Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
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2003051520030518Despite the potential, Turkey's economy is on the verge of chaos.

Peter Day looks at how to conduct business in a country with ties to the EU and the Middle East.

"Despite the potential, Turkey's economy is on the verge of chaos.

Peter Day looks at how to conduct business in a country with ties to the EU and the Middle East."

20040704Grape Expectations: How did upstart newcomers wrench the mystique away from the hallowed French wine trade? Peter Day tells the story of a vintage revolution. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20041017Dates with Destiny: Without much oil wealth, tiny Dubai has been trying to turn itself into the business and tourist crossroads of the Middle East. Peter Day reports. [Rpt of Thu 8.00pm] Then Weather.
20041107Battle of the Chips: Two American companies dominate the silicon chip industry - the giant Intel and the much smaller AMD, founded by Jerry Sanders. [Rpt of Thu 8.00pm] Then Weather.
20050109Small Change: David Bussau thinks he has hit on an important way to tackle world poverty. He tells his story to Peter Day - from orphanage to social entrepreneur. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20050116Heartbeat Economy: Within years, companies will have to offer goods and services providing seamless, stressless satisfaction. Peter Day looks at how this might happen. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather

"Heartbeat Economy: Within years, companies will have to offer goods and services providing seamless, stressless satisfaction. Peter Day looks at how this might happen. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather"

20050123Patents Make Perfect: Companies need new ideas to survive, and the granting of patents to protect these ideas has increased in recent years. Peter Day investigates. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20050130Body Talk: Your body says far more about you than your speech. Some experts claim they can analyse which job suits you just by watching how you move. With Peter Day. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20050206Framed: Peter Day examines the boom in modern art and the threat to the London art market posed by big changes in the rules about arts sales in Europe. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20050227All Change: Peter Day listens to experts who believe that companies still need to undertake some fundamental rethinking about what they do and how they do it. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
2005051220050515The Spanish economy has been booming and flexing its muscle internationally. But now it faces the growing threat of competition from all sides.

Presenter Peter Day travels from Madrid to Barcelona to see how Spain is confronting that challenge, including how the city of Zaragoza is trying to turn China's manufacturing prowess to its own advantage. Then Weather.

Presenter Peter Day travels from Madrid to Barcelona to see how Spain is confronting that challenge, including how the city of Zaragoza is trying to turn CHINA's manufacturing prowess to its own advantage.

"The Spanish economy has been booming and flexing its muscle internationally.

Presenter Peter Day travels from Madrid to Barcelona to see how Spain is confronting that challenge, including how the city of Zaragoza is trying to turn CHINA's manufacturing prowess to its own advantage."

"The Spanish economy has been booming and flexing its muscle internationally. But now it faces the growing threat of competition from all sides.

But now it faces the growing threat of competition from all sides."

Presenter Peter Day travels from Madrid to Barcelona to see how Spain is confronting that challenge, including how the city of Zaragoza is trying to turn China's manufacturing prowess to its own advantage. Then News.

20050925Testing, Testing: Why do employers need to subject their workers to psychometric tests and what do they learn from them? Peter Day investigates. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20051009Through the Net: As jobs for life decrease, people in search of contacts and contracts are turning to new business networks for help and support. With Peter Day. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20060108Nuts about Brazil: Economists predict Brazil may be one of the booming countries as changes reshape the global economy over the next 30 years. Peter Day investigates. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20060219Sickness absence in the workplace: Who's sick the worker or the organisation?

Sometimes people are too ill to work, sometimes perhaps they just don't feel like it. According to the labour experts being absent from work in Britain has been stubbornly high for the last three decades. For employers, the CBI estimates being absent is costing 12 billion pounds a year in lost days at work. On average a public sector worker is off 9.1 days every year, in the private sector the average is 6.4 days. So is Britain a nest of malingerers or is there something wrong with the way we work, or the way work works?

"Sickness absence in the workplace: Who's sick the worker or the organisation?

Sometimes people are too ill to work, sometimes perhaps they just don't feel like it. According to the labour experts being absent from work in Britain has been stubbornly high for the last three decades. For employers, the CBI estimates being absent is costing 12 billion pounds a year in lost days at work. On average a public sector worker is off 9.1 days every year, in the private sector the average is 6.4 days. So is Britain a nest of malingerers or is there something wrong with the way we work, or the way work works?"

2006050520060507Not Very Productive: Despite an economy that's doing relatively well, Britain still lags far behind its rivals in productivity. Peter Day asks why, and why it matters. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

"Not Very Productive: Despite an economy that's doing relatively well, Britain still lags far behind its rivals in productivity. Peter Day asks why, and why it matters. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]"

Not Very Productive: Despite an economy that's doing relatively well, Britain still lags far behind its rivals in productivity. Peter Day asks why, and why it matters. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

2006060820060611The computer guru James Martin has made the biggest donation to a British university: £60 million for Oxford to fund a new school designed to tackle the big new problems of the 21st Century.

He tells Peter Day what's behind this significant slice of philanthropy, and why he believes it's so important to think hard about the way technology is changing our world.

He tells Peter Day what's behind this significant slice of philanthropy, and why he believes it's so important to think hard about the way technology is changing our world.

The computer guru James Martin has made the biggest donation to a British university: £60 million to Oxford to fund a new School designed to tackle the big new problems of the 21st century.

He tells Peter Day what's behind this significant chunk of philanthropy, and why he thinks it is so important to think hard about the way technology is changing our world.

"The computer guru James Martin has made the biggest donation to a British university: £60 million for Oxford to fund a new school designed to tackle the big new problems of the 21st Century.

He tells Peter Day what's behind this significant chunk of philanthropy, and why he thinks it is so important to think hard about the way technology is changing our world."

He tells Peter Day what's behind this significant slice of philanthropy, and why he believes it's so important to think hard about the way technology is changing our world."

He tells Peter Day what's behind this significant slice of philanthropy, and why he believes it's so important to think hard about the way technology is changing our world."

Then News.

The computer guru James Martin has made the biggest donation to a British university: £60 million for Oxford to fund a new school designed to tackle the big new problems of the 21st Century.

He tells Peter Day what's behind this significant slice of philanthropy, and why he believes it's so important to think hard about the way technology is changing our world.

Then Weather.

2006060820060612Tangled Web

The Internet is evolving into a powerful new communications medium. It is leaching power away from the old information providers in press and broadcasting and handing it to a new democracy of bloggers and communicators, now numbered in millions. Peter Day asks how established businesses will cope with this vital change in the media landscape.

"Tangled Web

The Internet is evolving into a powerful new communications medium. It is leaching power away from the old information providers in press and broadcasting and handing it to a new democracy of bloggers and communicators, now numbered in millions. Peter Day asks how established businesses will cope with this vital change in the media landscape."

Tangled Web

The Internet is evolving into a powerful new communications medium. It is leaching power away from the old information providers in press and broadcasting and handing it to a new democracy of bloggers and communicators, now numbered in millions. Peter Day asks how established businesses will cope with this vital change in the media landscape.

2006062920060702Peter Day goes behind the headlines to look at the long-running battle that has been going on between the world's two giant airplane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing.

In Business reports on the dogfight in the global aircraft industry as the European group Airbus seems to be on its knees.

There are reports of rows between French and German owners, production difficulties and delays to the double-decker super jumbo A380, which has been failing to win long hoped-for orders for what the makers insisted was a new way of flying.

Instead, Boeing has grabbed the attention of the industry with the success of it yet-to-fly 787, called the Dreamliner.

Only two significant players remain in the industry that shaped the 20th century more than almost any other.

What's gone wrong and why? Using material gathered for programmes made over over the past five years, Peter Day examines the great battle of the skies.

Peter Day goes behind the headlines to look at the long-running battle that has been going on between the world's two giant airplane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm]

"Peter Day goes behind the headlines to look at the long-running battle that has been going on between the world's two giant airplane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing.

What's gone wrong and why? Using material gathered for programmes made over over the past five years, Peter Day examines the great battle of the skies."

"Peter Day goes behind the headlines to look at the long-running battle that has been going on between the world's two giant airplane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm]

20060702Peter Day goes behind the headlines to look at the long-running battle that has been going on between the world's two giant airplane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm] Then Weather.
20061022Peter Day talks to Muhammad Yunus, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, about the remarkable achievements of the Grameen bank in Bangladesh and the growing phenomenon of micro credit. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm]
2006102620061029The rise of a new army of investors is changing the way high finance works. Companies are finding that their destinies are being shaped by secretive and powerful hedge funds. Is big business getting ever riskier - and does it matter? Peter Day investigates.

Is big business getting ever riskier - and does it matter? Peter Day investigates.

Companies are finding their destinies are being shaped by secret and powerful hedge funds. Is big business getting riskier. And does it matter? Peter Day investigates. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

Companies are finding their destinies are being shaped by secret and powerful hedge funds. Is big business getting riskier. And does it matter? Peter Day investigates. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

20070520Peter Day reports on the trends that are setting the pace in corporate life.
2007092020070923Peter Day examines bubbles and bursts in the financial industry, their causes and why they always take the public by surprise.

Peter Day examines trends and developments in industry and the world of work.

"Peter Day examines bubbles and bursts in the financial industry, their causes and why they always take the public by surprise.

Peter Day examines trends and developments in industry and the world of work."

"Peter Day examines bubbles and bursts in the financial industry, their causes and why they always take the public by surprise."

Followed by News.

20080601Hot Stuff: Some people think that global warming offers a huge business opportunity for companies who can find new ways of tackling climate change. Peter Day investigates.
20080608Mr Bottom Line

Peter Day talks to David Tweedie, the most powerful accountant in the world. As chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board, he is the man who tries to keep global capitalism honest in the face of bubbles, corporate lies, corruption, and huge changes in what companies do and the way they value their businesses. Peter hears about his ceaseless quest for clarity in a world of often baffling facts and figures.

"Mr Bottom Line

Peter Day talks to David Tweedie, the most powerful accountant in the world. As chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board, he is the man who tries to keep global capitalism honest in the face of bubbles, corporate lies, corruption, and huge changes in what companies do and the way they value their businesses. Peter hears about his ceaseless quest for clarity in a world of often baffling facts and figures."

20080615On the Rack

Many of the clothes bearing some of the best-known labels in the high street are made by exploited workers in developing countries, according to campaigners. Some retailers stand accused of selling goods made with child labour, or by workers not paid a living wage. Peter Day investigates.

20080622Happy Go Lucky: Peter Day asks whether companies ought to pay more attention to how happy their employees are.
20080629India's Supermarket Sweep

India's retail sector employs over 40 million people. Into this seemingly chaotic and crowded market, western-style supermarkets - both Indian and foreign - are attempting to gain a foothold in the face of organised and vocal opposition. Peter Day investigates.

"India's Supermarket Sweep

India's retail sector employs over 40 million people. Into this seemingly chaotic and crowded market, western-style supermarkets - both Indian and foreign - are attempting to gain a foothold in the face of organised and vocal opposition. Peter Day investigates."

20080831Biotech Battle

Britain's world-class pharmaceutical industry fears that it is failing to keep pace with biotechnology, the latest development in medicines. Industry leaders held an elaborate business war game in London to find out how to catch up. Peter Day reports on the how the game was played and the lessons they learned.

20080907Bring on the Bandwidth

An ever-expanding internet needs more and more bandwidth to provide the services that users are demanding. But can the system cope? Peter Day asks experts including writer George Gilder, who has been predicting what is now happening for over 20 years.

20080921Casino Capitalism

What can financiers learn about risk management from gambling and the casinos who do it every day of the week? Peter Day asks the experts.

20080928Brand Wagon

Companies are obsessed with creating and nurturing their brands, but what is the business of branding all about? Peter Day visits a museum of brands that failed and talks to the people trying to revive old brands from the dead.

20081005Forty Per Cent Female

This year in Norway it became law that company boards must consist of at least 40 per cent women. Peter Day asked four years ago why the country intended to take such drastic action. Now he wonders if other countries may follow suit.

20081016Whistling in the Dark

Peter Day finds out what happens when co-workers blow the whistle on what appear to be dirty dealings by companies and organisations, and whether they ought to be rewarded for their activities.

20081019
2008122820090101Corporate change expert John Kao shows how jazz improvision can help companies innovate.

John Kao, one of the world's leading experts on corporate change, shows Peter Day how jazz improvision can help companies learn how to innovate.

"Corporate change expert John Kao shows how jazz improvision can help companies innovate.

Corporate change expert John Kao shows how jazz improvision can help companies innovate."

John Kao, one of the world's leading experts on corporate change, shows Peter Day how jazz improvision can help companies learn how to innovate."

John Kao, one of the world's leading experts on corporate change, shows Peter Day how jazz improvision can help companies learn how to innovate.

2009010820090111Business models that challenge conventional wisdom about charging for goods and services.

Peter Day hears from two advocates of business models that challenge the conventional wisdom about charging for goods and services.

Peter Day hears from two advocates of business models that challenge the conventional wisdom about charging for goods and services.

20190905Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers.
08/01/200920090111Business models that challenge conventional wisdom about charging for goods and services.
21st Century Unlimited20111222The American business guru Joe Pine thinks we have moved into an era of what he calls "Infinite Possibility".

Peter Day finds out what he is talking about and what the ideas mean for conventional 20th-centuy-style corporations.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Joe Pine discusses his idea of Infinite Possibility and what it means for modern business.

The American business guru Joe Pine thinks we have moved into an era of what he calls "Infinite Possibility". Peter Day finds out what he is talking about and what the ideas mean for conventional 20th-centuy-style corporations.

21st Century Unlimited20150104New ways of doing business are making people think hard about how companies function. Peter Day hears how these alternative economies work, and what they might do.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

21st CENTURY UNLIMITED

"New ways of doing business are making people think hard about how companies function. Peter Day hears how these alternative economies work, and what they might do.

"

28/12/200820090101Corporate change expert John Kao shows how jazz improvision can help companies innovate.

John Kao, one of the world's leading experts on corporate change, shows Peter Day how jazz improvision can help companies learn how to innovate.

A Glass Of Its Own2011122920120101For decades now, gin has been regarded as an old-fashioned drink for old fashioned drinkers. But now that may be changing, thanks in part to the efforts of some tiny new British drinks entrepreneurs with big ideas.

After centuries of decline, London's distilling industry is picking up again, fuelled by small-scale producers and European rules changes that recognise London dry gin as a distinct drinks category. At a festive time of the year, Peter Day meets some of the entrepreneurs behind the trend and raises a glass or two to home-grown UK businesses.

Producer: Mike Wendling

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day looks at the boom in small-scale spirits companies.

After centuries of decline, London's distilling industry is picking up again, fuelled by small-scale producers and European rules changes that recognise London dry gin as a distinct drinks category. At a festive time of the year, Peter Day meets some of the entrepreneurs behind the trend and raises a glass or two to home-grown UK businesses.

Peter Day looks at the boom in small-scale spirits companies.

"For decades now, gin has been regarded as an old-fashioned drink for old fashioned drinkers. But now that may be changing, thanks in part to the efforts of some tiny new British drinks entrepreneurs with big ideas.

Peter Day looks at the boom in small-scale spirits companies."

Peter Day looks at the boom in small-scale spirits companies."

A Glass Of Its Own20120101Peter Day looks at the boom in small-scale spirits companies.
A Great Disruption2012090620120909Series about the world of work, from vast corporations to the modest volunteer.

"Series about the world of work, from vast corporations to the modest volunteer."

A New Capitalism2011012020110123In Business

A NEW CAPITALISM

One of the world's most influential business professors thinks it is time for companies completely to redefine their relationship with society.

Prof Michael Porter of Harvard Business School tells Peter Day about the radical changes in corporate operations and responsibilities he is calling for.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day talks to Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter.

In this week's In Business one of the world's best-known management gurus issues a challenge to the way capitalism works.

Professor Michael Porter from Harvard Business School tells Peter Day about the radical changes he thinks companies have to make in order in order to survive.

A New Capitalism20110123In this week's In Business one of the world's best-known management gurus issues a challenge to the way capitalism works. Professor Michael Porter from Harvard Business School tells Peter Day about the radical changes he thinks companies have to make in order in order to survive.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day talks to Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter.

A Night At The Opera2015081320150816 (R4)

Opera is an expensive art form. It receives millions of pounds of public money. Can that be justified? Peter Day gets a range of operatic experiences - from top opera companies, to pub performers and a country house summer festival. The first opera was performed 400 years ago in Italy; how does the future look?

Producer: Penny Murphy.

Opera is an expensive art form. It receives millions of pounds of public money. Can that be justified? Peter Day gets a range of operatic experiences - from top opera companies, to pub performers and a country house Summer festival. The first opera was performed 400 years ago in Italy; how does the future look?

"Opera is an expensive art form. It receives millions of pounds of public money. Can that be justified? Peter Day gets a range of operatic experiences - from top opera companies, to pub performers and a country house summer festival. The first opera was performed 400 years ago in Italy; how does the future look?

"

A Tale Of Two Sanctions2014112720141130 (R4)Peter Day talks to companies affected by economic sanctions imposed against Russia, and by retaliatory sanctions imposed by Russia, and asks how they cope when they suddenly lose a key market. He also asks how effective sanctions are and who they hit the hardest.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

"Peter Day talks to companies affected by economic sanctions imposed against Russia, and by retaliatory sanctions imposed by Russia, and asks how they cope when they suddenly lose a key market. He also asks how effective sanctions are and who they hit the hardest.

Producer: Caroline Bayley."

Producer: Caroline Bayley."

A Tale Of Two Towns2019040420190407 (R4)Much has been made of the death of the high street, but some places are staging a comeback.

The government has announced this Spring a £1.6bn Stronger Towns Fund to help less well-off areas. Six hundred million pounds of that will be shared out to towns which can come up with credible plans to help their high street adapt to the rapidly changing retail environment.

So what does it take to turn a town around? In this programme, Ruth Alexander visits two towns in Cheshire - Northwich and Altrincham - which have tried two quite different approaches to see what works, and what doesn’t.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Elisabeth Mahy

How can the British high street be revived?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

A Virtual World2016081820160821 (R4)Adam Shaw looks at how virtual reality could change our world.

A new technology is emerging which could change the world as significantly as mobile phones or the Internet. That technology is Virtual Reality. Up to now it's mainly been used for fun - but things are changing. Adam Shaw investigates how VR could change our lives and revolutionise the world of business. Enabling us to be in two places at once and, for example, replacing the need for many painkillers and helping cure psychological problems.

Producer Smita Patel.

"Adam Shaw looks at how virtual reality could change our world.

"

Adam Shaw looks at how Virtual Reality could change our world.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Adapt To Survive2020051420200517 (R4)Many businesses are struggling in the lockdown, but some are adapting to survive.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

2020 hasn't been good for British business - certainly not since Covid-19 showed up. The global pandemic and the lockdown imposed to try to fight it have affected individual livelihoods and those of many companies. John Murphy talks to some business owners from different sectors of the economy - a family-run pub, a fruit farm, a fabric and haberdashery shop and a multinational - to see what changes they've experienced and how they have had to adapt during the crisis. They explain what they think the future will hold and, indeed, whether they will survive.

Presenter: John Murphy

Producer: Lizzy McNeill

photo by: Victoria Connolly, MacCulloch and Wallis Ltd

Adventure Capitalist2008050820080511Peter Day talks to Welsh-born Michael Moritz, one of the venture capital stars of Silicon Valley USA.

A partner in Sequoia Capital, Moritz successfully invested in start-ups such as Yahoo, Google and YouTube.

Peter asks him how it all happened and gets some advice about how to make a high-tech fortune.

"Peter Day talks to Welsh-born Michael Moritz, one of the venture capital stars of Silicon Valley USA.

Adventure Capitalist

Peter Day talks to Welsh-born Michael Moritz, one of the venture capital stars of Silicon Valley USA. A partner in Sequoia Capital, Moritz successfully invested in start-ups such as Yahoo, Google and YouTube. Peter asks him how it all happened and gets some advice about how to make a high-tech fortune."

Peter asks him how it all happened and gets some advice about how to make a high-tech fortune."

"Adventure Capitalist

Followed by News.

Africa Calling2005060920050612Even in AFRICA, technology is touching the lives of the poor and bringing new opportunities to exiles returning home.

Peter Day reports from KENYA and Ghana.

"Even in AFRICA, technology is touching the lives of the poor and bringing new opportunities to exiles returning home.

Africa Calling

Even in Africa, technology is touching the lives of the poor and bringing new opportunities to exiles returning home. Peter Day reports from Kenya and Ghana.

Even in Africa, technology is touching the lives of the poor and bringing new opportunities to exiles returning home. Peter Day reports from Kenya and Ghana. Then Weather.

""""

Even in Africa, technology is touching the lives of the poor and bringing new opportunities to exiles returning home. Peter Day reports from Kenya and Ghana."

Peter Day reports from KENYA and Ghana."

Even in Africa, technology is touching the lives of the poor and bringing new opportunities to exiles returning home. Peter Day reports from Kenya and Ghana. Then Weather."

"Africa Calling

Then News.

After The Crunch20100919Peter Day reports from the front line of industry.

Peter Day is on quest to the North East to find out how businesses are doing in a part of the country where many publically funded jobs have been created in the past decade - jobs that are now under threat as the country waits to hear how and where the big planned government spending cuts will bite.

What comes after the crunch? Peter Day reports from the front line of industry.

Age Rage2006090720060910From October 1, 65 is the new nationwide retirement age in Britain, the age when employers can legally force workers to retire whether they want to or not.

Peter Day finds out what it means for employees, for companies - and for people like him on the verge of being retired.

"From October 1, 65 is the new nationwide retirement age in Britain, the age when employers can legally force workers to retire whether they want to or not.

Age Rage

From October 1, 65 is the new nationwide retirement age in Britain, the age when employers can legally force workers to retire whether they want to or not. Peter Day finds out what it means for employees, for companies - and for people like him on the verge of being retired."

Peter Day finds out what it means for employees, for companies - and for people like him on the verge of being retired."

Then Weather.

"Age Rage

Then News.

All Aboard2003110620031109The world's biggest ocean liner is being prepared for its maiden voyage.

Peter Day hears from the people who are creating a new community on the waves.

All At Sea2011011320110116It is a long time since Britain ruled the maritime world, and North Sea oil has peaked.

But ocean transport is still a vital UK activity and wind and water power are making big waves around our shores.

Peter Day takes the helm of a container ship to find out what British seapower means today.

Producer : Jo Mathys.

ALL AT SEA

This week's In Business is all at sea.

Peter Day reports on the great boom in the sea as as real estate: a site for huge arrays of windmills and other sustainable energy devices.

He also has an unfortunate experience in what he thinks might have been Portsmouth harbour.

Peter Day takes the helm of a container ship to find what British sea power means today.

It is a long time since Britain ruled the maritime world, and North Sea oil has peaked. But ocean transport is still a vital UK activity and wind and water power are making big waves around our shores. Peter Day takes the helm of a container ship to find out what British seapower means today.

"It is a long time since Britain ruled the maritime world, and North Sea oil has peaked.

"

Peter Day takes the helm of a container ship to find what British sea power means today."

All Change2005022420050227Peter Day listens to experts who believe that companies still need to undertake some fundamental rethinking about what they do and how they do it.

All Change: Peter Day listens to experts who believe that companies still need to undertake some fundamental rethinking about what they do and how they do it. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm]

All Change: Peter Day listens to experts who believe that companies still need to undertake some fundamental rethinking about what they do and how they do it. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

All Join In2008011720080120
20080120 (R4)
Social networks such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Bebo and YouTube are revolutionising the way people use the internet.Peter Day asks how businesses need to respond.

"Social networks such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Bebo and YouTube are revolutionising the way people use the internet.Peter Day asks how businesses need to respond."

Peter Day asks how businesses need to respond to the growth of online social networks.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

All Join In

Social networks such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Bebo and YouTube are revolutionising the way people use the internet. Peter Day asks how businesses need to respond."

Peter Day asks how businesses need to respond."

"All Join In

Followed by News.

All New2009040920090412Peter Day hears from the business people who, faced with the uncertainties of the global recession, are pinning their hopes for economic recovery on bold new innovation.

Peter Day hears from those who are pinning their hopes for economic recovery on innovation

Peter Day hears from the business people who, faced with the uncertainties of the global recession, are pinning their hopes for economic recovery on bold new innovation.

"Peter Day hears from the business people who, faced with the uncertainties of the global recession, are pinning their hopes for economic recovery on bold new innovation."

All New20090412
All Together Now2012011220120115In these tough times, are there better ways of doing business: worker cooperatives, for example?

In crisis-battered Spain, Peter Day visits the world's biggest worker coop in Mondragon, to find out what makes it different. And, in the UK where the cooperative movement began, will 2012, designated the year of the cooperative see the rise of the mutual business model?

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

In these tough economic times, are worker cooperatives a better way of doing business?

"In these tough times, are there better ways of doing business: worker cooperatives, for example?

In crisis-battered Spain, Peter Day visits the world's biggest worker coop in Mondragon, to find out what makes it different. And, in the UK where the cooperative movement began, will 2012, designated the year of the cooperative see the rise of the mutual business model?

In these tough economic times, are worker cooperatives a better way of doing business?"

All Together Now20120115In these tough economic times, are worker cooperatives a better way of doing business?

"In these tough economic times, are worker cooperatives a better way of doing business?"

Antony Jenkins Talks To Kamal Ahmed2015120320151206 (R4)

In his first interview since being ousted as Chief Executive of Barclays, Antony Jenkins talks to the BBC's Business Editor, Kamal Ahmed. He discusses the challenges he faced at the troubled bank as he sought to change the culture and behaviour of its staff. And he predicts a worrying future for the banking sector, which he says could see staffing levels halved as technology and financial start-ups transform the industry.

Producer Caroline Bayley.

Anthony Jenkins, who was sacked as CEO of Barclays in July, talks to the BBC's Business Editor, Kamal Ahmed. They discuss the future of banking, bonuses and the global economy.

Producer Caroline Bayley.

Anthony Jenkins, who was sacked as CEO of Barclays in July, talks to the BBC's Business Editor, Kamal Ahmed. They discuss the future of banking, bonuses and the global economy.

"In his first interview since being ousted as Chief Executive of Barclays, Antony Jenkins talks to the BBC's Business Editor, Kamal Ahmed. He discusses the challenges he faced at the troubled bank as he sought to change the culture and behaviour of its staff. And he predicts a worrying future for the banking sector, which he says could see staffing levels halved as technology and financial start-ups transform the industry.

"

"

Are Ceos Up To The Job?2010081920100822In the wake of the very personal attacks on former BP boss, Tony Hayward, the programme asks: are chief executives really up to the job in our top companies? Peter Day shines the spotlight on these much praised and vilified high profile leaders.

Producer: Lesley McAlpine.

Are chief executives really up to the job in our top companies?

In the wake of the very personal attacks on former BP boss, Tony Hayward, the programme asks: are chief executives really up to the job in our top companies? Peter Day shines the spotlight on these much praised and vilified high profile leaders.

"In the wake of the very personal attacks on former BP boss, Tony Hayward, the programme asks: are chief executives really up to the job in our top companies? Peter Day shines the spotlight on these much praised and vilified high profile leaders.

Are chief executives really up to the job in our top companies?"

"

""

Are Ceos Up To The Job?20100822Are chief executives really up to the job in our top companies?
Are Freeports The Future?2018112920181202 (R4)"

In the 1970s a young Jiang Zemin headed to Shannon on the rural west coast of Ireland. The time he spent here at the world's first free trade zone would inspire the monumental industrial transformation of the Pearl River Delta and China itself.

The 'Shannon Model' as it became known came from the customs and tax deals around land at Shannon airport, its extraordinary transformation from green fields around a small airport to an industrial manufacturing hub inspired many of the world's most successful trade zones.

Now with Brexit looming Jonty Bloom heads to Teeside to see plans for it to become the UK's first 'freeport' offering customs free imports which it is hoped will encourage advanced manufacturing, utilising the region's deep water port.

With local and international business on board can this new scheme bring back manufacturing jobs not seen in decades to one of the UK's most industrialised and deprived regions?

Contributors;
Jerry Hopkinson - PD Ports
Sharon Lane- Tees Components
Ben Houchen- Tees Valley Combined Authority
Patrick Edmonds - Shannon Airport
Kevin Thompstone- Thompstone Group
Dr Meredith Crowley - University of Cambridge

Presenter: Jonty Bloom
Producer: Jordan Dunbar

Can 'freeports' spark a post-Brexit manufacturing boom?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

"

Asia Bling2010122320101226New places are leaping to prominence in the pampered world of luxury.

Peter Day hears from some of the people behind the extraordinary hunger for luxury in Asia.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day hears from some of the leaders in the growing Asian luxury goods market.

ASIA BLING

New places are leaping to prominence in the pampered world of luxury. Peter Day hears from some of the people behind the extraordinary hunger for luxury in Asia.

Peter Day hears from some of the leaders in the growing Asian luxury goods market.

Asia Bling20101226New places are leaping to prominence in the pampered world of luxury.

Peter Day hears from some of the people behind the extraordinary hunger for luxury in Asia.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day hears from some of the leaders in the growing Asian luxury goods market.

Back On The Map2007091320070916After two centuries of virtual anonymity, Kazakhstan, a big but sparsely populated country with vast oil and mineral reserves, is trying to make a name for itself.

Peter Day reports.

"After two centuries of virtual anonymity, Kazakhstan, a big but sparsely populated country with vast oil and mineral reserves, is trying to make a name for itself.

Back on the Map

After two centuries of virtual anonymity, Kazakhstan, a big but sparsely populated country with vast oil and mineral reserves, is trying to make a name for itself. Peter Day reports."

Peter Day reports."

"Back on the Map

Followed by News.

Back On The Road2010123020110102The United States auto industry has just limped through the biggest industrial car crash in history.

The Ford Motor Company has an industry outsider, Alan Mulally, at the helm as its new chief executive.

He tells Peter Day how he changed the way Ford works and it is now back in the business of selling cars.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Ford chief executive Alan Mulally talks to Peter Day about reviving the company's fortunes

BACK ON THE ROAD

The United States auto industry has just limped through the biggest industrial car crash in history. The Ford Motor Company has an industry outsider, Alan Mulally, at the helm as its new chief executive. He tells Peter Day how he changed the way Ford works and it is now back in the business of selling cars.

"The United States auto industry has just limped through the biggest industrial car crash in history.

"

BACK ON THE ROAD"

Back On The Road20110102BACK ON THE ROAD

The United States auto industry has just limped through the biggest industrial car crash in history. The Ford Motor Company has an industry outsider, Alan Mulally, at the helm as its new chief executive. He tells Peter Day how he changed the way Ford works and it is now back in the business of selling cars.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Ford chief executive Alan Mulally talks to Peter Day about reviving the company's fortunes

"The United States auto industry has just limped through the biggest industrial car crash in history. The Ford Motor Company has an industry outsider, Alan Mulally, at the helm as its new chief executive. He tells Peter Day how he changed the way Ford works and it is now back in the business of selling cars.

Ford chief executive Alan Mulally talks to Peter Day about reviving the company's fortunes"

"BACK ON THE ROAD

Back To School2005061620050619"From September, all 14 - 16 year olds in ENGLAND will get lessons in entrepreneurship.

Already, in the UK there are a number of specialist schools and other initiatives to make pupils business-minded.

Peter Day goes back to school to ask whether it's right to try to train young people to be entrepreneurs.

Back to School

From September, all 14 - 16 year olds in England will get lessons in entrepreneurship. Already, in the UK there are a number of specialist schools and other initiatives to make pupils business-minded. Peter Day goes back to school to ask whether it's right to try to train young people to be entrepreneurs."

Then Weather.

"Back to School

""

From September, all 14 - 16 year olds in England will get lessons in entrepreneurship. Already, in the UK there are a number of specialist schools and other initiatives to make pupils business-minded. Peter Day goes back to school to ask whether it's right to try to train young people to be entrepreneurs."

Bad Company2011081120110814Business leaders make a lot of fuss about corporate governance, but the scandals keep on coming.

Peter Day asks what's wrong with the way companies are run.

Producer: Ben Crighton.

Peter Day asks what's wrong with corporate governance.

Business leaders make a lot of fuss about corporate governance, but the scandals keep on coming. Peter Day asks what's wrong with the way companies are run.

"Business leaders make a lot of fuss about corporate governance, but the scandals keep on coming.

Business leaders make a lot of fuss about corporate governance, but the scandals keep on coming. Peter Day asks what's wrong with the way companies are run."

Peter Day asks what's wrong with corporate governance."

Bad Company20110814Business leaders make a lot of fuss about corporate governance, but the scandals keep on coming. Peter Day asks what's wrong with the way companies are run.

Peter Day asks what's wrong with corporate governance.

"Business leaders make a lot of fuss about corporate governance, but the scandals keep on coming. Peter Day asks what's wrong with the way companies are run.

Peter Day asks what's wrong with corporate governance."

Baltic Frontier2004021920040222: Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are lining up to join the EU in May.

Peter Day looks at what they can do for Europe - and what Europe can do for them.

": Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are lining up to join the EU in May.

Peter Day looks at what they can do for Europe - and what Europe can do for them."

Bank To Basics2012051020120513Britain's big four banks are being challenged by newcomers. Peter Day investigates.

Britain's big four banks are being challenged by newcomers.Peter Day investigates.

Britain's big four banks are being challenged by newcomers.Peter Day asks what new arrivals on the high street have to do to prize customers away from their traditional loyalties.

The Government wants more competition in banking with the aim of getting a better deal for customers who have been complaining about the service they receive in record numbers. There are key developments taking shape but will they be enough to create bigger banks to compete with the big boys?

Well, Virgin Money has bought Northern Rock and Lloyds is currently negotiating to sell more than 630 branches, possibly to Co-Op Bank. Meanwhile, newer banking players like Handelsbanken and Metro are expanding, promising better local customer service and in some cases, that elusive thing - a bank manager. Big retail names like Tesco and Sainsbury's have banking licences and hope to grow the business from the financial products they currently offer. Shawcross Bank and Aldermore Bank aim to take small business customers away from the high street banks.

But there are big stumbling blocks to competition. The big four - Lloyds Banking Group, RBS/Natwest, Barclays and HSBC have an eye watering 77% market share of personal current accounts, and 85% of Small and Medium Enterprises current accounts.

There are other factors too which complicate the picture. While the technology may be cheaper to create a new banking platform, banks will shortly have to hold more ready capital to prevent any future financial crises.

So can the newcomers really make a dent in the big four's domination of UK banking?

Producer Lesley McAlpine

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Bank to basics.

Britain's big four banks are being challenged by newcomers. Peter Day asks what new arrivals on the high street have to do to prize customers away from their traditional loyalties.

"Britain's big four banks are being challenged by newcomers.Peter Day investigates.

Bank to basics."

Editor Stephen Chilcott."

Banking On Change?2018080920180812 (R4)"Is old-style personal banking dead in an increasingly online world?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Online banking has grown massively, and some new banks don't bother with a branch network at all. But as Ruth Sunderland discovers, some in the banking business still think high street branches and personal service have a bright future. So how far will this financial revolution go? Talking to leading players in the business, Ruth hears how those who want to manage our money are full of new ideas, but facing huge uncertainty about what banking will become.

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Penny Murphy.

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Penny Murphy."

Battery Matters2014050120140504What are businesses doing to reinvent the battery?

Out of juice?

Perhaps the biggest problem facing makers of new technology is battery power....or lack of it. The battery is so critical that engineers design handheld devices around the battery, rather than the other way round. It's not just mobile phone and wearable technology manufacturers that are striving for longer lasting batteries, the electric vehicle is stalling (so to speak) because of the short distances between recharging and a limited service life of the battery.

So what are businesses doing to reinvent the battery? Is an average annual gain in capacity of 6% really the best we can do?

We'll ask whether Lithium-Air batteries can revitalise the electric car market, explore whether flexible graphene batteries and solar cells hold the key to enhancements in mobile phone battery life and look at the 3D printing of micro batteries the size of a grain of sand.

"What are businesses doing to reinvent the battery?

We'll ask whether Lithium-Air batteries can revitalise the electric car market, explore whether flexible graphene batteries and solar cells hold the key to enhancements in mobile phone battery life and look at the 3D printing of micro batteries the size of a grain of sand."

Battery Power2009082020090823The world may soon need huge supplies of the lightest metal, lithium, if plug-in cars really are a future replacement for the internal combustion engine. Half the world's supplies of lithium are high up in the Andes in the landlocked country of Bolivia. Peter Day asks if Bolivia really could become what experts are calling 'the Saudi Arabia of lithium'.

Could Bolivia could become what experts are calling 'the Saudi Arabia of lithium'?

""

Peter Day asks if Bolivia really could become what experts are calling 'the Saudi Arabia of lithium'.

"The world may soon need huge supplies of the lightest metal, lithium, if plug-in cars really are a future replacement for the internal combustion engine.

Peter Day asks if Bolivia really could become what experts are calling 'the Saudi Arabia of lithium'."

Battery Power20090823The world may soon need huge supplies of the lightest metal, lithium, if plug-in cars really are a future replacement for the internal combustion engine. Half the world's supplies of lithium are high up in the Andes in the landlocked country of Bolivia. Peter Day asks if Bolivia really could become what experts are calling 'the Saudi Arabia of lithium'.

Could Bolivia could become what experts are calling 'the Saudi Arabia of lithium'?

Battle Of Hastings2003020620030209What does it take to arrest a town's decline? Peter Jay reports from the Sussex coast.
Battle Of The Business Schools20130512Two of the world's most acclaimed business schools are engaged in fierce rivalry across

the Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. Harvard Business School and MIT's Sloan School of

Management are both making significant changes to the way teach in order to continue

to attract the best and the brightest. Peter Day wonders whether it is still worth becoming

a Master of Business Administration.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

to attract the best and the brightest.Peter Day wonders whether it is still worth becoming

"Two of the world's most acclaimed business schools are engaged in fierce rivalry across

Producer: Sandra Kanthal."

Battle Of The Chips2004110420041107Two American companies dominate the industry that makes the ever more powerful silicon chips at the heart of the desk top computer revolution, the giant Intel and the much smaller AMD, founded by Jerry Sanders.

He tells Peter Day about the extraordinary rivalry between the two of them and why they need each other.

Two American companies dominate the silicon chip industry - the giant Intel and the much smaller AMD, founded by Jerry Sanders.

Battle of the Chips: Two American companies dominate the silicon chip industry - the giant Intel and the much smaller AMD, founded by Jerry Sanders. [Rpt of Thu 8.00pm]"

Behind The Facades2019041820190421 (R4)The relationship between landlord and tenant is an important, often unseen, dynamic that most of us don’t give much thought to. And yet, it's reshaping high streets up and down the country.

High rents are blamed for the collapse of so many retailers - they appear unsustainable yet they are the vehicle through which much of our pension wealth is invested.

In this programme, Ruth Alexander looks at different models of ownership: from the big financial institutional investors through to the original aristocratic landowner and asks how - in the turmoil created by the rapidly changing retail environment - these landlords are facing up to a new reality.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Alex Lewis

How the changing relationship between landlord and tenant is reshaping our high street.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Beijing To Belarus - A New Silk Road To Europe2019050920190512 (R4)China and Belarus are building an economic trade zone so huge it will rival Barcelona or Dublin in footprint. It’s called Great Stone and it’s imagined as a futurist city - clean, green, and super modern - where pioneers of industry and technology will make their home. President Xi Jinping calls Great Stone a ‘Pearl’ of his New Silk Road - a turbo-charged version of ancient East-West trading routes.

Belarus is gradually opening up after years of post-Soviet caution. It’s keen to encourage international investment as its old Soviet era industries prove difficult to reform. Optimistic Belarusians point to their advantageous geography - the jigsaw piece between the European Union and Russia; their educated workforce and their impressive track record in high-tech innovation.

Presented and produced by Monica Whitlock

Will a giant industrial zone in Belarus become the European hub of China's new Silk Road?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Will a giant industrial zone in Belarus become the European hub of China's new Silk Road

Belarus: Harvesting The Whirlwind2019121920191222 (R4)The irradiated lands around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor were large, prosperous, and lively collective farms until the reactor exploded in 1986. Seventy percent of the toxic radiation fell in Belarus – a small, agrarian country in which most people lived on the land. Hundreds of villages were evacuated, but much of the population has since returned. A generation later In Business visits the Belarussian contamination zone and its hinterland to see how the local economy and way of life has adapted to a world turned upside down. We meet the beekeepers developing a honey farm in the depopulated part of the zone, visit an unexpected herd of horses and hear about the innovations in arable farming designed to resist radioactive toxins.

Produced and presented by Monica Whitlock

How does an economy recover after a catastrophic event.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Berries Galore2019080820190811 (R4)Strawberries at Christmas? No problem! And as cheap as ever? Yes, of course! Many of us have become used to buying whatever fruit and vegetables we want, whenever we want, no matter the season. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and blueberries are available in supermarkets all year round. Until recently that was not the case. So what does it take for this to happen and what’s the cost? John Murphy peels back the layers of the berry industry, which has grown massively in recent years. Despite increasing production costs, prices have remained stable. Can that continue? Politics, economics and the environment could have a bruising impact on producers and on the price and availability of the fresh fruit we eat.

Presenter: John Murphy
Producer: Sally Abrahams

How do we have fresh berries 52 weeks a year? And at what price?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Beyond The Barbed Wire - Cyber Security In The Uk2019011720190120 (R4)Since Bletchley Park and the enigma machine, Britain has been at the forefront of what would become cyber security. In GCHQ we have a world leader in threat detection and yet our industry lags far behind both the US and Israel.

Jonty Bloom looks at what we could do to make this Brexit proof industry bigger and finds out why Belfast is at the forefront of the UK’s research and development to keep us safe online.

He looks at Unit 8200 the Israeli Army’s elite cyber security unit which has spun off several successful start up companies because of the unique training system they employ.

Jonty gets to see inside the National Cyber Security Centre which is part of GCHQ’s new open policy as it invites investors to see the third round of it’s start up incubator.

The ‘Catalyst’ campus in Belfast’s newly redeveloped docks sits beside the shipyard that built the Titanic and is now securing silicon chips rather than building ships. It’s buzzing as foreign investment has flowed into to take advantage of its burgeoning cyber security talent pool. A bet placed on the industry a decade ago by Queen’s University has paid off with a pipeline of graduates with the specialist skills needed to protect us online.

Each and every heartbeat is unique to its owner and Jonty meets a company using this to secure our information as well as our cars. Getting the chance to test drive their heart beat steering wheel with some disastrous consequences.

No trip to Belfast would be complete without a trip to the pub and here we meet some of the young talent that’s drawing this attention. We hear how quickly the start-up culture has grown and how this tech cluster has reached a level that is reversing the once chronic brain drain from the region.

Can the UK become a world leader in making the internet safer?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

"

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers"

Jonty Bloom looks at what we could do to make this Brexit proof industry bigger and finds out why Belfast is at the forefront of the UK’s research and development to keep us safe online.

He looks at Unit 8200 the Israeli Army’s elite cyber security unit which has spun off several successful start up companies because of the unique training system they employ.

Jonty gets to see inside the National Cyber Security Centre which is part of GCHQ’s new open policy as it invites investors to see the third round of it’s start up incubator.

The ‘Catalyst’ campus in Belfast’s newly redeveloped docks sits beside the shipyard that built the Titanic and is now securing silicon chips rather than building ships. It’s buzzing as foreign investment has flowed into to take advantage of its burgeoning cyber security talent pool. A bet placed on the industry a decade ago by Queen’s University has paid off with a pipeline of graduates with the specialist skills needed to protect us online.

No trip to Belfast would be complete without a trip to the pub and here we meet some of the young talent that’s drawing this attention. We hear how quickly the start-up culture has grown and how this tech cluster has reached a level that is reversing the once chronic brain drain from the region.

Beyond The Boom2007083020070902The British economy has been growing for a record-breaking 15 years.

Reporting from the city of York, a place selected at random, Peter Day asks how much longer the expansion can go on, as seen through local eyes.

"The British economy has been growing for a record-breaking 15 years.

Beyond the Boom

The British economy has been growing for a record-breaking 15 years. Reporting from the city of York, a place selected at random, Peter Day asks how much longer the expansion can go on, as seen through local eyes."

Reporting from the city of York, a place selected at random, Peter Day asks how much longer the expansion can go on, as seen through local eyes."

"Beyond the Boom

Followed by News.

Big Ideas2006101220061015Nathan Myhrvold was a leading light at software giant Microsoft.

Now he has set up on his own, creating a new kind of company to exploit ideas and patents.

Peter Day meets him in Seattle.

"Nathan Myhrvold was a leading light at software giant Microsoft.

Big Ideas

Nathan Myhrvold was a leading light at software giant Microsoft. Now he has set up on his own, creating a new kind of company to exploit ideas and patents. Peter Day meets him in Seattle."

Peter Day meets him in Seattle."

Nathan Myhrvold was a leading light at software giant Microsoft. Now he has set up on his own, creating a new kind of company to exploit ideas and patents. Peter Day meets him in Seattle. Then Weather.

"Big Ideas

Nathan Myhrvold was a leading light at software giant Microsoft. Now he has set up on his own, creating a new kind of company to exploit ideas and patents. Peter Day meets him in Seattle. Then News.

Big Spenders20080504Oligarchs are not the only people making money in the new Russia.

The country's new prosperity, fuelled by the oil and gas industries, is creating a nation of middle-class consumers for the first time.

Peter Day reports on the hopes and fears of the new Muscovites.

"Oligarchs are not the only people making money in the new Russia.

Big Spenders

Oligarchs are not the only people making money in the new Russia. The country's new prosperity, fuelled by the oil and gas industries, is creating a nation of middle-class consumers for the first time. Peter Day reports on the hopes and fears of the new Muscovites."

Peter Day reports on the hopes and fears of the new Muscovites."

"Big Spenders

Biotech Battle2008082820080831Britain's world-class pharmaceutical industry fears that it is failing to keep pace with biotechnology, the latest development in medicines.

Industry leaders held an elaborate business war game in London to find out how to catch up.

Peter Day reports on the how the game was played and the lessons they learned.

"Britain's world-class pharmaceutical industry fears that it is failing to keep pace with biotechnology, the latest development in medicines.

Biotech Battle

Britain's world-class pharmaceutical industry fears that it is failing to keep pace with biotechnology, the latest development in medicines. Industry leaders held an elaborate business war game in London to find out how to catch up. Peter Day reports on the how the game was played and the lessons they learned."

Peter Day reports on the how the game was played and the lessons they learned."

"Biotech Battle

Bitter Pill2011080420110807The pharmaceutical giant Pfizer is closing most of its giant research facility at Sandwich in Kent, the place where Viagra was developed, putting two thousand science jobs at risk.

Peter Day asks what the surprising decision means for an important UK industry.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

What does the closure of the giant Pfizer facility in Kent mean for the UK's R&D future?

The pharmaceutical giant Pfizer is closing most of its giant research facility at Sandwich in Kent, the place where Viagra was developed, putting two thousand science jobs at risk. Peter Day asks what the surprising decision means for an important UK industry.

"The pharmaceutical giant Pfizer is closing most of its giant research facility at Sandwich in Kent, the place where Viagra was developed, putting two thousand science jobs at risk.

The pharmaceutical giant Pfizer is closing most of its giant research facility at Sandwich in Kent, the place where Viagra was developed, putting two thousand science jobs at risk. Peter Day asks what the surprising decision means for an important UK industry."

What does the closure of the giant Pfizer facility in Kent mean for the UK's R&D future?"

Bitter Pill20110807What does the closure of the giant Pfizer facility in Kent mean for the UK's R&D future?
Bitter Pills2010120920101212Britain's pharmaceutical companies have invested hundreds of millions of pounds in a search for new drugs and treatments which has not delivered the breakthroughs that were promised when the money was spent.

It's a problem for the whole global industry, too.

Peter Day asks if there are better ways of undertaking this quest for a cure.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Britain's pharma giants invest millions in the search for better cures but has it worked?

It is a problem for the whole global industry, too.

Peter Day talks to GlaxoSmithKline CEO Andrew Witty about the ways he is changing the company's quest for drug discovery and discusses the way ahead for big pharma.

BITTER PILLS

Britain's pharmaceutical companies have invested hundreds of millions of pounds in a search for new drugs and treatments which has not delivered the breakthroughs that were promised when the money was spent. It's a problem for the whole global industry, too. Peter Day asks if there are better ways of undertaking this quest for a cure.

"Britain's pharmaceutical companies have invested hundreds of millions of pounds in a search for new drugs and treatments which has not delivered the breakthroughs that were promised when the money was spent.

"

Peter Day talks to GlaxoSmithKline CEO Andrew Witty about the ways he is changing the company's quest for drug discovery and discusses the way ahead for big pharma."

Bitter Pills20101212Britain's pharmaceutical companies have invested hundreds of millions of pounds in a search for new drugs and treatments which has not delivered the breakthroughs that were promised when the money was spent. It is a problem for the whole global industry, too. Peter Day talks to GlaxoSmithKline CEO Andrew Witty about the ways he is changing the company's quest for drug discovery and discusses the way ahead for big pharma.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Britain's pharma giants invest millions in the search for better cures but has it worked?

"Britain's pharmaceutical companies have invested hundreds of millions of pounds in a search for new drugs and treatments which has not delivered the breakthroughs that were promised when the money was spent. It is a problem for the whole global industry, too. Peter Day talks to GlaxoSmithKline CEO Andrew Witty about the ways he is changing the company's quest for drug discovery and discusses the way ahead for big pharma.

Britain's pharma giants invest millions in the search for better cures but has it worked?"

Black Business Matters2020082020200823 (R4)Sparked by the Black Lives Matter protests around the world that followed the death of George Floyd, companies are wading into the conversation on racial inequality. With a focus on diversity in business, there was also interest and investment in a lot of companies run by black people in the UK.

Tobi Oredein, founder of media company Black Ballad, asks businesses including a home-ware maker, an interior design firm and a global bank if this is all a trend or if there will be substantial and long-term change.

Producer: Darin Graham

Presenter: Tobi Oredein

The impact of Black Lives Matter on business.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Blank Screens2015040920150412 (R4)The Information Technology department used to be a mysterious backroom operation, but has become the vital component of a successful company. With relentless technical developments businesses are facing a constant risk of their computer systems being past their sell by date.

Peter Day explores how companies are wrestling with the increasing demands of keeping their I.T fit for purpose.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Peter Day on how companies struggle to keep their computer systems fit for purpose.

Peter Day explores how companies are wrestling with the increasing demands of keeping their I.T fit for purpose.

"The Information Technology department used to be a mysterious backroom operation, but has become the vital component of a successful company. With relentless technical developments businesses are facing a constant risk of their computer systems being past their sell by date.

"

Body Talk2005012720050130Your body says far more about you than your speech.

Experts claim they can analyse which job suits you just by watching how you move.

Peter Day investigates.

Body Talk: Your body says far more about you than your speech. Some experts claim they can analyse which job suits you just by watching how you move. With Peter Day. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm]

Body Talk: Your body says far more about you than your speech. Experts claim they can analyse which job suits you just by watching how you move. Peter Day investigates. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

Body Talk: Your body says far more about you than your speech. Experts claim they can analyse which job suits you just by watching how you move. Peter Day investigates. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

Brand New2004061020040613Peter Day reports on how Chinese companies are learning to transform themselves from suppliers into makers of their own trusted branded products.

Brand New: Peter Day reports on how Chinese companies are learning to transform themselves from suppliers into makers of their own trusted branded products. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

Brand New: Peter Day reports on how Chinese companies are learning to transform themselves from suppliers into makers of their own trusted branded products. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

Brand Wagon2008092520080928Companies are obsessed with creating and nurturing their brands, but what is the business of branding all about? Peter Day visits a museum of brands that failed and talks to the people trying to revive old brands from the dead.

"Companies are obsessed with creating and nurturing their brands, but what is the business of branding all about? Peter Day visits a museum of brands that failed and talks to the people trying to revive old brands from the dead.

Brand Wagon

Companies are obsessed with creating and nurturing their brands, but what is the business of branding all about? Peter Day visits a museum of brands that failed and talks to the people trying to revive old brands from the dead."

Brand Wagon"

"Companies are obsessed with creating and nurturing their brands, but what is the business of branding all about? Peter Day visits a museum of brands that failed and talks to the people trying to revive old brands from the dead."

"Brand Wagon

Brexit And The Future Of Farming2016121520161218 (R4)What will Brexit mean for the future of British farms? The EU has been subsidising agriculture - via the Common Agricultural Policy - for decades, and there is a tariff-free market for produce. Jonty Bloom looks at the challenges that lie ahead.

Producer, Ruth Alexander.

"What will Brexit mean for the future of British farms? The EU has been subsidising agriculture - via the Common Agricultural Policy - for decades, and there is a tariff-free market for produce. Jonty Bloom looks at the challenges that lie ahead.

"

Jonty Bloom looks at the future of farming in the UK.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Brexit: The Response Of The French Abroad2016092220160925 (R4)How has London's French community fared since Brexit? Caroline Bayley explores why so many entrepreneurs have chosen to start businesses on this side of the channel. And what is the capital's attraction for so many of France's young people? After the vote to leave the EU, the response of many French ex-pats was deep shock. Three months on, are French people and companies re-assessing their future in the UK? And will London be as open for business as it has been in the past?

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

"How has London's French community fared since Brexit? Caroline Bayley explores why so many entrepreneurs have chosen to start businesses on this side of the channel. And what is the capital's attraction for so many of France's young people? After the vote to leave the EU, the response of many French ex-pats was deep shock. Three months on, are French people and companies re-assessing their future in the UK? And will London be as open for business as it has been in the past?

"

How has London's French business community fared since Brexit?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Bright Young Things2006022320060226Britain is bubbling with tiny young companies with bright ideas and big ambitions.

Their proprietors seem to have an instinct for business and no fear of taking great big risks.

They tell their stories to Peter Day.

Guests:

Charles Orton-Jones, Real Business Magazine

Paul Sheedy and Has Dosanjh, Engage Your Customer

Guy Weaver and Peter Brazier, Premium Appliance Brands

Simon Tate and Dominic McVey of Kew Health and Beauty

Dr Adrian Woolfson, Chief Executive, Proteinlogic.

"Britain is bubbling with tiny young companies with bright ideas and big ambitions.

Bright Young Things

Britain is bubbling with tiny young companies with bright ideas and big ambitions. Their proprietors seem to have an instinct for business and no fear of taking great big risks. They tell their stories to Peter Day."

Dr Adrian Woolfson, Chief Executive, Proteinlogic."

Dr Adrian Woolfson, Chief Executive, Proteinlogic Then Weather.

"Bright Young Things

Bring On The Bandwidth2008090420080907An ever-expanding internet needs more and more bandwidth to provide the services that users are demanding.

But can the system cope? Peter Day asks experts including writer George Gilder, who has been predicting what is now happening for over 20 years.

"An ever-expanding internet needs more and more bandwidth to provide the services that users are demanding.

Bring on the Bandwidth

An ever-expanding internet needs more and more bandwidth to provide the services that users are demanding. But can the system cope? Peter Day asks experts including writer George Gilder, who has been predicting what is now happening for over 20 years."

But can the system cope? Peter Day asks experts including writer George Gilder, who has been predicting what is now happening for over 20 years."

"Bring on the Bandwidth

Brought To Book20150517

Kevin Ashton is a businessman who has just written his first book, about innovation and creativity, with the intriguing title 'How to Fly a Horse'.

Charles Handy is an experienced and acclaimed management guru, who has just published a new book, called The Second Curve. Its focus is the big life changes business and individuals need to make to find fulfilment at work.

Peter Day hears the ideas behind their books

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

"Kevin Ashton is a businessman who has just written his first book, about innovation and creativity, with the intriguing title 'How to Fly a Horse'.

"

Building Back Better2020091720200920 (R4)The pandemic and the resulting recession have led to widespread calls to recognise that we now have a once in a generation opportunity to re-think how we put the economy back together again. Research shows we can help our economy flourish again by prioritising spending on environmentally friendly initiatives. From electric bikes, to eco-friendly cement, to a new type of plastic that could heat our homes, fill our mattresses and cushion our running trainers, Adam Shaw meets the businesses that could benefit from this type of recovery plan and could help us build back better.

Producer: Phoebe Keane

How can businesses ensure our recovery from Covid is green?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Building Sight2004060320040606Experts say that half the cement used in the whole world was poured in CHINA last year, and, as the country's economy grows, the skyline of many Chinese cities testifies to the fact.

In the first of two programmes from CHINA Peter Day asks: will the construction boom end in bust?

"Experts say that half the cement used in the whole world was poured in CHINA last year, and, as the country's economy grows, the skyline of many Chinese cities testifies to the fact.

Building Sight

Experts say that half the cement used in the whole world was poured in China last year, and, as the country's economy grows, the skyline of many Chinese cities testifies to the fact. In the first of two programmes from China Peter Day asks: will the construction boom end in bust?"

In the first of two programmes from CHINA Peter Day asks: will the construction boom end in bust?"

Experts say that half the cement used in the whole world was poured in China last year, and, as the country's economy grows, the skyline of many Chinese cities testifies to the fact. In the first of two programmes from China Peter Day asks: will the construction boom end in bust? Then Weather.

"Building Sight

Experts say that half the cement used in the whole world was poured in China last year, and, as the country's economy grows, the skyline of many Chinese cities testifies to the fact. In the first of two programmes from China Peter Day asks: will the construction boom end in bust? Then News.

Business Relations20190926
But Wait...there's More!2005090820050911Peter Day looks at the world of infomercials, those compelling sales pitches disguised as television shows on fringe TV stations across America, and, increasingly, in Europe too.

Peter hears from the pioneers who invented the industry 20 years ago, an industry now worth over $200 billion.

But Wait...There's More!

"Peter Day looks at the world of infomercials, those compelling sales pitches disguised as television shows on fringe TV stations across America, and, increasingly, in Europe too.

But Wait...There's More!"

But Wait...There's More!"

Peter hears from the pioneers who invented the industry 20 years ago, an industry now worth over $200 billion. Then Weather.

Peter Day looks at the world of Infomercials, those compelling sales pitches disguised as television shows on fringe TV stations across America, and, increasingly, in Europe too.

"But Wait...There's More!

Peter hears from the pioneers who invented the industry 20 years ago, an industry now worth over $200 billion."

Peter hears from the pioneers who invented the industry 20 years ago, an industry now worth over $200 billion. Then News.

Cabin Fever2014121120141214 (R4)Finding your comfort zone can be difficult at 35,000 feet. As cash strapped carriers try to put more passengers on each plane, flyers are feeling the squeeze. But there are innovations and advancements being made in aircraft design and London is leading the way with a cluster of firms in this specialist market. Peter Day asks about the width and breadth of these changes and when they will start to make some difference to air travellers everywhere.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Cabin Fever

"Finding your comfort zone can be difficult at 35,000 feet. As cash strapped carriers try to put more passengers on each plane, flyers are feeling the squeeze. But there are innovations and advancements being made in aircraft design and London is leading the way with a cluster of firms in this specialist market. Peter Day asks about the width and breadth of these changes and when they will start to make some difference to air travellers everywhere.

Cabin Fever"

California - Agriculture And Migration2016011420160117 (R4)Peter Day travels to California to discover how migrant workers have transformed farming and agriculture. He speaks to families from Japan and Mexico - who've made California their home and learns about the history of mass migration and its impact on the land.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Peter Day discovers the impact of migration on farming in California.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Called To Account2012052020120527The global Big Four accountancy groups are under sharp scrutiny from the authorities in Britain, Europe and the USA.Peter Day finds out why they are getting such close official attention..and why it matters to the rest of us.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

The global Big Four accountancy groups are under sharp scrutiny from the authorities in Britain, Europe and the USA. Peter Day finds out why they are getting such close official attention..and why it matters to the rest of us.

"The global Big Four accountancy groups are under sharp scrutiny from the authorities in Britain, Europe and the USA.Peter Day finds out why they are getting such close official attention..and why it matters to the rest of us.

Producer: Caroline Bayley."

CALLED TO ACCOUNT

Called To Account2012052420120527The global Big Four accountancy groups are under sharp scrutiny from the authorities in Britain, Europe and the USA. Peter Day finds out why they are getting such close official attention..and why it matters to the rest of us.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

"The global Big Four accountancy groups are under sharp scrutiny from the authorities in Britain, Europe and the USA. Peter Day finds out why they are getting such close official attention..and why it matters to the rest of us.

Producer: Caroline Bayley."

Can Internet Shopping Transform Rural China?2015112620151129 (R4)In some areas of rural China, traditional farming communities are transforming into something very 21st Century: internet shopping hubs.

Leading the way is the village of Qing Yan Liu where, four hours south of Shanghai, local residents have created a world of bubble wrap and sticky tape.

In the eyes of the Chinese Premier Xi Jinping this could be the future of rural China. He hopes that more and more small communities will copy what's happened in Qing Yan Liu - now dubbed 'China's No. 1 E-Commerce village'. It's hoped this will halt the flow of young people from rural China to the nation's cities, as they go in search of employment.

Turning more small towns and villages into online shopping hubs would provide much needed jobs, and a reason for young people to stay at home, ensuring communities continue to survive rather than disappear.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Can the internet shopping industry transform China's rural communities?

"In some areas of rural China, traditional farming communities are transforming into something very 21st Century: internet shopping hubs.

"

Can The Co-op Cope?2012122020121223What is the Co-op's place in the retail world of the 21st century? Peter Day investigates.

What is the Co-op's place in the retail world of the 21st century? Peter Day investigates.

The Cooperative movement is 168 years old and the Co-op brand is a presence in food, funerals, travel and banking.Peter Day reports on its relevance to the 21st century consumer.

The Cooperative movement is 168 years old and the Co-op brand is a presence in food, funerals, travel and banking. Peter Day reports on its relevance to the 21st century consumer.

"What is the Co-op's place in the retail world of the 21st century? Peter Day investigates.

The Cooperative movement is 168 years old and the Co-op brand is a presence in food, funerals, travel and banking. Peter Day reports on its relevance to the 21st century consumer."

The Cooperative movement is 168 years old and the Co-op brand is a presence in food, funerals, travel and banking.Peter Day reports on its relevance to the 21st century consumer."

"What is the Co-op's place in the retail world of the 21st century? Peter Day investigates.

Car Crash2007062820070701
20070701 (R4)
The US automobile industry, which changed the world during the last century, is in deep trouble.

Peter Day talks to an expert who has followed the long decline of American cars for decades.

"The US automobile industry, which changed the world during the last century, is in deep trouble.

Car Crash

Peter Day looks at the history of and the troubles with the modern car industry. He talks to industry experts along with the Chairman of Toyota.

The US automobile industry, which changed the world during the last century, is in deep trouble. Peter Day talks to an expert who has followed the long decline of American cars for decades."

Peter Day talks to an expert who has followed the long decline of American cars for decades."

The US automobile industry is in deep trouble. Peter Day investigates.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

"Car Crash

Casino Capitalism2008091820080921What can financiers learn about risk management from gambling and the casinos who do it every day of the week? Peter Day asks the experts.
Caught In The Web2007061420070617
20070617 (R4)
Bold companies are launching new technology over the Internet, delivering computer services on demand.

Peter Day investigates the trend.

"Bold companies are launching new technology over the Internet, delivering computer services on demand.

Caught in the Web

Bold companies are launching new technology over the Internet, delivering computer services on demand. Peter Day investigates the trend."

Peter Day investigates the trend."

Bold companies are launching new technology over the Internet. Peter Day investigates.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

"Caught in the Web

Changing Places20090104Peter Day asks why, in an interconnected world, it still matters where we live and work.

In Toronto, Peter Day finds out from author and urban studies expert Prof Richard Florida why, in an interconnected world, it still matters where we live and work.

"Peter Day asks why, in an interconnected world, it still matters where we live and work.

Peter Day asks why, in an interconnected world, it still matters where we live and work."

In Toronto, Peter Day finds out from author and urban studies expert Prof Richard Florida why, in an interconnected world, it still matters where we live and work."

In Toronto, Peter Day finds out from author and urban studies expert Prof Richard Florida why, in an interconnected world, it still matters where we live and work.

Chattanooga - The High Speed City2016080420160807 (R4)Does speed matter? Peter Day visits America's first 'gig city', Chattanooga, to find out.

Chattanooga has been re-inventing itself for decades. In the late 1960s Walter Cronkite referred to the city as "the dirtiest in America". Since then heavy industry has declined and, to take its place, civic leaders have been on a mission to bring high-tech innovation and enterprise to Chattanooga. In 2010 the city became the first in America to enjoy gig speed internet following an investment of a couple of hundred million dollars from its publically-owned electricity company, EPB. What economic and psychological benefits has super-fast internet brought to this mid-sized city in Tennessee? Has the investment in speed paid off?

Presenter Peter Day

Producer Rosamund Jones.

"Does speed matter? Peter Day visits America's first 'gig city', Chattanooga, to find out.

Chattanooga has been re-inventing itself for decades. In the late 1960s Walter Cronkite referred to the city as ""the dirtiest in America"". Since then heavy industry has declined and, to take its place, civic leaders have been on a mission to bring high-tech innovation and enterprise to Chattanooga. In 2010 the city became the first in America to enjoy gig speed internet following an investment of a couple of hundred million dollars from its publically-owned electricity company, EPB. What economic and psychological benefits has super-fast internet brought to this mid-sized city in Tennessee? Has the investment in speed paid off?

"

"Does speed matter? Peter Day visits America's first 'gig city', Chattanooga, to find out.

Presenter Peter Day

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

China Dispossessed20110106The vast national urbanisation plan to take Chinese people out of poverty leaves behind many who are dispossessed of land and homes, or see their farms drowned by huge new water and power projects.

Peter Day hears about some of the problems caused by China's rush for prosperity.

Producer: Julie Ball.

Peter Day looks at China's vast urbanisation plan to take Chinese people out of poverty.

The vast national urbanisation plan to take Chinese people out of poverty leaves behind many who are dispossessed of land and homes, or see their farms drowned by huge new water and power projects. Peter Day hears about some of the problems caused by China's rush for prosperity.

Peter Day hears about some of the problems caused by China's rush for prosperity.

Peter Day looks at China's vast urbanisation plan to take Chinese people out of poverty.

"The vast national urbanisation plan to take Chinese people out of poverty leaves behind many who are dispossessed of land and homes, or see their farms drowned by huge new water and power projects.

"

Peter Day looks at China's vast urbanisation plan to take Chinese people out of poverty."

China Going Green2015091720150920 (R4)Peter Day reports from China on the country's efforts to reduce pollution and go green.

China is the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases.

Many Chinese dream of seeing blue skies and white clouds but rarely do because of the smog. Often the daily routine is to wake up and check the pollution levels to decide if it is safe for children to play outside, or if a filter mask should be worn for protection.

Ahead of December's UN Climate Change summit, Peter Day reports on the Chinese ambitions to make China 'go green'. Many people say the Chinese aren't given enough credit for their efforts and argue the West will be shocked when it realises the extent of their actions. But can that ambition become reality? Peter Day reports from Beijing and beyond and asks when will the Chinese be able to breathe more easily?

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

"Peter Day reports from China on the country's efforts to reduce pollution and go green.

"

China's Economic Crossroads2013092620130929Peter Day travels to China to ask why so many graduates are having difficulty finding jobs

The Chinese government plans to have 200 million graduates by 2020. Although this number still needs to be seen in its context of the 1.3 billion Chinese population, it is still a large increase in skilled workers from the 1 million graduates in 2000. But cracks in the plan are being shown by the class of 2013. Seven million people finished university this year and many are finding that the types of job they want aren't available. Many employers also can't find the workers they want to fill their jobs. This is an illustration of China's economy at a turning point in its development. The rapid economic expansion of the past thirty years, based on cheap labour making goods for export, is slowing down and something needs to come and fill the gap it is leaving behind. In this week's In Business, Peter Day travels to the centre of China, the city of Zhengzhou in Henan province. For centuries the city has been known as the crossroads of the country, situated on the Yellow River and where the north-south and east-west railways meet. It's an apt place perhaps to investigate China's economy at its own crossroads.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Peter Day travels to China to ask why so many graduates are having difficulty finding jobs

The Chinese government plans to have 200 million graduates by 2020. Although this number still needs to be seen in its context of the 1.3 billion Chinese population, it is still a large increase in skilled workers from the 1 million graduates in 2000. But cracks in the plan are being shown by the class of 2013. Seven million people finished university this year and many are finding that the types of job they want aren't available. Many employers also can't find the workers they want to fill their jobs. This is an illustration of China's economy at a turning point in its development. The rapid economic expansion of the past thirty years, based on cheap labour making goods for export, is slowing down and something needs to come and fill the gap it is leaving behind. In this week's In Business, Peter Day travels to the centre of China, the city of Zhengzhou in Henan province. For centuries the city has been known as the crossroads of the country, situated on the Yellow River and where the north-south and east-west railways meet. It's an apt place perhaps to investigate China's economy at its own crossroads.

"Peter Day travels to China to ask why so many graduates are having difficulty finding jobs

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard."

"Peter Day travels to China to ask why so many graduates are having difficulty finding jobs

Chips Off The Old Block20100912Peter Day reports on the past, present and future of UK computing.

"Peter Day reports on the past, present and future of UK computing."

Christmas, Made In China2015122420151227 (R4)Peter Day visits the Chinese city which makes most of the world's Christmas decorations

Producers: Charlotte Pritchard and David Rhodes.

Peter Day visits the Chinese city that makes most of the world's Christmas decorations.

Producers: Charlotte Pritchard & David Rhodes.

Peter Day visits the Chinese city that makes most of the world's Christmas decorations.

Producers: Charlotte Pritchard & David Rhodes.

Circular Economy2015042320150426 (R4)Peter Day talks to Dame Ellen MacArthur about the so-called 'circular economy'.

As Dame Ellen MacArthur circumnavigated the globe she got first-hand knowledge of the finite nature of the world's resources. When she retired from sailing she created a foundation to promote the concept of a 'Circular Economy' - where resources are re-used and waste reduced to zero. Many companies around the world - including some of the biggest, like Unilever - are responding to her ideas.

Peter Day talks to the record-breaking sailor, to Unilever, and to the creators of an innovative urban farm in New Jersey about why these concepts are so important and how businesses can take them on board.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day talks to Dame Ellen MacArthur about the so-called 'circular economy'.

Peter Day talks to the record-breaking sailor, to Unilever, and to the creators of an innovative urban farm in New Jersey about why these concepts are so important and how businesses can take them on board.

"Peter Day talks to Dame Ellen MacArthur about the so-called 'circular economy'.

"

Civilian Drones2013090520130908Peter Day investigates the business use of what some call, with a shiver, drones.

For decades, unpersoned planes have been used by the military in places such as Afghanistan and Pakistan to watch the ground and deliver weapons controlled by remote pilots thousands of kilometres away. But now companies and experts are putting their minds to turning military drones into civilian vehicles that can do things cheaper and better than piloted planes. Peter Day investigates unmanned aerial vehicles and how they are already being used by farmers and the police. Also, could a drone be delivering your pizza in the not too distant future?

Peter Day investigates the business use of what some call, with a shiver, drones.

For decades, unpersoned planes have been used by the military in places such as Afghanistan and Pakistan to watch the ground and deliver weapons controlled by remote pilots thousands of kilometres away. But now companies and experts are putting their minds to turning military drones into civilian vehicles that can do things cheaper and better than piloted planes.Peter Day investigates unmanned aerial vehicles and how they are already being used by farmers and the police. Also, could a drone be delivering your pizza in the not too distant future?

"Peter Day investigates the business use of what some call, with a shiver, drones.

For decades, unpersoned planes have been used by the military in places such as Afghanistan and Pakistan to watch the ground and deliver weapons controlled by remote pilots thousands of kilometres away. But now companies and experts are putting their minds to turning military drones into civilian vehicles that can do things cheaper and better than piloted planes. Peter Day investigates unmanned aerial vehicles and how they are already being used by farmers and the police. Also, could a drone be delivering your pizza in the not too distant future?"

"Peter Day investigates the business use of what some call, with a shiver, drones.

For decades, unpersoned planes have been used by the military in places such as Afghanistan and Pakistan to watch the ground and deliver weapons controlled by remote pilots thousands of kilometres away. But now companies and experts are putting their minds to turning military drones into civilian vehicles that can do things cheaper and better than piloted planes.Peter Day investigates unmanned aerial vehicles and how they are already being used by farmers and the police. Also, could a drone be delivering your pizza in the not too distant future?"

Class Struggle2012010520120108In nearly every country in the world, there's one sector that everyone seems to think is in crisis: education. America produces legions of Nobel laureates and has the best universities in the world - and yet faces an epidemic of failing state-run schools. India churns out vast numbers of engineers ready for the modern economy, and yet its business leaders yearn for the kind of creative thought that is taught in the Anglo-Saxon system. In the UK we worry about discipline and standards, while at the same time welcoming thousands of foreigners anxious to get qualifications and training that are non-existent in their home counties.

Peter Day asks why everyone thinks education is so bad and what schools and businesses are doing to try to improve it.

Producer: Mike Wendling.

All around the world, people think education is in crisis.Peter Day asks why.

"In nearly every country in the world, there's one sector that everyone seems to think is in crisis: education. America produces legions of Nobel laureates and has the best universities in the world - and yet faces an epidemic of failing state-run schools. India churns out vast numbers of engineers ready for the modern economy, and yet its business leaders yearn for the kind of creative thought that is taught in the Anglo-Saxon system. In the UK we worry about discipline and standards, while at the same time welcoming thousands of foreigners anxious to get qualifications and training that are non-existent in their home counties.

Peter Day asks why everyone thinks education is so bad and what schools and businesses are doing to try to improve it.

All around the world, people think education is in crisis. Peter Day asks why."

All around the world, people think education is in crisis.Peter Day asks why."

Class Struggle20120108All around the world, people think education is in crisis. Peter Day asks why.

"All around the world, people think education is in crisis. Peter Day asks why."

Clean Cooking In Rwanda2020043020200503 (R4)We meet the companies trying to give women a cleaner and safer cooking environment.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

More than seventy percent of households in Rwanda cook over wooden and charcoal fires. This means women often sit for hours every day in smoky conditions which can damage their health, increasing the risk of respiratory infections, heart disease, strokes and lung cancer. These traditional cooking methods are also the cause of widespread deforestation. The Rwandan government is aiming to halve the number of people using these cooking fuels in the next six years. They're investing in infrastructure and offering tax incentives to try and support businesses to entice customers to other products which could give them a cleaner and safer way to cook. In other countries who’ve made this move though, changing from traditional stoves to modern clean cooking took the best part of a century - can that really be achieved here in just six years?

Producer/Presenter: Kate Lamble

Producer/Presenter: Kate Lamble

Coal Comfort2012081620120819Peter Day looks at the insatiable demand for coal and asks if it can ever go green.

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel, and the dirtiest, despite talk of "clean coal". It is the single biggest emitter of the greenhouse gas CO2. But with reserves of over 100 years, much more than for oil and gas, it's here to stay. In the US, almost half of all electricity comes from coal, about double the rate of the UK. With China and India fuelling their economic growth with coal, demand will stay high. So will we have to live with the environmental consequences or can coal become green? Peter Day travels to the US to find out.

In North Dakota coal is mined in a modern, open pit operation using electric draglines. One of the biggest hopes for minimising the impact of coal burning on climate change is to capture and store the resulting carbon dioxide. Peter visits the Great Plains Synfuels plant in North Dakota which burns coal to turn it into synthetic natural gas and captures about half of the resulting CO2 to pipe it to Canada for underground storage in a depleted oil field. Adjacent to the Synfuels plant is a coal-fuelled electricity power station, Antelope Valley. Unlike their neighbours, Antelope Valley decided against carbon capture and storage because adapting the plant would cost hundreds of millions of dollars. But if even a place like Antelope Valley, that could benefit from their neighbour's pipeline and other infrastructure can't do CCS in an economically viable way, what chance is there for other coal-burning power plants? While coal remains king, its status is being challenged not just by those concerned about climate change, but also by other fossil fuels such as shale gas and new oil fields. How will coal fight back? Or does it not need to, as the world cannot do without it anyway?

Producer Arlene Gregorius

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

"Peter Day looks at the insatiable demand for coal and asks if it can ever go green.

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel, and the dirtiest, despite talk of ""clean coal"". It is the single biggest emitter of the greenhouse gas CO2. But with reserves of over 100 years, much more than for oil and gas, it's here to stay. In the US, almost half of all electricity comes from coal, about double the rate of the UK. With China and India fuelling their economic growth with coal, demand will stay high. So will we have to live with the environmental consequences or can coal become green? Peter Day travels to the US to find out.

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel, and the dirtiest. With reserves of well over 100 years worth left, which is much more than for oil and gas, it's here to stay.

In the US, almost half of all electricity comes from coal, about double the rate of the UK. With China and India fuelling their economic growth with coal, demand will stay high. So, will we have to live with the environmental consequences or can coal become green? Peter Day visits the US and China to find out.

One of the biggest hopes for minimising the impact of coal burning on climate change is to capture and store the resulting carbon dioxide. Peter Day visits the Great Plains Synfuels plant in North Dakota which burns coal to turn it into synthetic natural gas and captures about half of the resulting CO2 to pipeline it to Canada for underground storage in a depleted oil field. Adjacent to the Synfuels plant is a coal-fuelled electricity power station, Antelope Valley. Unlike their neighbours, Antelope Valley decided against carbon capture and storage as they could not do it in an economically viable way. If CCS can't be made economically viable, what chance is there for other coal-burning power plants?

This is where China comes in. China produces three times more coal than the US, a staggering 3.5bn tonnes a year, no small motivation for researching new ways of reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. Peter Day visits a pilot project that uses micro-algae and sunlight to consume the CO2. Can this ever work at a big enough scale even when the sun doesn't shine?

While coal remains king, its status is being challenged not just by those concerned about climate change, but also by other fossil fuels such as shale gas and new oil fields. How will coal fight back? Or does it not need to, as the world cannot do without it anyway?"

Editor: Stephen Chilcott."

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel, and the dirtiest, despite talk of """"clean coal"""". It is the single biggest emitter of the greenhouse gas CO2. But with reserves of over 100 years, much more than for oil and gas, it's here to stay. In the US, almost half of all electricity comes from coal, about double the rate of the UK. With China and India fuelling their economic growth with coal, demand will stay high. So will we have to live with the environmental consequences or can coal become green? Peter Day travels to the US to find out.

Colombian Women2015090320150906 (R4)Colombia is known for its machismo culture, what does that mean for women at work?

An International Labour Organization report ranked Colombia second globally for the percentage of women in middle and senior management positions. Peter Day investigates why Colombian women have managed to advance in business and whether the figures are a true reflection of life for women in a country known for its machismo culture.

Producer: Keith Moore.

"Colombia is known for its machismo culture, what does that mean for women at work?

"

Colombia's Coffee Revolutions2019012420190127 (R4)"

Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia’s struggling farmers? It’s not been easy growing coffee in recent decades in Colombia, where rural life has been dominated by the conflict between guerrillas, paramilitaries and drug traffickers. Now, two years on from the historic peace deal here, how is business benefiting? And with global market prices not even covering growers’ costs, could the trend for coffee with a story come to growers’ rescue?

Presenter: Simon Maybin
Producer: Karenina Velandia

Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia's struggling farmers?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers"

Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia’s struggling farmers? It’s not been easy growing coffee in recent decades in Colombia, where rural life has been dominated by the conflict between guerrillas, paramilitaries and drug traffickers. Now, two years on from the historic peace deal here, how is business benefiting? And with global market prices not even covering growers’ costs, could the trend for coffee with a story come to growers’ rescue?

Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia's struggling farmers?

Colorado's Big Marijuana Experiment2016042820160501 (R4)Marijuana is now legal in some US states. How is the experiment working in Colorado?

Marijuana is now legal in some US states and a fast-growing industry has emerged, especially in Colorado which was the first state to embrace the drug. But according to federal law marijuana is still illegal. This means that many companies can't get banking services, advertise their wares or pay tax in the way that other companies do.

So how do they survive and thrive? And in what direction is the US moving? Will marijuana soon become a legal drug, like alcohol, across the US? Or will law-makers decide that Colorado's big marijuana experiment has gone too far? And what is it like to run a company in one of the world's riskiest business sectors?

Presenter : Peter Day

Producer : Rosamund Jones.

"Marijuana is now legal in some US states. How is the experiment working in Colorado?

"

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Coming Soon2010072220100725What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues? Peter Day gets the long view from a clutch of the distinguished economists including Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan and Sushil Wadhwani.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

"What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues? Peter Day gets the long view from a clutch of the distinguished economists including Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan and Sushil Wadhwani.

"

What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues?"

What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues? Peter Day gets the long view from a clutch of the distinguished economists including Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan and Sushil Wadhwani.

What happens next, as the credit crunch crisis continues? Peter Day gets the long view.

""

Coming Soon20100725What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues? Peter Day gets the long view from a clutch of the distinguished economists including Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan and Sushil Wadhwani.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

"What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues? Peter Day gets the long view from a clutch of the distinguished economists including Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan and Sushil Wadhwani.

What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues?"

Community Enterprise2017081020170813 (R4)What role can the community play in rejuvenating their local economy?

What role can the community play in rejuvenating their local economy? Globalisation often results in a big geographical divide between where profits are made and where they are spent. Anu Anand visits two communities trying to reverse that trend and keep investment, jobs and profits close to hand. In Frome, in Somerset, she meets local property developers who are keeping rents low and chain stores at bay in a bid to allow local independent retailers to thrive. And in rural Lancashire she spends time with villagers building their own broadband network and investing in local energy projects. What impact might these initiatives have long-term and could other communities follow suit?
Producer: Rosamund Jones.

"What role can the community play in rejuvenating their local economy?

What role can the community play in rejuvenating their local economy? Globalisation often results in a big geographical divide between where profits are made and where they are spent. Anu Anand visits two communities trying to reverse that trend and keep investment, jobs and profits close to hand. In Frome, in Somerset, she meets local property developers who are keeping rents low and chain stores at bay in a bid to allow local independent retailers to thrive. And in rural Lancashire she spends time with villagers building their own broadband network and investing in local energy projects. What impact might these initiatives have long-term and could other communities follow suit?
Producer: Rosamund Jones."

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Companies Without Managers2015082720150830 (R4)

Who's your boss? Peter Day explores how three different companies, in three different countries, do business without managers. Who hires and fires? And how do you get a pay rise? He asks how these radical organisations emerged, and whether other companies may follow their lead.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Who is your boss? Peter Day asks how three companies, without managers, do business.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

"Who's your boss? Peter Day explores how three different companies, in three different countries, do business without managers. Who hires and fires? And how do you get a pay rise? He asks how these radical organisations emerged, and whether other companies may follow their lead.

"

Computers Chipped2007090620070909For 40 years, computer chips have doubled in speed and power every two years.

But maintaining the pace of improvement is becoming more difficult.

Peter Day investigates.

"For 40 years, computer chips have doubled in speed and power every two years.

Computers Chipped

For 40 years, computer chips have doubled in speed and power every two years. But maintaining the pace of improvement is becoming more difficult. Peter Day investigates."

Peter Day investigates."

"Computers Chipped

Followed by News.

Conference Call20030601Every spring a select group of global corporate leaders gather in the comfortable Swiss city of St Gallen for an intensive interchange of views about the future.

The event is unique because it's organised by students from the city's international business school.

Peter Day reports from last week's conference on the mood of the multinationals at a time of great uncertainty.

Confronting Sexual Harassment2018042620180429 (R4)From training to employing more senior women: how businesses can stop workplace harassment

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Sexual harassment at work has become "normalised" according to the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

A recent UK survey by polling company ComRes found that half of women and a fifth of men have experienced it during their careers.

From unwanted comments and jokes to inappropriate touching, actions that go beyond office banter seem to have become the norm for many in the workplace.

As MPs and shareholders start to look at the issue more closely - business reporter Katie Prescott explores how companies are grappling with the growing number of sexual harassment revelations, and how they can prevent it happening in the first place.

Producer: Charlotte McDonald.

As MPs and shareholders start to look at the issue more closely - business reporter Katie Prescott explores how companies are dealing with the growing number of sexual harassment revelations, and how they can prevent it happening in the first place.

"From training to employing more senior women: how businesses can stop workplace harassment

Producer: Charlotte McDonald."

Connections2004093020041003Joining the internet with phones and home computers produces a new wired-up world.

Wireless, on the other hand, removes the wires.

Peter Day investigates.

"Joining the internet with phones and home computers produces a new wired-up world.

Connections

Joining the internet with phones and home computers produces a new wired-up world. Wireless, on the other hand, removes the wires.

Connections: Joining the internet with phones and home computers produces a new wired-up world. Wireless, on the other hand, removes the wires. Peter Day investigates. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

Connections: Joining the internet with phones and home computers produces a new wired-up world. Wireless, on the other hand, removes the wires. Peter Day investigates. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]"

Peter Day investigates."

Then Weather.

"Connections

Connections: Joining the internet with phones and home computers produces a new wired-up world. Wireless, on the other hand, removes the wires. Peter Day investigates. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] News follows.

Continental Drift2011052620110529As the sovereign debt crisis continues what next for the Euro? What next for Europe? Peter Day asks the experts.

What is next for the Euro and for Europe as the sovereign debt crisis continues?

Continental Drift

Continental Drift20110529Continental Drift

As the sovereign debt crisis continues what next for the Euro? What next for Europe? Peter Day asks the experts.

What is next for the Euro and for Europe as the sovereign debt crisis continues?

Cork2014012320140126Peter Day travels to Cork in Ireland to find out what life is really like in a country just recently realised from the constraints of an EU bailout.

Peter Day travels to Cork to find out what life is really like after the EU bailout.

Corporations And The Arts2016122220170402 (R4)Who pays for the arts, who should pay for the arts? In the UK, there is controversy about corporate sponsorship of arts organisations - particularly oil companies. In the US, there is a very different approach and state funding is much lower. Andrew Dickson examines the funding models and speaks to BP as well as a number of leading arts organisations.

Producer, Penny Murphy

(Image: Burlington House, the Piccadilly site for the Royal Academy of Arts. Credit: Fraser Mar).

"Who pays for the arts, who should pay for the arts? In the UK, there is controversy about corporate sponsorship of arts organisations - particularly oil companies. In the US, there is a very different approach and state funding is much lower. Andrew Dickson examines the funding models and speaks to BP as well as a number of leading arts organisations.

"

Andrew Dickson asks: Who pays for the arts? Who should pay for the arts?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Corruption2003062620030629International business is still disfigured by corruption, even though companies deny they take part.

Peter Day asks what's needed to make a clean-up happen.

"International business is still disfigured by corruption, even though companies deny they take part.

Peter Day asks what's needed to make a clean-up happen."

Could Carbon Offsetting Save The World's Forests?2020040920200412 (R4)Honey bees, cow dung and mulch - the company in Zimbabwe that is protecting the forests in order to offset carbon emissions. As Charlotte Ashton wrestles with ‘flight shame', she wants to find out where her money goes if she chooses to offset her flight. She lives in Zimbabwe, but is from the UK and doesn't have the money or time to spend three weeks at sea, sailing home to visit relatives. She focuses on a company based in Zimbabwe that runs one of the largest projects of its kind in the world and discovers how carbon credits work. Carbon Green Africa's project focuses on protecting existing forests, rather than planting new trees and her journey takes her to some surprising places. In a programme recorded last November, Charlotte finds that preventing deforestation not only helps her offset her carbon emissions, but helps give people in a remote part of Zimbabwe new jobs and access to international markets.

Guests: Charles Ndondo and Rory Muil, Carbon Green Africa
Christian Dannecker, South Pole

Presenter: Charlotte Ashton
Producer: Phoebe Keane

How a company in Zimbabwe is using carbon credits to protect forests.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Cracked China2009011520090118Peter Day reports from China's industrial cities on the economic strains they are facing.

Peter Day reports from China's heartland manufacturing cities on the global strains in the world's most vibrant economy, as hundreds of factories close and workers are laid off.

Peter Day reports from China's heartland manufacturing cities on the global strains in the world's most vibrant economy, as hundreds of factories close and workers are laid off.

Peter Day reports from China's industrial cities on the economic strains they are facing.

"Peter Day reports from China's heartland manufacturing cities on the global strains in the world's most vibrant economy, as hundreds of factories close and workers are laid off.

Peter Day reports from China's industrial cities on the economic strains they are facing."

Cracked China20090118Peter Day reports from China's industrial cities on the economic strains they are facing.
Craig Barrett Interview20090524Peter Day talks to the outgoing chairman of Intel, Craig Barrett, about receiving the largest fine ever imposed by the European Union and the other challenges of running a company on the cutting edge of modern technology.

Peter Day talks to the outgoing chairman of Intel, Craig Barrett.

Peter Day talks to the outgoing chairman of Intel, Craig Barrett, about receiving the largest fine ever imposed by the European Union and the other challenges of running a company on the cutting edge of modern technology.

Peter Day talks to the outgoing chairman of Intel, Craig Barrett.

"Peter Day talks to the outgoing chairman of Intel, Craig Barrett, about receiving the largest fine ever imposed by the European Union and the other challenges of running a company on the cutting edge of modern technology.

Peter Day talks to the outgoing chairman of Intel, Craig Barrett."

Crossing The Line2017091420170917 (R4)What red lines need to be crossed before companies retreat from foreign markets?

What red lines need to be crossed before companies retreat from foreign markets? As political turmoil engulfs Turkey, total economic collapse threatens in Venezuela and other global threats emerge, In Business explores the point at which businesses decide that enough is enough. Does it depend on the size of the investment and do companies in different sectors play by different rules? And what reputational risk might companies suffer if they get that calculation wrong? Presenter, Matthew Gwyther, talks to business people who have stayed and those who have left. Did they see the red line clearly or would they make a different call second time around?
Producer: Rosamund Jones.

"What red lines need to be crossed before companies retreat from foreign markets?

What red lines need to be crossed before companies retreat from foreign markets? As political turmoil engulfs Turkey, total economic collapse threatens in Venezuela and other global threats emerge, In Business explores the point at which businesses decide that enough is enough. Does it depend on the size of the investment and do companies in different sectors play by different rules? And what reputational risk might companies suffer if they get that calculation wrong? Presenter, Matthew Gwyther, talks to business people who have stayed and those who have left. Did they see the red line clearly or would they make a different call second time around?
Producer: Rosamund Jones."

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Crossroads2004062420040627Formula 1 is going east by holding the first Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai this autumn.

The British motor racing industry is a remarkable centre of excellence, but, asks Peter Day, is it now under threat from overseas influences as F1 flexes its muscles?

"Formula 1 is going east by holding the first Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai this autumn.

Crossroads

Formula 1 is going east by holding the first Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai this autumn. The British motor racing industry is a remarkable centre of excellence, but, asks Peter Day, is it now under threat from overseas influences as F1 flexes its muscles?"

The British motor racing industry is a remarkable centre of excellence, but, asks Peter Day, is it now under threat from overseas influences as F1 flexes its muscles?"

Formula 1 is going east by holding the first Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai this autumn. The British motor racing industry is a remarkable centre of excellence, but, asks Peter Day, is it now under threat from overseas influences as F1 flexes its muscles? Then Weather.

"Crossroads

Followed by News.

Crunching The Crisis2011082520110828Series of programmes about the whole world of work, public and private, from vast corporations to modest volunteers.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers.

"Series of programmes about the whole world of work, public and private, from vast corporations to modest volunteers.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers."

Crunching The Crisis20110828
Cuba Now2011121520111218After 53 years of revolution, President Raul Castro is trying to change the state-controlled Cuban economy with moves to promote private employment, and an open market in secondhand cars and home.

Peter Day reports from Havana on an island where in many ways time has been standing still for half a century.

Producer Julie Ball

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day reports from Cuba on the economic changes introduced by President Raul Castro.

CUBA NOW

After 53 years of revolution, President Raul Castro is trying to change the state-controlled Cuban economy with moves to promote private employment, and an open market in secondhand cars and home. Peter Day reports from Havana on an island where in many ways time has been standing still for half a century.

"After 53 years of revolution, President Raul Castro is trying to change the state-controlled Cuban economy with moves to promote private employment, and an open market in secondhand cars and home.

After 53 years of revolution, President Raul Castro is trying to change the state-controlled Cuban economy with moves to promote private employment, and an open market in secondhand cars and home. Peter Day reports from Havana on an island where in many ways time has been standing still for half a century."

Peter Day reports from Cuba on the economic changes introduced by President Raul Castro."

Cuba Now20111218CUBA NOW

After 53 years of revolution, President Raul Castro is trying to change the state-controlled Cuban economy with moves to promote private employment, and an open market in secondhand cars and home. Peter Day reports from Havana on an island where in many ways time has been standing still for half a century.

Producer Julie Ball

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day reports from Cuba on the economic changes introduced by President Raul Castro.

"CUBA NOW

Peter Day reports from Cuba on the economic changes introduced by President Raul Castro."

"After 53 years of revolution, President Raul Castro is trying to change the state-controlled Cuban economy with moves to promote private employment, and an open market in secondhand cars and home. Peter Day reports from Havana on an island where in many ways time has been standing still for half a century.

Curtain Up2013121920131222"Pantomime is a very British tradition, still as popular as ever with audiences. But it's also an important annual cash cow for regional theatres and big production companies. In Business goes to Nottingham to follow the progress of the city's two rival pantomimes: one made in-house at the Nottingham Playhouse, with a much-loved dame on his thirtieth (and last) pantomime and the other at the Theatre Royal, bought in from a big pantomime making production company starring the American Baywatch actor, known as ""The Hoff"". Peter Day finds out what's involved and why pantomimes matter so much to regional theatres.

(Image Robert Day).

episode-b03ls167.jpg

Peter Day goes behind the scenes at the pantomime to find out why it matters financially.

episode-b03ls167.jpg"

Peter Day goes behind the scenes at the pantomime to find out why it matters financially."

"

Pantomime is a very British tradition, still as popular as ever with audiences. But it's also an important annual cash cow for regional theatres and big production companies. In Business goes to Nottingham to follow the progress of the city's two rival pantomimes: one made in-house at the Nottingham Playhouse, with a much-loved dame on his thirtieth (and last) pantomime and the other at the Theatre Royal, bought in from a big pantomime making production company starring the American Baywatch actor, known as ""The Hoff"".Peter Day finds out what's involved and why pantomimes matter so much to regional theatres.

Pantomime is a very British tradition, still as popular as ever with audiences. But it's also an important annual cash cow for regional theatres and big production companies. In Business goes to Nottingham to follow the progress of the city's two rival pantomimes: one made in-house at the Nottingham Playhouse, with a much-loved dame on his thirtieth (and last) pantomime and the other at the Theatre Royal, bought in from a big pantomime making production company starring the American Baywatch actor, known as "The Hoff". Peter Day finds out what's involved and why pantomimes matter so much to regional theatres.

Cyber Town Malvern2014011620140119Peter Day visits Malvern to find out why it is a hub in the fight against cyber crime.

The historic spa town of Malvern in Worcestershire is rapidly becoming the centre of a hub of small companies specialising in a very 21st century occupation: defending people from Internet crime. Unlikely as it sounds, Malvern has been a centre of science expertise for decades. Now it's a place where innovation thrives outside big corporate labs. Peter Day finds out why.

Peter Day visits Malvern to find out why it is a hub in the fight against cyber crime.

The historic spa town of Malvern in Worcestershire is rapidly becoming the centre of a hub of small companies specialising in a very 21st century occupation: defending people from Internet crime. Unlikely as it sounds, Malvern has been a centre of science expertise for decades. Now it's a place where innovation thrives outside big corporate labs.Peter Day finds out why.

"Peter Day visits Malvern to find out why it is a hub in the fight against cyber crime.

"

Dates With Destiny2004101420041017Without much oil wealth, tiny Dubai has been trying to turn itself into the business and tourist crossroads of the Middle East.

Peter Day reports.

"Without much oil wealth, tiny Dubai has been trying to turn itself into the business and tourist crossroads of the Middle East.

Dates with Destiny: Without much oil wealth, tiny Dubai has been trying to turn itself into the business and tourist crossroads of the Middle East. Peter Day reports. [Rpt of Thu 8.00pm]

Dates with Destiny: Without much oil wealth, tiny Dubai has been trying to turn itself into the business and tourist crossroads of the Middle East. Peter Day reports. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

Dates with Destiny: Without much oil wealth, tiny Dubai has been trying to turn itself into the business and tourist crossroads of the Middle East. Peter Day reports. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]"

Peter Day reports."

"Dates with Destiny: Without much oil wealth, tiny Dubai has been trying to turn itself into the business and tourist crossroads of the Middle East. Peter Day reports. [Rpt of Thu 8.00pm]

Dc Rider2005102020051023What does it take to get an electric car off the ground? Lots of effort and endless patience, explains California-based inventor Lon Bell.

He talks to Peter Day about his vision of transforming city life with the introduction of a new breed of electric vehicle.

The all-electric, battery-powered car that Lon Bell has designed is called the G-Wiz.

Interviewees:

Keith Johnston, Managing Director, GoinGreen

Mark Duvall and Robert Graham, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California.

Lon Bell, Vice-Chairman, REVA Electric Car Company, Bangalore, India.

Dr John Wormald, Managing Partner, Autopolis

California-based inventor Lon Bell talks to Peter Day about his vision of transforming city life with the introduction of a new breed of electric vehicle.

DC Rider

"What does it take to get an electric car off the ground? Lots of effort and endless patience, explains California-based inventor Lon Bell.

What does it take to get an electric car off the ground? Lots of effort and endless patience, explains California-based inventor Lon Bell. He talks to Peter Day about his vision of transforming city life with the introduction of a new breed of electric vehicle. The all-electric, battery-powered car that Lon Bell has designed is called the G-Wiz.

DC Rider: California-based inventor Lon Bell talks to Peter Day about his vision of transforming city life with the introduction of a new breed of electric vehicle. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]"

DC Rider"

Then Weather.

"DC Rider

DC Rider: California-based inventor Lon Bell talks to Peter Day about his vision of transforming city life with the introduction of a new breed of electric vehicle. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

Deep Thoughts2014073120140803Peter Day meets business people inspired and influenced by highbrow philosophers.

It sounds abstruse, but clever people argue that commercial companies have a lot to learn from great philosophers and the academics who spend their lives studying them.

Peter Day meets some of the business people inspired and influenced by highbrow philosophy.

Produced by David Edmonds.

"Peter Day meets business people inspired and influenced by highbrow philosophers.

"

Design Thinking2013082220130825There's a certain magic when a product you've bought just simply works, when a company's customer service satisfies instead of frustrates, or when a website gives you exactly the right information you need, exactly when you need it. But these seemingly serendipitous moments might actually be the result of exact planning and customer research. The technical term is 'design thinking' and with the help of designers eager to break out of the lab and into the real world, it's a movement that's catching on in all sorts of unlikely places.

This week Peter Day talks to the people behind an award-winning government website, agencies that are creating whole companies from scratch, and finds out about other ways that innovative designers are intruding into the real world like never before.

Producer: Mike Wendling.

"There's a certain magic when a product you've bought just simply works, when a company's customer service satisfies instead of frustrates, or when a website gives you exactly the right information you need, exactly when you need it. But these seemingly serendipitous moments might actually be the result of exact planning and customer research. The technical term is 'design thinking' and with the help of designers eager to break out of the lab and into the real world, it's a movement that's catching on in all sorts of unlikely places.

Producer: Mike Wendling."

Diaspora Bonds20120617Diaspora Bonds

Developing countries need all kinds of facilities that most cannot afford, facilities that meet absolutely basic human needs: roads, bridges, railways, water supplies, power, sewerage, street lighting.

Many of them have little of the cash it needs to get big public investment programmes started. Overseas aid can help, and so can official borrowing from the big international institutions such as the World Bank.

But there's another pool of potential investment money that has so far been used mainly informally and only in very limited circumstances. Peter Day reports how developing governments, mostly in Africa, are waking up to the investment possibilities of the money diaspora send back to their own countries.

Producer: Richard Berenger.

But there's another pool of potential investment money that has so far been used mainly informally and only in very limited circumstances.Peter Day reports how developing governments, mostly in Africa, are waking up to the investment possibilities of the money diaspora send back to their own countries.

"Developing countries need all kinds of facilities that most cannot afford, facilities that meet absolutely basic human needs: roads, bridges, railways, water supplies, power, sewerage, street lighting.

Producer: Richard Berenger."

Digital Treatment2004051320040516The NHS is spending billions on computer power.

Peter Day finds out what the money will buy and asks if healthcare is ready to respond to the digital revolution.

Digital Treatment The NHS is spending billions on computer power.

Peter Day finds out what the money will buy and asks if healthcare is ready to respond to the digital revolution.

"The NHS is spending billions on computer power.

The NHS is spending billions on computer power. Peter Day finds out what the money will buy and asks if healthcare is ready to respond to the digital revolution.

The NHS is spending billions on computer power. Peter Day finds out what the money will buy and asks if healthcare is ready to respond to the digital revolution. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]"

The NHS is spending billions on computer power. Peter Day finds out what the money will buy and asks if healthcare is ready to respond to the digital revolution. Then Weather.

"Digital Treatment

The NHS is spending billions on computer power. Peter Day finds out what the money will buy and asks if healthcare is ready to respond to the digital revolution. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

Diversifying Russia's Economy2018010420180107 (R4)Can Russia diversify its economy beyond the energy sector?

Oil and gas are the backbone of Russia's economy and swings in energy prices can push the country from boom to bust. 80 per cent of the country's exports are directly related to hydro-carbons. So how successfully is Russia diversifying into new areas? As Caroline Bayley discovers, government money is supporting hi-tech start-ups and counter sanctions imposed by the government on food imports from the US and EU are helping the food sector. However, doing business in Russia is far from straightforward.

Producer: Kate Lamble.

"Can Russia diversify its economy beyond the energy sector?

Producer: Kate Lamble."

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Do It Like Deming2005063020050703W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas live on.

He is the quality guru whose analysis transformed Japanese business after the Second World War, and then took the rest of the world by storm decades later.

But, as Peter Day discovers, Deming's ideas are about more than mere quality: they try to transform the organisations that drive so many workers and customers to daily frustration.

W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas still live on.

Do It Like Deming

"W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas live on.

W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas live on. He is the quality guru whose analysis transformed Japanese business after the Second World War, and then took the rest of the world by storm decades later. But, as Peter Day discovers, Deming's ideas are about more than mere quality: they try to transform the organisations that drive so many workers and customers to daily frustration.

W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas still live on. He is the quality guru whose analysis transformed Japanese business after the Second World War, and then took the rest of the world by storm decades later. But as Peter Day discovers Deming's ideas are about more than mere quality: they try to transform the organisations that drive so many workers and customers to daily frustration."

Do It Like Deming"

W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas live on. He is the quality guru whose analysis transformed Japanese business after the Second World War, and then took the rest of the world by storm decades later. But, as Peter Day discovers, Deming's ideas are about more than mere quality: they try to transform the organisations that drive so many workers and customers to daily frustration. Then Weather.

"Do It Like Deming

W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas still live on. He is the quality guru whose analysis transformed Japanese business after the Second World War, and then took the rest of the world by storm decades later. But as Peter Day discovers Deming's ideas are about more than mere quality: they try to transform the organisations that drive so many workers and customers to daily frustration. Then News.

Do It Yourself Jobs2012011920120122If times are hard, why not set up your own business rather than try to find a job somewhere else? Peter Day hears from young entrepreneurs who think that one way of beating recession is to start from scratch.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day meets young people trying to beat the recession by setting up their own business

"If times are hard, why not set up your own business rather than try to find a job somewhere else? Peter Day hears from young entrepreneurs who think that one way of beating recession is to start from scratch.

If times are hard, why not set up your own business rather than try to find a job somewhere else? Peter Day hears from young entrepreneurs who think that one way of beating recession is to start from scratch.

Peter Day meets young people trying to beat the recession by setting up their own business"

Peter Day meets young people trying to beat the recession by setting up their own business"

Do It Yourself Jobs20120122Peter Day meets young people trying to beat the recession by setting up their own business
Dogfight2004102120041024The two giants of plane-making, Boeing and Airbus, are engaged in their fiercest battle ever.

Each accuses the other of receiving unfair levels of government aid.

At the same time, the two companies are sharply divided over the future of aviation itself.

Next year, Airbus launches the largest passenger plane the world has yet seen.

Boeing's approach is radically different - it says airlines want smaller planes which can be flown more frequently.

Peter Day asks who's right.

"The two giants of plane-making, Boeing and Airbus, are engaged in their fiercest battle ever.

Dogfight

The two giants of plane-making, Boeing and Airbus, are engaged in their fiercest battle ever. Each accuses the other of receiving unfair levels of government aid. At the same time, the two companies are sharply divided over the future of aviation itself. Next year, Airbus launches the largest passenger plane the world has yet seen. Boeing's approach is radically different - it says airlines want smaller planes which can be flown more frequently. Peter Day asks who's right."

Peter Day asks who's right."

The two giants of plane-making, Boeing and Airbus, are engaged in their fiercest battle ever. Each accuses the other of receiving unfair levels of government aid. At the same time, the two companies are sharply divided over the future of aviation itself. Next year, Airbus launches the largest passenger plane the world has yet seen. Boeing's approach is radically different - it says airlines want smaller planes which can be flown more frequently. Peter Day asks who's right. Then Weather.

"Dogfight

Then News.

Doing It Wrong2010011420100117The late business rebel Russell Ackoff's thoughts on how to get things done.

Russell Ackoff was a great subversive - a business school professor who thought that business schools were a block on management thinking and who delighted in pointing out the flaws in the way companies work. Before he died at the age of 90 in October 2009, this business rebel gave Peter Day some insights into his unconventional approach to getting things done.

"The late business rebel Russell Ackoff's thoughts on how to get things done.

"

""

"Russell Ackoff was a great subversive - a business school professor who thought that business schools were a block on management thinking and who delighted in pointing out the flaws in the way companies work.

The late business rebel Russell Ackoff's thoughts on how to get things done."

Doing It Wrong20100117The late business rebel Russell Ackoff's thoughts on how to get things done.
Don't Cry For Me, Argentina2011120120111204Is there life after a sovereign debt default such as Greece is now facing ? Peter Day reports from Argentina, a country which went through a similar sort of crisis ten years ago.

You can subscribe to "Peter Days World of Business" podcast, via the Radio 4 website.

The podcast brings you both the "In Business" programme, which broadcasts twenty six times a year and also "Global Business" which broadcasts every week of the year on the BBC World Service.

Producer: Richard Berenger Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Is there an 'Argentine Solution' for Europe? Peter Day reports from Argentina.

You can subscribe to "Peter Days World of Business" podcast, via the Radio 4 website. The podcast brings you both the "In Business" programme, which broadcasts twenty six times a year and also "Global Business" which broadcasts every week of the year on the BBC World Service.

"Is there life after a sovereign debt default such as Greece is now facing ? Peter Day reports from Argentina, a country which went through a similar sort of crisis ten years ago.

You can subscribe to "Peter Days World of Business" podcast, via the Radio 4 website. The podcast brings you both the "In Business" programme, which broadcasts twenty six times a year and also "Global Business" which broadcasts every week of the year on the BBC World Service."

Is there an 'Argentine Solution' for Europe? Peter Day reports from Argentina."

Don't Cry For Me, Argentina20111204
Down Japan2009012920090201After Japan's property bubble burst in 1990, the country was pitched into 10 years of economic depression, from which the world's second largest economy may not yet have fully recovered.

Peter Day asks what the rest of the world can learn from the now familiar-sounding Japanese experience.

"After Japan's property bubble burst in 1990, the country was pitched into 10 years of economic depression, from which the world's second largest economy may not yet have fully recovered.

Peter Day asks what the rest of the world can learn from the now familiar-sounding Japanese experience."

After Japan's property bubble burst in 1990, the country was pitched into 10 years of economic depression, from which the world's second largest economy may not yet have fully recovered. Peter Day asks what the rest of the world can learn from the now familiar-sounding Japanese experience.

Peter Day asks what the world can learn from Japan's experience of economic depression.

Down On The Farm2008091120080914What has been the effect of rocketing food prices on British farmers? Peter Day reports.

Down on the Farm

What has been the effect of rocketing food prices on British farmers? Peter Day reports.

Down With Hierarchies2006011920060122Feel Jaded? Job getting you down? Perhaps it's not you, but the organisation you work for.

Gerard Fairtlough is a very experienced business leader who thinks the traditional hierarchies of command and control are dysfunctional.

He tells Peter Day about some better ways of getting things done.

"Feel Jaded? Job getting you down? Perhaps it's not you, but the organisation you work for.

Down with Hierarchies

Feel Jaded? Job getting you down? Perhaps it's not you, but the organisation you work for. Gerard Fairtlough is an experienced business leader who thinks the traditional hierarchies of command and control are dysfunctional. He tells Peter Day about some better ways of getting things done.

Feel Jaded? Job getting you down? Perhaps it's not you, but the organisation you work for. Gerard Fairtlough is a very experienced business leader who thinks the traditional hierarchies of command and control are dysfunctional. He tells Peter Day about some better ways of getting things done."

He tells Peter Day about some better ways of getting things done."

Feel Jaded? Job getting you down? Perhaps it's not you, but the organisation you work for. Gerard Fairtlough is an experienced business leader who thinks the traditional hierarchies of command and control are dysfunctional. He tells Peter Day about some better ways of getting things done. Then Weather.

"Down with Hierarchies

Feel Jaded? Job getting you down? Perhaps it's not you, but the organisation you work for. Gerard Fairtlough is a very experienced business leader who thinks the traditional hierarchies of command and control are dysfunctional. He tells Peter Day about some better ways of getting things done. Then News.

Dragon's Den2012041920120422After 30 years of tearaway economic growth, there are fears that China may be rapidly slowing down, putting great strains on their economic system.Peter Day reports on the bursting of the great Chinese housing bubble and the pressures on private businesses and wonders if the Year of the Dragon is going be about hard times not traditional good fortune.

Producer: Julie Ball.

Is China's bubble about to burst? Peter Day reports.

"After 30 years of tearaway economic growth, there are fears that China may be rapidly slowing down, putting great strains on their economic system.Peter Day reports on the bursting of the great Chinese housing bubble and the pressures on private businesses and wonders if the Year of the Dragon is going be about hard times not traditional good fortune.

"

Is China's bubble about to burst? Peter Day reports."

After 30 years of tearaway economic growth, there are fears that China may be rapidly slowing down, putting great strains on their economic system. Peter Day reports on the bursting of the great Chinese housing bubble and the pressures on private businesses and wonders if the Year of the Dragon is going be about hard times not traditional good fortune.

Is China's bubble about to burst? Peter Day reports.

Dragon's Den20120422Is China's bubble about to burst? Peter Day reports.
Driverless Cars2015073020150802 (R4)Peter Day investigates a future of driverless cars - how soon will it come?

As the race to develop driverless cars hots up around the world, the UK is determined not to be left in the slow lane. Government money is being invested to help test vehicles and 'pods' over the next three years.

It's not just the robotic technology which is being developed- building the trust of the public in vehicles which eventually won't need drivers behind the wheel is crucial

There's still a long way to go, and Peter Day talks to those involved in this brave new world of transport.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

There's still a long way to go, and Peter Day talks to those involved in this brave new world of transport.

Peter Day investigates a future of driverless cars - how soon will it come?

"Peter Day investigates a future of driverless cars - how soon will it come?

"

Ebay Watch2004052720040530When the dot com bubble burst four years ago internet auctions went on powering ahead.

People are giving up their day jobs to trade on eBay and now its influence is spreading to big business too.

Peter Day investigates the economics of the eBay effect.

Economic Lessons From Pandemics Past2020042320200426 (R4)What can the past teach us about economies after a pandemic?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

In the 14th century the world was devastated by plague, known as 'The Black Death', in the 20th century a deadly form of influenza struck infecting around a quarter of the world's population. Since then HIV, Ebola and more have stricken nations. With each epidemic and pandemic comes a huge human cost but each also carry an economic cost. In this programme John Murphy visits pandemics past to see what history can teach us about economic cost and recovery.

Presenter: John Murphy
Producer: Lizzy McNeill

Economic Lessons From Pandemics Past.2020042320200426 (R4)In the 14th century the world was devastated by plague, known as 'The Black Death', in the 20th century a deadly form of influenza struck infecting around a quarter of the world's population. Since then HIV, Ebola and more have stricken nations. With each epidemic and pandemic comes a huge human cost but each also carry an economic cost. In this programme John Murphy visits pandemics past to see what history can teach us about economic cost and recovery.

Presenter: John Murphy
Producer: Lizzy McNeill

What can the past teach us about economies after a pandemic?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Economic Rebellion2016033120160403 (R4)Why is there so much dissatisfaction about how economics is taught at universities?

Why is there so much dissatisfaction about how economics is taught at universities? Since the financial crash, many students have been in revolt in the UK and overseas, determined to change the content of their courses. They are not alone. Employers and some economists share many of their concerns. Peter Day explores why the subject has changed over a generation and why that might matter.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

"Why is there so much dissatisfaction about how economics is taught at universities?

"

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Economic Recovery In The Usa2020050720200510 (R4)Jim O'Neill assesses American business and economic resilience.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

With the highest Covid19 death toll in the world, and 26 million Americans claiming unemployment insurance, the US economy has taken a massive hit. But how quickly can it bounce back?

Will America’s economy will be strong enough to pull its weight in the global economy? Economist Jim O’Neill explores the current scale of the problem and asks how resilient are US businesses and the country’s economy.

In Business hears how Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Romer has devised A Roadmap to Responsibly Re-opening America, which seeks to balance the health priorities with the pressure to open up the economy again.

The story of a small bakery in Brooklyn, which has had to lay off its workers, is illustrative of the damage that has been inflicted on businesses across America. Has the fiscal response from the authorities been sufficient to protect businesses so that they can recover once lockdowns end?

Is American manufacturing sufficiently flexible to pivot and adapt to the changing circumstances of the Covid health crisis? And will one of the longer term consequences of the crisis be a re-thinking of the character of American capitalism?

The answers to these questions will shed light on whether American will still be able to play its traditional crucial role in the global economy.

Presenter: Jim O'Neill
Producer: Philip Reevel

Electric Cars2018011120180114 (R4)Can electric cars replace petrol and diesel vehicles in a new motoring revolution?

There is a motoring revolution underway: the fast accelerating switch from petrol and diesel cars, to electric vehicles. In Norway, almost 40% of new car purchases are now fully electric or hybrids. Other countries are starting to catch up, and are setting ambitious targets. Britain wants to ban the sale of all petrol and diesel cars by 2040. Oxford wants to ban non-electric vehicles from parts of the city centre by 2020. Motor manufacturers are investing vast sums in the development of new electric models. Those who don't, risk being left behind.
And yet, as Peter Morgan reports, obstacles remain. Many drivers feel "range anxiety", the fear that the car battery will run out before they can recharge it. And electric cars are not cheap to buy.
But costs are coming down fast, batteries will soon last for hundreds of miles, and charge-points are being installed in more and more places. So much so, that there's a new land grab going on for market share. Start-ups are getting in on the act, and even big oil companies like Shell are branching out into this business.
Nevertheless, where will all the extra electricity come from? Will there be standardisation of the charging infrastructure, so drivers don't end up frustrated at a charge-point where their plug doesn't fit?
And while electric cars don't emit toxic fumes like nitrogen oxides, how much difference do they actually make to harmful particulates in the air?
Producer: Arlene Gregorius.

"Can electric cars replace petrol and diesel vehicles in a new motoring revolution?

There is a motoring revolution underway: the fast accelerating switch from petrol and diesel cars, to electric vehicles. In Norway, almost 40% of new car purchases are now fully electric or hybrids. Other countries are starting to catch up, and are setting ambitious targets. Britain wants to ban the sale of all petrol and diesel cars by 2040. Oxford wants to ban non-electric vehicles from parts of the city centre by 2020. Motor manufacturers are investing vast sums in the development of new electric models. Those who don't, risk being left behind.
And yet, as Peter Morgan reports, obstacles remain. Many drivers feel "range anxiety", the fear that the car battery will run out before they can recharge it. And electric cars are not cheap to buy.
But costs are coming down fast, batteries will soon last for hundreds of miles, and charge-points are being installed in more and more places. So much so, that there's a new land grab going on for market share. Start-ups are getting in on the act, and even big oil companies like Shell are branching out into this business.
Nevertheless, where will all the extra electricity come from? Will there be standardisation of the charging infrastructure, so drivers don't end up frustrated at a charge-point where their plug doesn't fit?
And while electric cars don't emit toxic fumes like nitrogen oxides, how much difference do they actually make to harmful particulates in the air?
Producer: Arlene Gregorius."

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Engineering The Future20170528For decades the UK has not produced enough engineers. What is needed to change that?

For decades the UK has not produced enough engineers. What's been going wrong? Is education at fault or does engineering have an intractable image problem? Engineering is a very male world. If that changes, might its recruitment problem disappear? Ruth Sunderland visits businesses with innovative schemes aimed at reversing the trend, and meets students, teachers and industry leaders. Who will be the engineers of the future?
Producer: Rosamund Jones

(Image: Ruth Sunderland. Credit: Mark Richards).

"For decades the UK has not produced enough engineers. What is needed to change that?

(Image: Ruth Sunderland. Credit: Mark Richards)."

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Estonia's E-residents2016120120161204 (R4)Ruth Alexander applies to become a virtual resident of Estonia.

Estonia is one of the smallest countries in Europe, with only 1.3 million citizens. But it is hoping to become much bigger - by attracting what it calls e-residents.

A scheme was started two years ago to give citizens of any nation the opportunity to set up Estonian bank accounts and businesses - and to develop a digital identity which can be managed from anywhere.

Ruth Alexander examines how it works, who benefits and why some UK citizens are seeing it as a post-Brexit business opportunity.

Producer: Elizabeth Cassin

(Image: Stanislav Yurin, an e-resident of Estonia, and his wife Kseniya Paliadnik).

"Ruth Alexander applies to become a virtual resident of Estonia.

"

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Eureka Democracy2007101120071014Business innovation is vital for corporate survival, but is it best left to companies? Some believe that the best ideas stem from the users of goods and services and that now is the time to make innovation a truly open and collaborative process.

Peter Day reports.

"Business innovation is vital for corporate survival, but is it best left to companies? Some believe that the best ideas stem from the users of goods and services and that now is the time to make innovation a truly open and collaborative process.

Eureka Democracy

Business innovation is vital for corporate survival, but is it best left to companies? Some believe that the best ideas stem from the users of goods and services and that now is the time to make innovation a truly open and collaborative process. Peter Day reports."

"Eureka Democracy

Followed by News.

Euro Everything2006051820060521Peter Day asks whether Europe really needs big projects such as the Galileo Satellite System and the Quaero internet research programme to boost innovation.

European politicians are worried about how the continent is falling behind the United States in innovation.

Some of them are placing their faith in big industrial and internet projects to boost the continents ability to compete.

But can taxpayers' money help innovation, or does it actually hinder it? And does Europe really need a European rival to the current American-run Global Positioning System and its own version of Google.

Peter Day interviews:

Kev Collins, Production Manager, EADS Astrium

Richard Peckham, Head of Business Development, EADS Astrium

Philippe de Buck, Secretary General, UNICE

David White, Director of Innovation Policy, European Commission

Francois Bourdoncle, President, Exalead

Loic Le Meur, Executive Vice President, Six Apart

Mike Lynch, Founder, Autonomy

Francois Loos, Frances Minister of Industry

Bernard Benhamou, senior lecturer, Political Studies Institute in Paris.

"Peter Day asks whether Europe really needs big projects such as the Galileo Satellite System and the Quaero internet research programme to boost innovation.

Euro Everything

Peter Day asks whether Europe really needs big projects such as the Galileo Satellite System and the Quaero internet research programme to boost innovation.

European politicians are worried about how the continent is falling behind the United States in innovation. Some of them are placing their faith in big industrial and internet projects to boost the continents ability to compete. But can taxpayers' money help innovation, or does it actually hinder it? And does Europe really need a European rival to the current American-run Global Positioning System and its own version of Google.

Peter Day interviews:

Euro Everything: The European Union wants its own Internet search engine and its own satellite navigation system. Peter Day asks why we need to go it alone. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

Euro Everything: The European Union wants its own Internet search engine and its own satellite navigation system. Peter Day asks why we need to go it alone. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]"

Bernard Benhamou, senior lecturer, Political Studies Institute in Paris."

Then Weather.

"Euro Everything

Euro Everything: The European Union wants its own Internet search engine and its own satellite navigation system. Peter Day asks why we need to go it alone. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

Euro On The Rocks?2010121620101219In Business

EURO ON THE ROCKS?

Euroland slides into big trouble as the crisis spreads from one country to another. In this change to the advertised programme, Peter Day asks a panel of experts what's happening and why it matters.

Producers: Caroline Bayley and Sandra Kanthal.

As crisis spreads from one country to another Peter Day asks if the Eurozone is in crisis.

"In Business

As crisis spreads from one country to another Peter Day asks if the Eurozone is in crisis."

In this change to the advertised programme, Peter Day asks a panel of experts what's happening and why it matters.

As crisis spreads from one country to another Peter Day asks if the Eurozone is in crisis.

"Euroland slides into big trouble as the crisis spreads from one country to another.

"

EURO ON THE ROCKS?"

Euro Peril2012071920120722Peter Day asks how continental European businesses are surviving the euro crisis.

EURO PERIL

As the euro struggles for survival, continental businesses are caught up in the maelstrom. Peter Day finds out what they make of their plight and what sort of future they see for the single currency and the euro zone.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day asks how continental European businesses are surviving the euro crisis.

As the euro struggles for survival, continental businesses are caught up in the maelstrom.Peter Day finds out what they make of their plight and what sort of future they see for the single currency and the euro zone.

"Peter Day asks how continental European businesses are surviving the euro crisis.

Producer: Caroline Bayley."

Europe On The Edge2009040220090405Peter Day reports on the heavy strains being felt by countries on the fringes of Europe.

Peter Day reports from Spain, Hungary, Ireland and Iceland on the heavy strains being felt by those countries on the fringes of Europe which boomed when they were new recruits to the EU. In the current economic crisis, however, they are now under heavy pressure, along with the Eurozone and the whole European Union.

Peter Day reports from Spain, Hungary, Ireland and Iceland on the heavy strains being felt by those countries on the fringes of Europe which boomed when they were new recruits to the EU.

Peter Day reports on the heavy strains being felt by countries on the fringes of Europe.

"Peter Day reports from Spain, Hungary, Ireland and Iceland on the heavy strains being felt by those countries on the fringes of Europe which boomed when they were new recruits to the EU.

Peter Day reports on the heavy strains being felt by countries on the fringes of Europe."

Europe On The Edge2011072120110724What is the Euro crisis doing to business in Spain and Poland.

The Euro crisis in Greece is creating effects that can be felt across the continent.

Peter Day finds out how this turbulence is affecting businesses in Spain and Poland.

Producers: Sandra Kanthal and Julie Ball.

The Euro crisis in Greece is creating effects that can be felt across the continent. Peter Day finds out how this turbulence is affecting businesses in Spain and Poland.

European Unicorns2016041420160417 (R4)A Unicorn is a mythical animal. But it's also the name now given to private start-up companies, mainly in the tech or internet sector which are valued at a billion dollars or more.

They're extremely fast-growing and are often keener to increase customers rather than make profits at this stage. They rely on private investors to fund their growth and those investors give the companies their valuations.

Through interviews with European unicorns including BlaBlaCar, a ride-sharing service and Hello Fresh which delivers measured fresh ingredients and recipes to your door, Caroline Bayley asks how "real" the tech unicorns are and whether the billion dollar plus valuations are fuelling another tech bubble which could be in danger of bursting.

Producer Anna Meisel.

Through interviews with European unicorns including Blah, Blah Car, a ride-sharing service and Hello Fresh which delivers measured fresh ingredients and recipes to your door, Caroline Bayley asks how "real" the tech unicorns are and whether the billion dollar plus valuations are fuelling another tech bubble which could be in danger of bursting.

"A Unicorn is a mythical animal. But it's also the name now given to private start-up companies, mainly in the tech or internet sector which are valued at a billion dollars or more.

Through interviews with European unicorns including BlaBlaCar, a ride-sharing service and Hello Fresh which delivers measured fresh ingredients and recipes to your door, Caroline Bayley asks how ""real"" the tech unicorns are and whether the billion dollar plus valuations are fuelling another tech bubble which could be in danger of bursting.

Through interviews with European unicorns including Blah, Blah Car, a ride-sharing service and Hello Fresh which delivers measured fresh ingredients and recipes to your door, Caroline Bayley asks how ""real"" the tech unicorns are and whether the billion dollar plus valuations are fuelling another tech bubble which could be in danger of bursting.

"

Through interviews with European unicorns including Blah, Blah Car, a ride-sharing service and Hello Fresh which delivers measured fresh ingredients and recipes to your door, Caroline Bayley asks how ""real"" the tech unicorns are and whether the billion dollar plus valuations are fuelling another tech bubble which could be in danger of bursting."

Caroline Bayley reports on Europe's unicorns, tech firms with billion dollar valuations.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Face The Music2012083020120902Public spending cuts are putting a big squeeze on orchestras all over the world. Peter Day hears how musicians are trying to find new ways of ensuring that the bands play on.

Producer: Ben Crighton

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day explores the impossible economics of the concert hall.

Presenter: Peter Day

Producer: Ben Crighton.

Failures, Flops And Flaws2018083020180902 (R4)Thousands of new consumer products are launched every year, and many end in failure.
These flops are rarely discussed, and quickly forgotten.
The Museum of Failure in Sweden is taking a different approach, showcasing some of the world's most flawed products and services.
Ruth Alexander talks to curator Samuel West, and some of the product designers, about what we can learn from commercial mistakes.

Producer: John Murphy.

Ruth Alexander visits the Museum of Failure in Sweden to learn the secrets of success.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

"Ruth Alexander visits the Museum of Failure in Sweden to learn the secrets of success.

Producer: John Murphy.

"

Fast And Furious2014080720140810Peter Day explains how the influence of Formula 1 expertise is reaching everyday lives.

Britain is a world leader in Formula 1 cars, engineering and research. Peter Day reports on how the influence of UK motor racing expertise is now reaching out into other businesses and our everyday lives, inspired by the drama of the pit-stop.

Produced by Sandra Kanthal.

"Peter Day explains how the influence of Formula 1 expertise is reaching everyday lives.

Produced by Sandra Kanthal."

Fast Boat To China2004011520040118A huge demand for vessel capacity has sent the cost of shipping rocketing.

World trade is changing rapidly.

Peter Day investigates.

Fighting Fit2007060720070610Being healthy and staying healthy are increasing preoccupations for companies as well as individuals.

Peter Day finds out how concepts of welfare are changing existing businesses and creating new ones.

Fighting Fit

Being healthy and staying healthy are increasing preoccupations for companies as well as individuals. Peter Day finds out how concepts of welfare are changing existing businesses and creating new ones.

Fish To Share2017083120170903 (R4)Lesley Curwen explores the potential future of fishing in the UK after it leaves the EU.

Many British fishermen rejoiced after the UK vote to leave the European Union. They hoped it would mean fewer EU boats fishing in UK waters. Business reporter and sailor Lesley Curwen visits ports and harbours at both ends of Britain to talk to fishermen about their hopes and fears, and hears from a group of European fishermen who argue a hard Brexit would destroy thousands of their jobs.

Producer: Smita Patel.

"Lesley Curwen explores the potential future of fishing in the UK after it leaves the EU.

Producer: Smita Patel."

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Fixing Capitalism2003061920030622The husband and wife team of Harvard Business School Professor, Shoshana Zuboff, and international businessman, James Maxmin, think that we need a new kind of capitalism to replace the 20th century model based on the male-dominated command and control.

They explain to Peter Day what the new sort of organisations might be like, and how they might happen.

"The husband and wife team of Harvard Business School Professor, Shoshana Zuboff, and international businessman, James Maxmin, think that we need a new kind of capitalism to replace the 20th century model based on the male-dominated command and control.

They explain to Peter Day what the new sort of organisations might be like, and how they might happen."

Fixing Germany2003103020031102With a drifting economy and major social and industrial problems, Germany needs to change the way it works in order to power the new Europe.

Peter Day looks at the issues through the eyes of Germans from both the West and the East, thirteen years after reunification.

"With a drifting economy and major social and industrial problems, Germany needs to change the way it works in order to power the new Europe.

Peter Day looks at the issues through the eyes of Germans from both the West and the East, thirteen years after reunification."

Flying Green2019091920190922 (R4)Flying, for many of us, is now routine. For a few of us it is a weekly, maybe even daily, event. At the same time, global protests concerned with the pressing danger of climate change and the need to reduce CO2 emissions are gaining attention and causing alarm. So, will we ever get to a point where we can indulge our flying habit and keep our conscience clear?
Katie Prescott talks to the flight refuseniks and assesses the impact they are having. Is the long-term solution to change minds or can technological advances provide a fix? Electric cars are here; small planes are already powered the same way. How long until sizeable passenger jets follow? At a number of airports around the world, planes can fill up with biofuels. But the take-up is extremely modest. While the oil price stays low, what's the incentive for airlines to go green?

Producer: Rosamund Jones

Can aviation become sustainable? Katie Prescott asks if a tech fix can be found.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Food For Fuel2007020120070204
20070204 (R4)
Peter Day meets the green entrepreneurs who are finding new ways to fuel the energy requirements of tomorrow.

But is it right, in a hungry world, to grow crops to keep Western cars running?

"Peter Day meets the green entrepreneurs who are finding new ways to fuel the energy requirements of tomorrow.

Food for Fuel

Peter Day meets the green entrepreneurs who are finding new ways to fuel the energy requirements of tomorrow. But is it right, in a hungry world, to grow crops to keep Western cars running?"

Peter Day meets the green entrepreneurs who are making environmentally friendly energy.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

"Food for Fuel

Food For Thought2005102720051030As the unending superstore war rages on in the shopping mall and the high street, other styles of food retailers are trying to make their presence felt - from overseas.

Peter Day finds out what lessons they might have for retailers here.

"As the unending superstore war rages on in the shopping mall and the high street, other styles of food retailers are trying to make their presence felt - from overseas.

Food for Thought

As the unending superstore war rages on in the shopping mall and the high street, other styles of food retailers are trying to make their presence felt - from overseas. Peter Day finds out what lessons they might have for retailers here."

Peter Day finds out what lessons they might have for retailers here."

As the unending superstore war rages on in the shopping mall and the high street, other styles of food retailers are trying to make their presence felt - from overseas. Peter Day finds out what lessons they might have for retailers here. Then Weather.

"Food for Thought

As the unending superstore war rages on in the shopping mall and the high street, other styles of food retailers are trying to make their presence felt - from overseas. Peter Day finds out what lessons they might have for retailers here. Then News.

For Ever And Ever2014121820141221 (R4)FOR EVER AND EVER

Britain's cathedrals have defined the landscape for more than 1000 years

as places of worship, tourist attractions, and unrivalled architectural

achievements. But what's their role in the 21st century? Peter Day hears

about the business of running some of the country's most famous places.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

achievements. But what's their role in the 21st century? Peter Day hears

"Britain's cathedrals have defined the landscape for more than 1000 years

FOR EVER AND EVER"

For Your Information2011042820110501Information seems to be moving right to the heart of the 21st century economy but nobody really knows what it is or how it works.

Peter Day talks to pioneers in the field of information management as well as corporate gatekeepers of this valuable commodity we call information to find out what advances are being made with the amount of data we now generate.

Peter Day finds out how we can use the growing amount of information we now generate.

Information seems to be moving right to the heart of the 21st century economy but nobody really knows what it is or how it works. Peter Day talks to pioneers in the field of information management as well as corporate gatekeepers of this valuable commodity we call information to find out what advances are being made with the amount of data we now generate.

For Your Information20110501Peter Day finds out how we can use the growing amount of information we now generate.
Forecasting: How To Map The Future2017090720170910 (R4)Why do so many economic and business forecasts fail to correctly map the future?

Why do so many economic and business forecasts fail to correctly map the future? Adam Shaw asks why so many recessions take us by surprise and why the failure of certain forecasts should be a cause of celebration, not despair. He examines the role of complexity and groupthink and how technological advance can scupper the best laid forecasts. Do we, as consumers, invest too much faith in forecasts? And is there anything forecasters can do to ensure their pronouncements are more reliable?
Producer: Rosamund Jones.

"Why do so many economic and business forecasts fail to correctly map the future?

Why do so many economic and business forecasts fail to correctly map the future? Adam Shaw asks why so many recessions take us by surprise and why the failure of certain forecasts should be a cause of celebration, not despair. He examines the role of complexity and groupthink and how technological advance can scupper the best laid forecasts. Do we, as consumers, invest too much faith in forecasts? And is there anything forecasters can do to ensure their pronouncements are more reliable?
Producer: Rosamund Jones."

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Forty Per Cent Female2008100220081005This year in Norway it became law that company boards must consist of at least 40 per cent women.

Peter Day asked four years ago why the country intended to take such drastic action.

Now he wonders if other countries may follow suit.

Forty Per Cent Female

This year in Norway it became law that company boards must consist of at least 40 per cent women. Peter Day asked four years ago why the country intended to take such drastic action. Now he wonders if other countries may follow suit.

Framed2005020320050206Peter Day examines the boom in modern art and the threat to the LONDON art market posed by big changes in the rules about arts sales in Europe.

Framed: Peter Day examines the boom in modern art and the threat to the London art market posed by big changes in the rules about arts sales in Europe. [Rpt of Thu 8.30pm]

Framed: Peter Day examines the boom in modern art and the threat to the London art market posed by big changes in the rules about arts sales in Europe. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm]

Framed: Peter Day examines the boom in modern art and the threat to the London art market posed by big changes in the rules about arts sales in Europe. [Rptd Sun 9.30pm] Then News.

French Lessons2012041220120415As the EuroZone struggles for survival, France remains at the heart of Europe. Peter Day finds out how French business is faring in an era of huge European uncertainty.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day finds out how French business is faring during the euro crisis.

"As the EuroZone struggles for survival, France remains at the heart of Europe. Peter Day finds out how French business is faring in an era of huge European uncertainty.

Peter Day finds out how French business is faring during the euro crisis."

French Lessons20120415Peter Day finds out how French business is faring during the euro crisis.
French With Tears2006100520061008Big social problems, high unemployment, a stuttering economy.

Despite some world class corporations, business in France appears to be in deep trouble.

As next year's Presidential election campaigning gets underway, Peter Day asks whether the French will stick to their model of state intervention - or embrace the Anglo Saxon market forces they have long shunned.

"Big social problems, high unemployment, a stuttering economy.

French with Tears

Big social problems, high unemployment, a stuttering economy. Despite some world class corporations, business in France appears to be in deep trouble. As next year's Presidential election campaigning gets underway, Peter Day asks whether the French will stick to their model of state intervention - or embrace the Anglo Saxon market forces they have long shunned."

As next year's Presidential election campaigning gets underway, Peter Day asks whether the French will stick to their model of state intervention - or embrace the Anglo Saxon market forces they have long shunned."

Big social problems, high unemployment, a stuttering economy. Despite some world class corporations, business in France appears to be in deep trouble. As next year's Presidential election campaigning gets underway, Peter Day asks whether the French will stick to their model of state intervention - or embrace the Anglo Saxon market forces they have long shunned. Then Weather.

"French with Tears

Big social problems, high unemployment, a stuttering economy. Despite some world class corporations, business in France appears to be in deep trouble. As next year's Presidential election campaigning gets underway, Peter Day asks whether the French will stick to their model of state intervention - or embrace the Anglo Saxon market forces they have long shunned. Then News.

From Ex-offender To Entrepreneur2017042020170423 (R4)The number of women in prison globally is rapidly increasing. The Institute for Criminal Policy Research has calculated that between 2000 and 2015, the female prison population around the world grew by 50%, compared with an 18% rise in male prisoners over the same period. Re-offending rates are high, and overcoming the stigma of a prison sentence makes finding a job extremely tough. But can entrepreneurship break the cycle? Caroline Bayley speaks to six former women prisoners across three continents. They were convicted under different circumstances and of different crimes - but they're united in their passion for business, enterprise and self-employment which has allowed them to turn their lives around on the outside.

Producer: Alex Burton.

How entrepreneurship can break the cycle of re-offending for women after prison.

Producer: Alex Burton.

The number of women in prison globally is rapidly increasing. The Institute for Criminal Policy Research has calculated that between 2000 and 2015, the female prison population around the world grew by 50%, compared with an 18% rise in male prisoners over the same period. Re-offending rates are high, and overcoming the stigma of a prison sentence makes finding a job extremely tough. But can entrepreneurship break the cycle ? Caroline Bayley speaks to six former women prisoners across three continents. They were convicted under different circumstances and of different crimes - but they're united in their passion for business, enterprise and self-employment which has allowed them to turn their lives around on the outside.

"The number of women in prison globally is rapidly increasing. The Institute for Criminal Policy Research has calculated that between 2000 and 2015, the female prison population around the world grew by 50%, compared with an 18% rise in male prisoners over the same period. Re-offending rates are high, and overcoming the stigma of a prison sentence makes finding a job extremely tough. But can entrepreneurship break the cycle? Caroline Bayley speaks to six former women prisoners across three continents. They were convicted under different circumstances and of different crimes - but they're united in their passion for business, enterprise and self-employment which has allowed them to turn their lives around on the outside.

"

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Frugal Feast2012050320120506A new approach to the business of innovation. Peter Day reports.

Big companies may have lots to learn from the cheap and cheerful improvisation which is commonplace in the developing world, particularly India. Peter Day discovers some of the secrets of what is now being called Frugal Innovation.

Producer Sandra Kanthal

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day on how companies can learn from the cheap improvisation of the developing world.

"A new approach to the business of innovation. Peter Day reports.

Peter Day on how companies can learn from the cheap improvisation of the developing world."

Frugal Feast20120506Big companies may have lots to learn from the cheap and cheerful improvisation which is commonplace in the developing world, particularly India. Peter Day discovers some of the secrets of what is now being called Frugal Innovation.

Producer Sandra Kanthal

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

A new approach to the business of innovation. Peter Day reports.

"Big companies may have lots to learn from the cheap and cheerful improvisation which is commonplace in the developing world, particularly India. Peter Day discovers some of the secrets of what is now being called Frugal Innovation.

A new approach to the business of innovation. Peter Day reports."

Gas Leak2013011720130120Russia's giant energy company Gazprom has the biggest reserves of natural gas in the world, and much of the country's new-found prosperity has depended on its exports to Europe. But now global gas prices are tumbling as new supplies come on stream, and the EU has launched a top level investigation of the company's grip on European energy. Peter Day examines Gazprom's future in an uncertain world.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

GAS LEAK

Russia's giant energy company Gazprom has the biggest reserves of natural gas in the world, and much of the country's new-found prosperity has depended on its exports to Europe. But now global gas prices are tumbling as new supplies come on stream, and the EU has launched a top level investigation of the company's grip on European energy.Peter Day examines Gazprom's future in an uncertain world.

"Russia's giant energy company Gazprom has the biggest reserves of natural gas in the world, and much of the country's new-found prosperity has depended on its exports to Europe. But now global gas prices are tumbling as new supplies come on stream, and the EU has launched a top level investigation of the company's grip on European energy. Peter Day examines Gazprom's future in an uncertain world.

"

GAS LEAK"

"Russia's giant energy company Gazprom has the biggest reserves of natural gas in the world, and much of the country's new-found prosperity has depended on its exports to Europe. But now global gas prices are tumbling as new supplies come on stream, and the EU has launched a top level investigation of the company's grip on European energy.Peter Day examines Gazprom's future in an uncertain world.

Producer: Caroline Bayley."

Gene Patenting2013080820130811Peter Day asks whether gene patenting is a good or bad thing for medical innovation.

Ever since the mapping of the human genome was completed 10 years ago medical companies have been rushing to patent genes that define all of us for their own exclusive use. Now the US Supreme Court has ruled against patenting things found in nature. Peter Day asks what this means for the biotech business.and for the future of healthcare.

Generation Next2007051020070513Teenagers are now big spenders, and corporations are waking up to a huge new market.

Peter Day finds out how teenage tastes are shaping businesses across the world.

Generation Next

Teenagers are now big spenders, and corporations are waking up to a huge new market. Peter Day finds out how teenage tastes are shaping businesses across the world."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900306] Unknown: Carol Leonard

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900313] Presenter: Carol Leonard.

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900321] Presenter: Carol Leonard.

Unknown: Lorna Murray

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900327] Presenter: Carol Leonard

Presenter: Researcher Loma Murray

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900403] Presenter: Carol Leonard.

Unknown: Lorna Murrav

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900410]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900424] Presenter: Carol Leonard

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900501]Presenter Carol Leonard Editor Rod Pounsett
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900501]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900502]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900508]Last in the present series with Carol Leonard. Research Lorna Murray Editor Rod Pounsett
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900508] Unknown: Carol Leonard.

Unknown: Lorna Murray

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900509]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900829] Presenter: Peter Day.

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900902] Presented By: Peter Day
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900905] Editor: Stephen Chilcott
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900912]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900919]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900926]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19901003]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19901010]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19901017]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910306]NEW The Credit Strike

Recession is biting and the banks are pulling in their loans - just when business needs their help most. In the first of a new series,

In Business hears from victims of the credit strike and maps out a blueprint for survival.

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

"NEW The Credit Strike

Editor: Colin Wilde."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910306] Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910310]NEW Recession is

NEW biting and the banks are pulling in their loans. In the first of a new series, the programme hears from victims of the credit strike. Presented by Peter Day.

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

"NEW Recession is

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910310] Presented By: Peter Day.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910313]Prophets of Change 'Change or die' is the gospel preached to giant companies by business gurus such as Tom Peters. But how do concerns as varied as BP, Courtaulds and Apple Computers put change into practice? And what does change mean for these business leaders fighting to stay in the front line?

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Tom Peters.

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

"Prophets of Change 'Change or die' is the gospel preached to giant companies by business gurus such as Tom Peters. But how do concerns as varied as BP, Courtaulds and Apple Computers put change into practice? And what does change mean for these business leaders fighting to stay in the front line?

Editor: Colin Wilde."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910313] Unknown: Tom Peters.

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910317]Prophets of Change 'Change or die' is the gospel preached to giant companies by business gurus. But how do big companies put change into practice? And what does change mean for those business leaders fighting to stay in the front line? Presented by Peter Day. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910317]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910320]Something from Nothing

A focus on Britain's unsung heroes - from corner shop to multimillionaire. Penniless and unwelcome, Asian immigrants clawed their way to business success. Plus details of the Business Survivor of the Year competition.

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

"Something from Nothing

Editor: Colin Wilde."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910320]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910324]Something from Nothing A focus on Britain's unsung heroes - Asian immigrants who fought their way to business success. Plus details of the Business Survivor of the Year competition.

Presented by Peter Day.

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910324]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910327]The Boys from Down Under

In the 80s, Aussie raiders scared hell out of the Poms, but as the 90s dawned they got their comeuppance. What was so special about them? Why did they fall? And how have they influenced management style? Peter Day reports. Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Editor: Colin Wilde.

"The Boys from Down Under

Editor: Colin Wilde."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910327] Unknown: Peter Day

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910331]The Boys from Down Under

In the 80s. Aussie raiders scared hell out of the Poms, but as the 90s dawned they got their comeuppance. What was so special about them? Why did they fall? And how have they influenced management style? Peter Day reports.

Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

"The Boys from Down Under

Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910331] Unknown: Peter Day
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910403]Is Service Included?

Are you really being served? The high street boomed in the 1980s but then went head first into recession, ruining many reputations. Tonight's programme finds out where retailing is heading in the hard times, and in an exclusive interview, hears from Lord Rayner, the retiring chairman of Marks and Spencer.

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Neil Koenig. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Neil Koenig.

"Is Service Included?

Editor: Neil Koenig."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910403] Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910407]Is Service Included?

Are you really being served? The high street boomed in the 1980s but then went head first into recession, ruining many reputations. Today's programme finds out where retailing is heading in the hard times and, in an exclusive interview, hears from Lord Rayner, the retiring chairman of Marks and Spencer.

Presented by Peter Day. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

"Is Service Included?

Presented by Peter Day. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910407]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910410]The Bank-Busters

For one bank in the USA, Easter was no bank holiday. Instead, the federal authorities moved in to close it down. The bank is one of hundreds to close in the USA this year as the crisis in the country's banking industry gathers pace.

In Business went in with the bank-busters to record this bizarre event.

Presented by Peter Day. Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Neil Koenig.

"The Bank-Busters

Producer: Neil Koenig."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910410] Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910414]The Bank-Busters

At Easter the federal authorities moved in to close down one bank in the USA. The bank is one of hundreds to close this year as the crisis in the country's banking industry gathers pace. In Business went in with the bank-busters, the first time a broadcasting team has been allowed to record this bizarre event.

Presented by Peter Day.

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

"The Bank-Busters

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910414]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910417]Cheerful Personality Required....

Roughly half of UK employers put job applicants through personality, or psychometric, tests. But doubts are being raised about their reliability. In Business reports.

Presented by Peter Day. Producer Stephen Chilcott Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Stephen Chilcott

Cheerful Personality Required - Roughly half of UK employers put job applicants through personality, or psychometric, tests. But doubts are being raised about their reliability. In Business reports.

"Cheerful Personality Required....

Producer: Stephen Chilcott"

"Cheerful Personality Required - Roughly half of UK employers put job applicants through personality, or psychometric, tests. But doubts are being raised about their reliability. In Business reports.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910417] Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910421]Cheerful Personality Required...

Roughly half of UK employers put job applicants through personality, or psychometric, tests. But doubts are being raised about their reliability. In Business reports.

Presented by Peter Day.

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

"Cheerful Personality Required...

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910421]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910424]Does Whitehall Mean

Business?

The DTI likes to be known as the Department for Enterprise - but is it clear about its role of encouraging business? Since 1979 it's had 12 different Secretaries of State. Peter Day talks to Sir Leon Brittan , Lord Young, Nicholas Ridley and others, about what the DTI is for.

Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Leon Brittan

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley

Editor: Colin Wilde.

"Does Whitehall Mean

Editor: Colin Wilde."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910424] Unknown: Sir Leon Brittan

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910428]Does Whitehall Mean

Business?

The DTI likes to be known as the Department for Enterprise - but is it clear about its role of encouraging business? Since 1979 it's had 12 different Secretaries of State. Peter Day talks to Sir Leon Brittan , Lord Young, Nicholas Ridley and others, about what the DTI is for.

Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Leon Brittan

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley

"Does Whitehall Mean

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910428] Unknown: Sir Leon Brittan

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910501]A Seat on the Board

It sounds like the ultimate career step - but what exactly is the role of a company director? Is it a privileged and easy ride - or have the responsibilities begun to weigh heavily around the necks of the fat cats?

Presented by Peter Day. Producer Ann Gilmartin. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Ann Gilmartin.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910501] Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Ann Gilmartin.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910505]A Seat on the Board

It sounds like the ultimate career step - but what exactly is the role of a company director? Is it a privileged and easy ride - or have the responsibilities begun to weigh heavily?

Presented by Peter Day.

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910505]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910508]Survivor of the Year

The winner of the In Business Survivor of the Year is announced - the business hero or heroine who looked disaster in the face during the past year.... and survived.

The last in the series, presented by Peter Day.

Series editor Alan Griffiths. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Alan Griffiths.

"Survivor of the Year

Editor: Alan Griffiths."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910508] Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Alan Griffiths.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910512]Survivor of the Year The winner of the In

Business Survivor of the Year is announced - the business hero or heroine who looked disaster in the face during the past year... and survived. The last in the present series, presented by Peter Day.

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day

"Survivor of the Year The winner of the In

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910512]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910821]NEW All Going Down

Together

The depositors in BCCI, the scandal-torn bank, include many small businesses. In the first of the new series, Peter Day and Nigel Cassidy find out how these businesses are surviving the fall of the bank - and how much longer they can avoid falling into the hands of the receiver themselves.

Producer Catherine Watt

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Catherine Watt

"NEW All Going Down

Producer: Catherine Watt"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910821] Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Catherine Watt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910825]All Going Down Together

The depositors in BCCI, the scandal-torn bank, include many small businesses. In the first of the new series, Peter Day and Nigel Cassidy find out how these businesses are surviving the fall of the bank - and how much longer they can avoid falling into the hands of the receiver themselves.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

"All Going Down Together

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910825] Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910828]The Bank That Likes to Say Ja

Peter Day travels to

Ingolstadt in Bavaria, and compares the British and German banking systems through the eyes of the town's inhabitants.

Producer Stuart Maisner

Contributors

Producer: Stuart Maisner

"The Bank That Likes to Say Ja

Producer Stuart Maisner

Contributors

Producer: Stuart Maisner"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910828] Producer: Stuart Maisner
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910901]The Bank That Likes to Say Ja

Peter Day travels to

Ingolstadt in Bavaria, and compares the British and German banking systems through the eyes of the town's inhabitants.

"The Bank That Likes to Say Ja

Ingolstadt in Bavaria, and compares the British and German banking systems through the eyes of the town's inhabitants."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910904]Terminal Illness

Healthcare in the United

States is in crisis. Costs have spiralled out of control; companies face enormous costs to protect their employees, and 37 million people have no health insurance at all.

As Britain's health service faces sweeping change,

Richard Quest reports on the American system in chaos, and the search for a solution. Presented by Peter Day.

Producer Colin Wilde

Contributors

Unknown: Richard Quest

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Colin Wilde

"Terminal Illness

Producer: Colin Wilde"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910904] Unknown: Richard Quest

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910908]Richard Quest reports on American healthcare in chaos. With Peter Day.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910911]The Hong Kong of Europe?

Japanese investment in Britain is set to rocket in the 90s, much to the alarm of some of our

European partners.

Peter Day explores the impact of Japan on different British industries and regions, and asks whether Britain is becoming 'the Hong Kong of Europe' or just a giant Japanese screwdriver plant. Producer Stuart Maisner

"The Hong Kong of Europe?

Peter Day explores the impact of Japan on different British industries and regions, and asks whether Britain is becoming 'the Hong Kong of Europe' or just a giant Japanese screwdriver plant. Producer Stuart Maisner"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910915]Peter Day explores the impact of Japan on British industries and regions.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910918]Daddy Breaks

Studies of the strain on working women are now looking at the stress on working men. Should men follow a work pattern which demands long hours away from their family, particularly when their children are young? And who is going to pay for it? Producer Colin Wilde

Contributors

Producer: Colin Wilde

"Daddy Breaks

Studies of the strain on working women are now looking at the stress on working men. Should men follow a work pattern which demands long hours away from their family, particularly when their children are young? And who is going to pay for it? Producer Colin Wilde

Contributors

Producer: Colin Wilde"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910918] Producer: Colin Wilde
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910922]Daddy Breaks

Studies of the strain on working women have now turned interest onto the stress on working men. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910925]The Channel Tunnel: the Ultimate Pipe Dream? When former Prime

Minister

Margaret Thatcher gave the Channel Tunnel the final go-ahead, she assured the people of Kent and the Nord-Pas de

Calais that the project would encourage new enterprise in their areas. Five years on, Nigel Cassidy reports on who will benefit when the Channel

Tunnel finally opens.

Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Margaret Thatcher

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig.

"The Channel Tunnel: the Ultimate Pipe Dream? When former Prime

Producer: Neil Koenig."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910925] Unknown: Margaret Thatcher

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910929]The Channel Tunnel: the Ultimate Pipe Dream? Nigel Cassidy reports on who will benefit when the Channel Tunnel opens. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910929] Unknown: Nigel Cassidy
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911002]Seconds Out

Time is money, and ever more ferocious competition is forcing firms to slash the amount of time it takes them to bring new products to market. It can mean cramming into a few months a development process that used to take years: experts call the technique 'time compression'. Peter Day reports on a management revolution in the making. Producer Mark Gregory. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Mark Gregory.

"Seconds Out

Producer: Mark Gregory."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911002] Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Mark Gregory.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911006]Seconds Out

Ferocious competition is forcing firms to slash the amount of time it takes them to bring new products to market. Peter Day reports on a management revolution in the making.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911006]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911009]You Never Got Poor by.... David Sullivan is a press baron with a difference: he and his readers have got sex on the brain. From this week, his paper The Sport is published seven days a week. Is it alien porn, or just pleasing the public? Peter Day finds out. Producer Neil Koenig

Contributors

Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Neil Koenig

"You Never Got Poor by.... David Sullivan is a press baron with a difference: he and his readers have got sex on the brain. From this week, his paper The Sport is published seven days a week. Is it alien porn, or just pleasing the public? Peter Day finds out. Producer Neil Koenig

Contributors

Unknown: David Sullivan

Producer: Neil Koenig"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911009] Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911013]You Never Got Poor by.... David Sullivan is a press baron with a difference: he and his readers have got sex on the brain. From last week his paper The Sport is published seven days a week. Alien porn, or just pleasing the public? Peter Day finds out.

Contributors

Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day

"You Never Got Poor by.... David Sullivan is a press baron with a difference: he and his readers have got sex on the brain. From last week his paper The Sport is published seven days a week. Alien porn, or just pleasing the public? Peter Day finds out.

Contributors

Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911013] Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911016]Quality Street

It sounds obvious: quality matters. Tens of thousands of companies have achieved the national standard for quality systems - BS 5750. But while manufacturing industry has been preaching the lesson for a decade, it's taking much longer for the quality gospel to spread into the service industries and the public sector. Are quality promises worth the paper they're printed on? Peter Day investigates.

Producer Stephen Chilcott. Stereo

Contributors

Producer: Stephen Chilcott.

"Quality Street

Producer Stephen Chilcott. Stereo

Contributors

Producer: Stephen Chilcott."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911016] Producer: Stephen Chilcott.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911020]Quality Street

The "quality" gospel is being preached ever louder throughout business. Is the message getting through? Peter Day investigates.

Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911023]Grapes of Wrath

Britons drink four billion pounds worth of wine a year - but only one fifth of one per cent is English. The British Government and the EC have radical plans for wine in Europe. Will their ideas wither English wine on the vine? Peter Day and Roger White investigate.

Producer Stephen Chilcott. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Roger White

Producer: Stephen Chilcott.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911023] Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Roger White

Producer: Stephen Chilcott.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911027]Grapes of Wrath

The British government and the EC have radical plans for wine in Europe. Will their ideas wither

English wine on the vine? In the last programme of the series, Peter Day and Roger White investigate. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Roger White

"Grapes of Wrath

Unknown: Roger White"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911027] Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Roger White

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920318]Bumping Along the Bottom

After the longest recession for 50 years, there's still little sign of an upturn. In the first of a new series,

Peter Day hears the anger and frustration of people who were in business and have seen their companies fail in the last 18 months.

How can businesses survive, and what is preventing this recession from ending?

Producer Colin Wilde Editor Alan Griffiths

"Bumping Along the Bottom

Producer Colin Wilde Editor Alan Griffiths"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920318] Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Colin Wilde

Editor: Alan Griffiths

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920322]Bumping Along the Bottom

In the first of a new series, Peter Day hears the anger and frustration of people who were in business and have seen their companies fail in the recession of the last eighteen months.

"Bumping Along the Bottom

In the first of a new series, Peter Day hears the anger and frustration of people who were in business and have seen their companies fail in the recession of the last eighteen months."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920322]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920325]Take a P45, Ms Jones In Sweden they promote them, in Britain we make them redundant.

Nigel Cassidy discovers why the office secretary is fast becoming an endangered species.

Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo

"Take a P45, Ms Jones In Sweden they promote them, in Britain we make them redundant.

Nigel CassiIn The Balance [world Service]

Nigel Cassidy discovers why the office secretary is fast becoming an endangeredIn Our Time

Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920325] Unknown: Ms Jones

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920329]Take a P45, Ms Jones Nigel Cassidy discovers why the office secretary is fast becoming an endangered species.

"Take a P45, Ms Jones Nigel Cassidy discovers why the office secretary is fast becoming an endangered species."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920329] Unknown: Ms Jones

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920401]Trainer

Presented by Peter Day.

It's dark, you are cold and damp, sheltering as best you can under some plastic sheeting. But this is not some army exercise - just part of the very latest in management training. From assault courses to role-playing, such training is now big business. But how useful is it, and which approach really challenges your executives' way of thinking?

Producer Tim Bowler

"Trainer

Producer Tim Bowler"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920401] Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Tim Bowler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920405]Trainer

Peter Day investigates the latest techniques in management training.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920408]After the boom that dramatically changed city skylines in the 1980s, commercial property is undergoing the worst slump this century. But it's less than 20 years since the last property crisis. Why do the banks who lend the money and the property developers who borrow it have such short memories?

Peter Day finds out.

Producer Melanie Fanstone

"After the boom that dramatically changed city skylines in the 1980s, commercial property is undergoing the worst slump this century. But it's less than 20 years since the last property crisis. Why do the banks who lend the money and the property developers who borrow it have such short memories?

Producer Melanie Fanstone"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920408] Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Melanie Fanstone

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920412]It's less than 20 years since the last property crisis. Why do the banks who lend the money and the property developers who borrow it have such short memories?

Peter Day finds out.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920412]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920415]1992: Old Customs Die

Hard

Balloonists think the single European Market is all hot air. To the drug companies, cough mixture is nothing to sneeze at. Lightning conductor makers aren't struck by it. Bee-keepers are still getting stung by trade barriers. Peter Day investigates the Uncommon Market.

Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo

"1992: Old Customs Die

Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920415] Producer: Neil Koenig.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920419]1992: Old Customs Die Hard

Balloonists think the single European Market is all hot air. To the drug companies, cough mixture is nothing to sneeze at. Lightning-conductor makers aren't struck by it. Bee-keepers are still getting stung by trade barriers. And recyclists can't pedal hard enough to keep up with the new

German packaging rules. Peter Day investigates the Uncommon Market.

"1992: Old Customs Die Hard

German packaging rules. Peter Day investigates the Uncommon Market."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920422]Grantrepreneurs? Northern Ireland's businesses are accused of absorbing huge public subsidies but showing few returns. Roger White investigates.

Producer Ann Gilmartin. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920422] Unknown: Roger White

Producer: Ann Gilmartin.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920426]Grantrepreneurs?

Roger White reports on the strengths and flaws of the Northern Ireland economy.

Roger White reports on the strengths and flaws of the Northern Ireland ecoIn Our Time

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920426] Unknown: Roger White
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920429]Dial "F" for Fraud

Telephone pirates are tapping into the networks in America and running up a multi-billion-dollar fraud. How soon will it be before they cross the Atlantic? Peter Day follows hard on the heels of the hackers, their trackers and the telephone 'phreaks' who don the names of comic-book heroes and villains in their battle with the organisations.

Producer Colin Wilde. Stereo

"Dial "F" for Fraud

Producer Colin Wilde. Stereo"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920429] Producer: Colin Wilde.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920503]Dial 'F' For Fraud

Peter Day reports on the American problem of telephone fraud that may soon arrive here.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920503]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920506]The prospects for business after the election.

Presented by Peter Day. Producer Mark Gregory. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920506] Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Mark Gregory.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920510]Is the new political environment helping firms to beat the recession?

Peter Day reports.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920510]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920517]Public or Private?

In the last programme of the series Peter Day explores the pros and cons of becoming a public company.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920826]"If ifs not hurting, it's not working...." said John Major of his economic policy when he was Chancellor. Three years later, it's still hurting, and the business outlook is grim. Recession is expected to stretch out well into next year - possibly even longer. How does a company survive? In Business returns with three case histories and a panel of experts taking a long look at the current agony of British business. Presented by Peter Day. Editor Stephen Chilcott Producer Caroline Bayley

"

"If ifs not hurting, it's not working...." said John Major of his economic policy when he was Chancellor. Three years later, it's still hurting, and the business outlook is grim. Recession is expected to stretch out well into next year - possibly even longer. How does a company survive? In Business returns with three case histories and a panel of experts taking a long look at the current agony of British business. Presented by Peter Day. Editor Stephen Chilcott Producer Caroline Bayley"

""If ifs not hurting, it's not working...." said John Major of his economic policy when he was Chancellor. Three years later, it's still hurting, and the business outlook is grim. Recession is expected to stretch out well into next year - possibly even longer. How does a company survive? In Business returns with three case histories and a panel of experts taking a long look at the current agony of British business. Presented by Peter Day. Editor Stephen Chilcott Producer Caroline Bayley"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920826] Unknown: John Major

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920830]The business outlook is grim.

Recession is expected to stretch out into the next year. In Business returns with three case histories and a panel of experts looking at the current agony of British business. Presented by Peter Day

Stereo (Broadcast fast Wednesday;

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920830]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920902]The New Age Auditors Just like everyone else, businesses are under pressure to conform to fashionable trends.

Nigel Cassidy follows a group of consultants around a Manchester paint company as they examine new management skills from ethics to the colour of clothes. But can these New

Age Auditors increase profitability?

Producer Robert McKenzie

"The New Age Auditors Just like everyone else, businesses are under pressure to conform to fashionable trends.

Producer Robert McKenzie"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920902] Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920906]The New Age Auditors Nigel Cassidy investigates new management skills in a Manchester paint company.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920906]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920909]California - Running on Empty

For generations, it's been a place of dreams: a place where the 21st century arrived early. But now the Golden State is tarnished.

Its economy is in trouble, its government hugely overspent. Even the lowest American interest rates for

40 years are failing to get business going again in time for the presidential election. Californians have seen the future - and it's faltering.

Peter Day reports on the lessons the rest of the world can learn from

California.

Producer Stephen Chilcott

"California - Running on Empty

Producer Stephen Chilcott"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920909] Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920913]California - Running on Empty

For generations, it's been a place of dreams: a place where the 21st century arrived early. But now the Golden State's economy is in trouble, its government hugely overspent. Even the lowest American interest rates for 40 years are failing to get business going again in time for the presidential election. Peter Day reports on the lessons the rest of the world can learn from California.

"California - Running on Empty

For generations, it's been a place of dreams: a place where the 21st century arrived early. But now the Golden State's economy is in trouble, its government hugely overspent. Even the lowest American interest rates for 40 years are failing to get business going again in time for the presidential election. Peter Day reports on the lessons the rest of the world can learn from California."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920913]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920916]Watching the Workers Every day fraudsters get away with pilfering the profits. They are employees who find hundreds of different ways to steal from their company. But now the firms are fighting back with increasingly sophisticated ways of catching the culprits. Peter Day investigates.

Producer Melanie Fanstone

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920916] Producer: Melanie Fanstone
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920920]Watching the Workers Peter Day investigates how firms are fighting back against office fraudsters.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920923]Dear Boss. You're Fired....

The radical process where staff are asked to rate their managers' performance has been in use in the US since the 60s - and now it's catching on in Britain. Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them, and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme. Editor Stephen Chilcott

Dear Boss. You're Fired - The radical process where staff are asked to rate their managers' performance has been in use in the US since the 60s - and now it's catching on in Britain. Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them, and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme. Editor Stephen Chilcott

"Dear Boss. You're Fired....

The radical process where staff are asked to rate their managers' performance has been in use in the US since the 60s - and now it's catching on in Britain. Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them, and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme. Editor Stephen Chilcott"

"Dear Boss. You're Fired - The radical process where staff are asked to rate their managers' performance has been in use in the US since the 60s - and now it's catching on in Britain. Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them, and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme. Editor Stephen Chilcott"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920923]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920927]"Dear Boss, You're Fired...."

Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them... and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme.

"

Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them... and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme."

""Dear Boss, You're Fired...."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920927]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920930]The Intensive Care Unit

Corporate casualties have reached epidemic proportions as the plague of the recession continues.

Banks are trying to stop the infection but only a few firms can be nursed back to health. Peter Day goes into a bank's intensive care unit with the man who has the power of business life and death in his hands. Producer Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920930]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921004]The Intensive Care Unit with Peter Day.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921004] Unknown: Peter Day.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921007]Who Needs Unions?

As trade unions face up to another round of legal curbs on their power, Peter Day reports on whether there is still a role for organised labour in a radically changed business climate.

Producer Mark Gregory

"Who Needs Unions?

Producer Mark Gregory"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921007] Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921011]Who Needs Unions?

Peter Day asks whether there is a role for organised labour in a radically changed business climate.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921014]"Dear Boss... You're

Fired...."

Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them... and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme. Editor Stephen Chilcott

(Postponed from 23 September)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921014] Unknown: Peter Day

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921018]"Dear Boss, You're Fired...."

Peter Day examines the radical process where staff evaluate their managers.

"

Peter Day examines the radical process where staff evaluate their managers."

""Dear Boss, You're Fired...."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921018]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921021]Dealing with the Bear Why has Littlewoods set up shop in St Petersburg? What's behind a Welsh company baking bread on a Moscow housing estate? Caroline Bayley reports on how well British business is overcoming the problems of dealing profitably with the Russian bear.

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921021] Unknown: Caroline Bayley

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921025]Dealing with the Bear Caroline Bayley reports on how well British businesses are dealing with Russia.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921025] Unknown: Caroline Bayley
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921028]There Are Bad Times

Just Around the Comer....

Noel Coward 's song of 40 years ago poked fun at doom-mongers, but these days it's not so amusing. With still no end to the recession in sight, is recession about to turn into a 1930s-style slump? Have politicians failed the economy - and can industry pull off a recovery in spite of them? Peter Day reports.

Just Around the Comer - Noel Coward 's song of 40 years ago poked fun at doom-mongers, but these days it's not so amusing. With still no end to the recession in sight, is recession about to turn into a 1930s-style slump? Have politicians failed the economy - and can industry pull off a recovery in spite of them? Peter Day reports.

"There Are Bad Times

Noel Coward 's song of 40 years ago poked fun at doom-mongers, but these days it's not so amusing. With still no end to the recession in sight, is recession about to turn into a 1930s-style slump? Have politicians failed the economy - and can industry pull off a recovery in spite of them? Peter Day reports."

Just Around the Comer - Noel Coward 's song of 40 years ago poked fun at doom-mongers, but these days it's not so amusing. With still no end to the recession in sight, is recession about to turn into a 1930s-style slump? Have politicians failed the economy - and can industry pull off a recovery in spite of them? Peter Day reports."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921028] Unknown: Noel Coward

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921101]There Are Bad Times Just Around the Comer

Have politicians failed the economy and can industry pull off a recovery? Peter Day reports.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921101]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930310]NEW Export or Die?

The Prime

Minister says it's time to start selling Britain abroad - but is British business up to the challenge?

Devaluation has given us a chance to steal a competitive advantage overseas, but are we sinking beneath the waves of imports rolling into the country? Peter Day asks if Britain PLC can export its way out of recession. Producer Robert McKenzie

"NEW Export or Die?

Devaluation has given us a chance to steal a competitive advantage overseas, but are we sinking beneath the waves of imports rolling into the country? Peter Day asks if Britain PLC can export its way out of recession. Producer Robert McKenzie"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930310] Producer: Robert McKenzie
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930314]Export or Die?

Peter Day asks if Britain PLC can export its way out of recession.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930317]The BBC is being shaken up, as market forces are applied to public services which have never had to face them before. The

BBC's market-place revolution is called

Producer Choice. From

April 1, programme makers will choose whether they want to pay for BBC resources, or go outside to buy from independent suppliers.

How big a change is this for a public organisation? Peter Day investigates. Producer Caroline Bayley

"The BBC is being shaken up, as market forces are applied to public services which have never had to face them before. The

How big a change is this for a public organisation? Peter Day investigates. Producer Caroline Bayley"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930317] Producer: Caroline Bayley
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930321]At the BBC, "producer choice" is applying market forces to programme making. How big a change is this for a public organisation? Peter Day investigates.

"At the BBC, "producer choice" is applying market forces to programme making. How big a change is this for a public organisation? Peter Day investigates."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930324]Business in Handcuffs

Fraud is a high-profile crime, but prosecuting fraudsters has brought big problems for the authorities - especially the Serious Fraud Office. Can juries cope? Is a trial that lasts more than a year a worse punishment than a conviction? Peter Day investigates how to lock up the fraudsters.

Producer Nicholas Kochan

"Business in Handcuffs

Producer Nicholas Kochan"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930324] Producer: Nicholas Kochan
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930328]Business in Handcuffs

In view of the problems caused by big fraud cases, Peter Day investigates how to lock up the fraudsters.

"Business in Handcuffs

In view of the problems caused by big fraud cases, Peter Day investigates how to lock up the fraudsters."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930328]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930331]Prize Performance

Companies large and small are waking up to the cult of quality, now seen as the essential ingredient in business success. The new glittering prize in the quality race is the award from the European

Foundation for Quality Management.

Peter Day finds how Rank Xerox Limited went about winning it, and what the company learned about itself during the arduous process.

Editor Stephen Chilcott

"Prize Performance

Editor Stephen Chilcott"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930331]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930404]Prize Performance

Companies large and small are waking up to the cult of quality, and the new glittering prize in the quality race is the award from the European

Foundation for Quality Management. Peter Day finds how Rank Xerox Limited went about winning it, and what the company learned about itself in the process.

"Prize Performance

Foundation for Quality Management. Peter Day finds how Rank Xerox Limited went about winning it, and what the company learned about itself in the process."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930404]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930407]Bad Company

Commercial skulduggery has focused attention on ethics in business. Peter

Day examines the gap between the promises companies make and what they do in practice. Editor Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930407] Editor: Neil Koenig
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930411]Bad Company
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930414]Arrivederci Roma

For years, the Italian economic miracle has been a patchwork quilt of wonder growth and inpenetrable corruption.

But now it's coming apart at the seams, as scandal unravels the system. Peter Day investigates whether Europe's third largest economy can pull itself back from the brink.

Producer Mark Gregory

"Arrivederci Roma

Producer Mark Gregory"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930414] Producer: Mark Gregory
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930418]Arrivederci Roma

Peter Day examines the state of the Italian economy.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930421]Turning Up the Heat The last ten years have seen the creation of a new breed of people: the regulators who intervene to control the activities of the privatised monopolies. They have got power without precedent, and they have provoked sharp reactions from the industries they preside over. Peter Day asks how the regulators are measuring up.

Producer Robert McKenzie

"Turning Up the Heat The last ten years have seen the creation of a new breed of people: the regulators who intervene to control the activities of the privatised monopolies. They have got power without precedent, and they have provoked sharp reactions from the industries they preside over. Peter Day asks how the regulators are measuring up.

Producer Robert McKenzie"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930421]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930425]Turning Up the Heat The last ten years have seen the creation of a new breed of people: the regulators who intervene to control the activities of the privatised monopolies. Peter Day asks how they are measuring up.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930428]with Peter Day. Producer Tim Bowler
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930428] Unknown: Peter Day.

Producer: Tim Bowler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930502]with Peter Day.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930502]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930505]BS 5750 - Dream or Nightmare?

The quality standard BS 5750 is now being widely adopted by service industries. Many companies are proud of their new kitemark: but many others are in revolt at the requirement to get one in order to remain in business.

Nigel Cassidy reports. Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930505] Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930509]BS 5750 - Dream or Nightmare?
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930516]Infomania

In the last of the series,

Peter Day reports from the USA on the impact of the communications explosion.

"Infomania

Peter Day reports from the USA on the impact of the communications explosion."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930516]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930825]Shelf Life. Shopping is in turmoil.

- The fabulous profit margins of the supermarket chains are under attack. From the High Street and out of town, Peter Day reports on the future of shopping, and the new competition from discounters, from high-tech innovation and from home shopping. Producer Colin Wilde

"Shelf Life. Shopping is in turmoil.

- The fabulous profit margins of the supermarket chains are under attack. From the High Street and out of town, Peter Day reports on the future of shopping, and the new competition from discounters, from high-tech innovation and from home shopping. Producer Colin Wilde"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930825] Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930829]Shelf Life. Peter Day reports on the future of shopping and takes a look at some of the new competitors.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930829]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930901]Who Needs Managers? Meet the company that's torn up the management rulebook. Where workers set their own hours, and many of them decide on their own pay. Peter Day reports from Brazil on the lessons Semco has to teach businesses around the world.

Producer Stephen Chilcott

"Who Needs Managers? Meet the company that's torn up the management rulebook. Where workers set their own hours, and many of them decide on their own pay. Peter Day reports from Brazil on the lessons Semco has to teach businesses around the world.

Producer Stephen Chilcott"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930901]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930905]Wlio Needs Managers? Meet the company that's torn up the management rulebook.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930908]TECnophobia. Industry complains of a skills shortage while the Government's network of Training and Enterprise Councils is supposed to provide people to do jobs. Can the TECs cope? Peter Day asks if Britain's idea of training is merely keeping the unemployment queues down.

Producer Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930908]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930912]TECnophobia. Peter Day asks if Britain's idea of training is merely keeping the unemployment queues down.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930915]Europe Unchained. One year ago, the pound was expelled from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism. At the end of July, continental Europe was shocked by the virtual breakdown of the ERM, but can the rest of Europe imitate Britain and translate monetary disaster into economic recovery? Peter Day asks European business leaders what they want now.

Producer Mark Gregory

"Europe Unchained. One year ago, the pound was expelled from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism. At the end of July, continental Europe was shocked by the virtual breakdown of the ERM, but can the rest of Europe imitate Britain and translate monetary disaster into economic recovery? Peter Day asks European business leaders what they want now.

Producer Mark Gregory"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930915]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930919]Europe Unchained

In the aftermath of the virtual breakdown of the ERM, Peter Day asks business leaders across Europe what they want now.

"Europe Unchained

In the aftermath of the virtual breakdown of the ERM, Peter Day asks business leaders across Europe what they want now."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930919]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930922]How to Steal the Best Ideas in the World

Business around the globe has discovered a way of plundering the best ideas and practices - legally. Peter Day sizes up the art of "benchmarking" one of the mightiest management tools around.

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930922]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930926]How to Steal the Best Ideas in the World

Peter Day looks at "Benchmarking".

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930926]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930929]Poisoned Profits. Peter Day investigates whether EC environmental legislation will make Europe a healthier place - or bankrupt the businesses that own land affected by years of drip by drip contamination. Who pays the billions of pounds' clean-up bill?

Producer Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930929]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931010]Presented by Peter Day.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931010]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931013]Can You Hear Me?

The communications revolution is speeding up and telecoms companies such as BT are busy forming global alliances with which to face the future.

But do they know where they are heading? Presented by Peter Day.

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931013] Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931017]Can You Hear Me? As the communications revolution speeds up, do telecoms companies knowwhere they're heading? Presented by Peter Day.

"Can You Hear Me? As the communications revolution speeds up, do telecoms companies knowwhere they're heading? Presented by Peter Day."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931017]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931020]Most bosses are sure they know best when it comes to running their firm. But what happens when visiting consultants think it's time to make some changes? Nigel Cassidy follows the fortunes of one company as it gets a second opinion. Producer Robert McKenzie
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931020]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931024]What happens when consultants think it's time to make some changes in a firm? Nigel Cassidy follows the fortunes of one company as it gets a second opinion.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931024]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931027]IfltAin Broke - Fix It. Re-engineering is the invention of Dr Mike Hammer. He believes it is pointless making small changes to a company. To create big gains, the way the company works must be rebuilt from scratch. Peter Day crosses America looking at companies transformed by Hammer's ideas.

"IfltAin Broke - Fix It. Re-engineering is the invention of Dr Mike Hammer. He believes it is pointless making small changes to a company. To create big gains, the way the company works must be rebuilt from scratch. Peter Day crosses America looking at companies transformed by Hammer's ideas."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931027] Unknown: Dr Mike Hammer.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931031]The last in the series looks at the re-engineering theory of Dr Mike Hammer , who believes that to create big gains companies must be rebuilt from scratch.

"The last in the series looks at the re-engineering theory of Dr Mike Hammer , who believes that to create big gains companies must be rebuilt from scratch."

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931031] Unknown: Dr Mike Hammer
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940316]Footprint across Ask. The battle for TV's final frontier has begun. Western media conglomerates are poised to sweep down on the great untapped markets of China and India. Media mogul Rupert Murdoch has stolen a lead on his rivals with Star TV - an Asian satellite service beaming programmes to two-thirds of the world's population. Nick Higham investigates the new market and the fierce strength of the opposition.

Producer Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940316] Unknown: Rupert Murdoch

Unknown: Nick Higham

Producer: Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940320]Footprint across Asia

The battle for TV's final frontier has begun. Western media conglomerates are poised to sweep down on the great untapped markets of China and India. Nick Higham investigates.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940320] Unknown: India. Nick Higham
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940323]Half rimes Two Times Three

" Half as many people will be paid twice as much for working three times as hard in four years'time. "This is the formula many large companies believe will deliver up optima levels of productivity and profit. But what are the real costs of this approach? How will we deal with these levels of unemployment? Peter Day leads a discussion on the challenges we face on the changing workfront.

Producer Ann Gilmartin

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940323] Producer: Ann Gilmartin
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940327]Presented by Peter Day.
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940327]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940410]Profit without Honour As companies begin to realise that profit alone is an insufficient yardstick, Peter Day asks what other standards should be used to judge tomorrow's company. Producer Colin Wilde

"Profit without Honour As companies begin to realise that profit alone is an insufficient yardstick, Peter Day asks what other standards should be used to judge tomorrow's company. Producer Colin Wilde"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940410]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940417]Communicopia Peter Day looks at information highways and the resultant effect on global business. Editor Stephen Chilcott
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940417]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940424]Off the Rails

The official opening of the Channel Tunnel takes place next month, but the first paying customers won't use it until the autumn.

It's the latest delay in an enterprise which has cost twice as much to build as originally projected. Peter Day finds out why big projects like this one have a tendencyto go wildly wrong.

Producer Catherine Chamaud

"Off the Rails

Producer Catherine Chamaud"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940424] Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Catherine Chamaud

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940501]Family Fortunes

Life's not easy for the family firm. Is there enough talent among the close relations? What happens when someone retires? And, when it comes to inheritance, how does a family firm avoid turning itself into a family feud? Peter Day investigates. Producer Colin Wilde

"Family Fortunes

Life's not easy for the family firm. Is there enough talent among the close relations? What happens when someone retires? And, when it comes to inheritance, how does a family firm avoid turning itself into a family feud? Peter Day investigates. Producer Colin Wilde"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940501]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940508]No Place Like Homework

For years people have talked of working from home. Now, it's an idea whose time has come. But is old-fashioned management holding back the concept of telecommuting? Peter Day telereports. Producer Stephen Chilcott

"No Place Like Homework

For years people have talked of working from home. Now, it's an idea whose time has come. But is old-fashioned management holding back the concept of telecommuting? Peter Day telereports. Producer Stephen Chilcott"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940508] Producer: Stephen Chilcott
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940515]Cheque Mates

In the 1970s Britain's banks lost millions on lending abroad. In the 80s they lost billions lending at home. Now they are climbing into bed with their high street rivals, the building societies. Peter Day reports on what these sweeping changes mean for all their customers. Producer Catherine Chamaud

"Cheque Mates

In the 1970s Britain's banks lost millions on lending abroad. In the 80s they lost billions lending at home. Now they are climbing into bed with their high street rivals, the building societies. Peter Day reports on what these sweeping changes mean for all their customers. Producer Catherine Chamaud"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940515] Producer: Catherine Chamaud
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940522]I Spy Business

The private detective industry is almost unregulated. Peter Day asks whether tighter controls are needed in the shdaowy world of private surveillance and espionage. Producer Nick Kochan

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940522] Producer: Nick Kochan
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940529]The Living Dead

We're supposed to be on the road to recovery, but there's no respite for the growing number of bankrupts in Britain. Peter Day reports on the problems of those who become the pariahs of society. Producer Colin Wilde

"The Living Dead

We're supposed to be on the road to recovery, but there's no respite for the growing number of bankrupts in Britain. Peter Day reports on the problems of those who become the pariahs of society. Producer Colin Wilde"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940529]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940612]Lancaster University has devised the Innovation War Game to enable companies to envisage the next 25 years - and react to it. Peter Day reports as top managers play out their future.... and ours. Editor Stephen Chilcott
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940612]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940619]Work - or the threat of losing it - is putting more and more people under strain. In the last of the series, Peter Day reports on stress in the workplace. Producer Catherine Chamaud

"Work - or the threat of losing it - is putting more and more people under strain. In the last of the series, Peter Day reports on stress in the workplace. Producer Catherine Chamaud"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940619]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940904]House Bound. Traditionally, the housing market has been a key to the rest of the economy, but with house prices flat and little sign of recovery, will it stay that way in the future? Peter Day investigates. Producer Colin Wilde

"House Bound. Traditionally, the housing market has been a key to the rest of the economy, but with house prices flat and little sign of recovery, will it stay that way in the future? Peter Day investigates. Producer Colin Wilde"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940904]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940911]New Foundations. Something is wrong with the L46 billion British construction industry. Why does a British building project cost up to 30 per cent more than one abroad? Peter Day reports on a new programme of radical change. Editor Stephen Chilcott
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940911]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940925]Paywatch. Peter Day reports on how, in an era of almost zero inflation, companies are still giving huge pay rises to their directors and executives, while battening down on the workforce. Producer Tim Fawcett

"Paywatch. Peter Day reports on how, in an era of almost zero inflation, companies are still giving huge pay rises to their directors and executives, while battening down on the workforce. Producer Tim Fawcett"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940925] Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Tim Fawcett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941002]Hello Caller. With all eyes on the so-called information superhighway, is the bell tolling for the POT - the plain old telephone? Peter Day investigates. Producer Colin Wilde

"Hello Caller. With all eyes on the so-called information superhighway, is the bell tolling for the POT - the plain old telephone? Peter Day investigates. Producer Colin Wilde"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941002]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941009]Big McK. The McKinsey men are the most influential management consultants in the world. Peter Day reports from Chicago where "the Firm" started almost 70 years ago. Producer Colin Wilde
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941009]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941016]Presented by Peter Day. Editor Stephen Chilcott
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941016]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941023]Peter Day investigates why many large companies lose their innovative edge. Producer Rosamund Jones
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941023] Producer: Rosamund Jones
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941030]Chips with Everything. As the National Lottery opens, Nigel Cassidy examines the prospects for the gambling industry. Producer Neil Koenig

"Chips with Everything. As the National Lottery opens, Nigel Cassidy examines the prospects for the gambling industry. Producer Neil Koenig"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941030]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941106]The Zero Era. How do businesses cope with the changed economic environment that has brought inflation down close to zero? On the eve of the CBI Conference, Peter Day reports. Editor Stephen Chilcott

"The Zero Era. How do businesses cope with the changed economic environment that has brought inflation down close to zero? On the eve of the CBI Conference, Peter Day reports. Editor Stephen Chilcott"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941106]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941120]The Oldest Profession. Hurry, hurry, hurry! Listen NOW while stocks last!! Peter Day investigates SELLING!!! Producer Neil Koenig

"The Oldest Profession. Hurry, hurry, hurry! Listen NOW while stocks last!! Peter Day investigates SELLING!!! Producer Neil Koenig"

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941120] Producer: Neil Koenig
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941127]