineers on how the International Space Station is helping to stretch the limits of our understanding of human physiology and survival in a way that no experiment back on Earth could.

(Photo: An astronaut in space. Credit: Nasa)

02How To Survive In Space: Into Deep Space - Science Special2015123120160101 (WS)

Kevin Fong escapes earth\u2019s gravity to examine the challenges on the body

If we want humans to properly explore the cosmos then we have to learn how stay alive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong has been delivering the 2015 London Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures on how to survive in space, and for the BBC World Service concludes his two part investigation into the extraordinary ways that science, engineering and medicine come together to get that fragile human life safely into space..

Kevin assesses where our ambitions for human space travel should lie – including a return to the moon and to our nearest planetary neighbour. Many agree there are scientific questions that can only be answered by sending a human mission to our lunar surface or to Mars, and such a long journey presents its own problems. Kevin examines what we might learn and celebrates the spirit of adventure that underpins these 21st century explorations.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Image credit: Paul Wilkinson

Kevin Fong escapes earth\u2019s gravity to examine the challenges on the body

If we want humans to properly explore the cosmos then we have to learn how stay alive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong has been delivering the 2015 London Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures on how to survive in space, and for the BBC World Service concludes his two part investigation into the extraordinary ways that science, engineering and medicine come together to get that fragile human life safely into space..

Kevin assesses where our ambitions for human space travel should lie – including a return to the moon and to our nearest planetary neighbour. Many agree there are scientific questions that can only be answered by sending a human mission to our lunar surface or to Mars, and such a long journey presents its own problems. Kevin examines what we might learn and celebrates the spirit of adventure that underpins these 21st century explorations.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Image credit: Paul Wilkinson

02Science Special2015123120160101 (WS)

Kevin Fong escapes earth’s gravity to examine the challenges on the body

If we want humans to properly explore the cosmos then we have to learn how stay alive in space.

Dr Kevin Fong has been delivering the 2015 London Royal Institution’s Christmas lectures on how to survive in space, and for the BBC World Service concludes his two part investigation into the extraordinary ways that science, engineering and medicine come together to get that fragile human life safely into space..

Kevin assesses where our ambitions for human space travel should lie – including a return to the moon and to our nearest planetary neighbour. Many agree there are scientific questions that can only be answered by sending a human mission to our lunar surface or to Mars, and such a long journey presents its own problems. Kevin examines what we might learn and celebrates the spirit of adventure that underpins these 21st century explorations.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Image credit: Paul Wilkinson