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20130828"Martin Luther King's ""I Have a Dream"" is one of the most powerfully passionate political statements of the 20th century.

This unique tribute program from BBC Radio, which will be broadcast to a global audience, seeks to commemorate Dr King's legacy through his words. Global figures celebrate Dr Kings legacy by reading sections of the speech which resonate with their own experiences and aspirations."

2013082820191206 (BBC7)
20191205 (BBC7)
In this unique tribute programme, global figures celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King by reading the words of "I Have a Dream."

It is Introduced by Professor Clayborne Carson, editor of the Martin Luther King papers.

Dr Martin Luther King gave his "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington D.C. on 28th August 1963.

The readers are:

Congressman John Lewis, who spoke at the 1963 March.
Dr Maya Angelou, American author and Civil Rights activist.
Prof Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Laureate and economist.
Doreen Lawrence, mother of murdered British teenager Stephen Lawrence.
Wei Jingsheng, Chinese democracy campaigner.
Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, first female President of Ireland.
John Hume, jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contribution to the peace process in Northern Ireland.
His Holiness the Dalai Lama.
Albie Sachs, anti-apartheid campaigner, judge on South Africa's Constitutional Court.
President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, first female Head of State in Africa.
Raja Shedadeh, Palestinian lawyer, author and human rights activist.
Ndileka Mandela, granddaughter of Nelson Mandela.
Ariel Dorfman, Chilean-American author and human rights activist.
David Grossman, Israeli author and peace campaigner.
Dr Shirin Ebadi, Iran's first female judge, Nobel Peace Laureate.
Malala Yousafzai, sixteen-year-old student from Swat in Pakistan, shot by the Taliban.
Satish Kumar, Indian peace campaigner and environmentalist.
Maestro José Antonio Abreu, Venezuelan educator and musician.
Joan Baez, American musician and activist, performer at the 1963 March on Washington.
Stevie Wonder, American musician, singer and songwriter. Campaigner for Martin Luther King's birthday to become a national holiday in the United States.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2013.

Global figures celebrate Dr Martin Luther King's legacy by reading "I Have a Dream".

20130828Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" is one of the most powerfully passionate political statements of the 20th century.

This unique tribute program from BBC Radio, which will be broadcast to a global audience, seeks to commemorate Dr King's legacy through his words. Global figures celebrate Dr Kings legacy by reading sections of the speech which resonate with their own experiences and aspirations.

2013082820130901"In this unique tribute program, global figures celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King by reading the words of ""I have a Dream."" Introduced by Professor Clayborne Carson, editor of the Martin Luther King papers.

The readers are Congressman John Lewis, who spoke at the 1963 March.

Dr Maya Angelou, American author and Civil Rights activist.

Prof Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Laureate and economist.

Doreen Lawrence, mother of murdered British teenager Stephen Lawrence.

Wei Jingsheng, Chinese democracy campaigner.

Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, first female President of Ireland.

John Hume, jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contribution to the peace process in Northern Ireland.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Albie Sachs, anti-apartheid campaigner, judge on South Africa's Constitutional Court.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, first female Head of State in Africa.

Raja Shedadeh, Palestinian lawyer, author and human rights activist.

Ndileka Mandela, granddaughter of Nelson Mandela.

Ariel Dorfman, Chilean-American author and human rights activist.

David Grossman, Israeli author and peace campaigner.

Dr Shirin Ebadi, Iran's first female judge, Nobel Peace Laureate.

Malala Yousafzai, sixteen-year-old student from Swat in Pakistan, shot by the Taliban.

Satish Kumar, Indian peace campaigner and environmentalist.

Maestro José Antonio Abreu, Venezuelan educator and musician.

Joan Baez, American musician and activist, performer at the 1963 March on Washington.

Stevie Wonder, American musician, singer and songwriter. Campaigner for Martin Luther King's birthday to become a national holiday in the United States."

2013082820130901"In this unique tribute program, global figures celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King by reading the words of ""I have a Dream."" Introduced by Professor Clayborne Carson, editor of the Martin Luther King papers.

The readers are Congressman John Lewis, who spoke at the 1963 March.

Dr Maya Angelou, American author and Civil Rights activist.

Prof Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Laureate and economist.

Doreen Lawrence, mother of murdered British teenager Stephen Lawrence.

Wei Jingsheng, Chinese democracy campaigner.

Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, first female President of Ireland.

John Hume, jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contribution to the peace process in Northern Ireland.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Albie Sachs, anti-apartheid campaigner, judge on South Africa's Constitutional Court.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, first female Head of State in Africa.

Raja Shedadeh, Palestinian lawyer, author and human rights activist.

Ndileka Mandela, granddaughter of Nelson Mandela.

Ariel Dorfman, Chilean-American author and human rights activist.

David Grossman, Israeli author and peace campaigner.

Dr Shirin Ebadi, Iran's first female judge, Nobel Peace Laureate.

Malala Yousafzai, sixteen-year-old student from Swat in Pakistan, shot by the Taliban.

Satish Kumar, Indian peace campaigner and environmentalist.

Maestro José Antonio Abreu, Venezuelan educator and musician.

Joan Baez, American musician and activist, performer at the 1963 March on Washington.

Stevie Wonder, American musician, singer and songwriter. Campaigner for Martin Luther King's birthday to become a national holiday in the United States.

Martin Luther King's """"I Have a Dream"""" is one of the most powerfully passionate political statements of the 20th century.

This unique tribute program from BBC Radio, which will be broadcast to a global audience, seeks to commemorate Dr King's legacy through his words. Global figures celebrate Dr Kings legacy by reading sections of the speech which resonate with their own experiences and aspirations.

"

2013082820130901"In this unique tribute program, global figures celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King by reading the words of ""I have a Dream."" Introduced by Professor Clayborne Carson, editor of the Martin Luther King papers.

The readers are Congressman John Lewis, who spoke at the 1963 March.

Dr Maya Angelou, American author and Civil Rights activist.

Prof Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Laureate and economist.

Doreen Lawrence, mother of murdered British teenager Stephen Lawrence.

Wei Jingsheng, Chinese democracy campaigner.

Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, first female President of Ireland.

John Hume, jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contribution to the peace process in Northern Ireland.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Albie Sachs, anti-apartheid campaigner, judge on South Africa's Constitutional Court.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, first female Head of State in Africa.

Raja Shedadeh, Palestinian lawyer, author and human rights activist.

Ndileka Mandela, granddaughter of Nelson Mandela.

Ariel Dorfman, Chilean-American author and human rights activist.

David Grossman, Israeli author and peace campaigner.

Dr Shirin Ebadi, Iran's first female judge, Nobel Peace Laureate.

Malala Yousafzai, sixteen-year-old student from Swat in Pakistan, shot by the Taliban.

Satish Kumar, Indian peace campaigner and environmentalist.

Maestro José Antonio Abreu, Venezuelan educator and musician.

Joan Baez, American musician and activist, performer at the 1963 March on Washington.

Stevie Wonder, American musician, singer and songwriter. Campaigner for Martin Luther King's birthday to become a national holiday in the United States.

Martin Luther King's ""I Have a Dream"" is one of the most powerfully passionate political statements of the 20th century.

This unique tribute program from BBC Radio, which will be broadcast to a global audience, seeks to commemorate Dr King's legacy through his words. Global figures celebrate Dr Kings legacy by reading sections of the speech which resonate with their own experiences and aspirations."

2013082820130901"In this unique tribute program, global figures celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King by reading the words of ""I have a Dream."" Introduced by Professor Clayborne Carson, editor of the Martin Luther King papers.

The readers are Congressman John Lewis, who spoke at the 1963 March.

Dr Maya Angelou, American author and Civil Rights activist.

Prof Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Laureate and economist.

Doreen Lawrence, mother of murdered British teenager Stephen Lawrence.

Wei Jingsheng, Chinese democracy campaigner.

Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, first female President of Ireland.

John Hume, jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contribution to the peace process in Northern Ireland.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Albie Sachs, anti-apartheid campaigner, judge on South Africa's Constitutional Court.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, first female Head of State in Africa.

Raja Shedadeh, Palestinian lawyer, author and human rights activist.

Ndileka Mandela, granddaughter of Nelson Mandela.

Ariel Dorfman, Chilean-American author and human rights activist.

David Grossman, Israeli author and peace campaigner.

Dr Shirin Ebadi, Iran's first female judge, Nobel Peace Laureate.

Malala Yousafzai, sixteen-year-old student from Swat in Pakistan, shot by the Taliban.

Satish Kumar, Indian peace campaigner and environmentalist.

Maestro José Antonio Abreu, Venezuelan educator and musician.

Joan Baez, American musician and activist, performer at the 1963 March on Washington.

Stevie Wonder, American musician, singer and songwriter. Campaigner for Martin Luther King's birthday to become a national holiday in the United States.

Martin Luther King's ""I Have a Dream"" is one of the most powerfully passionate political statements of the 20th century.

This unique tribute program from BBC Radio, which will be broadcast to a global audience, seeks to commemorate Dr King's legacy through his words. Global figures celebrate Dr Kings legacy by reading sections of the speech which resonate with their own experiences and aspirations.

Martin Luther King's ""I Have a Dream"" is one of the most powerfully passionate political statements of the 20th century.

This unique tribute program from BBC Radio, which will be broadcast to a global audience, seeks to commemorate Dr King's legacy through his words. Global figures celebrate Dr Kings legacy by reading sections of the speech which resonate with their own experiences and aspirations."

2013082820130901In this unique tribute program, global figures celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King by reading the words of "I have a Dream." Introduced by Professor Clayborne Carson, editor of the Martin Luther King papers.

The readers are Congressman John Lewis, who spoke at the 1963 March.

Dr Maya Angelou, American author and Civil Rights activist.

Prof Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Laureate and economist.

Doreen Lawrence, mother of murdered British teenager Stephen Lawrence.

Wei Jingsheng, Chinese democracy campaigner.

Mary Robinson, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, first female President of Ireland.

John Hume, jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contribution to the peace process in Northern Ireland.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Albie Sachs, anti-apartheid campaigner, judge on South Africa's Constitutional Court.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, first female Head of State in Africa.

Raja Shedadeh, Palestinian lawyer, author and human rights activist.

Ndileka Mandela, granddaughter of Nelson Mandela.

Ariel Dorfman, Chilean-American author and human rights activist.

David Grossman, Israeli author and peace campaigner.

Dr Shirin Ebadi, Iran's first female judge, Nobel Peace Laureate.

Malala Yousafzai, sixteen-year-old student from Swat in Pakistan, shot by the Taliban.

Satish Kumar, Indian peace campaigner and environmentalist.

Maestro José Antonio Abreu, Venezuelan educator and musician.

Joan Baez, American musician and activist, performer at the 1963 March on Washington.

Stevie Wonder, American musician, singer and songwriter. Campaigner for Martin Luther King's birthday to become a national holiday in the United States.

Shout Sister Shout20201103 (6M)
20090303 (6M)
Ruby Turner tells the extraordinary story of the guitar-playing gospel singer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Rosetta was one of the most innovative gospel musicians of her time. In her music you can hear blues, R & B and rock 'n' roll and she influenced the likes of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard.

When she married, 20,000 people attended the wedding in a baseball stadium, yet when she died she was buried in an unmarked grave.

Ruby Turner charts her rise to fame and popularity and subsequent demise in a documentary that was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2009.

Ruby Turner tells story of the guitar-playing gospel singer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

Shout Sister Shout20201104 (6M)
20090303 (6M)
Ruby Turner tells the extraordinary story of the guitar-playing gospel singer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Rosetta was one of the most innovative gospel musicians of her time. In her music you can hear blues, R & B and rock 'n' roll and she influenced the likes of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard.

When she married, 20,000 people attended the wedding in a baseball stadium, yet when she died she was buried in an unmarked grave.

Ruby Turner charts her rise to fame and popularity and subsequent demise in a documentary that was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2009.

Ruby Turner tells story of the guitar-playing gospel singer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

Shout Sister Shout2009030320201031 (R2)

Ruby Turner tells the extraordinary story of the guitar-playing gospel singer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Rosetta was one of the most innovative gospel musicians of her time. In her music you can hear blues, R & B and rock 'n' roll and she influenced the likes of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard.

When she married, 20,000 people attended the wedding in a baseball stadium, yet when she died she was buried in an unmarked grave.

Ruby Turner charts her rise to fame and popularity and subsequent demise in a documentary that was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2009.

Ruby Turner tells story of the guitar-playing gospel singer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

03Memphis And Martin Luther King -2018041120200816 (R2)Clive Myrie with a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

Dr King was in Memphis to support a strike by the local sanitation workers, & for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought & of the fall out from his death, the mistakes, the triumphs & what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including , Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

This programme was originally broadcast in 2018, to mark the 50th anniversary of Dr. King's assassination.

An oral history of events surrounding the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

04Memphis And Martin Luther King - 2018041820200823 (R2)

Clive Myrie introduces a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968. This final episode looks at the aftermath of the killing, and what its reverberations mean for Memphis today.

Dr King came to Memphis to support a strike by local sanitation workers, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fall out from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants.

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

This programme was first broadcast in 2018.

A look at the aftermath of Dr King's assassination, and how it affects Memphis today.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

06Motown At The Bbc - Episode 22019082520200816 (R2)Tony Blackburn presents the second of two shows celebrating Motown at the BBC. Including some rarely heard performances from the BBC Archive including The Jackson Five at the 1972 Royal Variety Performance, Edwin Starr performing War on Pebble Mill, and Michael McDonald with the BBC Concert Orchestra. Plus a recently rediscovered Radio 1 session from Martha Reeves and the Vandellas including Dancing In The Street and the Northern Soul favourite, I've Got To Let You Go. Plus Martin Freeman meets Eddie Holland, part of the legendary Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team and Marvin Gaye recalls his successful collaborations with Diana Ross, Kim Weston and Tammi Terrell in his 1976 meeting with Paul Gambaccini.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

07The Stax Renaissance: Soul Music's Phoenix From The Flames - Episode 12016082920200822 (R2)

Beverley Knight tells the story of the fall and the rise and the fall of the legendary Memphis soul label

In December 1967 the great soul singer Otis Redding was killed in a plane accident, depriving the musical world of one of its great singers, and costing his record label, Stax, their leading light, both artistically and commercially.

A matter of weeks later, the company also discovered that - due to a catastrophic business error - they no longer owned the rights to their back catalogue. The label that brought us Otis, Booker T & The MGs, Sam & Dave, Wilson Pickett, Eddie Floyd, Rufus & Carla Thomas and many , many more was on its knees with no prospect of survival ahead.

But within three years, Stax was one of the most successful African American companies in the world, boasting an entirely new roster of stars such as Isaac Hayes, the Staple Singers and William Bell, and expanding into concert promotion, film production, Broadway musicals and the world of rock music. They released 30 albums and 28 singles in a three month period, and rebuilt form the ground up.

Their 1972 Wattstax festival in Los Angeles boasted the largest bill of soul artists ever assembled performing to the biggest audience of African Americans ever seen paying the lowest admission fee in history thanks to an innovative use of sponsors. And that was before the multi-album, multi-platinum record releases from the show hit the shops, and the huge grossing feature documentary hit the cinemas. And then Isaac Hayes won an Oscar for "Shaft".

But at the same time there were other forces at play. Stax - always an informally integrated company in the deep South of the Civil Rights movement - was hit hard by the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in April 1968 and struggled to adjust to a new & intimidating era of prejudice and violence.

In 1974, an ambitious expansion into mainstream rock music came badly undone for the company, and amidst accusations of racism and fraudulent financial chicanery involving millions of dollars, Stax was wound up in January 1976.

40 years after its doors shut for the last time, the Stax alumni came together to tell the story of this great label with all its ups & downs, the triumphs and the disasters.

Beverley Knight tells the story of the rise and the fall of the legendary label

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

08The Stax Renaissance: Soul Music's Phoenix From The Flames- Episode 22016090520200829 (R2)

Beverley Knight tells the story of the fall and the rise and the fall of the legendary Memphis soul label

In December 1967 the legendary soul singer Otis Redding was killed in a plane accident, depriving the musical world of one of its great singers, and costing his record label, Stax, their leading light, both artistically and commercially.

A matter of weeks later, the company also discovered that - due to a catastrophic business error - they no longer owned the rights to their back catalogue. The label that brought us Otis, Booker T & The MGs, Sam & Dave, Wilson Pickett, Eddie Floyd, Rufus & Carla Thomas and many , many more was on its knees with no prospect of survival ahead.

But within three years, Stax was one of the most successful African American companies in the world, boasting an entirely new roster of stars like Isaac Hayes, the Staple Singers and William Bell and expanding into concert promotion, film production, Broadway musicals and the world of rock music. They released 30 albums and 28 singles in a three month period, and rebuilt form the ground up.

Their 1972 Wattstax festival in Los Angeles boasted the largest bill of soul artists ever assembled performing to the biggest audience of African Americans ever seen paying the lowest admission fee in history thanks to an innovative use of sponsors. And that was before the multi-album, multi-platinum record releases from the show hit the shops, and the huge grossing feature documentary hit the cinemas. And then Isaac Hayes won an Oscar for "Shaft".

But at the same time there were other forces at play. Stax - always an informally integrated company in the deep South of the Civil Rights movement - was hit hard by the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in April 1968 and struggled to adjust to a new & intimidating era of prejudice and violence.

In 1974, an ambitious expansion into mainstream rock music came badly undone for the company, and amidst accusations of racism and fraudulent financial chicanery involving millions of dollars, Stax was wound up in January 1976.

40 years after its doors shut for the last time, the Stax alumni come together to tell the story of this great label with all its ups & downs, the triumphs and the disasters.

Beverley Knight tells the story of the legendary Memphis soul label

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

09The Raw Pearl Bailey2018040220200823 (R2)

2018 is the centenary year of Pearl Bailey's birth and to celebrate we hear from those who admired her the most and understood her unique qualities as both a singer and an actress.
Hollywood actor, Morgan Freeman is one of Pearl's biggest fans, He made his Broadway debut with Pearl when she starred in David Merrick's all-black production of Hello Dolly in 1967. Morgan says it was a monumental moment for him 'watching Pearl Bailey sass the audience' as well as absorbing her professionalism. He says by hanging out together between shows and playing Bridge gave him the opportunity to get to know the real Pearl.

A preacher's daughter, Pearlie Mae sang and danced her way from Depression coal mining towns to Broadway and into the hearts of America. She saw herself more as a singer than an actress - 'I tell stories to music' whereas most audiences saw a combination of the two. Pearl had a distinguished charm - with her warm, lusty singing voice accompanied by an easy smile and elegant gestures that always enchanted audiences and later translated smoothly from the nightclub stage and Broadway to film and television.

After winning a competition at The Apollo Theatre in Harlem she decided to pursue a career in entertainment. She first appeared in Vaudeville in New York in 1941 at the Village Vanguard where she sang with the Sunset Royal Orchestra and Count Basie's band. During the Second World War she performed for the troops. Her Broadway debut followed in 1946 in St Louis Woman. Bailey's popularity as a singer and stage actress led to many offers to appear in Hollywood films. She then went on to host her own TV show 'The Pearl Bailey Show' which included such guests as Andy Williams, Bob Hope, Dinah Washington and Ella Fitzgerald to name but a few.

It was on the movie set of 'Porgy and Bess' (1958) that Bailey won an early skirmish for black civil rights by demanding the elimination of 'undignified and unnatural' Negro dialect from the George Gershwin drama. "There's a lot of people out there waiting for a dialect, so let's talk the way we really talk, without the 'dems and deses". "We don't talk like that. Maybe we did 50 years ago, but not now." Other noted film roles came in Carmen Jones and St Louis Blues.

Morgan feels wholeheartedly that 'Hello Dolly!' is among the top five best shows of his career and he tells us how this African-American show broadened the perspective of audiences at that time. The New Yorker drama critic John Lahr describes Pearl's performance in Hello Dolly! as one of the best he has ever seen and how playing the title role won her a Tony Award. Cab Calloway also co-starred with Pearl.

This one hour programme centres on Pearl's personal memories about her all singing and dancing family - particularly her brother Bill Bailey; discovering Tony Bennett with Bob Hope and helping the career of Diahann Carroll; and meeting the love of her life Louie Bellson who was the drummer in Duke Ellington's Orchestra. Pearl often suffered from the sting of racism and we hear how humour was often used as a survival tool amongst the black community particularly in Las Vegas and New York. On TV The Ed Sullivan Show helped to launch the careers of many African-American performers despite the many prejudices throughout America. Some of these included Nat King Cole, Lena Horne, Harry Belafonte, Louis Armstrong, Eartha Kitt and Pearl Bailey herself was on the show 23 times.

At the latter end of Pearl's career, after she retired from the stage, she took an interest in politics and had friendships with Presidents and performed at The White House in 1975. She was appointed to the US delegation at the United Nations. She then went on to study theology and got a bachelors degree at the age of 67. She continued to makes guest appearances on TV shows and recorded voice-overs for commercials and Disney Movies like 'The Fox and Hound'. Pearl died peacefully in Philadelphia at the age of 72.

With contributions from The New Yorker Drama critic John Lahr, singer Imelda May, Black music historian Stephen Bourne, and writer & producer Suzanne Kay (and daughter of Diahann Carroll).

A celebration of the life and career of Pearl Bailey, presented by Morgan Freeman.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

10The Amazing Mavis Staples2011082920200830 (R2)Ricky Ross presents an extended interview with the successful artist who has been performing for over sixty years with The Staple Singers. Mavis Staples talks about her friendship with Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Prince, Sister Mahalia Jackson and Martin Luther King. In this special programme Mavis describes her career as a gospel & soul singer and a civil rights activist. She shares her personal insights into those classic Stax recordings of the 1970's and her recent album recorded with Wilco's Jeff Tweedy.

Ricky Ross presents an extended interview with the successful gospel and soul singer.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.

11The Sister Rosetta Tharpe Story2009030320200830 (R2)Ruby Turner tells the extraordinary story of the guitar-playing gospel singer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Rosetta was one of the most innovative gospel musicians of her time. In her music you can hear blues, R & B and rock 'n' roll and she influenced the likes of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard.

When she married, 20,000 people attended the wedding in a baseball stadium, yet when she died she was buried in an unmarked grave.

Ruby Turner charts her rise to fame and popularity and subsequent demise in a documentary that was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2009.

Ruby Turner tells story of the guitar-playing gospel singer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Celebrating iconic black artists on the anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous speech.