Episodes

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Are Ceos Up To The Job?

Are Freeports the Future?2018112920181202 (R4)

In the 1970s a young Jiang Zemin headed to Shannon on the rural west coast of Ireland. The time he spent here at the world's first free trade zone would inspire the monumental industrial transformation of the Pearl River Delta and China itself.

The 'Shannon Model' as it became known came from the customs and tax deals around land at Shannon airport, its extraordinary transformation from green fields around a small airport to an industrial manufacturing hub inspired many of the world's most successful trade zones.

Now with Brexit looming Jonty Bloom heads to Teeside to see plans for it to become the UK's first 'freeport' offering customs free imports which it is hoped will encourage advanced manufacturing, utilising the region's deep water port.

With local and international business on board can this new scheme bring back manufacturing jobs not seen in decades to one of the UK's most industrialised and deprived regions?

Contributors;
Jerry Hopkinson - PD Ports
Sharon Lane- Tees Components
Ben Houchen- Tees Valley Combined Authority
Patrick Edmonds - Shannon Airport
Kevin Thompstone- Thompstone Group
Dr Meredith Crowley - University of Cambridge

Presenter: Jonty Bloom
Producer: Jordan Dunbar

Can 'freeports' spark a post-Brexit manufacturing boom?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

In the 1970s a young Jiang Zemin headed to Shannon on the rural west coast of Ireland. The time he spent here at the world's first free trade zone would inspire the monumental industrial transformation of the Pearl River Delta and China itself.

The 'Shannon Model' as it became known came from the customs and tax deals around land at Shannon airport, its extraordinary transformation from green fields around a small airport to an industrial manufacturing hub inspired many of the world's most successful trade zones.

Now with Brexit looming Jonty Bloom heads to Teeside to see plans for it to become the UK's first 'freeport' offering customs free imports which it is hoped will encourage advanced manufacturing, utilising the region's deep water port.

With local and international business on board can this new scheme bring back manufacturing jobs not seen in decades to one of the UK's most industrialised and deprived regions?

Contributors;
Jerry Hopkinson - PD Ports
Sharon Lane- Tees Components
Ben Houchen- Tees Valley Combined Authority
Patrick Edmonds - Shannon Airport
Kevin Thompstone- Thompstone Group
Dr Meredith Crowley - University of Cambridge

Presenter: Jonty Bloom
Producer: Jordan Dunbar

Can 'freeports' spark a post-Brexit manufacturing boom?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Battery Power

Behind the Facades20190418

The relationship between landlord and tenant is an important, often unseen, dynamic that most of us don’t give much thought to. And yet, it's reshaping high streets up and down the country.

High rents are blamed for the collapse of so many retailers - they appear unsustainable yet they are the vehicle through which much of our pension wealth is invested.

In this programme, Ruth Alexander looks at different models of ownership: from the big financial institutional investors through to the original aristocratic landowner and asks how - in the turmoil created by the rapidly changing retail environment - these landlords are facing up to a new reality.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Alex Lewis

How the changing relationship between landlord and tenant is reshaping our high street.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Behind The Facades2019041820190421 (R4)

The relationship between landlord and tenant is an important, often unseen, dynamic that most of us don’t give much thought to. And yet, it's reshaping high streets up and down the country.

High rents are blamed for the collapse of so many retailers - they appear unsustainable yet they are the vehicle through which much of our pension wealth is invested.

In this programme, Ruth Alexander looks at different models of ownership: from the big financial institutional investors through to the original aristocratic landowner and asks how - in the turmoil created by the rapidly changing retail environment - these landlords are facing up to a new reality.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Alex Lewis

How the changing relationship between landlord and tenant is reshaping our high street.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Beijing to Belarus - A new Silk Road to Europe2019050920190512 (R4)

China and Belarus are building an economic trade zone so huge it will rival Barcelona or Dublin in footprint. It’s called Great Stone and it’s imagined as a futurist city - clean, green, and super modern - where pioneers of industry and technology will make their home. President Xi Jinping calls Great Stone a ‘Pearl’ of his New Silk Road - a turbo-charged version of ancient East-West trading routes.

Belarus is gradually opening up after years of post-Soviet caution. It’s keen to encourage international investment as its old Soviet era industries prove difficult to reform. Optimistic Belarusians point to their advantageous geography - the jigsaw piece between the European Union and Russia; their educated workforce and their impressive track record in high-tech innovation.

Presented and produced by Monica Whitlock

Will a giant industrial zone in Belarus become the European hub of China's new Silk Road?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

China and Belarus are building an economic trade zone so huge it will rival Barcelona or Dublin in footprint. It’s called Great Stone and it’s imagined as a futurist city - clean, green, and super modern - where pioneers of industry and technology will make their home. President Xi Jinping calls Great Stone a ‘Pearl’ of his New Silk Road - a turbo-charged version of ancient East-West trading routes.

Belarus is gradually opening up after years of post-Soviet caution. It’s keen to encourage international investment as its old Soviet era industries prove difficult to reform. Optimistic Belarusians point to their advantageous geography - the jigsaw piece between the European Union and Russia; their educated workforce and their impressive track record in high-tech innovation.

Presented and produced by Monica Whitlock

Will a giant industrial zone in Belarus become the European hub of China's new Silk Road?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Beijing To Belarus - A New Silk Road To Europe2019050920190512 (R4)

China and Belarus are building an economic trade zone so huge it will rival Barcelona or Dublin in footprint. It’s called Great Stone and it’s imagined as a futurist city - clean, green, and super modern - where pioneers of industry and technology will make their home. President Xi Jinping calls Great Stone a ‘Pearl’ of his New Silk Road - a turbo-charged version of ancient East-West trading routes.

Belarus is gradually opening up after years of post-Soviet caution. It’s keen to encourage international investment as its old Soviet era industries prove difficult to reform. Optimistic Belarusians point to their advantageous geography - the jigsaw piece between the European Union and Russia; their educated workforce and their impressive track record in high-tech innovation.

Presented and produced by Monica Whitlock

Will a giant industrial zone in Belarus become the European hub of China's new Silk Road

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Beyond the Barbed Wire - Cyber Security in the UK2019011720190120 (R4)

Since Bletchley Park and the enigma machine, Britain has been at the forefront of what would become cyber security. In GCHQ we have a world leader in threat detection and yet our industry lags far behind both the US and Israel.

Jonty Bloom looks at what we could do to make this Brexit proof industry bigger and finds out why Belfast is at the forefront of the UK’s research and development to keep us safe online.

He looks at Unit 8200 the Israeli Army’s elite cyber security unit which has spun off several successful start up companies because of the unique training system they employ.

Jonty gets to see inside the National Cyber Security Centre which is part of GCHQ’s new open policy as it invites investors to see the third round of it’s start up incubator.

The ‘Catalyst’ campus in Belfast’s newly redeveloped docks sits beside the shipyard that built the Titanic and is now securing silicon chips rather than building ships. It’s buzzing as foreign investment has flowed into to take advantage of its burgeoning cyber security talent pool. A bet placed on the industry a decade ago by Queen’s University has paid off with a pipeline of graduates with the specialist skills needed to protect us online.

Each and every heartbeat is unique to its owner and Jonty meets a company using this to secure our information as well as our cars. Getting the chance to test drive their heart beat steering wheel with some disastrous consequences.

No trip to Belfast would be complete without a trip to the pub and here we meet some of the young talent that’s drawing this attention. We hear how quickly the start-up culture has grown and how this tech cluster has reached a level that is reversing the once chronic brain drain from the region.

Can the UK become a world leader in making the internet safer?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Since Bletchley Park and the enigma machine, Britain has been at the forefront of what would become cyber security. In GCHQ we have a world leader in threat detection and yet our industry lags far behind both the US and Israel.

Jonty Bloom looks at what we could do to make this Brexit proof industry bigger and finds out why Belfast is at the forefront of the UK’s research and development to keep us safe online.

He looks at Unit 8200 the Israeli Army’s elite cyber security unit which has spun off several successful start up companies because of the unique training system they employ.

Jonty gets to see inside the National Cyber Security Centre which is part of GCHQ’s new open policy as it invites investors to see the third round of it’s start up incubator.

The ‘Catalyst’ campus in Belfast’s newly redeveloped docks sits beside the shipyard that built the Titanic and is now securing silicon chips rather than building ships. It’s buzzing as foreign investment has flowed into to take advantage of its burgeoning cyber security talent pool. A bet placed on the industry a decade ago by Queen’s University has paid off with a pipeline of graduates with the specialist skills needed to protect us online.

Each and every heartbeat is unique to its owner and Jonty meets a company using this to secure our information as well as our cars. Getting the chance to test drive their heart beat steering wheel with some disastrous consequences.

No trip to Belfast would be complete without a trip to the pub and here we meet some of the young talent that’s drawing this attention. We hear how quickly the start-up culture has grown and how this tech cluster has reached a level that is reversing the once chronic brain drain from the region.

Can the UK become a world leader in making the internet safer?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Colombia's Coffee Revolutions2019012420190127 (R4)

Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia’s struggling farmers? It’s not been easy growing coffee in recent decades in Colombia, where rural life has been dominated by the conflict between guerrillas, paramilitaries and drug traffickers. Now, two years on from the historic peace deal here, how is business benefiting? And with global market prices not even covering growers’ costs, could the trend for coffee with a story come to growers’ rescue?

Presenter: Simon Maybin
Producer: Karenina Velandia

Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia's struggling farmers?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia’s struggling farmers? It’s not been easy growing coffee in recent decades in Colombia, where rural life has been dominated by the conflict between guerrillas, paramilitaries and drug traffickers. Now, two years on from the historic peace deal here, how is business benefiting? And with global market prices not even covering growers’ costs, could the trend for coffee with a story come to growers’ rescue?

Presenter: Simon Maybin
Producer: Karenina Velandia

Can the fashion for high-end coffee save Colombia's struggling farmers?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Coming Soon

Doing It Wrong

Getting Hired2019050220190505 (R4)

The face-to-face interview can be life-changing.
But it comes with risks attached, of bias on the part of the interviewer, or nerves on the part of the candidate.
Lesley Curwen looks at the fast-changing process of getting hired in companies, big and small.
Large companies are increasingly using recruitment tools including artificial intelligence to weed out the weakest candidates, in order to find the right candidate for the right job. But there is resistance in some quarters from some small employers who believe in the old ways of sifting through CVs by hand to produce a short-list.
So can the traditional face-to-face interview survive longterm?

Producer Smita Patel
Editor Penny Murphy

Lesley Curwen looks at the fast-changing process of getting hired for a job

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

The face-to-face interview can be life-changing.
But it comes with risks attached, of bias on the part of the interviewer, or nerves on the part of the candidate.
Lesley Curwen looks at the fast-changing process of getting hired in companies, big and small.
Large companies are increasingly using recruitment tools including artificial intelligence to weed out the weakest candidates, in order to find the right candidate for the right job. But there is resistance in some quarters from some small employers who believe in the old ways of sifting through CVs by hand to produce a short-list.
So can the traditional face-to-face interview survive longterm?

Producer Smita Patel
Editor Penny Murphy

Lesley Curwen looks at the fast-changing process of getting hired for a job

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Green Shoots: Growing Food In Uae's Deserts20190425

Can the United Arab Emirates grow its own food? The Desert kingdoms today import 85% of their own food, at great cost. And each year consumption increases by 12%. This raises issues of food security, price and environmental damage – flying in fruit from California is not environmentally sustainable.
This is a region with little soil and few water resources. On average it rains just five days a year. So why is agriculture now considered one of the most exciting growth areas in the UAE? Farmers here depend on desalinated water from the Arabian Sea – costly to both the farmer and, once again, to the environment. But new agricultural technologies are being developed. Starting at a small scale, can such businesses really be built up? Or are they vanity projects reliant simply on oil wealth? Georgia Tolley examines if the Emiratis can make their desert bloom and ensure their business of food production grows.

Producer: John Murphy

The United Arab Emirates plans to grow vegetables in the desert.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Green Shoots: growing food in UAE's deserts2019042520190428 (R4)

Can the United Arab Emirates grow its own food? The Desert kingdoms today import 90% of their own food, at great cost. And each year consumption increases by 12%. This raises issues of food security, price and environmental damage – flying in fruit from California is not environmentally sustainable.
This is a region with little soil and few water resources. On average it rains just five days a year. So why is agriculture now considered one of the most exciting growth areas in the UAE? Farmers here depend on desalinated water from the Arabian Sea – expensive and, once again, costly to the environment. But new agricultural technologies are being developed. Starting at a small scale, can such businesses really be built up? Or are they vanity projects reliant simply on oil wealth? Georgia Tolley examines if the Emiratis can make their desert bloom and ensure their business of food production grows.

Producer: John Murphy

The United Arab Emirates plans to grow vegetables in the desert.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Can the United Arab Emirates grow its own food? The Desert kingdoms today import 90% of their own food, at great cost. And each year consumption increases by 12%. This raises issues of food security, price and environmental damage – flying in fruit from California is not environmentally sustainable.
This is a region with little soil and few water resources. On average it rains just five days a year. So why is agriculture now considered one of the most exciting growth areas in the UAE? Farmers here depend on desalinated water from the Arabian Sea – expensive and, once again, costly to the environment. But new agricultural technologies are being developed. Starting at a small scale, can such businesses really be built up? Or are they vanity projects reliant simply on oil wealth? Georgia Tolley examines if the Emiratis can make their desert bloom and ensure their business of food production grows.

Producer: John Murphy

The United Arab Emirates plans to grow vegetables in the desert.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Hard To Credit

Hell For Leather

Hidden Depths

Home Truths2019010320190106 (R4)

Does the house building industry need to change? Manuela Saragosa meets the disruptors, the companies trying to transform how the vast majority of residential property is built. Across the country new factories are springing up - in a bid to manufacture our homes in much the same way as we do our cars. The risks are huge.

Significant investment is required to get things moving and demand for these new homes has yet to be tested. But the disruptors claim that the house building industry must modernise or die. Productivity is falling and traditional skills are in short supply - something that is likely to get worse as immigration reduces. Other countries, too, already build huge numbers of homes off-site, claiming that this results in quicker and cheaper construction. So, just how many of the hundreds of thousands of homes that we need to build might end up being factory produced?

Producer: Rosamund Jones

Meet the companies trying to fundamentally change how houses are built.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Does the house building industry need to change? Manuela Saragosa meets the disruptors, the companies trying to transform how the vast majority of residential property is built. Across the country new factories are springing up - in a bid to manufacture our homes in much the same way as we do our cars. The risks are huge.

Significant investment is required to get things moving and demand for these new homes has yet to be tested. But the disruptors claim that the house building industry must modernise or die. Productivity is falling and traditional skills are in short supply - something that is likely to get worse as immigration reduces. Other countries, too, already build huge numbers of homes off-site, claiming that this results in quicker and cheaper construction. So, just how many of the hundreds of thousands of homes that we need to build might end up being factory produced?

Producer: Rosamund Jones

Meet the companies trying to fundamentally change how houses are built.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

In At The Start

Learning Curve

Let Me Entertain You

Let's Start A Bank

Life Cycle

Light Bulb Moments and How To Have Them2019051620190519 (R4)

There’s more people and more money spent on innovation today than ever before. Yet the process by which we come up with ideas is still poorly understood. If only we had a better grasp of how great ideas are generated, we would have the key to unlock huge new waves of innovation and productivity. Adam Shaw looks at the growing study of innovation to uncover its’ secrets and looks at what companies and individuals are doing to make them more innovative than ever before.

Producer Smita Patel
Editor Penny Murphy

How do we create an innovative environment?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

There’s more people and more money spent on innovation today than ever before. Yet the process by which we come up with ideas is still poorly understood. If only we had a better grasp of how great ideas are generated, we would have the key to unlock huge new waves of innovation and productivity. Adam Shaw looks at the growing study of innovation to uncover its’ secrets and looks at what companies and individuals are doing to make them more innovative than ever before.

Producer Smita Patel
Editor Penny Murphy

How do we create an innovative environment?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Light Bulb Moments And How To Have Them2019051620190519 (R4)

There’s more people and more money spent on innovation today than ever before. Yet the process by which we come up with ideas is still poorly understood. If only we had a better grasp of how great ideas are generated, we would have the key to unlock huge new waves of innovation and productivity. Adam Shaw looks at the growing study of innovation to uncover its’ secrets and looks at what companies and individuals are doing to make them more innovative than ever before.

Producer Smita Patel
Editor Penny Murphy

How do we create an innovative environment?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

There’s more people and more money spent on innovation today than ever before. Yet the process by which we come up with ideas is still poorly understood. If only we had a better grasp of how great ideas are generated, we would have the key to unlock huge new waves of innovation and productivity. Adam Shaw looks at the growing study of innovation to uncover its’ secrets and looks at what companies and individuals are doing to make them more innovative than ever before.

Producer Smita Patel
Editor Penny Murphy

How do we create an innovative environment?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Media Mayhem

New Age

Not Just Silicon

Now Wash Your Hands Please

On the Rails2018122720181230 (R4)

It’s been a challenging year on Britain’s railways with timetable chaos, over-running engineering works, cancelled trains and irate passengers, not to mention a private operator handing back control to the government. The transport secretary, Chris Grayling has announced yet another review of the industry. Meanwhile, Labour and many of the public want to see rail re-nationalised. Rail professionals point to the industry’s successes – a doubling in passenger numbers since privatisation, and a current strong safety record. But the government says the rail industry hasn’t kept pace with customer demand. So is there another way? Matthew Gwyther goes to Italy to experience their take on free competition on their high speed lines. He also speaks to rail experts at home – all searching for answers.

Producer Caroline Bayley

Matthew Gwyther asks what's next for the UK's rail industry after a turbulent year.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

It’s been a challenging year on Britain’s railways with timetable chaos, over-running engineering works, cancelled trains and irate passengers, not to mention a private operator handing back control to the government. The transport secretary, Chris Grayling has announced yet another review of the industry. Meanwhile, Labour and many of the public want to see rail re-nationalised. Rail professionals point to the industry’s successes – a doubling in passenger numbers since privatisation, and a current strong safety record. But the government says the rail industry hasn’t kept pace with customer demand. So is there another way? Matthew Gwyther goes to Italy to experience their take on free competition on their high speed lines. He also speaks to rail experts at home – all searching for answers.

Producer Caroline Bayley

Matthew Gwyther asks what's next for the UK's rail industry after a turbulent year.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Organising Salvation

Plastic Backlash: The Business Response2019052320190526 (R4)

The last eighteen months have seen a global public backlash against plastic. Everyone talks about the huge impact that Sir David Attenborough and the BBC's Blue Planet series has had in raising public awareness about the damage that 8 million tonnes of plastic which enter the ocean every year is having on sea life. It was one of the triggers for consumers, governments and companies to decide that action needed to be taken.

But what does it mean for businesses which depend on plastic as a core raw material or for the packaging and retail industries, both deeply reliant on plastic? Caroline Bayley talks to companies about the opportunities and challenges presented by the plastic backlash.

Producer Beth Sagar-Fenton

How are businesses responding to the public backlash against plastic packaging?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Potholes - the road to the future2019011020190113 (R4)

Potholes are a national obsession. But there's much more to them than you might think. Ruth Alexander digs deep into their costs for business and society - where fixing two holes in a motorway can cost half a million pounds. But she also finds all kinds of entrepreneurial imagination going into solving the problem. Everything from new data analysis to 3D printing drones may be the answer. Beneath it all lies a fundamental question. Can we learn to value roads, and maintain them as a vital national asset, smoothing the way to big business and social gains?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Penny Murphy

Potholes - the hidden costs, and opportunities, lurking in our roads

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Potholes are a national obsession. But there's much more to them than you might think. Ruth Alexander digs deep into their costs for business and society - where fixing two holes in a motorway can cost half a million pounds. But she also finds all kinds of entrepreneurial imagination going into solving the problem. Everything from new data analysis to 3D printing drones may be the answer. Beneath it all lies a fundamental question. Can we learn to value roads, and maintain them as a vital national asset, smoothing the way to big business and social gains?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Penny Murphy

Potholes - the hidden costs, and opportunities, lurking in our roads

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Power Play

Press Under Pressure

Ready To Wear

Rwanda Rising

Selling Sleep2018122020181223 (R4)

From innovative mattresses to personal sleep consultants, business is moving in on our nights under the covers. The sector is booming, thanks to a new understanding of the importance of sleep, with annual sales in the billions of pounds. And it’s not only our homes that businesses are targeting. In the workplace, managers are becoming more aware of the sleep needs of their teams and some are even installing pods to allow their employees to have a nap on the job.

David Baker looks at the products and services on offer and finds out how we can separate the science from the snake oil.

Producer: Smita Patel
Editor: Penny Murphy

David Baker investigates the growing industry dedicated to improving our 40 winks.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

From innovative mattresses to personal sleep consultants, business is moving in on our nights under the covers. The sector is booming, thanks to a new understanding of the importance of sleep, with annual sales in the billions of pounds. And it’s not only our homes that businesses are targeting. In the workplace, managers are becoming more aware of the sleep needs of their teams and some are even installing pods to allow their employees to have a nap on the job.

David Baker looks at the products and services on offer and finds out how we can separate the science from the snake oil.

Producer: Smita Patel
Editor: Penny Murphy

David Baker investigates the growing industry dedicated to improving our 40 winks.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Small World

Sociability

Squeaky Clean

Student Start-ups

Sugaring The Pill

The Business of Sleep2018122020181223 (R4)

From innovative mattresses to personal sleep consultants, business is moving in on our nights under the covers. The sector is booming, thanks to a new understanding of the importance of sleep, with annual sales in the billions of pounds. And it’s not only our homes that businesses are targeting. In the workplace, managers are becoming more aware of the sleep needs of their teams and some are even installing pods to allow their employees to have a nap on the job.

David Baker looks at the products and services on offer and finds out how we can separate the science from the snake oil.

Producer: Smita Patel
Editor: Penny Murphy

David Baker investigates the growing industry dedicated to improving our 40 winks.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

From innovative mattresses to personal sleep consultants, business is moving in on our nights under the covers. The sector is booming, thanks to a new understanding of the importance of sleep, with annual sales in the billions of pounds. And it’s not only our homes that businesses are targeting. In the workplace, managers are becoming more aware of the sleep needs of their teams and some are even installing pods to allow their employees to have a nap on the job.

David Baker looks at the products and services on offer and finds out how we can separate the science from the snake oil.

Producer: Smita Patel
Editor: Penny Murphy

David Baker investigates the growing industry dedicated to improving our 40 winks.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

The Business of Tutors2018120620181209 (R4)

From stories of teachers in top schools being poached to tutor children on private yachts to single parents taking on extra cleaning jobs to afford a private tutor, tutoring is happening across the social divide - and is growing at a rate never seen before.

Mark Maclaine is one of Britain's "supertutors". He earns up to £1,000 an hour and has tutored the children of royal families, sports stars and musicians. But he also runs a charity giving free tuition to children who can't afford to pay.

Alanna and James are university students, tutoring GCSE and A Level physics to help pay for their studies.

The profile of Britain's army of tutors is varied.....but they're all part of a rapidly expanding sector now estimated as being worth £2 billion in the UK. Caroline Bayley looks at the profound effect tutoring is having on children, teachers and schools and asks if this industry is starting to change the very way we educate our children.

Producer: Adele Armstrong

Caroline Bayley delves into the booming industry of private tutoring.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

From stories of teachers in top schools being poached to tutor children on private yachts to single parents taking on extra cleaning jobs to afford a private tutor, tutoring is happening across the social divide - and is growing at a rate never seen before.

Mark Maclaine is one of Britain's "supertutors". He earns up to £1,000 an hour and has tutored the children of royal families, sports stars and musicians. But he also runs a charity giving free tuition to children who can't afford to pay.

Alanna and James are university students, tutoring GCSE and A Level physics to help pay for their studies.

The profile of Britain's army of tutors is varied.....but they're all part of a rapidly expanding sector now estimated as being worth £2 billion in the UK. Caroline Bayley looks at the profound effect tutoring is having on children, teachers and schools and asks if this industry is starting to change the very way we educate our children.

Producer: Adele Armstrong

Caroline Bayley delves into the booming industry of private tutoring.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

The Business Of Tutors20181206

From stories of teachers in top schools being poached to tutor children on private yachts to single parents taking on extra cleaning jobs to afford a private tutor, tutoring is happening across the social divide - and is growing at a rate never seen before.

Mark Maclaine is one of Britain's "supertutors". He earns up to £1,000 an hour and has tutored the children of royal families, sports stars and musicians. But he also runs a charity giving free tuition to children who can't afford to pay.

Alanna and James are university students, tutoring GCSE and A Level physics to help pay for their studies.

The profile of Britain's army of tutors is varied....but they're all part of a rapidly expanding sector now estimated as being worth £2 billion in the UK. Caroline Bayley looks at the profound effect tutoring is having on children, teachers and schools and asks if this industry is starting to change the very way we educate our children.

Producer: Adele Armstrong

Caroline Bayley delves into the booming industry of private tutoring.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

The Golden Opportunity2018121320181216 (R4)

Will life sciences lead Britain towards a new economic future? Brexit's causing uncertainty. But as Ruth Alexander discovers, there's a dynamic 'golden triangle' now linking medical and other cutting edge research at Oxford and Cambridge universities with London's political and financial power. The government's putting this at the centre of its vision for a transformed economy. So what's behind all this, and can this sector live up to the ambition?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Penny Murphy

(Researchers in a lab. Credit: Getty Images)

Will life sciences lead Britain towards a new economic future?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Will life sciences lead Britain towards a new economic future? Brexit's causing uncertainty. But as Ruth Alexander discovers, there's a dynamic 'golden triangle' now linking medical and other cutting edge research at Oxford and Cambridge universities with London's political and financial power. The government's putting this at the centre of its vision for a transformed economy. So what's behind all this, and can this sector live up to the ambition?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Penny Murphy

(Researchers in a lab. Credit: Getty Images)

Will life sciences lead Britain towards a new economic future?

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

The Irresistible Rise of eSports20190411

Its top stars can earn millions of dollars a year, without breaking into a sweat. They train for hours a day and have legions of fans, who fill stadiums to watch them. But these aren't normal sports stars. They're part of one of the fastest growing industries - known as Esports. And, as John Murphy discovers, the distinction between real physical sport and this online, virtual version is narrowing, as major companies and some of the world's most famous football clubs are signing up the top Esports players to play in major competitions. A number of video games, including Fifa, Dota2, Call of Duty and League of Legends, have their own international leagues and world championships. The global audience is now estimated at more than 200 million, and growing. Annual revenues from Esports, currently around 650 million dollars for events, continue to rise.

Billions more are generated through video games sales. In the UK the video games sector, from which Esports have sprung, is now worth more than video (films) and music combined. There's even talk of Esports becoming an Olympic sport.

So will dexterous Esporters become the new athletic champions, or is this a business that will play itself out? Who is making the money and how? And why are top football clubs clamouring for some of the virtual action?

Presenter: John Murphy
Producer: Lizzy McNeill

Sport, yes, but not as you know it. The irresistible rise of competitive gaming or Esports

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers

Ticking Over

Unlimited Company

Upending The Pyramid: Remembering Ck Prahalad

Who Sets Our Standards?

Women's Work

0201Chips Off The Old Block

0504After The Crunch