Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971)

Episodes

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01Recollections Of A Childhood20140804

01Recollections Of A Childhood20140804

Donald Macleod explores Stravinsky's childhood musical experiences, growing up in late-19th century St Petersburg.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

Donald Macleod begins the week with Stravinsky's own memories of childhood - a trio of songs after children's rhymes - as well piano pieces recalling his own attempts to 'find' music at the keyboard as a boy. He explores the world of old St Petersburg - and the influence of Tchaikovsky on the young composer - and fast-forwards to Stravinsky's very final work, written at the age of 83, which hauntingly looks back at his then-distant youth.

01Recollections of a Childhood20140804

Donald Macleod explores Stravinsky's childhood musical experiences, growing up in late-19th century St Petersburg.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

Donald Macleod begins the week with Stravinsky's own memories of childhood - a trio of songs after children's rhymes - as well piano pieces recalling his own attempts to 'find' music at the keyboard as a boy. He explores the world of old St Petersburg - and the influence of Tchaikovsky on the young composer - and fast-forwards to Stravinsky's very final work, written at the age of 83, which hauntingly looks back at his then-distant youth.

01Recollections Of A Childhood20140804

Donald Macleod explores Stravinsky's childhood musical experiences, growing up in late-19th century St Petersburg.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

Donald Macleod begins the week with Stravinsky's own memories of childhood - a trio of songs after children's rhymes - as well piano pieces recalling his own attempts to 'find' music at the keyboard as a boy. He explores the world of old St Petersburg - and the influence of Tchaikovsky on the young composer - and fast-forwards to Stravinsky's very final work, written at the age of 83, which hauntingly looks back at his then-distant youth.

02Towards The Firebird20140805
02Towards The Firebird20140805

02Towards The Firebird20140805

Donald Macleod explores a series of overlooked Stravinsky works.

Donald Macleod presents the tuneful, highly "Russian" scores that led to Stravinsky's breakthrough work, The Firebird - including a rare performance of its original 1910 ballet suite.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

Continuing his exploration of the music of "Young Igor", Donald Macleod today presents a tuneful series of works overlooked in the melee of publicity that surrounded the premiere of Stravinsky's huge early success, the ballet "The Firebird". These include a trio of charming songs, "The Faun And The Shepherdess", and two Poulenc-esque compositions that seem to look forward to the cool neo-classicism of the 1920s. We end with a rare outing for the original 1910 suite from The Firebird - full of spectacular moments of orchestration that the composer later revised and reigned in in the versions usually heard in the concert hall.

02Towards The Firebird20140805

Donald Macleod explores a series of overlooked Stravinsky works.

02Towards The Firebird20140805

Donald Macleod presents the tuneful, highly "Russian" scores that led to Stravinsky's breakthrough work, The Firebird - including a rare performance of its original 1910 ballet suite.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

Continuing his exploration of the music of "Young Igor", Donald Macleod today presents a tuneful series of works overlooked in the melee of publicity that surrounded the premiere of Stravinsky's huge early success, the ballet "The Firebird". These include a trio of charming songs, "The Faun And The Shepherdess", and two Poulenc-esque compositions that seem to look forward to the cool neo-classicism of the 1920s. We end with a rare outing for the original 1910 suite from The Firebird - full of spectacular moments of orchestration that the composer later revised and reigned in in the versions usually heard in the concert hall.

02Towards The Firebird20140805

Donald Macleod presents the tuneful, highly "Russian" scores that led to Stravinsky's breakthrough work, The Firebird - including a rare performance of its original 1910 ballet suite.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

Continuing his exploration of the music of "Young Igor", Donald Macleod today presents a tuneful series of works overlooked in the melee of publicity that surrounded the premiere of Stravinsky's huge early success, the ballet "The Firebird". These include a trio of charming songs, "The Faun And The Shepherdess", and two Poulenc-esque compositions that seem to look forward to the cool neo-classicism of the 1920s. We end with a rare outing for the original 1910 suite from The Firebird - full of spectacular moments of orchestration that the composer later revised and reigned in in the versions usually heard in the concert hall.

Donald Macleod explores a series of overlooked Stravinsky works.

03Young Igor The Russian20140806

Donald Macleod considers the influence of Stravinsky's teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov.

Donald Macleod explores the influence of Stravinsky's teacher Rimsky-Korsakov, and presents an acclaimed - and extraordinary - arrangement of Petrushka for accordion duo.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

Before Stravinsky became the doyen of musical modernism in the early 20th century, he was steeped in the Russian nationalist tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky. Donald Macleod begins today's programme with two works tinged with the tolling church bells and orchestral flourishes of Stravinsky's forebears, before moving on to a complete performance of an acclaimed - and remarkable - arrangement of one of Stravinsky's best-loved scores: a brand-new version, by the Mythos accordion duo, of the ballet Petrushka.

03Young Igor The Russian20140806

Donald Macleod explores the influence of Stravinsky's teacher Rimsky-Korsakov, and presents an acclaimed - and extraordinary - arrangement of Petrushka for accordion duo.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

Before Stravinsky became the doyen of musical modernism in the early 20th century, he was steeped in the Russian nationalist tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky. Donald Macleod begins today's programme with two works tinged with the tolling church bells and orchestral flourishes of Stravinsky's forebears, before moving on to a complete performance of an acclaimed - and remarkable - arrangement of one of Stravinsky's best-loved scores: a brand-new version, by the Mythos accordion duo, of the ballet Petrushka.

Donald Macleod considers the influence of Stravinsky's teacher, Rimsky-Korsakov.

04Starry Faces And Soldiers20140807

Donald Macleod recounts Stravinsky's experiences in exile in Switzerland during WWI.

Donald Macleod explores Stravinsky's experiences in exile in Switzerland during the First World War, including a rare performance of his bizarre miniature cantata "The Starry-Faced One".

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

You thought The Rite Of Spring was strange? Stravinsky's infamous ballet - which caused a riot on its debut in 1913 - has almost completely obscured a truly bizarre, and ferociously difficult, miniature cantata the composer composed around the same time. Roughly translated as "The Starry-Faced One", this four-minute tour-de-force for vast orchestra and chorus is rarely performed - today, Donald Macleod introduces the work, and explores Stravinsky's time in exile in Switzerland during the First World War. The programme ends with a complete performance of the suite from Stravinsky's theatrical collaboration with the writer CF Ramuz: The Soldier's Tale.

04Starry Faces And Soldiers20140807

Donald Macleod recounts Stravinsky's experiences in exile in Switzerland during WWI.

Donald Macleod explores Stravinsky's experiences in exile in Switzerland during the First World War, including a rare performance of his bizarre miniature cantata "The Starry-Faced One".

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

You thought The Rite Of Spring was strange? Stravinsky's infamous ballet - which caused a riot on its debut in 1913 - has almost completely obscured a truly bizarre, and ferociously difficult, miniature cantata the composer composed around the same time. Roughly translated as "The Starry-Faced One", this four-minute tour-de-force for vast orchestra and chorus is rarely performed - today, Donald Macleod introduces the work, and explores Stravinsky's time in exile in Switzerland during the First World War. The programme ends with a complete performance of the suite from Stravinsky's theatrical collaboration with the writer CF Ramuz: The Soldier's Tale.

05 LASTReturn To Europe20110318

Donald Macleod looks at Stravinsky's emotional return to his homeland, Russia, during the period of incessant travel that would define his final years.

Donald Macleod describes Stravinsky's emotional return to his Russian homeland.

05 LASTReturn To Europe2014081420110318

Donald Macleod looks at Stravinsky's emotional return to his homeland, Russia, during the period of incessant travel that would define his final years.

Donald Macleod describes Stravinsky's emotional return to his Russian homeland.

05 LASTWhen Igor Met Pablo20140808

05 LASTWhen Igor Met Pablo20140808

Donald Macleod presents tales of boozy escapades and Italian adventure as Stravinsky hits it off with the young Pablo Picasso - including a rare complete performance of Stravinsky's sung ballet Pulcinella.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

By the end of the First World War, Stravinsky was in permanent exile. But that wasn't about to stop him having fun... Donald Macleod explores the riotous time Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso had in Italy when they met for the first time, as well as the shared interest in commedia dell'arte that sparked Stravinsky's ballet Pulcinella. The programme is framed by a rare performance - in three excerpts - of the complete ballet (most usually heard in its abridged concert suite) allowing us to hear the brilliant sung arias.

05 LASTWhen Igor Met Pablo20140808

Donald Macleod presents tales of boozy escapades and Italian adventure as Stravinsky hits it off with the young Pablo Picasso - including a rare complete performance of Stravinsky's sung ballet Pulcinella.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

By the end of the First World War, Stravinsky was in permanent exile. But that wasn't about to stop him having fun... Donald Macleod explores the riotous time Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso had in Italy when they met for the first time, as well as the shared interest in commedia dell'arte that sparked Stravinsky's ballet Pulcinella. The programme is framed by a rare performance - in three excerpts - of the complete ballet (most usually heard in its abridged concert suite) allowing us to hear the brilliant sung arias.

05 LASTWhen Igor Met Pablo20140808

Donald Macleod presents tales of boozy escapades and Italian adventure as Stravinsky hits it off with the young Pablo Picasso - including a rare complete performance of Stravinsky's sung ballet Pulcinella.

Igor Stravinsky was one of the most brilliant, daring and influential musical thinkers of the early 20th century - a composer who forged new musical horizons and scandalised high society. But it wasn't always that way... Stravinsky was, in fact, a relatively late starter - no musical prodigy here - and his earliest musical works show no hint of the coruscating modernism that was to make him the most famous composer in the world. Instead, we find charming, witty and delightful music in the great Russian tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov, Glazunov and Mussorgsky - compositions often sadly overlooked in the great swirl of publicity that surrounded his trio of great ballets, The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite Of Spring. This week, Donald Macleod explores the world of "Young Igor", presenting a rare hearing of Stravinsky's fine early compositions and a selection of rarities as we follow the composer's development up to the end of the First World War. He also presents two rare and unusual versions of Stravinsky's iconic ballets: the Firebird in its original 1910 ballet suite, and an extraordinary - and acclaimed - new arrangement of Petrushka by the Mythos accordion duo.

By the end of the First World War, Stravinsky was in permanent exile. But that wasn't about to stop him having fun... Donald Macleod explores the riotous time Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso had in Italy when they met for the first time, as well as the shared interest in commedia dell'arte that sparked Stravinsky's ballet Pulcinella. The programme is framed by a rare performance - in three excerpts - of the complete ballet (most usually heard in its abridged concert suite) allowing us to hear the brilliant sung arias.