In The Balance [world Service]

Episodes

TitleFirst
Broadcast
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2011121420111217

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

20111224

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

2012010720120109
2012011420120116
20120121
20120128
20120204
20120211
2012021820120220
20120303
20120310
20120317
20120324
20120331
20120407

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

20120414
20120421

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

20120428
2012051220120513
2012051920120520

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

2012061620120617
2012062320120624
2012063020120701
2012070720120708
20120901

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

2012090120120902 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012092220120923 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012092920120930 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012100620121007 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012102020121021 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012110320121104 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012111020121111 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012111720121118 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012112420121125 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012120120121202 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012120820121209 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012121520121216 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2012122220121223 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013020220130203 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013020920130210 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013022320130224 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013030920130310 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013031620130317 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the global business headlines

2013032320130324 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

The Business Daily team looks at what's really going on in this changing global economy

2013033020130331 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the global business headlines

2013040620130407 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013041320130414 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013042720130428 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013051120130512 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2013051820130519 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

20130525
2013060820130609 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013061520130616 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013070620130707 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013071320130714 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013072020130721 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013072720130728 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013080320130804 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013081020130811 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013081720130818 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

20130907
20130928
2013113020131201 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013120720131208 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013121420131215 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2013122120131222 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

episode-p01n9fs7.jpg

2014010420140105 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014011120140112 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014011820140119 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014020120140202 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014020820140209 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014021520140216 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014030120140302 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014032220140323 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

20140329

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014040520140406 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014041220140413 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014050320140504 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014051720140518 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014052420140525 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014061420140615 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014062820140629 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014070520140706 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014071920140720 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014081620140817 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014090620140907 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014091320140914 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014092020140921 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014101820141019 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

2014110120141102 (WS)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

20170610

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Thursday's general election in the UK was supposed to strengthen the conservative British prime minister's hand on Brexit. However, things didn't quite go as planned and Britain was left with a hung parliament. The Conservatives are still the country's biggest party, but they've been left without the necessary majority and fewer parliamentary seats than before the election. And all this has happened only a few days before the country is due to sit down at the negotiating table with the European Union to discuss the terms of the UK's departure from the EU.

So how will the election result play out in those talks? Is Britain's hand now fatally weakened? What are the concerns of the business community? And what sort of Brexit should they be preparing for? To discuss these issues In The Balance brings together four people with insight into the matter: Jean de Ruyt, a former Belgian ambassador to the EU and a diplomat of 40 years experience; Jason Langrish, Executive Director of the Canada Europe Roundtable for Business, who worked on the Canadian trade deal with the EU; Jill Rutter, Programme Director for Brexit at the Institute for Government; and Lord Billimoria, Founder and Chair of Cobra Beer, Founding Chair of the UK-India Business Council and Chancellor of the University of Birmingham. All are in discussion with the BBC's Manuela Saragosa.

20170617

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Sharp falls in commodity prices have dealt serious blows to the prospects of workers, communities, and businesses in large parts of Africa over the last few years.

The World Bank said economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa slumped to its lowest level for more than two decades last year and earlier this month South Africa, the continent’s third largest economy, re-entered recession.

The picture is not uniformly bleak – the outlook is much more positive in East Africa – but the continent’s largest economies are suffering. Can they turn things around and end their reliance on oil and mining? What hope is there for those seeking relief from poverty, and what jobs might they do in the future?

Ed Butler is joined by a panel of guests: Kola Karim, CEO of Shoreline Group, a Nigerian energy and infrastructure company; professor Mthuli Ncube, head of Quantum Global Research Lab and former chief economist of the African Development Bank; and Lorenzo Fioramonti, professor of political economy at the University of Pretoria, in South Africa.

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images)

20170708

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How much pocket money, if any, should you give your children? What does it teach them about the world of finance?

Some parents give their children an unconditional allowance, with no strings attached, but could this be considered a form of child abuse? Does it make them financially irresponsible adults with a sense of entitlement?

And if you only give your children money in return for them washing the dishes or cleaning their room, do they ever understand the real meaning or usefulness of the work they are doing?

We assess the value of pocket money as a tool for introducing young minds to the world of money, and ask whether parents should be more open with children on money matters and even give them more power to make their own choices with the help of new technology.

Contributors

Professor Lewis Mandell, a financial economist specialising in financial literacy
Dean Brauer, c-founder of goHenry, a digital pocket money app
Professor Agnes Nairn, a researcher on consumerism and marketing to children
Bianca Isaincu, from Child and Youth Finance International, a non-profit which aims to educate children about money and get them access to bank accounts

(Picture: Piggy bank. Credit: iStock, Getty Images)

20170909

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does passing down large amounts of money within families drive the gap between rich and poor even wider? It seems that some of the world's richest people, like Bill Gates, recognised this and have pledged to give away most, if not all, of their wealth to good causes rather than their children. Is inherited wealth a curse, both on a personal and macro-economic level? Should we tax it much more heavily, or even ban inheritance altogether? Manuela Saragosa is joined by a global panel of guests to unpick the issues on intergenerational fairness.

Contributors: Barbara Blouin, founder of The Inheritance Project, Karen Rowlingson Professor of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham, Edward Wolff, Professor of Economics at New York University and Jørgen Næsje, State Secretary in Norway's Finance Ministry.

(Picture: College Republicans Rally For Repeal Of Estate Tax. Washington DC June 2006. Credit: Getty Imgages)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does passing down large amounts of money within families drive the gap between rich and poor even wider? It seems that some of the world's richest people, like Bill Gates, recognised this and have pledged to give away most, if not all, of their wealth to good causes rather than their children. Is inherited wealth a curse, both on a personal and macro-economic level? Should we tax it much more heavily, or even ban inheritance altogether? Manuela Saragosa is joined by a global panel of guests to unpick the issues on intergenerational fairness.

Contributors: Barbara Blouin, founder of The Inheritance Project, Karen Rowlingson Professor of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham, Edward Wolff, Professor of Economics at New York University and Jørgen Næsje, State Secretary in Norway's Finance Ministry.

(Picture: College Republicans Rally For Repeal Of Estate Tax. Washington DC June 2006. Credit: Getty Imgages)

20170916

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What lessons should we learn from the damage hurricane Irma has inflicted on Florida and the Caribbean, the flooding hurricane Harvey wreaked on Texas and the floods that have devastated parts of South Asia? And how can politicians and aid agencies be persuaded to spend more money preparing for natural disasters, rather than clearing up after the event? Manuela Saragosa talks to one environmental planning expert in Houston, Texas, who says some parts of the city will become uninhabitable. And she hears from experts around the world on the best way to contain the economic damage of future natural disasters.

Contributors:
Jim Blackburn, Rice University, Houston
MB Akhter, Bangladesh Country Director for Oxfam
Tom Bamforth from Shelter Cluster
Ilan Noy, Professor at Victoria University in Wellington, holder of the inaugural Chair in the Economics of Disasters
Christina Bennett from the Overseas Development Institute

(Picture: People shop in a supermarket after Hurricane Irma swept through the area on September 13, 2017 in Naples, Florida. Credit: Getty Images)

20170930

Very soon, for the first time in modern history, five generations will be working side by side. Baby boomers, traditionalists, and Generations X, Y and Z. Is it a manager's dream - or a nightmare? Manuela Saragosa and guests ask why millennials are so hard to manage - and how do you keep older workers motivated throughout a career that could last for 50 years?

Contributors: Professor Andrew Scott, Deputy Dean at London Business School and co-author of The 100-Year Life
Ali Hall, leadership development coach and Associate Fellow of Saïd Business School, Oxford
Chip Conley, Modern Elder and former head of global hospitality and strategy at Airbnb

20171007

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

China's economy is still growing at a respectable rate - but how long can that last? Ed Butler reports from China on the problems caused by increasing amounts of debt. Ed hears from students taking on debt they don't understand and finds out about the extent of Shanghai's property bubble. He is joined back in the studio by a panel of experts on China to ask whether high levels of debt could sink the country's booming economy.

Contributors: Linda Yueh, Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School and Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University;
Steve Tsang, Director of SOAS China Institute;
Geoffrey Yu, Head of UK Investment Office at UBS Wealth Management.

(Picture: People visit a shopping mall complex in Shenyang, Liaoning province, as the authorities seek to revive the recession-hit industrial region. Credit: AFP/Getty images)

20171014

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance reports this week from Catalonia, Spain's strongest economic region. The Catalan leader has declared that the region has won the right to independence, following a referendum declared illegal by the Spanish state. But what about the economy? Catalonia accounts for nearly 20% of Spain's GDP, but who would stand to lose most if the region breaks away? Manuela Saragosa travels to the Catalan capital Barcelona to hear from business people, economists and workers on whether Catalonia can afford to go it alone.

(Picture: Protesters wave Spanish and Catalan flags in Barcelona on October 12, 2017. Credit: JORGE GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)

20171021

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Are there clever solutions to real life challenges across South Asia? In partnership with the BBC Innovators series, Shivaani Kohok hears from some of the people in India who are coming up with new ideas to improve health, education and business in areas where life is tough. Shivaani and guests discuss how "jugaad" can help. It is a Hindi term that translates as "frugal innovation" - how to make the most of limited resources. But does jugaad have the potential to change lives?

(Photo: A crowd of Indian residents gather outside the Fair Price Shop in the northern district of Jahangirpuri, New Delhi. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

20180526
20180811

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

20180825

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

20180915

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

20180929

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

03/03/201220120305

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

03/06/2017 Gmt20170603
04/02/201220120206
04/02/2017 Gmt2017020420170205 (WS)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

04/03/2017 Gmt2017030420170305 (WS)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

07/01/201220120109
07/04/201220120408

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

08/10/2016 Gmt20161009

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

10/03/201220120312
11/02/201220120213
11/02/2017 Gmt2017021120170212 (WS)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

12/05/201220120513
12/11/2016 Gmt2016111220161113 (WS)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

14/01/201220120116
14/04/201220120415
17/03/201220120319
18/02/201220120220
18/03/2017 Gmt20170318
19/11/2016 Gmt2016111920161120 (WS)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

20/05/2017 Gmt20170520

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

2014: A Disruptive Year?2014122720141228 (WS)

What kind of year has it been for the world's workers?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Has it been a good year for the workers of the world? What changes has 2014 brought and do any of them herald a revolution in the way we work? In the Balance's resident commentator, Colm O'Regan, takes the reins this week in a wide-ranging discussion with Sarah Lyall, a social policy researcher with the New Economics Foundation; Richard Dobbs from McKinsey Global Institute; and Peter Antonioni, co-author of Economics for Dummies and a lecturer in management at University College, London.

Is technology the friend or foe workers trying to protect their life outside work? Is the offer to freeze female workers' eggs till they're ready to have children a generous gesture or a company's way of trying to control its workforce? And is mental health finally being taken as seriously physical health by bosses?

2014: A Disruptive Year?20141227

What kind of year has it been for the world's workers?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Has it been a good year for the workers of the world? What changes has 2014 brought and do any of them herald a revolution in the way we work? In the Balance's resident commentator, Colm O'Regan, takes the reins this week in a wide-ranging discussion with Sarah Lyall, a social policy researcher with the New Economics Foundation; Richard Dobbs from McKinsey Global Institute; and Peter Antonioni, co-author of Economics for Dummies and a lecturer in management at University College, London.

Is technology the friend or foe workers trying to protect their life outside work? Is the offer to freeze female workers' eggs till they're ready to have children a generous gesture or a company's way of trying to control its workforce? And is mental health finally being taken as seriously physical health by bosses?

2018: Top Risks20180106

What are the biggest economic risks in 2018?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What are the biggest risks to the global economy in 2018? Ed Butler is joined by some of the world's leading economists and political scientists to ask the key questions that will affect us all in the year ahead. Ed hears from Ian Bremmer, American political scientist and the President and founder of Eurasia Group, a political risk research firm; Megan Greene, Chief Economist at Manulife and John Hancock Asset Management in the USA and Guntram Wolf, Director of Bruegel, a leading European think tank, focussing on economics and politics. Comedian Colm O'Regan chips in from Dublin with his take on how the world is changing as 2018 gets underway.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping attend a business leaders event inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

What are the biggest economic risks in 2018?

What are the biggest risks to the global economy in 2018? Ed Butler is joined by some of the world's leading economists and political scientists to ask the key questions that will affect us all in the year ahead. Ed hears from Ian Bremmer, American political scientist and the President and founder of Eurasia Group, a political risk research firm; Megan Greene, Chief Economist at Manulife and John Hancock Asset Management in the USA and Guntram Wolf, Director of Bruegel, a leading European think tank, focussing on economics and politics. Comedian Colm O'Regan chips in from Dublin with his take on how the world is changing as 2018 gets underway.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping attend a business leaders event inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

21/01/201220120123

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

21/04/2012

21/04/201220120422

22/10/2016 Gmt20161023

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

24/12/201120111217
25/02/2017 Gmt2017022520170226 (WS)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

27/05/2017 Gmt20170527
28/01/201220120130
28/01/2017 Gmt2017012820170129 (WS)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

28/04/201220120429
31/03/201220120401
A Big Brother World?2013041320130414 (WS)

Do companies know too much about us?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Jamie Robertson and his guests look at what companies know about you, and ask: do they know too much? Every time you go online and buy anything from wrapping paper to a Rolls Royce, or send an email or ask a question about, say, the population of Botswana or the height of the Niagara Falls, the information is stored. So who then uses it and why - to target you with advertising? - or with something more sinister? Three experts give us their views on whether we should be worried, and they are the lawyer Chris Watson, Partner and Head of the Telecoms team at CMS Cameron McKenna; Matthew Heath, Chief Strategy Officer at LIDA, the digital and direct marketing agency; and Michal Kosinski of the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University. And in their midst we find Colm O'Regan musing on his attractiveness to advertisers.

A Big Brother World?20130413

Do companies know too much about us?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Jamie Robertson and his guests look at what companies know about you, and ask: do they know too much? Every time you go online and buy anything from wrapping paper to a Rolls Royce, or send an email or ask a question about, say, the population of Botswana or the height of the Niagara Falls, the information is stored. So who then uses it and why - to target you with advertising? - or with something more sinister? Three experts give us their views on whether we should be worried, and they are the lawyer Chris Watson, Partner and Head of the Telecoms team at CMS Cameron McKenna; Matthew Heath, Chief Strategy Officer at LIDA, the digital and direct marketing agency; and Michal Kosinski of the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University. And in their midst we find Colm O'Regan musing on his attractiveness to advertisers.

A Turning Point for Bangladesh?2013050420130505 (WS)

Who will bring about change in the garment industry in Bangladesh?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

More than 400 workers died in Dhaka when the Rana Plaza factory building collapsed ten days ago. 262 others died in Karachi in Pakistan at the Ali Enterprises fire last year, and over 100 at another Bangladesh fire in the Tazreen factory. Jamie Robertson asks his guests who can bring this death toll to a halt - the factory owners, governments, workers, the retailers or the consumers themselves? Jamie's joined fom Dhaka by Shahriar Alam, a member of the Bangladesh Parliament and the managing director of Renaissance Group of manufacturers; with Shahriar is Ifty Islam founder and managing partner of Asian Tiger Capital Partners; and in London is Peter McAllister Director of the Ethical Trading Initiative, which counts some of the big brands in the fashion industry amongst its members. Plus Colm O'Regan, the programme's regular commentator, reflects on the part played in the Rana Plaza disaster by western consumers' appetite for cheap clothes.

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

A Turning Point for Bangladesh?20130504

Who will bring about change in the garment industry in Bangladesh?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

More than 400 workers died in Dhaka when the Rana Plaza factory building collapsed ten days ago. 262 others died in Karachi in Pakistan at the Ali Enterprises fire last year, and over 100 at another Bangladesh fire in the Tazreen factory. Jamie Robertson asks his guests who can bring this death toll to a halt - the factory owners, governments, workers, the retailers or the consumers themselves? Jamie's joined fom Dhaka by Shahriar Alam, a member of the Bangladesh Parliament and the managing director of Renaissance Group of manufacturers; with Shahriar is Ifty Islam founder and managing partner of Asian Tiger Capital Partners; and in London is Peter McAllister Director of the Ethical Trading Initiative, which counts some of the big brands in the fashion industry amongst its members. Plus Colm O'Regan, the programme's regular commentator, reflects on the part played in the Rana Plaza disaster by western consumers' appetite for cheap clothes.

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Abenomics2014021520140216 (WS)

Is Abenomics - the economic policies of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe - working in Japan?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Abenomics is the name given to a massive economic project launched a year ago by Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe. In the Balance explores whether the project is paying off and asks what are the dangers, as Japan aims to bring back growth to its moribund economy.

Ed Butler is joined by guests Richard Dobbs of the McKinsey Global Institute, Yuuichiro Nakajima of Crimson Phoenix Limited, a UK and Japan-based consultancy, and Dr Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Director of Global Asian Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. And Colm O Regan asks - what's in a name?

Abenomics20140215

Is Abenomics - the economic policies of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe - working in Japan?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Abenomics is the name given to a massive economic project launched a year ago by Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe. In the Balance explores whether the project is paying off and asks what are the dangers, as Japan aims to bring back growth to its moribund economy.

Ed Butler is joined by guests Richard Dobbs of the McKinsey Global Institute, Yuuichiro Nakajima of Crimson Phoenix Limited, a UK and Japan-based consultancy, and Dr Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Director of Global Asian Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. And Colm O Regan asks - what's in a name?

Aberdeen To Abadan2015101720151018 (WS)

As oil prices plunge, Scotland's oil industry looks for new business horizons in Iran

As global oil prices reach rock bottom, the profits of the Scottish oil industry are being squeezed as never before. So Scotland is looking to Iran for new business opportunities in anticipation of sanctions being lifted there. Could it mean the flowering of a new business partnership between the two countries? With Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and senior business figures from both Iran and Scotland. Presented by Pooneh Ghoddoosi.

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Aberdeen to Abadan2015101720151018 (WS)

As oil prices plunge, Scotland's oil industry looks for new business horizons in Iran

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As global oil prices reach rock bottom, the profits of the Scottish oil industry are being squeezed as never before. So Scotland is looking to Iran for new business opportunities in anticipation of sanctions being lifted there. Could it mean the flowering of a new business partnership between the two countries? With Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and senior business figures from both Iran and Scotland. Presented by Pooneh Ghoddoosi.

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Aberdeen to Abadan20151017

As oil prices plunge, Scotland's oil industry looks for new business horizons in Iran

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As global oil prices reach rock bottom, the profits of the Scottish oil industry are being squeezed as never before. So Scotland is looking to Iran for new business opportunities in anticipation of sanctions being lifted there. Could it mean the flowering of a new business partnership between the two countries? With Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and senior business figures from both Iran and Scotland. Presented by Pooneh Ghoddoosi.

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Africa: Risks And Rewards2014053120140601 (WS)

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

Africa: Risks and Rewards2014053120140601 (WS)

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

Africa: Risks and Rewards20140531

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

Africa: The Commodity Curse Returns20170617

Can the continent's biggest economies recover from a sharp fall in oil and metal prices?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Sharp falls in commodity prices have dealt serious blows to the prospects of workers, communities, and businesses in large parts of Africa over the last few years.

The World Bank said economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa slumped to its lowest level for more than two decades last year and earlier this month South Africa, the continent’s third largest economy, re-entered recession.

The picture is not uniformly bleak – the outlook is much more positive in East Africa – but the continent’s largest economies are suffering. Can they turn things around and end their reliance on oil and mining? What hope is there for those seeking relief from poverty, and what jobs might they do in the future?

Ed Butler is joined by a panel of guests: Kola Karim, CEO of Shoreline Group, a Nigerian energy and infrastructure company; professor Mthuli Ncube, head of Quantum Global Research Lab and former chief economist of the African Development Bank; and Lorenzo Fioramonti, professor of political economy at the University of Pretoria, in South Africa.

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images)

African Enterprise2014032220140323 (WS)

What do Africa's entrepreneurs need most urgently to help them start up companies?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What do Africa's entrepreneurs need from their governments and big institutions to help them start up new ventures? The president of the African Development Bank, Donald Kaberuka, answers some of the criticisms over lack of capital. And the founder of Ghana’s biggest home-grown technology company, Herman Chinery Hesse, spells out why foreign aid can hinder – rather than help – business in Africa.

Manuela Saragosa hosts a lively debate with guests Teddy Ruge, founder of Ugandan tech hub Hive Colab, Michelle Essome, chief executive of the African Private Equity and Venture Capital Association and Paddy Docherty, CEO of Phoenix Africa.

Also Colm O'Regan looks at the value of branding.

African Enterprise20140322

What do Africa's entrepreneurs need most urgently to help them start up companies?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What do Africa's entrepreneurs need from their governments and big institutions to help them start up new ventures? The president of the African Development Bank, Donald Kaberuka, answers some of the criticisms over lack of capital. And the founder of Ghana’s biggest home-grown technology company, Herman Chinery Hesse, spells out why foreign aid can hinder – rather than help – business in Africa.

Manuela Saragosa hosts a lively debate with guests Teddy Ruge, founder of Ugandan tech hub Hive Colab, Michelle Essome, chief executive of the African Private Equity and Venture Capital Association and Paddy Docherty, CEO of Phoenix Africa.

Also Colm O'Regan looks at the value of branding.

Africa's Banks And Financial Services2014042620140427 (WS)

Why Africa's financial services are one of the continent's fastest-growing sectors

Africa's financial services are among the continent's fastest-growing sectors, and companies there are plugging the continent's unbanked into the global financial system. Presenter Manuela Saragosa discusses how, with Diana Layfield, chief executive officer of Africa Operations at Standard Chartered Bank, Dr Iraj Abedian, chief executive officer of Pan-African Capital Holdings and Bob Collymore, chief executive officer of Kenya's Safaricom, which owns the M-Pesa mobile money transfer system. Our resident management consultant-turned-comedian Colm O'Regan muses about the relationship he has with his bank. And our guests also discuss the nature of our dealings with banks - the relationship may be unequal but we still place a lot of trust in banking institutions.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

Africa's Banks and Financial Services2014042620140427 (WS)

Why Africa's financial services are one of the continent's fastest-growing sectors

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Africa's financial services are among the continent's fastest-growing sectors, and companies there are plugging the continent's unbanked into the global financial system. Presenter Manuela Saragosa discusses how, with Diana Layfield, chief executive officer of Africa Operations at Standard Chartered Bank, Dr Iraj Abedian, chief executive officer of Pan-African Capital Holdings and Bob Collymore, chief executive officer of Kenya's Safaricom, which owns the M-Pesa mobile money transfer system. Our resident management consultant-turned-comedian Colm O'Regan muses about the relationship he has with his bank. And our guests also discuss the nature of our dealings with banks - the relationship may be unequal but we still place a lot of trust in banking institutions.

Africa's Banks and Financial Services20140426

Why Africa's financial services are one of the continent's fastest-growing sectors

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Africa's financial services are among the continent's fastest-growing sectors, and companies there are plugging the continent's unbanked into the global financial system. Presenter Manuela Saragosa discusses how, with Diana Layfield, chief executive officer of Africa Operations at Standard Chartered Bank, Dr Iraj Abedian, chief executive officer of Pan-African Capital Holdings and Bob Collymore, chief executive officer of Kenya's Safaricom, which owns the M-Pesa mobile money transfer system. Our resident management consultant-turned-comedian Colm O'Regan muses about the relationship he has with his bank. And our guests also discuss the nature of our dealings with banks - the relationship may be unequal but we still place a lot of trust in banking institutions.

Africa's Oil Boom2014062120140622 (WS)

Is Africa ready to make the most of its oil and gas boom?

Is Africa ready for its oil and gas boom? The continent already produces about a 10th of the world's oil and gas and that share is set to rise, as new finds from Sierra Leone in the West, to Kenya and Uganda in the East, come onstream. But what impact will all this have on the continent - and will it be enough to meet the energy needs of a fast growing population? In the Balance has a panel of experts from across Africa to answer those questions. Ed Butler hears from Arnold Ekpe, the honorary president of the Business Council for Africa, Tonye Cole co-founder and group executive director of Sahara Group and also Rashid Pelpuo, Ghanaian government minister. And, resident comedian Colm O' Regan goes out and about to discover the heritage of one of the British Empire's great cities.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

Africa's Oil Boom2014062120140622 (WS)

Is Africa ready to make the most of its oil and gas boom?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is Africa ready for its oil and gas boom? The continent already produces about a 10th of the world's oil and gas and that share is set to rise, as new finds from Sierra Leone in the West, to Kenya and Uganda in the East, come onstream. But what impact will all this have on the continent - and will it be enough to meet the energy needs of a fast growing population? In the Balance has a panel of experts from across Africa to answer those questions. Ed Butler hears from Arnold Ekpe, the honorary president of the Business Council for Africa, Tonye Cole co-founder and group executive director of Sahara Group and also Rashid Pelpuo, Ghanaian government minister. And, resident comedian Colm O' Regan goes out and about to discover the heritage of one of the British Empire's great cities.

Africa's Oil Boom20140621

Is Africa ready to make the most of its oil and gas boom?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is Africa ready for its oil and gas boom? The continent already produces about a 10th of the world's oil and gas and that share is set to rise, as new finds from Sierra Leone in the West, to Kenya and Uganda in the East, come onstream. But what impact will all this have on the continent - and will it be enough to meet the energy needs of a fast growing population? In the Balance has a panel of experts from across Africa to answer those questions. Ed Butler hears from Arnold Ekpe, the honorary president of the Business Council for Africa, Tonye Cole co-founder and group executive director of Sahara Group and also Rashid Pelpuo, Ghanaian government minister. And, resident comedian Colm O' Regan goes out and about to discover the heritage of one of the British Empire's great cities.

Africa's Technology Revolution - Hype or Reality?2013083120130901 (WS)

Has Africa's hi-tech revolution been over-hyped? If so, what can be done to solve it?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Has Africa's hi-tech revolution been over-hyped? Or is it on track to boost economies? Lesley Curwen is joined by ‘Bosun Tijani of the technology space CCHub Nigeria, Robin Miller of Dalberg, who has reported on the impact of the internet in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and Senegal, plus Arthur Goldstuck, managing director of World Wide Worx, an independent technology research and strategy organisation and Professor Tim Unwin, Secretary General of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation which works with governments and regulators to promote technology expansion.

Plus comedian Colm O'Regan takes a light-hearted look at how to protect your passwords.

Picture: A man looks at mobile phones in a shop window, Credit: Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

Africa's Technology Revolution - Hype or Reality?20130831

Has Africa's hi-tech revolution been over-hyped? If so, what can be done to solve it?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Has Africa's hi-tech revolution been over-hyped? Or is it on track to boost economies? Lesley Curwen is joined by ‘Bosun Tijani of the technology space CCHub Nigeria, Robin Miller of Dalberg, who has reported on the impact of the internet in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and Senegal, plus Arthur Goldstuck, managing director of World Wide Worx, an independent technology research and strategy organisation and Professor Tim Unwin, Secretary General of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation which works with governments and regulators to promote technology expansion.

Plus comedian Colm O'Regan takes a light-hearted look at how to protect your passwords.

Picture: A man looks at mobile phones in a shop window, Credit: Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

Africa's Technology Revolution - Hype Or Reality?2013083120130901 (WS)

Has Africa's hi-tech revolution been over-hyped? Or is it on track to boost economies? Lesley Curwen is joined by ‘Bosun Tijani of the technology space CCHub Nigeria, Robin Miller of Dalberg, who has reported on the impact of the internet in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and Senegal, plus Arthur Goldstuck, Founder and CEO of World Wide Worx, an independent technology research and strategy organisation and Professor Tim Unwin, Secretary General of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation which works with governments and regulators to promote technology expansion.

Plus comedian Colm O'Regan takes a light-hearted look at how to protect your passwords.

Picture: A man looks at mobile phones in a shop window, Credit: Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

After Lehman20130914

Five years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, we look at the global impact.

Five years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, we look at the impact on the global economy. Have lessons been learned from the collapse of one of America's biggest and most prestigious investment banks? Three women with ring-side seats at the events that triggered the greatest recession since the 1930s recount where they were on the day Lehman Brothers went bankrupt. Manuela Saragosa hears from Pippa Malmgren, President of Principalis, politics and policy expert who used to be Special Assistant for Economic Policy to the President of the United States; Rachel Lomax, a former deputy governor of the Bank of England and Professor Ngaire Woods, Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University and Professor of Global Economic Governance.

After Lehman2013091420130915 (WS)

Five years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, we look at the global impact.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Five years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, we look at the impact on the global economy. Have lessons been learned from the collapse of one of America's biggest and most prestigious investment banks? Three women with ring-side seats at the events that triggered the greatest recession since the 1930s recount where they were on the day Lehman Brothers went bankrupt. Manuela Saragosa hears from Pippa Malmgren, President of Principalis, politics and policy expert who used to be Special Assistant for Economic Policy to the President of the United States; Rachel Lomax, a former deputy governor of the Bank of England and Professor Ngaire Woods, Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University and Professor of Global Economic Governance.

After Lehman20130914

Five years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, we look at the global impact.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Five years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, we look at the impact on the global economy. Have lessons been learned from the collapse of one of America's biggest and most prestigious investment banks? Three women with ring-side seats at the events that triggered the greatest recession since the 1930s recount where they were on the day Lehman Brothers went bankrupt. Manuela Saragosa hears from Pippa Malmgren, President of Principalis, politics and policy expert who used to be Special Assistant for Economic Policy to the President of the United States; Rachel Lomax, a former deputy governor of the Bank of England and Professor Ngaire Woods, Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University and Professor of Global Economic Governance.

After Rana Plaza2013102620131027 (WS)

Who should take responsibility for conditions in Bangladesh's garment industry?

Bangladesh has the lowest wage garment economy in the world and is still reeling from a catastrophic factory building collapse six months ago in which more than 1130 people died. Most of them have received little or no long term compensation for the deaths of their relatives, or for their own injuries. In the Balance comes from Dhaka where the wounds inflicted by the Rana Plaza disaster are still raw. Ed Butler asks a factory owner, a union leader and a leading economist as well as an audience of Bangladeshi entrepreneurs, campaigners and students, who should take responsibility for the conditions in the country's factories. And should western consumers think again about how cheap their clothes should be?

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

After Rana Plaza2013102620131027 (WS)

Who should take responsibility for conditions in Bangladesh's garment industry?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Bangladesh has the lowest wage garment economy in the world and is still reeling from a catastrophic factory building collapse six months ago in which more than 1130 people died. Most of them have received little or no long term compensation for the deaths of their relatives, or for their own injuries. In the Balance comes from Dhaka where the wounds inflicted by the Rana Plaza disaster are still raw. Ed Butler asks a factory owner, a union leader and a leading economist as well as an audience of Bangladeshi entrepreneurs, campaigners and students, who should take responsibility for the conditions in the country's factories. And should western consumers think again about how cheap their clothes should be?

After Rana Plaza20131026

Who should take responsibility for conditions in Bangladesh's garment industry?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Bangladesh has the lowest wage garment economy in the world and is still reeling from a catastrophic factory building collapse six months ago in which more than 1130 people died. Most of them have received little or no long term compensation for the deaths of their relatives, or for their own injuries. In the Balance comes from Dhaka where the wounds inflicted by the Rana Plaza disaster are still raw. Ed Butler asks a factory owner, a union leader and a leading economist as well as an audience of Bangladeshi entrepreneurs, campaigners and students, who should take responsibility for the conditions in the country's factories. And should western consumers think again about how cheap their clothes should be?

AIIB: China's Tiger Roars2015040420150405 (WS)

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank offers China a potent voice on the world stage

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank - the AIIB - offers China a potent voice on the world stage and challenges the dollar-based financial institutions with which it may one day compete including the IMF and the World Bank. So is this a defining moment in the rise of China? Pippa Malmgren, former Whitehouse Economic Adviser to George W Bush, Michael Pettis Beijing-based economic theorist and financial strategist, Steve Tsang, Head of School and professor of Contemporary Chinese Studies at Nottingham University and the BBC's China editor Carrie Gracie consider the question.

(Photo: Top of a tower looming out of heavy fog in Qingdao, east China's Shandong province. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

AIIB: China's Tiger Roars20150404

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank offers China a potent voice on the world stage

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank - the AIIB - offers China a potent voice on the world stage and challenges the dollar-based financial institutions with which it may one day compete including the IMF and the World Bank. So is this a defining moment in the rise of China? Pippa Malmgren, former Whitehouse Economic Adviser to George W Bush, Michael Pettis Beijing-based economic theorist and financial strategist, Steve Tsang, Head of School and professor of Contemporary Chinese Studies at Nottingham University and the BBC's China editor Carrie Gracie consider the question.

(Photo: Top of a tower looming out of heavy fog in Qingdao, east China's Shandong province. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

American Recovery?20120428

Justin Rowlatt and guests try to guage the true health of the U.S. Economy

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Just when it seemed the world's biggest economy was getting back on its feet a new set of GDP figures come in suggesting growth in America has slowed. The hope had been that America could provide inspiration - and some desperately needed demand - for the rest of the developed world. Or could it be the figures themselves that are at fault? Can't statistics be used to prove almost anything?
Justin Rowlatt and his guests, Professor Nancy Koehn of Harvard Business School, Paul Dales, senior US economist at Capital Economics and Timothy Noah, author of "The Great Divergence, discuss the truth behind the numbers.

An economic super-state?20120602

How would you organise an economic super-state? Would that solve the Eurozone's problems?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

At the end of a week of renewed financial strains in the Eurozone, there was a little political relief for embattled leaders.

A referendum in Ireland approved a system of discipline for European government finances.

The rules could be a step on the road to a much more integrated Eurozone, perhaps even a United States of Europe.

Would that fix the economic problems and is it feasible politically?

And Europe's financial engineering - clever tricks, but do they do anything other than hide the reality of who is paying the bills?

Andrew Walker hears the views of Huw Pill, Chief European Economist at Goldman Sachs, Michael Mainelli, Executive Chairman of the financial think tank Z/Yen and Carl Astorri, senior economist at the consultancy, Oxford Economics.

An Economic Super-state?2012060220120603
20120603 (WS)

How would you organise an economic super-state? Would that solve the Eurozone's problems?

At the end of a week of renewed financial strains in the Eurozone, there was a little political relief for embattled leaders.

A referendum in Ireland approved a system of discipline for European government finances.

The rules could be a step on the road to a much more integrated Eurozone, perhaps even a United States of Europe.

Would that fix the economic problems and is it feasible politically?

And Europe's financial engineering - clever tricks, but do they do anything other than hide the reality of who is paying the bills?

Andrew Walker hears the views of Huw Pill, Chief European Economist at Goldman Sachs, Michael Mainelli, Executive Chairman of the financial think tank Z/Yen and Carl Astorri, senior economist at the consultancy, Oxford Economics.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

An Entrepreneurial State?2014080220140803 (WS)

The state has a role in shaping markets of the future but should it?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week we consider the role that governments play in creating some of the most disruptive, and profit making, technologies of our time. Do our lumbering government bureaucracies also contain the vital engines of enterprise?

Economists have long recognised that the state has a role in promoting innovation, but one of our guests this week argues that an entrepreneurial state does far more than just make up for the private sector's shortcomings. Through the big bets it makes on new technologies, such as aircraft or the internet, it can create and shape the markets of the future. But should it?

To debate this issue we have brought together Mariana Mazzucato, professor of economics and innovation at the University of Sussex; Arun Majumdar, vice president for energy at Google and soon to join Stanford University as Jay Precourt professor. He was previously the founding director of ARPA-E, the US federal government's lead programme for investing in high-risk, high-reward energy research. And Mark LIttlewood, director general of the Institute of Economic Affairs, A free market think-tank in the UK.

(Image: President Obama making a speech about innovation and entrepreneurship in June 2014)

This week we consider the role that governments play in creating some of the most disruptive, and profit making, technologies of our time. Do our lumbering government bureaucracies also contain the vital engines of enterprise?

Economists have long recognised that the state has a role in promoting innovation, but one of our guests this week argues that an entrepreneurial state does far more than just make up for the private sector's shortcomings. Through the big bets it makes on new technologies, such as aircraft or the internet, it can create and shape the markets of the future. But should it?

To debate this issue we have brought together Mariana Mazzucato, professor of economics and innovation at the University of Sussex; Arun Majumdar, vice president for energy at Google and soon to join Stanford University as Jay Precourt professor. He was previously the founding director of ARPA-E, the US federal government's lead programme for investing in high-risk, high-reward energy research. And Mark LIttlewood, director general of the Institute of Economic Affairs, A free market think-tank in the UK.

(Image: President Obama making a speech about innovation and entrepreneurship in June 2014)

And What a Year it Was2014122020141221 (WS)

A look at the economic highs and lows of 2014 and what it might mean for the year ahead?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As 2014 draws to a close we look backwards and forwards to review some of the highs and lows of the year - nose-diving growth in Russia alongside the annexation of Crimea, Abe's reflationary blitz in Japan, mayhem and violence in the Middle East and the extraordinary lows of the global oil price. What do the mixed 12 months just gone herald for 2015? With influential British political economist Will Hutton, senior fellow of the Cato Institute Daniel Mitchell and Amrita Sen, chief oil analyst with Energy Aspects.

And What a Year it Was20141220

A look at the economic highs and lows of 2014 and what it might mean for the year ahead?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As 2014 draws to a close we look backwards and forwards to review some of the highs and lows of the year - nose-diving growth in Russia alongside the annexation of Crimea, Abe's reflationary blitz in Japan, mayhem and violence in the Middle East and the extraordinary lows of the global oil price. What do the mixed 12 months just gone herald for 2015? With influential British political economist Will Hutton, senior fellow of the Cato Institute Daniel Mitchell and Amrita Sen, chief oil analyst with Energy Aspects.

Are central bankers grabbing too much power?20120908

As the ECB acts to save the euro, are central banks are over-reaching themselves?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As the ECB brings in a new scheme to save the euro, the programme asks whether central banks have been over reaching themselves. Have they been poking their noses into stuff that should be left to elected politicians?

Plus central bankers' impenetrable jargon: In the Balance's resident comedian Colm O'Regan reckons parents could deploy that kind of language next time the kids ask for more pocket money.

Discussing these issues with Lesley Curwen - naturally in the clearest way possible - are Randall Kroszner, former member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, who was chair of its Committee on Supervision and Regulation of Banking Institutions during the global financial crisis; Professor David Blanchflower, formerly a member of the Bank of England's interest rate-setting Monetary Policy Committee and economist Gabriel Stein, from the Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum, who's also managing director of Stein Brothers UK.

Are Central Bankers Grabbing Too Much Power?2012090820120909 (WS)

As the ECB brings in a new scheme to save the euro, the programme asks whether central banks have been over reaching themselves. Have they been poking their noses into stuff that should be left to elected politicians?

Plus central bankers' impenetrable jargon: In the Balance's resident comedian Colm O'Regan reckons parents could deploy that kind of language next time the kids ask for more pocket money.

Discussing these issues with Lesley Curwen - naturally in the clearest way possible - are Randall Kroszner, former member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, who was chair of its Committee on Supervision and Regulation of Banking Institutions during the global financial crisis; Professor David Blanchflower, formerly a member of the Bank of England's interest rate-setting Monetary Policy Committee and economist Gabriel Stein, from the Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum, who's also managing director of Stein Brothers UK.

As the ECB acts to save the euro, are central banks are over-reaching themselves?

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Are We All Smartphone Users Now?2012091520120916 (WS)

Is there too much hype about smartphones and connectivity?

In the week Apple's new iPhone was launched, we discuss whether there's too much hype about smartphones and connectivity. Do we need to be connected to the internet 24 hours a day? Do business people really need a smartphone to succeed?

And our resident comedian Colm O'Regan looks at the eternal question of age and youth and wonders whether we listen to sages like George Soros and Warren Buffett partly because they're in their eighties.

Lesley Curwen is joined by the tech savvy brains of Herman Chinery-Hesse founder and chief executive of SoftTribe, the biggest software company in Ghana; Eben Upton, from Broadcom Europe who is the man behind the $25 credit card sized computer known as Raspberry Pi; Dr Mark Graham from the Oxford Internet Institute who's been looking at whether highspeed internet helps small business, and Ben Holmes, a Partner at Index Ventures, a UK Venture Capital business specialising in tech companies.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Are we all smartphone users now?20120915

Is there too much hype about smartphones and connectivity?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the week Apple's new iPhone was launched, we discuss whether there's too much hype about smartphones and connectivity. Do we need to be connected to the internet 24 hours a day? Do business people really need a smartphone to succeed?

And our resident comedian Colm O'Regan looks at the eternal question of age and youth and wonders whether we listen to sages like George Soros and Warren Buffett partly because they're in their eighties.

Lesley Curwen is joined by the tech savvy brains of Herman Chinery-Hesse founder and chief executive of SoftTribe, the biggest software company in Ghana; Eben Upton, from Broadcom Europe who is the man behind the $25 credit card sized computer known as Raspberry Pi; Dr Mark Graham from the Oxford Internet Institute who's been looking at whether highspeed internet helps small business, and Ben Holmes, a Partner at Index Ventures, a UK Venture Capital business specialising in tech companies.

Art and Business2013080320130804 (WS)

BBC Arts Editor, Will Gompertz asks leading arts professionals if money stifles creativity

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does money stifle creativity? That's the question BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, puts to his guests in this week's edition which comes from the Biennale art show in Venice. They all agree that the art market has changed in the last twenty years, but is it for the better? Ralph Rugoff, director of the Hayward Gallery in London, Turner Prize winning artist, Jeremy Deller and art critic and author Louisa Buck, discuss with Will whether the new money that has come in has been a corrupting influence rather than a force for good.

Art and Business20130803

BBC Arts Editor, Will Gompertz asks leading arts professionals if money stifles creativity

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does money stifle creativity? That's the question BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz, puts to his guests in this week's edition which comes from the Biennale art show in Venice. They all agree that the art market has changed in the last twenty years, but is it for the better? Ralph Rugoff, director of the Hayward Gallery in London, Turner Prize winning artist, Jeremy Deller and art critic and author Louisa Buck, discuss with Will whether the new money that has come in has been a corrupting influence rather than a force for good.

Artificial Intelligence - Friend Or Foe?20170923

Who gets to decide how AI will develop in future?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The development of Artificial Intelligence is being seen as one of the biggest threats to jobs this century. Yet it's a technology that can also help humanity hugely and is forecast to increase global economic growth. So should we be afraid of AI - or should we embrace a future where machines could become as intelligent as humans? In the Balance brings together some of the top thinkers in the debate to ask whether AI is our friend or our enemy.

Contributors: Nick Bostrom, founding Director of the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford University
Luis Perez Breva, an expert in the process of technology innovation and entrepreneur, based at MIT
Kathleen Richardson, professor of Ethics and Culture of Robots and AI at De Montfort University
Kevin Warwick, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) at Coventry University
Seán Ó hÉigeartaigh, Executive Director of Cambridge University's Centre for the Study of Existential Risk

(Picture: A Google Earth map of Paris, France as the company unveils the revamped version of the application April, 2017 at a event at New York's Whitney Museum of Art. Credit: Getty Images)

The development of Artificial Intelligence is being seen as one of the biggest threats to jobs this century. Yet it's a technology that can also help humanity hugely and is forecast to increase global economic growth. So should we be afraid of AI - or should we embrace a future where machines could become as intelligent as humans? In the Balance brings together some of the top thinkers in the debate to ask whether AI is our friend or our enemy.

Contributors: Nick Bostrom, founding Director of the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford University
Luis Perez Breva, an expert in the process of technology innovation and entrepreneur, based at MIT
Kathleen Richardson, professor of Ethics and Culture of Robots and AI at De Montfort University
Kevin Warwick, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) at Coventry University
Seán Ó hÉigeartaigh, Executive Director of Cambridge University's Centre for the Study of Existential Risk

(Picture: A Google Earth map of Paris, France as the company unveils the revamped version of the application April, 2017 at a event at New York's Whitney Museum of Art. Credit: Getty Images)

Austerity Rules OK?20111210

Justin Rowlatt and guests wonder whether austerity is strangling economies or saving them

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week our new business discussion programme - In the Balance - reveals the secrets of successful budgeting from getting the cheapest clothes to the cheapest meals.

But if balancing the household budget is so simple, why doesn't it work for whole economies?

We discuss the paradox of austerity - is it strangling economies or rescuing them?

And in these hard times, when should you retire?

Our resident management consultant turned stand up comedian, Colm O'Regan, kicks off the series.

Join Justin Rowlatt and his guests: former Trade Union leader John Monks, Economist Paola Subacchi and Irish opposition politician Dara Calleary.

Austerity Rules Ok?2011121020111212

Justin Rowlatt and guests wonder whether austerity is strangling economies or saving them

This week our new business discussion programme - In the Balance - reveals the secrets of successful budgeting from getting the cheapest clothes to the cheapest meals.

But if balancing the household budget is so simple, why doesn't it work for whole economies? We discuss the paradox of austerity - is it strangling economies or rescuing them?

And in these hard times, when should you retire? Our resident management consultant turned stand up comedian, Colm O'Regan, kicks off the

Join Justin Rowlatt and his guests: former Trade Union leader John Monks, Economist Paola Subacchi and Irish opposition politician Dara Calleary

This week our new business discussion programme - In the Balance - reveals the secrets of successful budgeting from getting the cheapest clothes to the cheapest meals. But if balancing the household budget is so simple, why doesn't it work for whole economies? We discuss the paradox of austerity - is it strangling economies or rescuing them?

Austerity Rules Ok?20111212

Justin Rowlatt and guests wonder whether austerity is strangling economies or saving them

Austerity Rules OK?20111212

Justin Rowlatt and guests wonder whether austerity is strangling economies or saving them

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week our new business discussion programme - In the Balance - reveals the secrets of successful budgeting from getting the cheapest clothes to the cheapest meals.

But if balancing the household budget is so simple, why doesn't it work for whole economies?

We discuss the paradox of austerity - is it strangling economies or rescuing them?

And in these hard times, when should you retire?

Our resident management consultant turned stand up comedian, Colm O'Regan, kicks off the series.

Join Justin Rowlatt and his guests: former Trade Union leader John Monks, Economist Paola Subacchi and Irish opposition politician Dara Calleary.

Baby Bust: Are We Running Out of Workers?2016070920160710 (WS)

The economic impact of falling birth rates and, in some cases, shrinking populations.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We are having fewer children than we used to. That's not true everywhere, but the global trend is a declining birth rate and in some countries populations have actually started shrinking.

Some have talked of the trend in fairly apocalyptic terms, forecasting the slow death of entire countries, but is it really that catastrophic? Is it in fact the answer to the economic and environmental pressures of population growth?

Falling fertility comes at the same time that many of us are living longer - could we find there aren't enough workers to power the world's economies and support the growing numbers of people in retirement?

What's causing these fertility declines and what, if anything, should governments and international agencies do about them?

In developing parts of the world, where birth rates are comparatively high, is falling fertility still seen as a sign of progress?

Andrew Walker is joined by Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director at the United Nations Population Fund, Ronald Lee, professor of demography at University of California, Berkeley, and Professor Jane Falkingham, of the University of Southampton and director of the Economic and Social Research Council's Centre for Population Change.

(Photo: A baby's cheek being stroked. Credit: Fiona Goodall, Getty Images)

Baby Bust: Are We Running Out Of Workers?20160710

We are having fewer children than we used to. That's not true everywhere, but the global trend is a declining birth rate and in some countries populations have actually started shrinking.

Some have talked of the trend in fairly apocalyptic terms, forecasting the slow death of entire countries, but is it really that catastrophic? Is it in fact the answer to the economic and environmental pressures of population growth?

Falling fertility comes at the same time that many of us are living longer - could we find there aren't enough workers to power the world's economies and support the growing numbers of people in retirement?

What's causing these fertility declines and what, if anything, should governments and international agencies do about them?

In developing parts of the world, where birth rates are comparatively high, is falling fertility still seen as a sign of progress?

Andrew Walker is joined by Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director at the United Nations Population Fund, Ronald Lee, professor of demography at University of California, Berkeley, and Professor Jane Falkingham, of the University of Southampton and director of the Economic and Social Research Council's Centre for Population Change.

(Photo: A baby's cheek being stroked. Credit: Fiona Goodall, Getty Images)

The economic impact of falling birth rates and, in some cases, shrinking populations.

Banking black hole20121222

Andrew Walker and guests discuss the size of the black hole of debt facing Europe's banks.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance stares into the banking black hole of debt. Andrew Walker and guests Steve Hanke,a Professor of Applied Economics at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; James Ferguson, from Westhouse Securities in London and Rosa Lastra, Professor in International Financial and Monetary Law at Queen Mary, University of London, discuss how best to navigate away from the huge debts faced by many European banks. And how to deal with banks that have broken the law. The In the Balance in-house comedian Colm O Regan asks whether ticking boxes on compliance is any help whatsoever in making sure companies stick to the rules.

Banking black hole20121223

Andrew Walker and guests discuss the size of the black hole of debt facing Europe's banks.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance stares into the banking black hole of debt. Andrew Walker and guests Steve Hanke,a Professor of Applied Economics at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; James Ferguson, from Westhouse Securities in London and Rosa Lastra, Professor in International Financial and Monetary Law at Queen Mary, University of London, discuss how best to navigate away from the huge debts faced by many European banks. And how to deal with banks that have broken the law. The In the Balance in-house comedian Colm O Regan asks whether ticking boxes on compliance is any help whatsoever in making sure companies stick to the rules.

Battling the Bosses: The Rise of the Activist Investor2016112620161127 (WS)

Do investors that buy poorly performing companies and then lobby for change do any good?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We take a look at the growing international phenomenon of the activist investor. They hunt down companies they think are under-performing, buy a stake and then lobby for change. It can be aggressive, it can get ugly, and it is on the rise.

The number of activist campaigns in the US has grown from 104 in 2000 to 487 in 2015, according to a Credit Suisse report. The targets of these investors are becoming increasingly diverse, and activism has now spread into Europe and Asia. Companies from Yahoo to Apple to Rolls Royce have all been affected. Critics say activists are bad for companies and shareholders in the long-term, and detrimental to society as a whole. But activists say they provide a valuable service, holding poorly performing boards to account, and increasing shareholder profit.

The BBC's Ed Butler asks our panel of experts: Who really benefits in the long-term from activist activity? He's joined from Singapore by Dr Lawrence Loh, Director of the Centre for Governance, Institutions and Organisations at the National University of Singapore Business School, and by two guests in Washington DC - Nell Minow, Vice-chair of ValueEdge Advisors and David Langstaff, former founder of Veridian and former CEO of TASC.

(Photo: Man in business suit with boxing gloves on. Credit: Thinkstock)

Battling the Bosses: The Rise of the Activist Investor20161126

Do investors that buy poorly performing companies and then lobby for change do any good?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We take a look at the growing international phenomenon of the activist investor. They hunt down companies they think are under-performing, buy a stake and then lobby for change. It can be aggressive, it can get ugly, and it is on the rise.

The number of activist campaigns in the US has grown from 104 in 2000 to 487 in 2015, according to a Credit Suisse report. The targets of these investors are becoming increasingly diverse, and activism has now spread into Europe and Asia. Companies from Yahoo to Apple to Rolls Royce have all been affected. Critics say activists are bad for companies and shareholders in the long-term, and detrimental to society as a whole. But activists say they provide a valuable service, holding poorly performing boards to account, and increasing shareholder profit.

The BBC's Ed Butler asks our panel of experts: Who really benefits in the long-term from activist activity? He's joined from Singapore by Dr Lawrence Loh, Director of the Centre for Governance, Institutions and Organisations at the National University of Singapore Business School, and by two guests in Washington DC - Nell Minow, Vice-chair of ValueEdge Advisors and David Langstaff, former founder of Veridian and former CEO of TASC.

(Photo: Man in business suit with boxing gloves on. Credit: Thinkstock)

Battling The Bosses: The Rise Of The Activist Investor2016112620161127 (WS)

We take a look at the growing international phenomenon of the activist investor. They hunt down companies they think are under-performing, buy a stake and then lobby for change. It can be aggressive, it can get ugly, and it is on the rise.

The number of activist campaigns in the US has grown from 104 in 2000 to 487 in 2015, according to a Credit Suisse report. The targets of these investors are becoming increasingly diverse, and activism has now spread into Europe and Asia. Companies from Yahoo to Apple to Rolls Royce have all been affected. Critics say activists are bad for companies and shareholders in the long-term, and detrimental to society as a whole. But activists say they provide a valuable service, holding poorly performing boards to account, and increasing shareholder profit.

The BBC's Ed Butler asks our panel of experts: Who really benefits in the long-term from activist activity? He's joined from Singapore by Dr Lawrence Loh, Director of the Centre for Governance, Institutions and Organisations at the National University of Singapore Business School, and by two guests in Washington DC - Nell Minow, Vice-chair of ValueEdge Advisors and David Langstaff, former founder of Veridian and former CEO of TASC.

(Photo: Man in business suit with boxing gloves on. Credit: Thinkstock)

Do investors that buy poorly performing companies and then lobby for change do any good?

Beautiful Game, Final Frontier2014071220140713 (WS)

This week we're dealing with the dreams of nations: World cup woes and space economies

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week's In the Balance deals with the dreams of nations; counting the cost of world cup woes and exploring Africa's investment in space technology.

We ask who stands to gain from high drama on the footballing field? Soccernomics expert Professor Stefan Szymanski and our regular contributor (and footballing fanatic) comedian Colm O’Regan will provide the answers.

And we discuss the new business being generated by the expansion of space programmes in Africa; With Seidu Mohammed of the Nigerian Space Agency, Dickson Adomako of Ghana's Space Science and Technology Institute, and Sir Martin Sweeting, Executive Chairman of Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.

Beautiful Game, Final Frontier20140712

This week we're dealing with the dreams of nations: World cup woes and space economies

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week's In the Balance deals with the dreams of nations; counting the cost of world cup woes and exploring Africa's investment in space technology.

We ask who stands to gain from high drama on the footballing field? Soccernomics expert Professor Stefan Szymanski and our regular contributor (and footballing fanatic) comedian Colm O’Regan will provide the answers.

And we discuss the new business being generated by the expansion of space programmes in Africa; With Seidu Mohammed of the Nigerian Space Agency, Dickson Adomako of Ghana's Space Science and Technology Institute, and Sir Martin Sweeting, Executive Chairman of Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.

Beautiful Game, Final Frontier2014071220140713 (WS)

This week's In the Balance deals with the dreams of nations; counting the cost of world cup woes and exploring Africa's investment in space technology.

We ask who stands to gain from high drama on the footballing field? Soccernomics expert Professor Stefan Szymanski and our regular contributor (and footballing fanatic) comedian Colm O’Regan will provide the answers.

And we discuss the new business being generated by the expansion of space programmes in Africa; With Seidu Mohammed of the Nigerian Space Agency, Dickson Adomako of Ghana's Space Science and Technology Institute, and Sir Martin Sweeting, Executive Chairman of Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.

This week we're dealing with the dreams of nations: World cup woes and space economies

Biofuels and Food Prices20120825

Are biofuels responsible for rising food prices?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

High food prices are again a cause for concern. In the Balance debates to what extent it's the result of food crops being used to make biofuels. Ruth Kelly from Oxfam says they must take some of the blame. Clare Wenner of the Renewable Energy Association in the UK defends them. David Hallam from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation explains the strains that are showing in the global food situation.

And as Europe and North America get back to work, do holidays do us, or our employers any good at all? Our resident comedian Colm O'Regan says that he takes lots of holidays - each one lasting just an hour.

Biofuels And Food Prices2012082520120826 (WS)

High food prices are again a cause for concern. In the Balance debates to what extent it's the result of food crops being used to make biofuels. Ruth Kelly from Oxfam says they must take some of the blame. Clare Wenner of the Renewable Energy Association in the UK defends them. David Hallam from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation explains the strains that are showing in the global food situation.

And as Europe and North America get back to work, do holidays do us, or our employers any good at all? Our resident comedian Colm O'Regan says that he takes lots of holidays - each one lasting just an hour.

Are biofuels responsible for rising food prices?

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Bitcoin: Has its Time Come?2013112320131124 (WS)

Digital dealings: What are virtual currencies and what are they for?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How can the large stone currency called Rai stones, from the island of Yap in Micronesia help us understand "bitcoin" and the world of virtual currencies? As US senators this week discussed the merits, and dangers, of these so-called crypto currencies, Justin Rowlatt and his guests delve into the opaque world of digital dealings and ask what on earth is a virtual currency, and what's the point of bitcoin when there are so many conventional currencies on offer?

And the programme's resident chief ruminator, Colm O'Regan, on why he's failed, so far, to grasp the freedom from the rules that bitcoin represents.

Bitcoin: Has its Time Come?20131123

Digital dealings: What are virtual currencies and what are they for?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How can the large stone currency called Rai stones, from the island of Yap in Micronesia help us understand "bitcoin" and the world of virtual currencies? As US senators this week discussed the merits, and dangers, of these so-called crypto currencies, Justin Rowlatt and his guests delve into the opaque world of digital dealings and ask what on earth is a virtual currency, and what's the point of bitcoin when there are so many conventional currencies on offer?

And the programme's resident chief ruminator, Colm O'Regan, on why he's failed, so far, to grasp the freedom from the rules that bitcoin represents.

Bitcoin: Has Its Time Come?2013112320131124 (WS)

How can the giant stone currency of the island of Yap help us understand "bitcoin" and the world of virtual currencies? As US senators this week discussed the merits, and dangers, of these so-called crypto currencies, Justin Rowlatt and his guests delve into the opaque world of digital dealings and ask what on earth is a virtual currency, and what's the point of bitcoin when there are so many conventional currencies on offer? And the programme's resident chief ruminator, Colm O'Regan, on why he's failed, so far, to grasp the freedom from the rules that bitcoin represents.

How can a giant stone currency help us understand bitcoin and virtual currencies?

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

Bitcoin: Still The Future of Money?2016071620160717 (WS)

Internal feuding and defections threaten the stability of the virtual currency

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

A bitter ideological battle is being fought for control over the virtual currency's future. Can it survive if it doesn't expand to accommodate more users and transactions?

Meanwhile, banks and others are using Bitcoin's underlying technology to develop their own products and services. Does the blockchain ultimately have more potential?

The Bitcoin impasse has led to some high-profile defections, including that of former core developer Mike Hearn. He tells Rory Cellan-Jones why he thinks the experiment has failed.

They are joined by Alex Waters, co-founder of Bitcoin investment firm Coin Apex, and Melanie Swan, a philosopher and economic theorist at the New School for Social Research in New York.

(Picture: A shop displaying a Bitcoin sign in Hong Kong. Credit: Philippe Lopez, Getty Images)

Bitcoin: Still The Future Of Money?20160717

Internal feuding and defections threaten the stability of the virtual currency

A bitter ideological battle is being fought for control over the virtual currency's future. Can it survive if it doesn't expand to accommodate more users and transactions?

Meanwhile, banks and others are using Bitcoin's underlying technology to develop their own products and services. Does the blockchain ultimately have more potential?

The Bitcoin impasse has led to some high-profile defections, including that of former core developer Mike Hearn. He tells Rory Cellan-Jones why he thinks the experiment has failed.

They are joined by Alex Waters, co-founder of Bitcoin investment firm Coin Apex, and Melanie Swan, a philosopher and economic theorist at the New School for Social Research in New York.

(Picture: A shop displaying a Bitcoin sign in Hong Kong. Credit: Philippe Lopez, Getty Images)

Brand Jihad: How Extremism Uses the Tools of Global Business20150307

Does Islamic extremism have a 'business model'? Can economics explain the jihadi journey?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Brand Jihad: How Extremism Uses the Tools of Global Business2015030720150308 (WS)

Does Islamic extremism have a 'business model'? Can economics explain the jihadi journey?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Brazil: The Last World Cup?2014061420140615 (WS)

Will Brazil 2014 be a game changer for the World Cup?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Will Brazil be a game changer for the World Cup? Public anger at the cost of the event isn’t going away and Fifa, the organisers, are back in the spotlight over their awarding of the 2022 tournament to Qatar. There have been allegations of corruption and for the first time the big sponsors have spoken out too.

We all know money talks in football, so might Fifa finally be forced to change? And what will that mean for the future of the World Cup?

Speaking to us from the University of Michigan is Stefan Szymanski, professor of Sport Management and 'Soccernomics' expert. Kate Robertson, Co-Global president of advertising agency Havas Worldwide explains why the brands care. And, Silio Boccanera, a top journalist for Brazilian TV network Globo news, helps us navigate the shifts in public opinion in Brazil.

Brazil: The Last World Cup?20140614

Will Brazil 2014 be a game changer for the World Cup?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Will Brazil be a game changer for the World Cup? Public anger at the cost of the event isn’t going away and Fifa, the organisers, are back in the spotlight over their awarding of the 2022 tournament to Qatar. There have been allegations of corruption and for the first time the big sponsors have spoken out too.

We all know money talks in football, so might Fifa finally be forced to change? And what will that mean for the future of the World Cup?

Speaking to us from the University of Michigan is Stefan Szymanski, professor of Sport Management and 'Soccernomics' expert. Kate Robertson, Co-Global president of advertising agency Havas Worldwide explains why the brands care. And, Silio Boccanera, a top journalist for Brazilian TV network Globo news, helps us navigate the shifts in public opinion in Brazil.

Brazil's Middle Class2013072020130721 (WS)

What are the economic and social factors behind the discontent of Brazil's middle class?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What are the economic and social factors behind the discontent of Brazil's middle class?
Simon Jack and guests discuss the issues in Sao Paulo, where the recent protests erupted. As Brazil's middle class finds its voice, In the Balance asks whether we are witnessing the growing pains of a developing country or a crisis point in Brazil's economic march forward. We hear what's behind the discontent and whether it is all about money.

Simon's guests are: Mailson da Nobrega, former finance minister and now a founder of Tendencias consultancy; Alexandre Schwartsman, former central banker and now teacher at one of Sao Paulo's leading business schools; Lucia Nader, executive director of Conectas human rights organisation and Vincent Bevins, from the LA Times anda writer for one of Sao Paulo's leading newspapers.

Picture: Sao Paulo street protests, Brazil, Credit: AFP/Getty

Brazil's Middle Class20130720

What are the economic and social factors behind the discontent of Brazil's middle class?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What are the economic and social factors behind the discontent of Brazil's middle class?
Simon Jack and guests discuss the issues in Sao Paulo, where the recent protests erupted. As Brazil's middle class finds its voice, In the Balance asks whether we are witnessing the growing pains of a developing country or a crisis point in Brazil's economic march forward. We hear what's behind the discontent and whether it is all about money.

Simon's guests are: Mailson da Nobrega, former finance minister and now a founder of Tendencias consultancy; Alexandre Schwartsman, former central banker and now teacher at one of Sao Paulo's leading business schools; Lucia Nader, executive director of Conectas human rights organisation and Vincent Bevins, from the LA Times anda writer for one of Sao Paulo's leading newspapers.

Picture: Sao Paulo street protests, Brazil, Credit: AFP/Getty

Bread and Soil: The Global Scramble for Land2014120620141207 (WS)

Vast global land transactions are taking place but are the deals always fair?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Vast global land transactions take place as nations scramble to ensure they can eat. But are these deals always fair? And what happens when yield countries change their mind? We speak to Fahad bin Mohammed al-Attiya, the man whose job it is to make sure Qatar, a nation which imports 95% of its food, does not run out. Professor Jacqueline McGlade, chief scientist of the UN Environment Programme talks about the social and environmental challenges involved in buying land from within vulnerable and unstable African countries and Ken Ash, director of Trade and Agriculture at the OECD tells us why the world needs to wake up to a future in which land ownership and land distribution will look very different.

Bread and Soil: The Global Scramble for Land20141206

Vast global land transactions are taking place but are the deals always fair?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Vast global land transactions take place as nations scramble to ensure they can eat. But are these deals always fair? And what happens when yield countries change their mind? We speak to Fahad bin Mohammed al-Attiya, the man whose job it is to make sure Qatar, a nation which imports 95% of its food, does not run out. Professor Jacqueline McGlade, chief scientist of the UN Environment Programme talks about the social and environmental challenges involved in buying land from within vulnerable and unstable African countries and Ken Ash, director of Trade and Agriculture at the OECD tells us why the world needs to wake up to a future in which land ownership and land distribution will look very different.

Brexit, Business and the Border2018060920180610 (WS)

What would border guards and smuggling in Northern Ireland mean for peace?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The British government is in the middle of a struggle over how the UK will leave the European Union. At the heart of it is the trading relationship between the two after Brexit - how closely will the UK stick to the rules and regulations of the EU when it's no longer a member?

The border between Northern Ireland - part of the UK - and the Republic of Ireland, which is and will remain an EU member, has become central to the argument. Since the Good Friday agreement of 1998, which helped bring years of violence to an end, it's become no more than a line on the map, with people and goods moving freely across it. After Brexit, it will become the only land border between the EU and the UK. What will that mean? A return to a 'hard border', rigorously policed by officials at customs checkpoints, or a 'soft border', with all the checking done remotely by technology?

In the Balance visits the border city of Newry in Northern Ireland to find out. The BBC's Rachel Horne is joined by Tina McKenzie, of the Federation of Small Businesses in Northern Ireland; Dr Katy Hayward, political sociologist from Queen's University, Belfast; Wesley Aston, chief executive of the Ulster Farmers' Union and Paddy Malone from the Dundalk Chamber of Commerce, just over the border in the Republic of Ireland. Rachel is also joined by comedian and writer Colm O'Regan.

And from the audience who came along to the discussion, we hear from local business people and young people whose lives could be profoundly changed by the decision to leave the EU.

(Picture: Traffic crossing the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland in the village of Bridgend, Co Donegal. Credit: Press Association)

Producers: Philippa Goodrich, Audrey Tinline
Researcher: Eimear Devlin

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Brexit, Business and the Border20180609

What would border guards and smuggling in Northern Ireland mean for peace?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The British government is in the middle of a struggle over how the UK will leave the European Union. At the heart of it is the trading relationship between the two after Brexit - how closely will the UK stick to the rules and regulations of the EU when it's no longer a member?

The border between Northern Ireland - part of the UK - and the Republic of Ireland, which is and will remain an EU member, has become central to the argument. Since the Good Friday agreement of 1998, which helped bring years of violence to an end, it's become no more than a line on the map, with people and goods moving freely across it. After Brexit, it will become the only land border between the EU and the UK. What will that mean? A return to a 'hard border', rigorously policed by officials at customs checkpoints, or a 'soft border', with all the checking done remotely by technology?

In the Balance visits the border city of Newry in Northern Ireland to find out. The BBC's Rachel Horne is joined by Tina McKenzie, of the Federation of Small Businesses in Northern Ireland; Dr Katy Hayward, political sociologist from Queen's University, Belfast; Wesley Aston, chief executive of the Ulster Farmers' Union and Paddy Malone from the Dundalk Chamber of Commerce, just over the border in the Republic of Ireland. Rachel is also joined by comedian and writer Colm O'Regan.

And from the audience who came along to the discussion, we hear from local business people and young people whose lives could be profoundly changed by the decision to leave the EU.

(Picture: Traffic crossing the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland in the village of Bridgend, Co Donegal. Credit: Press Association)

Producers: Philippa Goodrich, Audrey Tinline
Researcher: Eimear Devlin

Brexit: What Next for the City of London?2016102920161030 (WS)

Will Brexit undermine the dominance of London's banking industry?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Could Brexit be about to undermine the dominance of London's banking industry? The British Banker's Association has warned that large banks are getting ready to relocate out of the UK early next year, and smaller banks could move operations overseas before then.

It comes amid a fierce debate in Britain and Europe over what Brexit should look like. Some banks in London are pushing to retain access to the single market - especially so-called passporting rights. But the British government is unwilling to give ground to the EU on its key demand - control over immigration.

Frankfurt, Berlin and Paris are certainly on the charm offensive, with lobbyists hard at work encouraging relocation. So can London retain its status as a global finance hub – and who benefits if it doesn't? How much do other cities really stand to gain from Britain's imminent exit from the EU, and possibly the single market? And if there is an exodus of banks from the City of London, what will it mean for Europe, and even the global economy?

The BBC's Ed Butler is joined by an expert panel - Mark Boleat, policy chairman of The City of London Corporation; Marta Krupinska, a Polish-born businesswoman and founder of Azimo, a platform for sending money internationally; Dr Gerard Lyons, of the Policy Exchange think-tank and NetWealth Investments; Nicolas Véron, of the Bruegel Institute and the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

(Photo: City of London skyline. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Brexit: What Next For The City Of London?20161030

Will Brexit undermine the dominance of London's banking industry?

Could Brexit be about to undermine the dominance of London's banking industry? The British Banker's Association has warned that large banks are getting ready to relocate out of the UK early next year, and smaller banks could move operations overseas before then.

It comes amid a fierce debate in Britain and Europe over what Brexit should look like. Some banks in London are pushing to retain access to the single market - especially so-called passporting rights. But the British government is unwilling to give ground to the EU on its key demand - control over immigration.

Frankfurt, Berlin and Paris are certainly on the charm offensive, with lobbyists hard at work encouraging relocation. So can London retain its status as a global finance hub – and who benefits if it doesn't? How much do other cities really stand to gain from Britain's imminent exit from the EU, and possibly the single market? And if there is an exodus of banks from the City of London, what will it mean for Europe, and even the global economy?

The BBC's Ed Butler is joined by an expert panel - Mark Boleat, policy chairman of The City of London Corporation; Marta Krupinska, a Polish-born businesswoman and founder of Azimo, a platform for sending money internationally; Dr Gerard Lyons, of the Policy Exchange think-tank and NetWealth Investments; Nicolas Véron, of the Bruegel Institute and the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

(Photo: City of London skyline. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Brexit: What Now?20170610

What does Thursday's election result mean for the UK's negotiations with the EU?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Thursday's general election in the UK was supposed to strengthen the conservative British prime minister's hand on Brexit. However, things didn't quite go as planned and Britain was left with a hung parliament. The Conservatives are still the country's biggest party, but they've been left without the necessary majority and fewer parliamentary seats than before the election. And all this has happened only a few days before the country is due to sit down at the negotiating table with the European Union to discuss the terms of the UK's departure from the EU.

So how will the election result play out in those talks? Is Britain's hand now fatally weakened? What are the concerns of the business community? And what sort of Brexit should they be preparing for? To discuss these issues In The Balance brings together four people with insight into the matter: Jean de Ruyt, a former Belgian ambassador to the EU and a diplomat of 40 years experience; Jason Langrish, Executive Director of the Canada Europe Roundtable for Business, who worked on the Canadian trade deal with the EU; Jill Rutter, Programme Director for Brexit at the Institute for Government; and Lord Billimoria, Founder and Chair of Cobra Beer, Founding Chair of the UK-India Business Council and Chancellor of the University of Birmingham. All are in discussion with the BBC's Manuela Saragosa.

Brexit: Will the UK Stay or Go?2016013020160131 (WS)

What is at stake if the UK decides to leave the EU, not just for the UK, but Europe too?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This year looks set to be the moment when the UK decides whether or not it will remain as part of the European Union. With a referendum expected, we look at the implications of this historic vote, not just for the UK, but for the EU and for the global economy, too. We hear from business men and women from both sides of the so-called 'Brexit' divide, making the case for Britain in or Britain out, including Global Head of Economics at Societe Generale, Michala Marcussen, CEO of JML John Mills and leading UK economist and adviser to the Mayor of London, Gerard Lyons. Presented by Ed Butler

(Photo: A young spectator watches sporting action with a Union Jack painted on his face at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London, England. Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images)

Brexit: Will the UK Stay or Go?20160130

What is at stake if the UK decides to leave the EU, not just for the UK, but Europe too?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This year looks set to be the moment when the UK decides whether or not it will remain as part of the European Union. With a referendum expected, we look at the implications of this historic vote, not just for the UK, but for the EU and for the global economy, too. We hear from business men and women from both sides of the so-called 'Brexit' divide, making the case for Britain in or Britain out, including Global Head of Economics at Societe Generale, Michala Marcussen, CEO of JML John Mills and leading UK economist and adviser to the Mayor of London, Gerard Lyons. Presented by Ed Butler

(Photo: A young spectator watches sporting action with a Union Jack painted on his face at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London, England. Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images)

Brexit: Will The Uk Stay Or Go?2016013020160131 (WS)

What is at stake if the UK decides to leave the EU, not just for the UK, but Europe too?

This year looks set to be the moment when the UK decides whether or not it will remain as part of the European Union. With a referendum expected, we look at the implications of this historic vote, not just for the UK, but for the EU and for the global economy, too. We hear from business men and women from both sides of the so-called 'Brexit' divide, making the case for Britain in or Britain out, including Global Head of Economics at Societe Generale, Michala Marcussen, CEO of JML John Mills and leading UK economist and adviser to the Mayor of London, Gerard Lyons. Presented by Ed Butler

(Photo: A young spectator watches sporting action with a Union Jack painted on his face at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London, England. Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images)

Business and the State2013051120130512 (WS)

Is a good business preferable to a bad government? What is the state's role in business?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

There's no question that some government is a good thing. But how much? In the Balance meets Abdirashid Duale, whose family built a thriving business without any help from government at all, out of the shattered wreckage of Somalia. So what role can business play in rebuilding failed states?

Is a good business preferable to a bad government? Justin Rowlatt discusses the issues with Bob Bishof who is a partner of the consultancy firm SCCO International, Dr. Obadiah Mailafia who heads up the office of the African, Caribbean and Pacific group of nations in Brussels and Professor Ann Lee, author of the book What the US can learn from China.

Business and the State20130511

Is a good business preferable to a bad government? What is the state's role in business?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

There's no question that some government is a good thing. But how much? In the Balance meets Abdirashid Duale, whose family built a thriving business without any help from government at all, out of the shattered wreckage of Somalia. So what role can business play in rebuilding failed states?

Is a good business preferable to a bad government? Justin Rowlatt discusses the issues with Bob Bishof who is a partner of the consultancy firm SCCO International, Dr. Obadiah Mailafia who heads up the office of the African, Caribbean and Pacific group of nations in Brussels and Professor Ann Lee, author of the book What the US can learn from China.

Business And Youth2013062220130623 (WS)

Brazil and Turkey are the latest countries to see protests featuring large numbers of young people. How can developing economies harness the power of youth? Of the 1.2 billion people globally aged between 15 and 24, around 1 billion live in developing countries. So how do you turn a big young population into an economic opportunity? Manuela Saragosa and guests: Ganesh Natarajan, Vice Chairman and CEO of Zensar Technologies; Andrew Devenport, CEO of Youth Business International - a charity that promotes entrepreneurialism among young people and Paras Fatnani, One Young World ambassador for India, discuss how business can benefit from a young workforce. And resident comedian, Colm O'Regan, asks what it takes to move up in the world.

(Image: A Brazilian teenager listens to music, Credit: Getty Images)

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

Business and Youth2013062220130623 (WS)

What can young people do to help boost developing economies?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Brazil and Turkey are the latest countries to see protests featuring large numbers of young people. How can developing economies harness the power of youth? Of the 1.2 billion people globally aged between 15 and 24, around 1 billion live in developing countries. So how do you turn a big young population into an economic opportunity? Manuela Saragosa and guests: Ganesh Natarajan, Vice Chairman and CEO of Zensar Technologies; Andrew Devenport, CEO of Youth Business International - a charity that promotes entrepreneurialism among young people and Paras Fatnani, One Young World ambassador for India, discuss how business can benefit from a young workforce. And resident comedian, Colm O'Regan, asks what it takes to move up in the world.

(Image: A Brazilian teenager listens to music, Credit: Getty Images)

Business and Youth20130622

What can young people do to help boost developing economies?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Brazil and Turkey are the latest countries to see protests featuring large numbers of young people. How can developing economies harness the power of youth? Of the 1.2 billion people globally aged between 15 and 24, around 1 billion live in developing countries. So how do you turn a big young population into an economic opportunity? Manuela Saragosa and guests: Ganesh Natarajan, Vice Chairman and CEO of Zensar Technologies; Andrew Devenport, CEO of Youth Business International - a charity that promotes entrepreneurialism among young people and Paras Fatnani, One Young World ambassador for India, discuss how business can benefit from a young workforce. And resident comedian, Colm O'Regan, asks what it takes to move up in the world.

(Image: A Brazilian teenager listens to music, Credit: Getty Images)

Can Social Media Be Fixed?20180113

Who is to blame for the ills of social media - and how to fix them.

Political manipulation and fake news have shaken trust in social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg has vowed to make 2018 the year of big changes on the social media giant. And politicians around the world are threatening to bring in new regulations too. In Germany a new law is now forcing platforms to remove hate speech or face big fines. Join Ed Butler and guests for a discussion on who is to blame for the ills of social media - and how to fix them.

Contributors:Samantha Bradshaw from the Computational Propaganda Project at Oxford University.
Douglas Rushkoff , Professor of Media Theory and Digital Economics at City University of New York and author of Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus.
Andreas Kluth, Editor-in-Chief of Handelsblatt Global, the online English-language edition of the German newspaper.
Roger McNamee is an American businessman, investor and venture capitalist who was an early mentor to Mark Zuckerberg.

Can Social Media be Fixed?20180113

Who is to blame for the ills of social media - and how to fix them.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Political manipulation and fake news have shaken trust in social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg has vowed to make 2018 the year of big changes on the social media giant. And politicians around the world are threatening to bring in new regulations too. In Germany a new law is now forcing platforms to remove hate speech or face big fines. Join Ed Butler and guests for a discussion on who is to blame for the ills of social media - and how to fix them.

Contributors:Samantha Bradshaw from the Computational Propaganda Project at Oxford University.
Douglas Rushkoff , Professor of Media Theory and Digital Economics at City University of New York and author of Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus.
Andreas Kluth, Editor-in-Chief of Handelsblatt Global, the online English-language edition of the German newspaper.
Roger McNamee is an American businessman, investor and venture capitalist who was an early mentor to Mark Zuckerberg.

Image: Mark Zuckerberg speaks on stage during the annual Facebook F8 developers conference in San Jose, California, U.S., April 18, 2017 (Credit: Reuters)

Can the Rainbow Nation deliver?20121027

What is it that stops South Africa delivering a better standard of living to its people?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What is it that stops South Africa delivering a better standard of living to all its people? Archbishop Desmond Tutu coined the term, and Nelson Mandela famously called the country the rainbow nation. But 18 years after the end of apartheid, the pot of gold is still out of sight for many. Manuela Saragosa and her guests, Will Jimerson, Lyal White, John Capel and Kate Robertson discuss what's gone wrong and how to fix the yawning gap between South Africa's haves and have nots. Plus, inequality may be bad for countries, but is it essential in the workplace? Colm O'Regan muses on the moment he joined management and became "them", not "us".

Can The Rainbow Nation Deliver?2012102720121028 (WS)

What is it that stops South Africa delivering a better standard of living to its people?

What is it that stops South Africa delivering a better standard of living to all its people? Archbishop Desmond Tutu coined the term, and Nelson Mandela famously called the country the rainbow nation. But 18 years after the end of apartheid, the pot of gold is still out of sight for many. Manuela Saragosa and her guests, Will Jimerson, Lyal White, John Capel and Kate Robertson discuss what's gone wrong and how to fix the yawning gap between South Africa's haves and have nots. Plus, inequality may be bad for countries, but is it essential in the workplace? Colm O'Regan muses on the moment he joined management and became "them", not "us".

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Can the Rainbow Nation deliver?20121028

What is it that stops South Africa delivering a better standard of living to its people?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What is it that stops South Africa delivering a better standard of living to all its people? Archbishop Desmond Tutu coined the term, and Nelson Mandela famously called the country the rainbow nation. But 18 years after the end of apartheid, the pot of gold is still out of sight for many. Manuela Saragosa and her guests, Will Jimerson, Lyal White, John Capel and Kate Robertson discuss what's gone wrong and how to fix the yawning gap between South Africa's haves and have nots. Plus, inequality may be bad for countries, but is it essential in the workplace? Colm O'Regan muses on the moment he joined management and became "them", not "us".

Can Trump Rebuild America?2016111220161113 (WS)

Can Donald Trump deliver on his promises of more jobs and growth?

Can Donald Trump deliver on his promises of more jobs and growth, especially to parts of the Midwest that have been starved of employment and hope for decades? Around seven million factory jobs have been lost in the region since the 1970s. President-elect Trump has promised to invest in infrastructure, boost production, revive manufacturing, and cut taxes. He also talked about abandoning the country's trade deals and building a wall with Mexico. How much of this is feasible, and can he do it whilst keeping some kind of reasonable limit on the country's already substantial national debt?

The BBC's Ed Butler discuss these issues with Pippa Malmgren, a former member of George W Bush's economic team; Jared Bernstein from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and formerly, Barack Obama's economic team. They are also joined by Lou Mavrakis, Mayor of Monessen, Pennsylvania, a rust-belt town which has been hard hit by the recent decades of decline.

(Photo: A former steel factory in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania in November 2016. Credit: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images)

Can Trump Rebuild America?2016111220161113 (WS)

Can Donald Trump deliver on his promises of more jobs and growth?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Can Donald Trump deliver on his promises of more jobs and growth, especially to parts of the Midwest that have been starved of employment and hope for decades? Around seven million factory jobs have been lost in the region since the 1970s. President-elect Trump has promised to invest in infrastructure, boost production, revive manufacturing, and cut taxes. He also talked about abandoning the country's trade deals and building a wall with Mexico. How much of this is feasible, and can he do it whilst keeping some kind of reasonable limit on the country's already substantial national debt?

The BBC's Ed Butler discuss these issues with Pippa Malmgren, a former member of George W Bush's economic team; Jared Bernstein from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and formerly, Barack Obama's economic team. They are also joined by Lou Mavrakis, Mayor of Monessen, Pennsylvania, a rust-belt town which has been hard hit by the recent decades of decline.

(Photo: A former steel factory in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania in November 2016. Credit: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images)

Can Trump Rebuild America?20161112

Can Donald Trump deliver on his promises of more jobs and growth?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Can Donald Trump deliver on his promises of more jobs and growth, especially to parts of the Midwest that have been starved of employment and hope for decades? Around seven million factory jobs have been lost in the region since the 1970s. President-elect Trump has promised to invest in infrastructure, boost production, revive manufacturing, and cut taxes. He also talked about abandoning the country's trade deals and building a wall with Mexico. How much of this is feasible, and can he do it whilst keeping some kind of reasonable limit on the country's already substantial national debt?

The BBC's Ed Butler discuss these issues with Pippa Malmgren, a former member of George W Bush's economic team; Jared Bernstein from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and formerly, Barack Obama's economic team. They are also joined by Lou Mavrakis, Mayor of Monessen, Pennsylvania, a rust-belt town which has been hard hit by the recent decades of decline.

(Photo: A former steel factory in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania in November 2016. Credit: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images)

Can You Disaster-Proof an Economy?20170916

Why are natural disasters costing more than ever to deal with?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What lessons should we learn from the damage hurricane Irma has inflicted on Florida and the Caribbean, the flooding hurricane Harvey wreaked on Texas and the floods that have devastated parts of South Asia? And how can politicians and aid agencies be persuaded to spend more money preparing for natural disasters, rather than clearing up after the event? Manuela Saragosa talks to one environmental planning expert in Houston, Texas, who says some parts of the city will become uninhabitable. And she hears from experts around the world on the best way to contain the economic damage of future natural disasters.

Contributors:
Jim Blackburn, Rice University, Houston
MB Akhter, Bangladesh Country Director for Oxfam
Tom Bamforth from Shelter Cluster
Ilan Noy, Professor at Victoria University in Wellington, holder of the inaugural Chair in the Economics of Disasters
Christina Bennett from the Overseas Development Institute

(Picture: People shop in a supermarket after Hurricane Irma swept through the area on September 13, 2017 in Naples, Florida. Credit: Getty Images)

Capitalism in the Spotlight20120128

Justin Rowlatt and guests discuss whether capitalism needs fixing. And do meetings work?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance goes right back to basics and asks asking whether the economic system on which the entire world economy is based is not working.

Has capitalism broken down and if so - do we need to get under its bonnet?

Justin Rowlatt and his guests Raghurum Rajan, Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business, Nancy Koehn of the Harvard Business School and Paddy Docherty of Phoenix Africa get to grips with the issue.

Plus the programme's regular comedian Colm O'Regan helps the panel explore that bugbear of the business world, the meeting - does anything good ever come out of them?

Capitalism In The Spotlight20120130

In the Balance goes right back to basics and asks asking whether the economic system on which the entire world economy is based is not working. Has capitalism broken down and if so - do we need to get under its bonnet? Justin Rowlatt and his guests Raghurum Rajan, Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business, Nancy Koehn of the Harvard Business School and Paddy Docherty of Pheonix Africa get to grips with the issue. Plus the programme's regular comedian Colm O'Regan helps the panel explore that bugbear of the business world, the meeting - does anything good ever come out of them?

Justin Rowlatt and guests discuss whether capitalism needs fixing. And do meetings work?

Capitalism in the Spotlight20120130

Justin Rowlatt and guests discuss whether capitalism needs fixing. And do meetings work?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance goes right back to basics and asks asking whether the economic system on which the entire world economy is based is not working.

Has capitalism broken down and if so - do we need to get under its bonnet?

Justin Rowlatt and his guests Raghurum Rajan, Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business, Nancy Koehn of the Harvard Business School and Paddy Docherty of Phoenix Africa get to grips with the issue.

Plus the programme's regular comedian Colm O'Regan helps the panel explore that bugbear of the business world, the meeting - does anything good ever come out of them?

Career Change2014101820141019 (WS)

From tennis star to businessman. Boris Becker talks about his career change.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance examines career change. Jamie Robertson talks to the tennis star Boris Becker about his career change to a businessman and we hear from serial entrepreneurs Hailo founder Jay Bregman and Michiel Mol who has changed careers from video games to space travel with a number of projects in between. And Colm O Regan talks to young people about their career expectations at the One Young World summit in his home city of Dublin

Career Change20141018

From tennis star to businessman. Boris Becker talks about his career change.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance examines career change. Jamie Robertson talks to the tennis star Boris Becker about his career change to a businessman and we hear from serial entrepreneurs Hailo founder Jay Bregman and Michiel Mol who has changed careers from video games to space travel with a number of projects in between. And Colm O Regan talks to young people about their career expectations at the One Young World summit in his home city of Dublin

Catalan Independence - for Richer or Poorer?20171014

Would independence make Catalonia richer?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance reports this week from Catalonia, Spain's strongest economic region. The Catalan leader has declared that the region has won the right to independence, following a referendum declared illegal by the Spanish state. But what about the economy? Catalonia accounts for nearly 20% of Spain's GDP, but who would stand to lose most if the region breaks away? Manuela Saragosa travels to the Catalan capital Barcelona to hear from business people, economists and workers on whether Catalonia can afford to go it alone.

(Picture: Protesters wave Spanish and Catalan flags in Barcelona on October 12, 2017. Credit: JORGE GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)

Central Bankers: Failed Heroes?2016101520161016 (WS)

Once seen as the rock stars of the finance world, have central bankers run out of ammo?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Should central bankers, once seen as the new rock stars of the finance world, be more aptly described as failed heroes? As the world's finance ministries battle to revive their ailing, post-crisis economies, they have increasingly turned to the central bankers to do whatever it takes according to Mario Draghi, to keep those economic wheels turning. As a result, interest rates have been slashed in the rich world and some banks have launched massive programmes of quantitative easing. But have these technical remedies for economic stagnation run their course? As the debt piles rise and the rates approach zero or even negative in some countries - are the bankers' big bazookas as they were once memorably called, running out of ammunition?

The BBC's Ed Butler is joined by three guests - DeAnne Julius, a founding member of the Monetary Policy Committee which sets the Bank of England's interest rates, Jeff Deist, president of the Mises Institute, a long-time critic of the tactics deployed by the leading central banks, and Usha Thorat, a former deputy governor of the Reserve Bank of India in Mumbai.

(Photo: Computer graphic of a man opening his shirt revealing a t-shirt with percent symbol. Credit: Wavebreakmedia Ltd)

Central Bankers: Failed Heroes?20161016

Should central bankers, once seen as the new rock stars of the finance world, be more aptly described as failed heroes? As the world's finance ministries battle to revive their ailing, post-crisis economies, they have increasingly turned to the central bankers to do whatever it takes according to Mario Draghi, to keep those economic wheels turning. As a result, interest rates have been slashed in the rich world and some banks have launched massive programmes of quantitative easing. But have these technical remedies for economic stagnation run their course? As the debt piles rise and the rates approach zero or even negative in some countries - are the bankers' big bazookas as they were once memorably called, running out of ammunition?

The BBC's Ed Butler is joined by three guests - DeAnne Julius, a founding member of the Monetary Policy Committee which sets the Bank of England's interest rates, Jeff Deist, president of the Mises Institute, a long-time critic of the tactics deployed by the leading central banks, and Usha Thorat, a former deputy governor of the Reserve Bank of India in Mumbai.

(Photo: Computer graphic of a man opening his shirt revealing a t-shirt with percent symbol. Credit: Wavebreakmedia Ltd)

Once seen as the rock stars of the finance world, have central bankers run out of ammo?

Challenges Ahead2014010420140105 (WS)

What are the biggest challenges facing global economies in 2014?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance looks at the prospects for the global economy in 2014. Our panel of international economists tackles a number of big issues, including the difficult task of scaling back economic stimulus in western countries and the possibility of a successful recovery in the eurozone.

Lesley Curwen and guests also discuss the gap between rich and poor in emerging nations, and how this might change in 2014.

Image: The headquarters of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, September 2013. Credit: Getty Images

Challenges Ahead20140104

What are the biggest challenges facing global economies in 2014?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance looks at the prospects for the global economy in 2014. Our panel of international economists tackles a number of big issues, including the difficult task of scaling back economic stimulus in western countries and the possibility of a successful recovery in the eurozone.

Lesley Curwen and guests also discuss the gap between rich and poor in emerging nations, and how this might change in 2014.

Image: The headquarters of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, September 2013. Credit: Getty Images

Changing Behaviour2013060820130609 (WS)

How do companies and governments go about influencing what we do and how we do it?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How do companies and governments go about influencing our behaviour? It's all about incentives, nudges and knowing what motivates us. But doesn't this all smack of manipulation? Many would argue changing someone's behaviour starts with knowing everything about them. Colm O'Regan and the BBC's technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones, investigate the "quantified self", where you measure everything from the number of hours you sleep to the number of calories you eat in a day. But can a set of facts and figures really give you the whole picture? Are we being blinded by data and numbers, and losing sight of some greater truth in the process? Manuela Saragosa is joined by three people who know a lot about how to change behaviour: Jo Arden, strategy director at the marketing consultancy, 23Red; Steve Martin, Director of Influence at Work; and Josh Kaufman, author and business advisor.

Changing Behaviour20130608

How do companies and governments go about influencing what we do and how we do it?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How do companies and governments go about influencing our behaviour? It's all about incentives, nudges and knowing what motivates us. But doesn't this all smack of manipulation? Many would argue changing someone's behaviour starts with knowing everything about them. Colm O'Regan and the BBC's technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones, investigate the "quantified self", where you measure everything from the number of hours you sleep to the number of calories you eat in a day. But can a set of facts and figures really give you the whole picture? Are we being blinded by data and numbers, and losing sight of some greater truth in the process? Manuela Saragosa is joined by three people who know a lot about how to change behaviour: Jo Arden, strategy director at the marketing consultancy, 23Red; Steve Martin, Director of Influence at Work; and Josh Kaufman, author and business advisor.

China's Debt Mountain20171007

Is China too deep in debt?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

China's economy is still growing at a respectable rate - but how long can that last? Ed Butler reports from China on the problems caused by increasing amounts of debt. Ed hears from students taking on debt they don't understand and finds out about the extent of Shanghai's property bubble. He is joined back in the studio by a panel of experts on China to ask whether high levels of debt could sink the country's booming economy.

Contributors: Linda Yueh, Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School and Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University;
Steve Tsang, Director of SOAS China Institute;
Geoffrey Yu, Head of UK Investment Office at UBS Wealth Management.

(Picture: People visit a shopping mall complex in Shenyang, Liaoning province, as the authorities seek to revive the recession-hit industrial region. Credit: AFP/Getty images)

China's economic path20120310

Is China's economy running out of steam? Lesley Curwen and her guests debate the issue.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As China's leaders meet in Beijing, Lesley Curwen and her guests debate whether its economy is running out of steam.

The guests are: from Singapore, Fraser Howie Managing Director of independent brokerage CLSA Singapore who is the co-author of Red Capitalism: from London, Dr KC Lin from the Department of Politics and International Studies at Cambridge University: and from Beijing, Qian Liu who's Deputy Director of the China Forecasting Service at the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Plus, comedian Colm O'Regan looks at how to be thrifty in an era of austerity.

China's Economic Path20120312

As China's leaders meet in Beijing, Lesley Curwen and her guests debate whether its economy is running out of steam.

The guests are: from Singapore, Fraser Howie Managing Director of independent brokerage CLSA Singapore who is the co-author of Red Capitalism: from London, Dr KC Lin from the Department of Politics and International Studies at Cambridge University: and from Beijing, Qian Liu who's Deputy Director of the China Forecasting Service at the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Plus, comedian Colm O'Regan looks at how to be thrifty in an era of austerity.

Is China's economy running out of steam? Lesley Curwen and her guests debate the issue.

China's economic path20120312

Is China's economy running out of steam? Lesley Curwen and her guests debate the issue.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As China's leaders meet in Beijing, Lesley Curwen and her guests debate whether its economy is running out of steam.

The guests are: from Singapore, Fraser Howie Managing Director of independent brokerage CLSA Singapore who is the co-author of Red Capitalism: from London, Dr KC Lin from the Department of Politics and International Studies at Cambridge University: and from Beijing, Qian Liu who's Deputy Director of the China Forecasting Service at the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Plus, comedian Colm O'Regan looks at how to be thrifty in an era of austerity.

China's Economy: Does Size Matter?2014051020140511 (WS)

China's economy will overtake the US as the world's largest this year, statisticians say

China's economy will overtake the US as the world's largest this year, according to a grouping of the world’s leading statistical agencies called the International Comparison Program. We'll be asking if that matters, and discussing whether we're just too focused on numbers. Is there more to economic power than statistical superlatives?

Our guests this week are George Magnus, an author and the former chief economist at the investment bank UBS; Ting Zhang, founder and CEO of the consultancy China Business Solutions; Jeffrey Frankel, professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard University; Gurcharan Das, author, commentator and former CEO of Procter and Gamble India; and Dr Kent Deng, associate professor in Economic History at the London School of Economics.

Plus, amid all the talk of economic superpowers, our resident comedian Colm O'Regan wonders if Ireland can teach the world a few lessons when it comes to soft power.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

China's Economy: Does Size Matter?2014051020140511 (WS)

China's economy will overtake the US as the world's largest this year, statisticians say

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

China's economy will overtake the US as the world's largest this year, according to a grouping of the world’s leading statistical agencies called the International Comparison Program. We'll be asking if that matters, and discussing whether we're just too focused on numbers. Is there more to economic power than statistical superlatives?

Our guests this week are George Magnus, an author and the former chief economist at the investment bank UBS; Ting Zhang, founder and CEO of the consultancy China Business Solutions; Jeffrey Frankel, professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard University; Gurcharan Das, author, commentator and former CEO of Procter and Gamble India; and Dr Kent Deng, associate professor in Economic History at the London School of Economics.

Plus, amid all the talk of economic superpowers, our resident comedian Colm O'Regan wonders if Ireland can teach the world a few lessons when it comes to soft power.

China's Economy: Does Size Matter?20140510

China's economy will overtake the US as the world's largest this year, statisticians say

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

China's economy will overtake the US as the world's largest this year, according to a grouping of the world’s leading statistical agencies called the International Comparison Program. We'll be asking if that matters, and discussing whether we're just too focused on numbers. Is there more to economic power than statistical superlatives?

Our guests this week are George Magnus, an author and the former chief economist at the investment bank UBS; Ting Zhang, founder and CEO of the consultancy China Business Solutions; Jeffrey Frankel, professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard University; Gurcharan Das, author, commentator and former CEO of Procter and Gamble India; and Dr Kent Deng, associate professor in Economic History at the London School of Economics.

Plus, amid all the talk of economic superpowers, our resident comedian Colm O'Regan wonders if Ireland can teach the world a few lessons when it comes to soft power.

China's Generation-Y Speaks Out2016011620160117 (WS)

Young Chinese, trapped amidst economic turmoil, raise doubts about government tactics

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

With a Chinese economic crisis looming, IN THE BALANCE this week takes a step inside the country to hear from the generation of wealthy, middle-class twenty-somethings who will determine the country's future. With extraordinary candour, they raise questions about the way their government is handling the country's economy, they raise questions about the ability of their parent's generation to fully understand the global economic changes which impact China and they outline with remarkable clarity, their generation's hopes for personal wealth, freedom to choose and a greater participation in the global economy. We're also joined by leading economic thinkers and long-time China-watchers Kenneth Rogoff, George Magnus and Diana Choyleva, all on hand to respond to this unique glimpse inside the minds of China's Generation-Y. Presented by Ed Butler (PHOTO: Chinese teenagers attend a rock-and-roll festival in Beijing CREDIT: Guang Niu/Getty Images)

China's Generation-Y Speaks Out20160116

Young Chinese, trapped amidst economic turmoil, raise doubts about government tactics

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

With a Chinese economic crisis looming, IN THE BALANCE this week takes a step inside the country to hear from the generation of wealthy, middle-class twenty-somethings who will determine the country's future. With extraordinary candour, they raise questions about the way their government is handling the country's economy, they raise questions about the ability of their parent's generation to fully understand the global economic changes which impact China and they outline with remarkable clarity, their generation's hopes for personal wealth, freedom to choose and a greater participation in the global economy. We're also joined by leading economic thinkers and long-time China-watchers Kenneth Rogoff, George Magnus and Diana Choyleva, all on hand to respond to this unique glimpse inside the minds of China's Generation-Y. Presented by Ed Butler (PHOTO: Chinese teenagers attend a rock-and-roll festival in Beijing CREDIT: Guang Niu/Getty Images)

China's Generation-y Speaks Out2016011620160117 (WS)

Young Chinese, trapped amidst economic turmoil, raise doubts about government tactics

With a Chinese economic crisis looming, IN THE BALANCE this week takes a step inside the country to hear from the generation of wealthy, middle-class twenty-somethings who will determine the country's future. With extraordinary candour, they raise questions about the way their government is handling the country's economy, they raise questions about the ability of their parent's generation to fully understand the global economic changes which impact China and they outline with remarkable clarity, their generation's hopes for personal wealth, freedom to choose and a greater participation in the global economy. We're also joined by leading economic thinkers and long-time China-watchers Kenneth Rogoff, George Magnus and Diana Choyleva, all on hand to respond to this unique glimpse inside the minds of China's Generation-Y. Presented by Ed Butler (PHOTO: Chinese teenagers attend a rock-and-roll festival in Beijing CREDIT: Guang Niu/Getty Images)

Chinese property20120107

Is the Chinese property market the next financial disaster waiting to happen?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The eurozone crisis is usually presented as the most worrying trend in the world economy but is it? Are there even more frightening crises around, just ones we haven't been paying quite as much attention to?

The strongest contender has to be the Chinese property market. Is it on the verge of a catastrophic collapse? There are reports that prices in Beijing and Shanghai are already on the slide and sales are down dramatically.

The continued explosive economic growth in China has been one of the key factors keeping the entire world economy ticking over in recent years so if the property market bombed that might threaten the wider Chinese economy and the world.

One manager of a major hedge fund has described the threat as like "Dubai times 1,000 - but worse". So is that right?

Presenter Justin Rowlatt is joined from Beijing by Xie Tao who is professor of political science at the Beijing Foreign Studies University and in London by Dr Kent Deng of the Economic history department at the London School of Economics and Duncan Innes-Ker, who is a senior Asia editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit.

And we'll also be asking the panel what to make of the Chinese government's decision to set its sights on the moon. Why on earth - so to speak - would you fund a space programme when hundreds of millions of Chinese people still live in abject poverty.

(Image: A worker standing on scaffolding at a construction site for a new shopping complex in Hefei, in eastern China. Credit: AFP/Getty)

Chinese property20120109

Is the Chinese property market the next financial disaster waiting to happen?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The eurozone crisis is usually presented as the most worrying trend in the world economy but is it? Are there even more frightening crises around, just ones we haven't been paying quite as much attention to?

The strongest contender has to be the Chinese property market. Is it on the verge of a catastrophic collapse? There are reports that prices in Beijing and Shanghai are already on the slide and sales are down dramatically.

The continued explosive economic growth in China has been one of the key factors keeping the entire world economy ticking over in recent years so if the property market bombed that might threaten the wider Chinese economy and the world.

One manager of a major hedge fund has described the threat as like "Dubai times 1,000 - but worse". So is that right?

Presenter Justin Rowlatt is joined from Beijing by Xie Tao who is professor of political science at the Beijing Foreign Studies University and in London by Dr Kent Deng of the Economic history department at the London School of Economics and Duncan Innes-Ker, who is a senior Asia editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit.

And we'll also be asking the panel what to make of the Chinese government's decision to set its sights on the moon. Why on earth - so to speak - would you fund a space programme when hundreds of millions of Chinese people still live in abject poverty.

(Image: A worker standing on scaffolding at a construction site for a new shopping complex in Hefei, in eastern China. Credit: AFP/Getty)

Chinese Property20120109

The eurozone crisis is usually presented as the most worrying trend in the world economy but is it? Are there even more frightening crises around, just ones we haven't been paying quite as much attention to?

The strongest contender has to be the Chinese property market. Is it on the verge of a catastrophic collapse? There are reports that prices in Beijing and Shanghai are already on the slide and sales are down dramatically.

The continued explosive economic growth in China has been one of the key factors keeping the entire world economy ticking over in recent years so if the property market bombed that might threaten the wider Chinese economy and the world.

One manager of a major hedge fund has described the threat as like "Dubai times 1,000 - but worse". So is that right?

Presenter Justin Rowlatt is joined from Beijing by Xie Tao who is professor of political science at the Beijing Foreign Studies University and in London by Dr Kent Deng of the Economic history department at the London School of Economics and Duncan Innes-Ker, who is a senior Asia editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit.

And we'll also be asking the panel what to make of the Chinese government's decision to set its sights on the moon. Why on earth - so to speak - would you fund a space programme when hundreds of millions of Chinese people still live in abject poverty.

(Image: A worker standing on scaffolding at a construction site for a new shopping complex in Hefei, in eastern China. Credit: AFP/Getty)

Is the Chinese property market the next financial disaster waiting to happen?

Choosing a Running Mate20120818

As Paul Ryan is picked, is the U.S. unusually divided on how to cut government borrowing?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The United States' $11 trillion debt is an issue the new Republican candidate for the vice-presidency, Paul Ryan, has close to his heart. As the country gets ready to vote, is America unusually divided on how to cut government borrowing? Plus do the spouses of political or business leaders, for that matter, always have to take a back seat?
Andrew Walker's guests this week are Diana Furchtgott-Roth a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and formerly an economic advisor to Republican presidents George Bush Senior and Ronald Reagan; Neera Tanden, President of the Center for American Progress and a former director of domestic policy for the Obama-Biden presidential campaign; and Professor Iwan Morgan of the Institute of the Americas at University College London. And In the Balance's in- house comedian, Colm O'Regan, wonders whether he has what it takes to be a supportive spouse.

Choosing A Running Mate2012081820120819 (WS)

The United States' $11 trillion debt is an issue the new Republican candidate for the vice-presidency, Paul Ryan, has close to his heart. As the country gets ready to vote, is America unusually divided on how to cut government borrowing? Plus do the spouses of political or business leaders, for that matter, always have to take a back seat?

Andrew Walker's guests this week are Diana Furchtgott-Roth a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and formerly an economic advisor to Republican presidents George Bush Senior and Ronald Reagan; Neera Tanden, President of the Center for American Progress and a former director of domestic policy for the Obama-Biden presidential campaign; and Professor Iwan Morgan of the Institute of the Americas at University College London. And In the Balance's in- house comedian, Colm O'Regan, wonders whether he has what it takes to be a supportive spouse.

As Paul Ryan is picked, is the U.S. unusually divided on how to cut government borrowing?

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Cities and Migration2014102520141026 (WS)

Can our cities cope in the face of rapid urbanisation?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Can our cities cope in the face of rapid urbanisation? We hear from the megacity of Dhaka in Bangladesh, where migrants are struggling with poor water, health and schooling services.

We also go to Beijing, where marathon runners last year were force to pull out, or run in masks, because air pollution was at dangerous levels.

Ed Butler talks to Leo Johnson, co-author of Turnaround Challenge: Business and the City of the Future and Sir David King, Chairman of the Future Cities Catapult and currently the British Foreign Secretary's Special Representative for Climate Change.

Plus, the independent economist Andy Xie joins the debate from Hong Kong.

Cities and Migration20141025

Can our cities cope in the face of rapid urbanisation?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Can our cities cope in the face of rapid urbanisation? We hear from the megacity of Dhaka in Bangladesh, where migrants are struggling with poor water, health and schooling services.

We also go to Beijing, where marathon runners last year were force to pull out, or run in masks, because air pollution was at dangerous levels.

Ed Butler talks to Leo Johnson, co-author of Turnaround Challenge: Business and the City of the Future and Sir David King, Chairman of the Future Cities Catapult and currently the British Foreign Secretary's Special Representative for Climate Change.

Plus, the independent economist Andy Xie joins the debate from Hong Kong.

Clean Energy and Corporate Tax2013052520130526 (WS)

Has clean technology in the U.S. made a clean get away?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance comes from the Future in Review Conference in Southern California, where delegates gaze into their crystal ball to tell us what the world of business and technology will look like in years to come. Ed Butler and his guests discuss whether clean technology in North America has made a clean get away. In the era of shale gas extraction and oil production from giant tar sands, is anyone still investing in clean energy? And close to the West Coast homes of Google and Apple what do company bosses feel about the row over corporate tax avoidance? Ed is joined on the shores of the Pacific Ocean by Sheeraz Haji, CEO of the Clean Tech Group; Heidi Lubin, CEO of HEVT; and John Lowell of Zinc Air Group. Plus comedian Colm O'Regan on his own and the globe's tax affairs.

Clean Energy and Corporate Tax20130525

Has clean technology in the U.S. made a clean get away?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance comes from the Future in Review Conference in Southern California, where delegates gaze into their crystal ball to tell us what the world of business and technology will look like in years to come. Ed Butler and his guests discuss whether clean technology in North America has made a clean get away. In the era of shale gas extraction and oil production from giant tar sands, is anyone still investing in clean energy? And close to the West Coast homes of Google and Apple what do company bosses feel about the row over corporate tax avoidance? Ed is joined on the shores of the Pacific Ocean by Sheeraz Haji, CEO of the Clean Tech Group; Heidi Lubin, CEO of HEVT; and John Lowell of Zinc Air Group. Plus comedian Colm O'Regan on his own and the globe's tax affairs.

Climate Challenges2014092720140928 (WS)

Is economic growth compatible with protecting the environment?

Following the major United Nations climate gathering in New York we ask if the summit's premise - that economic growth is compatible with protecting the environment - is right? Manuela Saragosa and guests : Jennifer Turner, China environment expert at the Wilson Center in Washington DC, Shreekant Gupta of the University of Dehli's Department of Economics, Helen Mountford, from the New Climate Economy grouping and Samuel Fankhauser of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change debate the likelihood of a low carbon future. While our resident comedian Colm O' Regan puts his green credentials to the test on a bicycle in Copenhagen

Climate Challenges2014092720140928 (WS)

Is economic growth compatible with protecting the environment?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Following the major United Nations climate gathering in New York we ask if the summit's premise - that economic growth is compatible with protecting the environment - is right? Manuela Saragosa and guests Jennifer Turner, China environment expert at the Wilson Center in Washington DC, Shreekant Gupta of the University of Dehli's Department of Economics, Helen Mountford, from the New Climate Economy grouping and Samuel Fankhauser of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change, debate the likelihood of a low carbon future. While our resident comedian Colm O' Regan puts his green credentials to the test on a bicycle in Copenhagen

Climate Challenges20140927

Is economic growth compatible with protecting the environment?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Following the major United Nations climate gathering in New York we ask if the summit's premise - that economic growth is compatible with protecting the environment - is right? Manuela Saragosa and guests Jennifer Turner, China environment expert at the Wilson Center in Washington DC, Shreekant Gupta of the University of Dehli's Department of Economics, Helen Mountford, from the New Climate Economy grouping and Samuel Fankhauser of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change, debate the likelihood of a low carbon future. While our resident comedian Colm O' Regan puts his green credentials to the test on a bicycle in Copenhagen

Climate Change: The Business End2015052320150524 (WS)

Business says environmental concern is the big new driver in their forward planning

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Business leaders say environmental concern is the big new driver in their forward planning as they strive to be heard ahead of the Paris Climate Summit taking place later this year. Are they problem or part of the solution? And what can they bring to the global debate about tackling carbon emissions? (Photo: A wind power generator. Credit: Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)

Climate Change: The Business End20150523

Business says environmental concern is the big new driver in their forward planning

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Business leaders say environmental concern is the big new driver in their forward planning as they strive to be heard ahead of the Paris Climate Summit taking place later this year. Are they problem or part of the solution? And what can they bring to the global debate about tackling carbon emissions? (Photo: A wind power generator. Credit: Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)

Climate Countdown2015120520151206 (WS)

Business faces tough questions from experts and activists at the climate summit in Paris

As the world gathers in Paris to hammer out measures which all hope will slow the rise in global temperatures, In the Balance is in the city to debate the role of big business and big finance in what happens now? We hear from the CEO of one of the world's biggest electricity producers - Engie - and from the former President of Mexico Felipe Calderón. They are joined by an audience of activists, students and some leading thinkers from the world climate economics, to debate what corporate responsibility might look like, as the world confronts the need to change its ways. That's the Climate Countdown - an In the Balance special debate - from the Climate summit in Paris. PHOTO: Shows an apple marked with the portrait of French President Francois Hollande and another apple marked with the logo of the COP21 (CREDIT: Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/AFP/Getty Images)

Climate Countdown2015120520151206 (WS)

Business faces tough questions from experts and activists at the climate summit in Paris

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As the world gathers in Paris to hammer out measures which all hope will slow the rise in global temperatures, In the Balance is in the city to debate the role of big business and big finance in what happens now? We hear from the CEO of one of the world's biggest electricity producers - Engie - and from the former President of Mexico Felipe Calderón. They are joined by an audience of activists, students and some leading thinkers from the world climate economics, to debate what corporate responsibility might look like, as the world confronts the need to change its ways. That's the Climate Countdown - an In the Balance special debate - from the Climate summit in Paris. PHOTO: Shows an apple marked with the portrait of French President Francois Hollande and another apple marked with the logo of the COP21 (CREDIT: Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/AFP/Getty Images)

Climate Countdown20151205

Business faces tough questions from experts and activists at the climate summit in Paris

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As the world gathers in Paris to hammer out measures which all hope will slow the rise in global temperatures, In the Balance is in the city to debate the role of big business and big finance in what happens now? We hear from the CEO of one of the world's biggest electricity producers - Engie - and from the former President of Mexico Felipe Calderón. They are joined by an audience of activists, students and some leading thinkers from the world climate economics, to debate what corporate responsibility might look like, as the world confronts the need to change its ways. That's the Climate Countdown - an In the Balance special debate - from the Climate summit in Paris. PHOTO: Shows an apple marked with the portrait of French President Francois Hollande and another apple marked with the logo of the COP21 (CREDIT: Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/AFP/Getty Images)

Collective Memory20120519

Why doesn't the collective memory of an organisation stop it from making the old mistakes?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In The Balance gets to grips with why businesses don't learn the lessons of the past, why for example banks do like JP Morgan make huge trading losses.

What's happened to the collective memory of organisations?

And once the mistakes are made - what about the blame game - should it be the boss or the underlings who take the rap when it all goes pearshaped?

Join Lesley Curwen and her guests, Bob Collymore, the chief executive of Safaricom, the African telecoms company; from Geneva, Thiierry Malleret, co-founder of the newsletter The Monthly Barometer; and from Boston in the USA, Professor Baskhar Chakravorti, senior associate Dean at the Fletcher School at Tufts University.

Competing for critical elements2013020920130210 (WS)

Are we too dependent on metals and minerals that are increasingly hard to get hold of?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week Manuela Saragosa and her guests take on the elements: not the weather, but tantalum, europium, polonium, iridium, samarium - to name but a few. They're not just mysterious names on a periodic table, they're metals and minerals found in everyday products from laptops to mobile phones.
But is their supply really safe? And are we too dependent on them? Plus, In the Balance's resident muse, Colm O'Regan, ponders on the value of things and the price we're prepared to pay for them. Manuela's guests - Steven Duclos, a Chief Scientist at General Electric Global Research, mining industry consultant, David Humphreys, and Jaakko Kooroshy, Research Fellow in Energy, Environment and Resources at the research institute, Chatham House - take up the theme.
(Image: A man holds minerals in his hands, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Competing for critical elements20130209

Are we too dependent on metals and minerals that are increasingly hard to get hold of?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week Manuela Saragosa and her guests take on the elements: not the weather, but tantalum, europium, polonium, iridium, samarium - to name but a few. They're not just mysterious names on a periodic table, they're metals and minerals found in everyday products from laptops to mobile phones.
But is their supply really safe? And are we too dependent on them? Plus, In the Balance's resident muse, Colm O'Regan, ponders on the value of things and the price we're prepared to pay for them. Manuela's guests - Steven Duclos, a Chief Scientist at General Electric Global Research, mining industry consultant, David Humphreys, and Jaakko Kooroshy, Research Fellow in Energy, Environment and Resources at the research institute, Chatham House - take up the theme.
(Image: A man holds minerals in his hands, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Corruption2014020820140209 (WS)

How can lawmakers incentivise businesses and governments to fight corruption?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance digs into the knotty problem of corruption. How can lawmakers incentivise businesses and governments to fight corruption and to blow the whistle on corrupt practices? Justin Rowlatt and guests convene in London's historic Chatham House to discuss how co-ordinated action around the globe can throw light into the darkest corners of corporate or individual dishonesty. And comedian Colm O' Regan reflects on how to find courage. Justin's guests are Jennifer Shasky Calvery, director of the US Department of the Treasury Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Elena Panfilova, director of Transparency International Russia and whistle-blower Michael Woodford, the former CEO of the Japanese electronics giant Olympus.

Corruption20140208

How can lawmakers incentivise businesses and governments to fight corruption?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance digs into the knotty problem of corruption. How can lawmakers incentivise businesses and governments to fight corruption and to blow the whistle on corrupt practices? Justin Rowlatt and guests convene in London's historic Chatham House to discuss how co-ordinated action around the globe can throw light into the darkest corners of corporate or individual dishonesty. And comedian Colm O' Regan reflects on how to find courage. Justin's guests are Jennifer Shasky Calvery, director of the US Department of the Treasury Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Elena Panfilova, director of Transparency International Russia and whistle-blower Michael Woodford, the former CEO of the Japanese electronics giant Olympus.

Costing the Terror Threat2015012420150125 (WS)

Are the billions being spent on the fight against the terror threat monies well spent?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Billions of dollars are being spent trying to keep our towns and cities safe from the global terror threat but is it money well spent? Listen to former US Assistant Secretary of State James Rubin, the man in charge of policing London before the 7/7 terror attack in 2005 Lord Blair, the BBC's security correspondent Frank Gardner and former CIA operative Robert Baer. They consider how resources can best be allocated to tackle this constantly evolving security challenge. And they answer your questions about the economic challenges posed by the terror threat.

(Photo: An armed British police officer patrols outside of Heathrow Airport. Credit: Getty Images)

Costing the Terror Threat20150124

Are the billions being spent on the fight against the terror threat monies well spent?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Billions of dollars are being spent trying to keep our towns and cities safe from the global terror threat but is it money well spent? Listen to former US Assistant Secretary of State James Rubin, the man in charge of policing London before the 7/7 terror attack in 2005 Lord Blair, the BBC's security correspondent Frank Gardner and former CIA operative Robert Baer. They consider how resources can best be allocated to tackle this constantly evolving security challenge. And they answer your questions about the economic challenges posed by the terror threat.

(Photo: An armed British police officer patrols outside of Heathrow Airport. Credit: Getty Images)

Could The Next 'emerging Economy' Be The West?2016041620160417 (WS)

The former manufacturing hubs turning globalisation on its head.

It has been a familiar story of decline in Europe and North America: former industrial areas unable to keep up with global competition, devastated by enormous losses in manufacturing jobs. In a new book, Antoine Van Agtmael - the man who coined the term ‘emerging markets’ – challenges this received wisdom. He tells Manuela Saragosa how places like places like Akron, Ohio and Albany in the United States and Eindhoven and Dresden in Europe are using deep industry expertise, world-class research institutions and a sense of urgency from having hit rock bottom in decades past, to turn their fortunes around. Could the next 'emerging economy' in fact be the West? They are joined by author, commentator and former CEO of Procter and Gamble India, Gucharan Das and urban economist from Harvard University, Edward Glaeser.

Image: Hand with light bulbs, Credit: Thinkstock

Could the Next 'Emerging Economy' be the West?2016041620160417 (WS)

The former manufacturing hubs turning globalisation on its head.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

It has been a familiar story of decline in Europe and North America: former industrial areas unable to keep up with global competition, devastated by enormous losses in manufacturing jobs. In a new book, Antoine Van Agtmael - the man who coined the term ‘emerging markets’ – challenges this received wisdom. He tells Manuela Saragosa how places like places like Akron, Ohio and Albany in the United States and Eindhoven and Dresden in Europe are using deep industry expertise, world-class research institutions and a sense of urgency from having hit rock bottom in decades past, to turn their fortunes around. Could the next 'emerging economy' in fact be the West? They are joined by author, commentator and former CEO of Procter & Gamble India, Gucharan Das and urban economist from Harvard University, Edward Glaeser.

Image: Hand with light bulbs, Credit: Thinkstock

Cowboy bankers20120707

As a criminal enquiry opens into bank rate-rigging, have banks lost their true purpose?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As a criminal enquiry opens into bank rate-rigging, Lesley Curwen and her guests debate whether banks have lost sight of their true purpose, and whether the solution involves cutting bonuses and addressing conflicts of interest.

This week's guests are Dan Ariely, Professor of Psychology and Behavioural Economics at Duke University, author Clark McGinn who worked for 20 years at Royal Bank of Scotland, and Henrietta Royle, an ex-banker and Chief Executive of consultancy Fanshawe Haldin.

Plus, comedian Colm O'Regan finds expialidocious lessons for today's bankers from the tale of Mary Poppins.

Crowdfunding2014031520140316 (WS)

Is banking - as we know it - over? A new breed of company is now offering lending and borrowing online through what's called peer to peer lending, or crowdfunding. These websites match potential borrowers, who need money, with potential lenders who have money to invest.

Now powerful institutional investors are piling into the area - hoping to invest in this fast-growing sector. One prediction, made for the World Bank, suggests that this kind of alternative finance may be worth more than $93 billion by 2025. Is this stealing business from the banks? What about the lack of bank guarantees and comparatively light regulation; how secure is the money placed with these websites?

Presenter Lesley Curwen is joined by Rhydian Lewis, founder and CEO of RateSetter, one of the largest UK peer-to-peer lending companies,

Irene Graham, managing director of business finance at the British Bankers Association and Richard Swart, director of research in entrepreneurial finance from the University of California, Berkeley.

And our regular commentator, comedian Colm O'Regan suggests even the Dutch East India Company got its money from an ancient form of crowdfunding.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

Crowdfunding2014031520140316 (WS)

Will banking without banks become the model of the future, with the rise of crowdfunding?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is banking - as we know it - over? A new breed of company is now offering lending and borrowing online through what's called peer to peer lending, or crowdfunding. These websites match potential borrowers, who need money, with potential lenders who have money to invest.

Now powerful institutional investors are piling into the area - hoping to invest in this fast-growing sector. One prediction, made for the World Bank, suggests that this kind of alternative finance may be worth more than $93 billion by 2025. Is this stealing business from the banks? What about the lack of bank guarantees and comparatively light regulation; how secure is the money placed with these websites?

Presenter Lesley Curwen is joined by Rhydian Lewis, founder and CEO of RateSetter, one of the largest UK peer-to-peer lending companies,
Irene Graham, managing director of business finance at the British Bankers Association and Richard Swart, director of research in entrepreneurial finance from the University of California, Berkeley.

And our regular commentator, comedian Colm O'Regan suggests even the Dutch East India Company got its money from an ancient form of crowdfunding.

Crowdfunding20140315

Will banking without banks become the model of the future, with the rise of crowdfunding?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is banking - as we know it - over? A new breed of company is now offering lending and borrowing online through what's called peer to peer lending, or crowdfunding. These websites match potential borrowers, who need money, with potential lenders who have money to invest.

Now powerful institutional investors are piling into the area - hoping to invest in this fast-growing sector. One prediction, made for the World Bank, suggests that this kind of alternative finance may be worth more than $93 billion by 2025. Is this stealing business from the banks? What about the lack of bank guarantees and comparatively light regulation; how secure is the money placed with these websites?

Presenter Lesley Curwen is joined by Rhydian Lewis, founder and CEO of RateSetter, one of the largest UK peer-to-peer lending companies,
Irene Graham, managing director of business finance at the British Bankers Association and Richard Swart, director of research in entrepreneurial finance from the University of California, Berkeley.

And our regular commentator, comedian Colm O'Regan suggests even the Dutch East India Company got its money from an ancient form of crowdfunding.

Crystal Ball Gazing2016010220160103 (WS)

The trends, the big events, the risks that lie ahead for 2016 and the global economy.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We take a glance at what lies ahead for the global economy in 2016 - the trends, the big events, the risks coming up - how do things look from here? With the BBC's Business Editor Kamal Ahmed (Photo: Indian jewellery trader displays the world's largest transparent and colorless crystal ball. Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

Crystal Ball Gazing20160102

The trends, the big events, the risks that lie ahead for 2016 and the global economy.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We take a glance at what lies ahead for the global economy in 2016 - the trends, the big events, the risks coming up - how do things look from here? With the BBC's Business Editor Kamal Ahmed (Photo: Indian jewellery trader displays the world's largest transparent and colorless crystal ball. Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

Crystal Ball Gazing2016010220160103 (WS)

We take a glance at what lies ahead for the global economy in 2016 - the trends, the big events, the risks coming up - how do things look from here? With the BBC's Business Editor Kamal Ahmed (Photo: Indian jewellery trader displays the world's largest transparent and colorless crystal ball. Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

The trends, the big events, the risks that lie ahead for 2016 and the global economy.

Cybercrime2013070620130707 (WS)

Cybercrime has become big business, so how can companies protect themselves?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How robust is your cybersecurity? Hacking has been "industrialised" with criminals even selling hacking kits to allow attacks on computer systems. So how can business protect itself from cyber attacks and what is the real size of the threat? Jamie Robertson and expert guests: Guy Bunker from Clearswift; "white hat hacker" John Yeo and Kenneth Cukier, co-author of "Big Data" unravel the issues. And Colm O Regan looks at the dangers of sharing - both on and off-line

Cybercrime20130706

Cybercrime has become big business, so how can companies protect themselves?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How robust is your cybersecurity? Hacking has been "industrialised" with criminals even selling hacking kits to allow attacks on computer systems. So how can business protect itself from cyber attacks and what is the real size of the threat? Jamie Robertson and expert guests: Guy Bunker from Clearswift; "white hat hacker" John Yeo and Kenneth Cukier, co-author of "Big Data" unravel the issues. And Colm O Regan looks at the dangers of sharing - both on and off-line

Cybercrime: the 21st Century Business Risk2015041120150412 (WS)

What are the risks for businesses and governments from cyber attack?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The risk to businesses from cyber attack represents a constant threat and the costs of managing the threat increase year on year as the skills and technology available to hackers is modified and perfected. And, it is not just businesses - the economic activity of entire countries can be impacted by malicious hacking by individuals and by hostile nations. So what is to be done?

How should businesses and governments allocate resources to protect themselves? And how high are the stakes if we get this wrong? We hear from three world leaders in this field, professor Peter Sommer, cybersecurity expert and adviser to the UK government, Ben de la Salle, head of Head of IT Security and Risk, Old Mutual Wealth and Brian Lord, risk management consultant with 21 years experience working for the UK's spy agency GCHQ.
And, Colm O'Regan tells us what keeps him awake at night.

Cybercrime: the 21st Century Business Risk20150411

What are the risks for businesses and governments from cyber attack?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The risk to businesses from cyber attack represents a constant threat and the costs of managing the threat increase year on year as the skills and technology available to hackers is modified and perfected. And, it is not just businesses - the economic activity of entire countries can be impacted by malicious hacking by individuals and by hostile nations. So what is to be done?

How should businesses and governments allocate resources to protect themselves? And how high are the stakes if we get this wrong? We hear from three world leaders in this field, professor Peter Sommer, cybersecurity expert and adviser to the UK government, Ben de la Salle, head of Head of IT Security and Risk, Old Mutual Wealth and Brian Lord, risk management consultant with 21 years experience working for the UK's spy agency GCHQ.
And, Colm O'Regan tells us what keeps him awake at night.

Cyprus: Small Island, Big Problem2013032320130324 (WS)

Is the flare-up in Cyprus more dangerous than those in other Eurozone countries?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The eurozone crisis is back, but is this particular flare-up in Cyprus potentially more dangerous than the ones we saw in other EU countries with questionable state finances? Cyprus may be one of the eurozone's smallest members, but our guests this week tell us why small can still equal deadly. One again, it's banks that are causing problems. Join Manuela Saragosa and guests: Katinka Barysch, deputy director of the Centre for European Reform, Maria Margaronis, London correspondent for The Nation and Gabriel Stein, Managing Director at macroeconomic forecasters Stein Brothers. Plus Comedian Colm O'Regan wonders if the Irish have something to learn from plucky Cypriots.

Cyprus: Small Island, Big Problem20130323

Is the flare-up in Cyprus more dangerous than those in other Eurozone countries?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The eurozone crisis is back, but is this particular flare-up in Cyprus potentially more dangerous than the ones we saw in other EU countries with questionable state finances? Cyprus may be one of the eurozone's smallest members, but our guests this week tell us why small can still equal deadly. One again, it's banks that are causing problems. Join Manuela Saragosa and guests: Katinka Barysch, deputy director of the Centre for European Reform, Maria Margaronis, London correspondent for The Nation and Gabriel Stein, Managing Director at macroeconomic forecasters Stein Brothers. Plus Comedian Colm O'Regan wonders if the Irish have something to learn from plucky Cypriots.

Davos: Spreading The Wealth?20180127

With global growth rising - can capitalism deliver prosperity for all of us?

The world's top business people, politicians and economists have been meeting in the Swiss resort of Davos. In the Balance asks: Can capitalism deliver prosperity for all of us?

The International Monetary Fund confirmed a strong picture for global growth this year - but is it the right kind of growth? The IMF report reveals that one fifth of emerging market economies saw per capita incomes fall last year. So, with global growth rising, why isn't everyone getting richer? Join Manuela Saragosa and her guests in Davos, Washington and London, to discuss whether global growth can reach even the world's poorest.

Contributors:
Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics
Kishore Mahbubani, Senior Advisor and Professor in the Practice of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore
Eve Poole, author of Capitalism's Toxic Assumptions, Associate at Ashridge Business School
Desmond Lachman, Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute

Picture: US President Donald Trump looks on as the Landwehr Fribourg band leaves the stage during the World Economic Forum meeting on January 26, 2018 in Davos (Credit: FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Davos: Spreading the Wealth?20180127

With global growth rising - can capitalism deliver prosperity for all of us?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The world's top business people, politicians and economists have been meeting in the Swiss resort of Davos. In the Balance asks: Can capitalism deliver prosperity for all of us?

The International Monetary Fund confirmed a strong picture for global growth this year - but is it the right kind of growth? The IMF report reveals that one fifth of emerging market economies saw per capita incomes fall last year. So, with global growth rising, why isn't everyone getting richer? Join Manuela Saragosa and her guests in Davos, Washington and London, to discuss whether global growth can reach even the world's poorest.

Contributors:
Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics
Kishore Mahbubani, Senior Advisor and Professor in the Practice of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore
Eve Poole, author of Capitalism's Toxic Assumptions, Associate at Ashridge Business School
Desmond Lachman, Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute

Picture: US President Donald Trump looks on as the Landwehr Fribourg band leaves the stage during the World Economic Forum meeting on January 26, 2018 in Davos (Credit: FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Diamond years for business?20120609

At the end of Diamond Jubilee week, we ask how business has changed in the last 60 years.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

At the end of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee week, we take the British festivities as an excuse to reflect on six decades of change in the world of business.

There are two big themes: globalisation - the opportunities and the dangers - and the shift of the centre of economic gravity in the world from West to East, the rise of China.

Andrew Walker hears the views and experiences of Lord Karan Bilimoria the founder of the Indian company Cobra beer, Mmasekgoa Masire-Mwamba Deputy Secretary General of the Commonwealth, who is a national of Botswana, and Rupert Soames, Chief Executive of Aggreko, a company which supplies temporary power generation equipment.

The historical context is set out by Professor Nicholas Crafts of Warwick University.

Diamond Years For Business?2012060920120610
20120610 (WS)

At the end of Diamond Jubilee week, we ask how business has changed in the last 60 years.

At the end of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee week, we take the British festivities as an excuse to reflect on six decades of change in the world of business. There are two big themes: globalisation - the opportunities and the dangers - and the shift of the centre of economic gravity in the world from West to East, the rise of China. Andrew Walker hears the views and experiences of Lord Karan Bilimoria the founder of the Indian company Cobra beer, Mmasekgoa Masire-Mwamba Deputy Secretary General of the Commonwealth, who is a national of Botswana, and Rupert Soames, chief executive of Aggreko a company which supplies temporary power generation equipment. The historical context is set out by Professor Nicholas Crafts of Warwick University.

Disability Hiring2017022520170226 (WS)

How can employers offer more opportunities for disabled workers?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What can governments and employers do to ensure disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else in the workplace? And how can disabled people give themselves the best chance of getting into work? Join Manuela Saragosa and guests: Dr Alice Maynard, an associate of Business Disability International; Randy Lewis, a former executive at the US pharmacy giant Walgreens; and Tunusha Naidu, founder of ABLE Consulting in South Africa, a disability-focussed recruitment firm that also helps companies make their workplaces more accessible.

(Picture: Man in a wheelchair working at container terminal. Credit: Thinkstock)

Disability Hiring20170225

How can employers offer more opportunities for disabled workers?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What can governments and employers do to ensure disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else in the workplace? And how can disabled people give themselves the best chance of getting into work? Join Manuela Saragosa and guests: Dr Alice Maynard, an associate of Business Disability International; Randy Lewis, a former executive at the US pharmacy giant Walgreens; and Tunusha Naidu, founder of ABLE Consulting in South Africa, a disability-focussed recruitment firm that also helps companies make their workplaces more accessible.

(Picture: Man in a wheelchair working at container terminal. Credit: Thinkstock)

Divided Life?20120922

Divided lives: do we display different moral behaviour at work and at home?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the wake of recent financial scandals, we ask whether many of us lead divided lives? Do we display different moral behaviour in the business world and at home?

Lesley Curwen's guests are former banker and City trader Barbara Stcherbatcheff, author of "Confessions of a City Girl",
Dr Catherine Cowley, a nun and a research fellow at Heythrop College, London, and
from Delhi, Gurcharan Das, former CEO of Procter and Gamble in India and author of "India Grows at Night".

Plus, comedian Colm O'Regan looks at why neighbours often fall out.

Do good ethics make good business?20121229

Do ethics fly out of the window as we chase profit? Or is an ethical code key to business?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Most of us like to think we are principled, that our actions are guided by an ethical code. But how ethical are we really? And when it comes to business do ethics fly out of the window as we go off in search of profits? In the Balance explores ethics with a multi-millionaire venture capitalist, a Harvard professor of business history, an expert on business in India, and a fund manager who advocates ethical investment. Plus as the year draws to a close, we send Colm O'Regan up to his garret to compose the definitive poem for 2012. Spurred on by that, Justin Rowlatt's guests, Ed Conard, Nancy Koehn, Deepak Lalwani and Gervais Williams give us their predictions for 2013.

(Image: Shaking hands, Credit: Science Photo Library)

Do Good Ethics Make Good Business?2012122920121230 (WS)

Most of us like to think we are principled, that our actions are guided by an ethical code. But how ethical are we really? And when it comes to business do ethics fly out of the window as we go off in search of profits? In the Balance explores ethics with a multi-millionaire venture capitalist, a Harvard professor of business history, an expert on business in India, and a fund manager who advocates ethical investment. Plus as the year draws to a close, we send Colm O'Regan up to his garret to compose the definitive poem for 2012. Spurred on by that, Justin Rowlatt's guests, Ed Conard, Nancy Koehn, Deepak Lalwani and Gervais Williams give us their predictions for 2013.

(Image: Shaking hands, Credit: Science Photo Library)

Do ethics fly out of the window as we chase profit? Or is an ethical code key to business?

Do good ethics make good business?20121230

Do ethics fly out of the window as we chase profit? Or is an ethical code key to business?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Most of us like to think we are principled, that our actions are guided by an ethical code. But how ethical are we really? And when it comes to business do ethics fly out of the window as we go off in search of profits? In the Balance explores ethics with a multi-millionaire venture capitalist, a Harvard professor of business history, an expert on business in India, and a fund manager who advocates ethical investment. Plus as the year draws to a close, we send Colm O'Regan up to his garret to compose the definitive poem for 2012. Spurred on by that, Justin Rowlatt's guests, Ed Conard, Nancy Koehn, Deepak Lalwani and Gervais Williams give us their predictions for 2013.

(Image: Shaking hands, Credit: Science Photo Library)

Do Sanctions Work?20180512

Can economic sanctions work to change behaviour?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

US President Donald Trump is bringing back sanctions on Iran and is threatening to extend the sanctions to European companies that do business there. The Iran announcement came in the same week that the USA announced more sanctions on Venezuela, ahead of controversial elections later this month. Since coming into power, President Trump has used economic sanctions as a weapon of choice. But do sanctions actually work? And how do they affect businesses trading with the countries concerned? Ed Butler is joined by a panel of experts to discuss what to expect as the US grip tightens over the economies of countries it is in conflict with.

(Picture: An Iranian woman walks past a mural on the wall of the former US embassy in Tehran on May 8, 2018. Photo credit:ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

Contributors: Elizabeth Rosenberg from the Center for a New American Security. Former Senior Advisor at the U.S. Department of the Treasury where she helped to develop and implement financial and energy sanctions.
Nigel Kushner, specialist sanctions lawyer, CEO of W Legal.
Professor Ricardo Hausmann, Director of Harvard's Center for International Development. Former Minister of Planning of Venezuela.

Producer: Audrey Tinline

Does Business have a responsiblity beyond making a profit?2013012620130127 (WS)

Are companies there to please their shareholders or do good? Can they do both?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We host a passionate debate this week about whether companies are there to please their shareholders or do good: can they do both? We'll hear from a CEO and a historian in Davos and a self-styled professional libertarian in London. And our in-house comedian, Colm O'Regan, looks at the notion of exclusivity, is it all it's cracked up to be? There's no champagne, just sparkling ideas from Lesley Curwen and her guests, Nancy Koehn of Harvard Business School, David Jones, CEO of the global communications company Havas, and Sam Bowman of the Adam Smith Institute. And BBC Technology Correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones' classical language skills are put to the test.

Does Business have a responsiblity beyond making a profit?20130126

Are companies there to please their shareholders or do good? Can they do both?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We host a passionate debate this week about whether companies are there to please their shareholders or do good: can they do both? We'll hear from a CEO and a historian in Davos and a self-styled professional libertarian in London. And our in-house comedian, Colm O'Regan, looks at the notion of exclusivity, is it all it's cracked up to be? There's no champagne, just sparkling ideas from Lesley Curwen and her guests, Nancy Koehn of Harvard Business School, David Jones, CEO of the global communications company Havas, and Sam Bowman of the Adam Smith Institute. And BBC Technology Correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones' classical language skills are put to the test.

Does Business Have A Responsiblity Beyond Making A Profit?2013012620130127 (WS)

We host a passionate debate this week about whether companies are there to please their shareholders or do good: can they do both? We'll hear from a CEO and a historian in Davos and a self-styled professional libertarian in London. And our in-house comedian, Colm O'Regan, looks at the notion of exclusivity, is it all it's cracked up to be? There's no champagne, just sparkling ideas from Lesley Curwen and her guests, Nancy Koehn of Harvard Business School, David Jones, CEO of the global communications company Havas, and Sam Bowman of the Adam Smith Institute. And BBC Technology Correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones' classical language skills are put to the test.

Are companies there to please their shareholders or do good? Can they do both?

Does business need the euro?20120623

Greece has chosen to stay in the euro, but how much does business care about it?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Decisions, decisions. The Greeks choose to stay in the euro, but is it a case of Greece can fail another day?

In the Balance discusses how the world of business lives under that cloud of eurozone uncertainty.

Wouldn't it just be better off without the single currency altogether? Who decides?

Not the politicians - they're too busy kicking the can down the road.

Manuela Saragosa talks to Gabriel Sterne, director of the investment house EXOTIX and also an economist who used to be with the Bank of England and the IMF, Panos Manuelides of the Greek and Mediterranean food wholesale company Odysea and Julie Meyer, founder of Ariadne Capital and author of Welcome to Entrepreneur Country.

Does Economics Still Work?2017021820170219 (WS)

Is it still a useful way to make sense of events in an increasingly unpredictable world?

Have economists become the latest casualties of the so-called "populist wave"?

Some of them got their forecasts badly wrong over Brexit, and widespread fears over a US economy under President Donald Trump have given way to record highs in financial markets. Plus, of course, most economists completely failed to foresee the global financial crisis.

It's led some to suggest that economics has become too detached from reality, that its experts have become too politicised and that the profession has lost much of its credibility. After all, Brexit and Trump voters ignored economists' dire warnings in their tens of millions.

And, at a time of such huge political and technological change, is economics still a useful way to make sense of and predict events?

Ed Butler is joined by three guests with their own visions for how economics should change: Wendy Carlin, professor of economics at University College London and leader of the CORE project to reform the undergraduate economics curriculum; Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at recruitment website Glassdoor, in San Francisco; and Paola Subacchi, director of international economics research at the UK think-tank Chatham House.

(Picture: A man on a dollar boat in bad weather. Credit: Thinkstock)

Does Economics Still Work?2017021820170219 (WS)

Is it still a useful way to make sense of events in an increasingly unpredictable world?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Have economists become the latest casualties of the so-called "populist wave"?

Some of them got their forecasts badly wrong over Brexit, and widespread fears over a US economy under President Donald Trump have given way to record highs in financial markets. Plus, of course, most economists completely failed to foresee the global financial crisis.

It's led some to suggest that economics has become too detached from reality, that its experts have become too politicised and that the profession has lost much of its credibility. After all, Brexit and Trump voters ignored economists' dire warnings in their tens of millions.

And, at a time of such huge political and technological change, is economics still a useful way to make sense of and predict events?

Ed Butler is joined by three guests with their own visions for how economics should change: Wendy Carlin, professor of economics at University College London and leader of the CORE project to reform the undergraduate economics curriculum; Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at recruitment website Glassdoor, in San Francisco; and Paola Subacchi, director of international economics research at the UK think-tank Chatham House.

(Picture: A man on a dollar boat in bad weather. Credit: Thinkstock)

Does Economics Still Work?20170218

Is it still a useful way to make sense of events in an increasingly unpredictable world?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Have economists become the latest casualties of the so-called "populist wave"?

Some of them got their forecasts badly wrong over Brexit, and widespread fears over a US economy under President Donald Trump have given way to record highs in financial markets. Plus, of course, most economists completely failed to foresee the global financial crisis.

It's led some to suggest that economics has become too detached from reality, that its experts have become too politicised and that the profession has lost much of its credibility. After all, Brexit and Trump voters ignored economists' dire warnings in their tens of millions.

And, at a time of such huge political and technological change, is economics still a useful way to make sense of and predict events?

Ed Butler is joined by three guests with their own visions for how economics should change: Wendy Carlin, professor of economics at University College London and leader of the CORE project to reform the undergraduate economics curriculum; Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at recruitment website Glassdoor, in San Francisco; and Paola Subacchi, director of international economics research at the UK think-tank Chatham House.

(Picture: A man on a dollar boat in bad weather. Credit: Thinkstock)

Economics Without Borders?2015091920150920 (WS)

Are EU countries right not to let refugees in, or are they missing an economic trick?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Are EU countries such as Hungary and Poland right to resist mass refugee migration into their economies or are they missing a trick? We hear from the former Finance Minister of Poland Jacek Rostowski about why he thinks taking in large numbers of refugees is not a good option for his country. Meanwhile professor Alexander Betts, of the Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford, tells us his research shows that if refugees are allowed to work, they can make a huge positive contribution to the economy into which they settle. They are joined by former economic adviser to the US government Diana Furchtgott-Roth and Tania Kaiser of School of Oriental and African Studies to discuss the economic pros and cons of allowing refugees in.

(Photo: Migrants and refugees wait to cross the Greece-Macedonia border, 13 September 2015. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Economics Without Borders?20150919

Are EU countries right not to let refugees in, or are they missing an economic trick?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Are EU countries such as Hungary and Poland right to resist mass refugee migration into their economies or are they missing a trick? We hear from the former Finance Minister of Poland Jacek Rostowski about why he thinks taking in large numbers of refugees is not a good option for his country. Meanwhile professor Alexander Betts, of the Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford, tells us his research shows that if refugees are allowed to work, they can make a huge positive contribution to the economy into which they settle. They are joined by former economic adviser to the US government Diana Furchtgott-Roth and Tania Kaiser of School of Oriental and African Studies to discuss the economic pros and cons of allowing refugees in.

(Photo: Migrants and refugees wait to cross the Greece-Macedonia border, 13 September 2015. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Economics Without Borders?2015091920150920 (WS)

Are EU countries such as Hungary and Poland right to resist mass refugee migration into their economies or are they missing a trick? We hear from the former Finance Minister of Poland Jacek Rostowski about why he thinks taking in large numbers of refugees is not a good option for his country. Meanwhile professor Alexander Betts, of the Refugee Studies Centre in Oxford, tells us his research shows that if refugees are allowed to work, they can make a huge positive contribution to the economy into which they settle. They are joined by former economic adviser to the US government Diana Furchtgott-Roth and Tania Kaiser of School of Oriental and African Studies to discuss the economic pros and cons of allowing refugees in.

(Photo: Migrants and refugees wait to cross the Greece-Macedonia border, 13 September 2015. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Are EU countries right not to let refugees in, or are they missing an economic trick?

Education that Works?2015031420150315 (WS)

What education do today's students need to equip them for the workplaces of the future?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

With an ever changing employment market, and a workforce that is not only globalised but also increasingly technology driven, what kind of education works to equip today's students for the workplaces of the future? And, what does business need?

We hear from a panel of educational experts including former Ghanaian education minister Elizabeth Ohene and blue skies thinker Marc Prensky. And, we hear from kids about what they make of the huge pressure they are under to perform well at school, and about how competitive they think the jobs market will be for them, when they get there.

(Photo: Two school boys in a classroom, one with his hands raised. Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Education that Works?20150314

What education do today's students need to equip them for the workplaces of the future?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

With an ever changing employment market, and a workforce that is not only globalised but also increasingly technology driven, what kind of education works to equip today's students for the workplaces of the future? And, what does business need?

We hear from a panel of educational experts including former Ghanaian education minister Elizabeth Ohene and blue skies thinker Marc Prensky. And, we hear from kids about what they make of the huge pressure they are under to perform well at school, and about how competitive they think the jobs market will be for them, when they get there.

(Photo: Two school boys in a classroom, one with his hands raised. Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Egypt, Elections and Economic Renewal20120616

Will presidential elections in Egypt banish uncertainty and bring economic renewal?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

It was hoped that the Arab Spring would mark the beginning of a period of renewal for the entire Middle East. Well, more than a year on and Egypt goes to the polls to elect a new president. But political change hasn't brought economic success. Both Tunisia and Egypt have seen economic growth plummet - the size of Libya's economy has been halved. So what hope is there for economic renewal in the Arab world. That's what we'll be discussing on this week's In the Balance. Join Justin Rowlatt and his guests: Dr Ashraf Mishrif - an Egyptian and a Senior Lecturer in Political Economy at Kings College London, Dr Magdi Ishak, a medical doctor and a successful Egyptian businessman and from Cairo, Angus Blair who is the former head of research for the Arab investment bank, Beltone Financial, and who has now set up a think tank called the Signet Institute.

Emotional Intelligence and Business2014012520140126 (WS)

Tapping in to some of the latest leadership trends at Davos - emotional intelligence

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Business leaders and politicians meeting for the annual World Economic forum in Davos have - amongst other things - been talking about how to get better at their jobs. If you're the boss of the company, one of your preoccupations has to be your people, your employees, and how to get the most out of them. The leaders meeting at Davos have been listening to psychologists and neuroscientists explain the latest thinking on how to get better at understanding their staff - using the skills of emotional intelligence. Manuela Saragosa is joined from Davos by psychologist Sigal Barsade, Professor of Management, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and Uwe Krueger, chief executive officer of the design and engineering consultants Atkins. And in London by company boss Edwina Dunn, director at Starcount, a social media analytics company. And from Dublin, Comedian Colm O'Regan looks at the business of being social.

Emotional Intelligence and Business20140125

Tapping in to some of the latest leadership trends at Davos - emotional intelligence

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Business leaders and politicians meeting for the annual World Economic forum in Davos have - amongst other things - been talking about how to get better at their jobs. If you're the boss of the company, one of your preoccupations has to be your people, your employees, and how to get the most out of them. The leaders meeting at Davos have been listening to psychologists and neuroscientists explain the latest thinking on how to get better at understanding their staff - using the skills of emotional intelligence. Manuela Saragosa is joined from Davos by psychologist Sigal Barsade, Professor of Management, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and Uwe Krueger, chief executive officer of the design and engineering consultants Atkins. And in London by company boss Edwina Dunn, director at Starcount, a social media analytics company. And from Dublin, Comedian Colm O'Regan looks at the business of being social.

Emotional Intelligence And Business2014012520140126 (WS)

Tapping in to some of the latest leadership trends at Davos - emotional intelligence

Business leaders and politicians meeting for the annual World Economic forum in Davos have - amongst other things - been talking about how to get better at their jobs. If you're the boss of the company, one of your preoccupations has to be your people, your employees, and how to get the most out of them. The leaders meeting at Davos have been listening to psychologists and neuroscientists explain the latest thinking on how to get better at understanding their staff - using the skills of emotional intelligence. Manuela Saragosa is joined from Davos by psychologist Sigal Barsade, Professor of Management, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and Uwe Krueger, chief executive officer of the design and engineering consultants Atkins. And in London by company boss Edwina Dunn, director at Starcount, a social media analytics company. And from Dublin, Comedian Colm O'Regan looks at the business of being social.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

Energy Dreams2013081720130818 (WS)

What does the future of energy look like? In the Balance asks three experts

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What does the future of energy look like? Finding renewable energy to replace non-renewable resources is high on the agenda of most countries around the world. But do we even know what an ideal energy generating system would look like? Predicting the future is no mean feat, as In the Balance discovers. Jamie Robertson is joined by Dimitri Zenghelis from the London School of Economics; Founder of the Weinberg Foundation which promotes the use of thorium, John Durham, and David Reiner from Cambridge University's Judge Business school to ask the crucial question: what are your energy dreams?

Energy Dreams20130817

What does the future of energy look like? In the Balance asks three experts

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What does the future of energy look like? Finding renewable energy to replace non-renewable resources is high on the agenda of most countries around the world. But do we even know what an ideal energy generating system would look like? Predicting the future is no mean feat, as In the Balance discovers. Jamie Robertson is joined by Dimitri Zenghelis from the London School of Economics; Founder of the Weinberg Foundation which promotes the use of thorium, John Durham, and David Reiner from Cambridge University's Judge Business school to ask the crucial question: what are your energy dreams?

Equal Pay Vs. Free Market Economics: Lessons from Sport and Hollywood2016040920160410 (WS)

A look at the gender pay debate through the public arenas of sport and film

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week In the Balance takes a look at the gender pay debate through the public arenas of sport and film. Off the stage and field, what lessons can be learnt in everyday business? Last month, world tennis number one Novak Djokovic ignited controversy by saying male tennis players should get more money than their female counterparts, is he right if the men’s game brings in more money? Over in tinsel town actresses like Charlize Theron and Jennifer Lawrence are shining a light on gender pay discrepancy – but is it vulgar to talk about money when you are already earning millions of dollars? The BBC’s Ed Butler hears from retired US goalkeeper Briana Scurry - one of the first women to participate in a woman’s paid professional league- Terry Lawler, Executive Director of ‘New York Women in Film & Television’ and labour market economist Andrew Chamberlain.

Image: Actress Jennifer Lawrence, Credit: Getty Images

Equal Pay Vs. Free Market Economics: Lessons From Sport And Hollywood20160410

This week In the Balance takes a look at the gender pay debate through the public arenas of sport and film. Off the stage and field, what lessons can be learnt in everyday business? Last month, world tennis number one Novak Djokovic ignited controversy by saying male tennis players should get more money than their female counterparts, is he right if the men’s game brings in more money? Over in tinsel town actresses like Charlize Theron and Jennifer Lawrence are shining a light on gender pay discrepancy – but is it vulgar to talk about money when you are already earning millions of dollars? The BBC’s Ed Butler hears from retired US goalkeeper Briana Scurry - one of the first women to participate in a woman’s paid professional league- Terry Lawler, Executive Director of ‘New York Women in Film and Television’ and labour market economist Andrew Chamberlain.

Image: Actress Jennifer Lawrence, Credit: Getty Images

A look at the gender pay debate through the public arenas of sport and film

Europe's Rocky Road Ahead2017020420170205 (WS)

Will 2017 be the year that breaks Europe?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Will 2017 be the year that breaks Europe? With geo-political risk at the top of everyone's radar, we focus on one region that's going to be increasingly in the spotlight in the coming months - Europe. It's not just the high-stakes elections due shortly in France, the Netherlands and Germany, there's also the migrant crisis, the potential death of the open border Schengen agreement, and the wide-ranging challenges presented by America's new administration. Could the challenging politics undermine the economics of the European project? In the Balance weighs up the issues with a panel of guests.

Ed Butler talks to Maria Demertzis, Deputy Director at the Bruegel think tank in Brussels and a visiting professor at the University of Amsterdam; Professor Ngaire Woods, Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government and Professor of Global Economic Governance at the University of Oxford, and Ruth Lea, Arbuthnot Banking Group's Economic Adviser.

(Picture: The US and European Union flags fly in Berlin, November 2016. Credit: TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe's Rocky Road Ahead20170204

Will 2017 be the year that breaks Europe?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Will 2017 be the year that breaks Europe? With geo-political risk at the top of everyone's radar, we focus on one region that's going to be increasingly in the spotlight in the coming months - Europe. It's not just the high-stakes elections due shortly in France, the Netherlands and Germany, there's also the migrant crisis, the potential death of the open border Schengen agreement, and the wide-ranging challenges presented by America's new administration. Could the challenging politics undermine the economics of the European project? In the Balance weighs up the issues with a panel of guests.

Ed Butler talks to Maria Demertzis, Deputy Director at the Bruegel think tank in Brussels and a visiting professor at the University of Amsterdam; Professor Ngaire Woods, Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government and Professor of Global Economic Governance at the University of Oxford, and Ruth Lea, Arbuthnot Banking Group's Economic Adviser.

(Picture: The US and European Union flags fly in Berlin, November 2016. Credit: TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Fool's Gold?2016080620160807 (WS)

Why are cities pulling out of the race to host the Olympic Games?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The 2016 Olympic Games have almost bankrupted Rio de Janeiro, and other world cities are pulling out as potential future hosts because of spiralling costs. Does it ever make economic sense to stage what is often dubbed the greatest show on earth?

Angry protests greeted the Olympic torch as it entered Rio, with many residents furious about the cost of an event that they fear will leave them no lasting economic or social legacy.

Boston, Oslo and Hamburg are just some of the cities that have pulled out of hosting future summer or winter Olympics. It has led some to suggest a major downsizing to safeguard the very future of Olympic hosting, at least in western democracies.

But are these fears justified? Ed Butler is joined by Brazilian-born journalist Juliana Barbassa, Allan Brimicombe from the University of East London, economist Andrew Zimbalist from Smith College in Massachusetts, and Simone Perillo from Rome 2024.

(Photo: A protester calling for a boycott of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Credit: Christophe Simon/Getty Images)

Fool's Gold?20160807

Why are cities pulling out of the race to host the Olympic Games?

The 2016 Olympic Games have almost bankrupted Rio de Janeiro, and other world cities are pulling out as potential future hosts because of spiralling costs. Does it ever make economic sense to stage what is often dubbed the greatest show on earth?

Angry protests greeted the Olympic torch as it entered Rio, with many residents furious about the cost of an event that they fear will leave them no lasting economic or social legacy.

Boston, Oslo and Hamburg are just some of the cities that have pulled out of hosting future summer or winter Olympics. It has led some to suggest a major downsizing to safeguard the very future of Olympic hosting, at least in western democracies.

But are these fears justified? Ed Butler is joined by Brazilian-born journalist Juliana Barbassa, Allan Brimicombe from the University of East London, economist Andrew Zimbalist from Smith College in Massachusetts, and Simone Perillo from Rome 2024.

(Photo: A protester calling for a boycott of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Credit: Christophe Simon/Getty Images)

For Better or For Worse: the Greek Crisis2015062720150628 (WS)

How can the sniffles of a small Mediterranean country cause nervousness the world over?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

They used to say - 'the USA sneezes, the world catches a cold'. But could the sniffles of a small Mediterranean country cause economies across the globe to reach for their Kleenex? What does global market reaction to the Greek crisis tell us about our interconnectedness? Now, as never before, we face crises not as individual economies or even economic regions, but as a tightly bound financial community. But is it for the better or for worse?

(Photo: A Syriza supporter with Greek flag in Athens. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

For Better or For Worse: the Greek Crisis20150627

How can the sniffles of a small Mediterranean country cause nervousness the world over?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

They used to say - 'the USA sneezes, the world catches a cold'. But could the sniffles of a small Mediterranean country cause economies across the globe to reach for their Kleenex? What does global market reaction to the Greek crisis tell us about our interconnectedness? Now, as never before, we face crises not as individual economies or even economic regions, but as a tightly bound financial community. But is it for the better or for worse?

(Photo: A Syriza supporter with Greek flag in Athens. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images)

Foreign Takeovers and the National Interest2014050320140504 (WS)

Does economic nationalism have a role to play in foreign mergers and acquisitions?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Should nationalism play a role in foreign takeovers? Politicians say national interests need to be protected as US companies, Pfizer and General Electric, make approaches to the UK's AstraZeneca and France's Alstom respectively.

Presenter Manuela Saragosa discusses the question with Yannick Naud of asset managers Sturgeon Capital; Bob Bischof, vice president of the German-British Chamber of Industry and Commerce; and Pankaj Ghemawat, Professor of Global Strategy at IESE Business School in Barcelona and visiting professor of Global Management, Stern School of Business, New York University.

The discussion also focuses on the role of national identity in the corporate world, which prompts In the Balance's resident management consultant-turned-comedian, Colm O'Regan, to muse about his own sense of self.

Foreign Takeovers and the National Interest20140503

Does economic nationalism have a role to play in foreign mergers and acquisitions?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Should nationalism play a role in foreign takeovers? Politicians say national interests need to be protected as US companies, Pfizer and General Electric, make approaches to the UK's AstraZeneca and France's Alstom respectively.

Presenter Manuela Saragosa discusses the question with Yannick Naud of asset managers Sturgeon Capital; Bob Bischof, vice president of the German-British Chamber of Industry and Commerce; and Pankaj Ghemawat, Professor of Global Strategy at IESE Business School in Barcelona and visiting professor of Global Management, Stern School of Business, New York University.

The discussion also focuses on the role of national identity in the corporate world, which prompts In the Balance's resident management consultant-turned-comedian, Colm O'Regan, to muse about his own sense of self.

Fortunes of Film2015022820150301 (WS)

Are the film industries of Africa and Asia changing how Hollywood does its business?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Worth over 88 billion dollars world-wide, the film industry has never been more potent; but is the success of film in Asia and Africa now changing how Hollywood does its business? We hear from Nollywood, Bollywood and Hollywood; and we hear about the new 'superpower struggle' between the film sectors of China and the USA

Fortunes of Film20150228

Are the film industries of Africa and Asia changing how Hollywood does its business?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Worth over 88 billion dollars world-wide, the film industry has never been more potent; but is the success of film in Asia and Africa now changing how Hollywood does its business? We hear from Nollywood, Bollywood and Hollywood; and we hear about the new 'superpower struggle' between the film sectors of China and the USA

France: Are the good times over?20120421

France is often envied for its lifestyle, but is its social model sustainable?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

France is famous for living la vie en rose - living well. It isn't just the country's great cuisine and enviable climate, France also has a very generous welfare state. Justin Rowlatt and his guests, Yannick Naud who is a portfolio manager at the asset manger Glendevon King, Professor Brigitte Granville of the University of London, and Simon Tilford, chief economist at the Centre for European Reform in London, discuss whether this model is sustainable. It's the first round of the French presidential election this weekend and the biggest issue is ... l'economie, stupide.

Germany in the lead20111217

Justin Rowlatt asks whether Germany wants to dominate Europe's finances.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance, the new discussion programme from the Business Daily team, tackles some provocative questions.

Germany is calling the economic shots in Europe but does what makes sense for one of the world's fifth largest economies really make sense for Greece or Portugal?

And can recessions ever be good for you? Justin Rowlatt and his guests discuss whether they have a useful role in clearing away the inefficient and the obsolete

Germany In The Lead20111219

Justin Rowlatt asks whether Germany wants to dominate Europe's finances.

In the Balance, the new discussion programme from the Business Daily team, tackles some provocative questions.

Germany is calling the economic shots in Europe but does what makes sense for one of the world's fifth largest economies really make sense for Greece or Portugal?

And can recessions ever be good for you? Justin Rowlatt and his guests discuss whether they have a useful role in clearing away the inefficient and the obsolete

Germany in the lead20111219

Justin Rowlatt asks whether Germany wants to dominate Europe's finances.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance, the new discussion programme from the Business Daily team, tackles some provocative questions.

Germany is calling the economic shots in Europe but does what makes sense for one of the world's fifth largest economies really make sense for Greece or Portugal?

And can recessions ever be good for you? Justin Rowlatt and his guests discuss whether they have a useful role in clearing away the inefficient and the obsolete

Germany's Economy: Is the Crown Slipping?2014112220141123 (WS)

Is Germany's determination to balance its budget hurting the Eurozone?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Germany's economy is teetering on the brink of a new recession - we ask what is Berlin's plan to turn things around and will it do anything to help the rest of the Eurozone? Ed Butler speaks to the German Deputy Finance Minister Steffen Kampeter and discusses the issues with Marcel Fratzscher, head of the German Institute for Economic Research; Philippe Legrain, a visiting senior fellow at the London School of Economics' European Institute, and Christian Schulz, senior economist at the German bank, Berenberg.

Germany's Economy: Is the Crown Slipping?20141122

Is Germany's determination to balance its budget hurting the Eurozone?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Germany's economy is teetering on the brink of a new recession - we ask what is Berlin's plan to turn things around and will it do anything to help the rest of the Eurozone? Ed Butler speaks to the German Deputy Finance Minister Steffen Kampeter and discusses the issues with Marcel Fratzscher, head of the German Institute for Economic Research; Philippe Legrain, a visiting senior fellow at the London School of Economics' European Institute, and Christian Schulz, senior economist at the German bank, Berenberg.

Giving it away20120526

Is giving away a fortune, even more fun than making the money in the first place?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week In the Balance goes to the beach.

Lesley Curwen visits the Future in Review conference at Laguna Beach California, to meet some of America's top technology entrepreneurs.

Lesley asks - does business have a responsibility to come up with solutions to climate change?

Or is that the job of governments?

And how to give it all away - is philanthropy, giving away a fortune, even more fun than making the money in the first place?

Jin Zindell, founder and chairman of Blue Planet Network, David Sarna, chief executive of Woodall Tech Inc and Peter Byck, director and producer of the film Carbon Nation discuss the issues.

While Colm O Regan muses over whether he should set up his own In the Balance Foundation.

Giving It Away2012052620120527
20120527 (WS)

This week In the Balance goes to the beach. Lesley Curwen visits the Future in Review conference at Laguna Beach, California, to meet some of America's top technology entrepreneurs. Lesley asks: does business have a responsibility to come up with solutions to climate change? Or is that the job of governments? And how to give it all away - is philanthropy, giving away a fortune, even more fun than making the money in the first place? Jin Zindell, founder and chairman of Blue Planet Network, David Sarna, chief executive of Woodall Tech Inc and Peter Byck, director and producer of the film "Carbon Nation" discuss the issues. While Colm O Regan muses over whether he should set up his own In the Balance Foundation.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Giving It Away20171230

Can huge sums of money donated by the world's richest businesspeople undermine democracy?

Giving It Away

Global philanthropy is on the rise, but can the huge sums donated by wealthy business people risk undermining governments and democracy?
Manuela Saragosa is joined by economist Neva Rockefeller Goodwin, a member of the Rockefeller family that owns one of the world's largest fortunes. Neva is also one of 400 wealthy people in the USA who signed a letter organised by the Responsible Wealth project against tax cuts for the rich. And we hear from British businessman John Caudwell who sold his high street mobile phone company for more than 2 billion dollars. He now spends more time on his philanthropic work, including his charity for children with disabilities, Caudwell Children. Manuela is also joined by Barbara Ridpath, Director of the St Paul's Institute in London and Antonia Mitchell, Director of Aurelia Philanthropy.

Also in the programme: David Callahan, author of The Givers, which questions the power acquired by philanthropists.

(Picture:the 85th Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony, New York November 29 2017. Credit: Getty Images)

Giving It Away20171230

Can huge sums of money donated by the world's richest businesspeople undermine democracy?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Giving It Away

Global philanthropy is on the rise, but can the huge sums donated by wealthy business people risk undermining governments and democracy?
Manuela Saragosa is joined by economist Neva Rockefeller Goodwin, a member of the Rockefeller family that owns one of the world's largest fortunes. Neva is also one of 400 wealthy people in the USA who signed a letter organised by the Responsible Wealth project against tax cuts for the rich. And we hear from British businessman John Caudwell who sold his high street mobile phone company for more than 2 billion dollars. He now spends more time on his philanthropic work, including his charity for children with disabilities, Caudwell Children. Manuela is also joined by Barbara Ridpath, Director of the St Paul's Institute in London and Antonia Mitchell, Director of Aurelia Philanthropy.

Also in the programme: David Callahan, author of The Givers, which questions the power acquired by philanthropists.

(Picture:the 85th Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony, New York November 29 2017. Credit: Getty Images)

Global Healthcare2014052420140525 (WS)

Is there a crisis in global healthcare?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is there a crisis in global healthcare? Spiralling costs, aging populations and in some cases failing treatments have all added to that general feeling. But are there technological solutions? Ed Butler is at the Future in Review conference in California where he discusses this with Dr Leroy Hood who heads up the Institute for Systems Biology, Larry Smarr a computer scientist who is making computer-aided study of his own body, Samir Damani founder of MD Revolution and Bill Hearl Founder of Immunomic Therapeutics Inc.

Global Healthcare20140524

Is there a crisis in global healthcare?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is there a crisis in global healthcare? Spiralling costs, aging populations and in some cases failing treatments have all added to that general feeling. But are there technological solutions? Ed Butler is at the Future in Review conference in California where he discusses this with Dr Leroy Hood who heads up the Institute for Systems Biology, Larry Smarr a computer scientist who is making computer-aided study of his own body, Samir Damani founder of MD Revolution and Bill Hearl Founder of Immunomic Therapeutics Inc.

Globalisation Backlash?2016100820161009 (WS)

Is globalisation now in retreat? Should it or can it be abandoned?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The impact of globalisation has been very much in the spotlight with the wave of populist rhetoric of late. We heard it in Britain with the Brexit referendum to leave the EU, and now with the arguments of US presidential candidate, Donald Trump, who thinks recent trade deals with China, Latin America and beyond have short-changed American workers. Until the global financial crisis of 2009, free trade seemed like an ambition everyone believed in. Today - not so much. Currency manipulation, tariffs and state support - they all mean that one person's free trade is another person's rip off. Is globalisation now in retreat? Should it and can it, be abandoned? And what is globalisation anyway?

The BBC's Ed Butler is joined by Professor Jeffrey Sachs, US economist and UN adviser based at Columbia University, Michael Stumo, Head of the Coalition for a Prosperous America, which opposes many of his country's recent trade deals, and Professor Pankaj Ghemawat, from the New York University Stern School of Business and IESE Business School in Barcelona.

(Photo: Demonstrators pull a Trojan horse as they protest against the transatlantic trade deals CETA and TTIP in Vienna, 2016. Credit: Georg Hochmuth/AFP)

Greece: Light at the end of the Tunnel?2013120720131208 (WS)

There are hopeful signs in Greece, but is the economy really on the mend?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

After two years of draconian austerity measures, the Greek economy is finally showing signs of recovery. The stock market's done well this year and the government is balancing the books. Now the country needs growth, but where's that going to come from? And if you're running a business in Greece, does it actually feel as though the economy's on the mend? Ed Butler and his guests, Simos Anastasopoulos, President of the American Hellenic Chamber of Commerce; Panos Xenokostas, President and CEO of ONEX; and Peter Spiegel, Brussels Bureau Chief of the Financial Times, discuss the extent of Greece's upturn and what's needed to sustain it.

Greece: Light at the end of the Tunnel?20131207

There are hopeful signs in Greece, but is the economy really on the mend?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

After two years of draconian austerity measures, the Greek economy is finally showing signs of recovery. The stock market's done well this year and the government is balancing the books. Now the country needs growth, but where's that going to come from? And if you're running a business in Greece, does it actually feel as though the economy's on the mend? Ed Butler and his guests, Simos Anastasopoulos, President of the American Hellenic Chamber of Commerce; Panos Xenokostas, President and CEO of ONEX; and Peter Spiegel, Brussels Bureau Chief of the Financial Times, discuss the extent of Greece's upturn and what's needed to sustain it.

Green Subsidies2012101320121014 (WS)

How long will taxpayers have to pay out billions to subsidise wind or solar power? Lesley Curwen's guests are Dimitri Zenghelis, from the Grantham Institute of the London School of Economics who also advises Cisco, Professor Claudia Kemfert, Head of the Department of Energy, Transportation and Environment at the German Institute of Economic Research, David Buchan, senior research fellow at the Oxford Energy Institute, and comedian Colm O'Regan.

Plus, we discuss the unlikeliest sought-after commodities - insect excrement and the guar bean.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Green subsidies20121013

How long will taxpayers have to pay out billions to subsidise wind or solar power?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How long will taxpayers have to pay out billions to subsidise wind or solar power? Lesley Curwen's guests are Dimitri Zenghelis, from the Grantham Institute of the London School of Economics who also advises Cisco, Professor Claudia Kemfert, Head of the Department of Energy, Transportation and Environment at the German Institute of Economic Research, David Buchan, senior research fellow at the Oxford Energy Institute, and comedian Colm O'Regan.

Plus, we discuss the unlikeliest sought-after commodities - insect excrement and the guar bean.

Harnessing The Power Of Women2013060120130602 (WS)

Why getting more women into business could improve their human rights.

In the Balance discusses whether getting more women into business will improve their human rights. Justin Rowlatt discusses how encouraging women to be entrepreneurs can give them independence and greater power in developing economies. Justin is joined by guests Cherie Blair, founder of the Cherie Blair Foundation for Women, which is doing work on training entrepreneurs in developing countries; Wu Qing, founder of the Beijing Cultural Development Centre for Rural Women and an activist for women's rights. And Muna AbuSulayman, the first Saudi UN Goodwill Ambassador. Muna was also the first Saudi woman to become a media personality and she is an entrepreneur with her own fashion line.

And Justin learns how to taste coffee - as he slurps a brew produced by women from the International Women’s Coffee Alliance.

Harnessing the Power of Women2013060120130602 (WS)

Why getting more women into business could improve their human rights.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance discusses whether getting more women into business will improve their human rights. Justin Rowlatt discusses how encouraging women to be entrepreneurs can give them independence and greater power in developing economies. Justin is joined at the Said Business School in Oxford by guests Cherie Blair, founder of the Cherie Blair Foundation for Women, which is doing work on training entrepreneurs in developing countries; Wu Qing, founder of the Beijing Cultural Development Centre for Rural Women and an activist for women's rights. And Muna AbuSulayman, the first Saudi UN Goodwill Ambassador. Muna was also the first Saudi woman to become a media personality and she is an entrepreneur with her own fashion line.
And Justin learns how to taste coffee - as he slurps a brew produced by women from the International Women’s Coffee Alliance.

Harnessing the Power of Women20130601

Why getting more women into business could improve their human rights.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance discusses whether getting more women into business will improve their human rights. Justin Rowlatt discusses how encouraging women to be entrepreneurs can give them independence and greater power in developing economies. Justin is joined at the Said Business School in Oxford by guests Cherie Blair, founder of the Cherie Blair Foundation for Women, which is doing work on training entrepreneurs in developing countries; Wu Qing, founder of the Beijing Cultural Development Centre for Rural Women and an activist for women's rights. And Muna AbuSulayman, the first Saudi UN Goodwill Ambassador. Muna was also the first Saudi woman to become a media personality and she is an entrepreneur with her own fashion line.
And Justin learns how to taste coffee - as he slurps a brew produced by women from the International Women’s Coffee Alliance.

Has QE worked?2014110120141102 (WS)

Has quantitative easing worked in the US?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

BBC World Service Economics correspondent Andrew Walker enjoys the wisdom of country and western singing money manager Merle Hazard (also known as Nashville fund manager Jon Shayne) for this week's In the Balance programme. Andrew discusses whether QE has worked in the USA with guests Bridget Rosewell from the economic consultancy Volterra; Richard Dobbs, a director of the McKinsey Global Institute and in the US, Professor Jeffrey Frankel of Harvard University. And Professor John Kay talks about the perils of short-termism.

Has QE worked?20141101

Has quantitative easing worked in the US?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

BBC World Service Economics correspondent Andrew Walker enjoys the wisdom of country and western singing money manager Merle Hazard (also known as Nashville fund manager Jon Shayne) for this week's In the Balance programme. Andrew discusses whether QE has worked in the USA with guests Bridget Rosewell from the economic consultancy Volterra; Richard Dobbs, a director of the McKinsey Global Institute and in the US, Professor Jeffrey Frankel of Harvard University. And Professor John Kay talks about the perils of short-termism.

Hierarchy At Work2014041920140420 (WS)

Who's in charge in the modern workplace?

In the Balance examines office hierarchy. If some of the latest buzz about the 21st Century workplace is to be believed, old-style vertical management structure is dead. Or is it? Are such rumours greatly exaggerated?

An anthropologist, a business school professor and a so-called envisioner from Microsoft, battle it out to discover the truth. Ed Butler is joined by Dave Coplin, chief envisioning officer for Microsoft UK; Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at London Business School and Kathleen Richardson, research associate at the department of anthropology at University College London.

And Colm O'Regan considers how the place where you work is important.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

Hierarchy at Work2014041920140420 (WS)

Who's in charge in the modern workplace?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance examines office hierarchy. If some of the latest buzz about the 21st Century workplace is to be believed, old-style vertical management structure is dead. Or is it? Are such rumours greatly exaggerated?

An anthropologist, a business school professor and a so-called envisioner from Microsoft, battle it out to discover the truth. Ed Butler is joined by Dave Coplin, chief envisioning officer for Microsoft UK; Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at London Business School and Kathleen Richardson, research associate at the department of anthropology at University College London.

And Colm O'Regan considers how the place where you work is important.

Hierarchy at Work20140419

Who's in charge in the modern workplace?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance examines office hierarchy. If some of the latest buzz about the 21st Century workplace is to be believed, old-style vertical management structure is dead. Or is it? Are such rumours greatly exaggerated?

An anthropologist, a business school professor and a so-called envisioner from Microsoft, battle it out to discover the truth. Ed Butler is joined by Dave Coplin, chief envisioning officer for Microsoft UK; Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at London Business School and Kathleen Richardson, research associate at the department of anthropology at University College London.

And Colm O'Regan considers how the place where you work is important.

Holding Companies to Account20120721

How can big companies be held to account by parliaments?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How can big companies be held to account by parliaments? Is it right for politicians to grill CEOS about the failings of their companies, or is it just public humiliation which stirs up anti-business sentiment, and doesn't actually change behaviour?

Plus our resident comedian Colm O'Regan brings us the truth about business books. Can self-improvement guides help the culture of banking and big corporations?

Lesley Curwen's guests this week are Maurice Pratt, former chairman of RBS bank in Ireland and former boss of Tesco Ireland, and now head of a pro-Europe body; Bundeep Singh Rangar, Chairman of IndusView which advises multi-nationals on business opportunities in India and Roger Steare, Visiting Professor of Organisational Ethics, and Corporate Philosopher in Residence at the Cass Business School in London.

Holding Companies To Account2012072120120722
20120722 (WS)

How can big companies be held to account by parliaments?

How can big companies be held to account by parliaments? Is it right for politicians to grill CEOS about the failings of their companies, or is it just public humiliation which stirs up anti-business sentiment, and doesn't actually change behaviour?

Plus our resident comedian Colm O'Regan brings us the truth about business books. Can self-improvement guides help the culture of banking and big corporations?

Lesley Curwen's guests this week are Maurice Pratt, former chairman of RBS bank in Ireland and former boss of Tesco Ireland, and now head of a pro-Europe body; Bundeep Singh Rangar, Chairman of IndusView which advises multi-nationals on business opportunities in India and Roger Steare, Visiting Professor of Organisational Ethics, and Corporate Philosopher in Residence at the Cass Business School in London.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Hong Kong: China's Bridge to the Global Economy?2014100420141005 (WS)

Does Beijing still need Hong Kong as its gateway to the wider global economy?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Many regard Hong Kong as China's bridge to the wider global economy, but is that still the case now that Hong Kong's economy is dwarfed by that of its giant neighbour? Economically and financially, how much does Hong Kong still matter to China these days? Joining the discussion are Hong Kong-based independent economist Andy Xie, Jonathan Fenby, director of the China team at consultants Trusted Sources, Dr. Enze Han, senior lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies, and Joyce Man, a writer and blogger from Hong Kong.

Plus, our resident columnist Colm O'Regan wonders if there is ever a right economic time to leave your home country.

Hong Kong: China's Bridge to the Global Economy?20141004

Does Beijing still need Hong Kong as its gateway to the wider global economy?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Many regard Hong Kong as China's bridge to the wider global economy, but is that still the case now that Hong Kong's economy is dwarfed by that of its giant neighbour? Economically and financially, how much does Hong Kong still matter to China these days? Joining the discussion are Hong Kong-based independent economist Andy Xie, Jonathan Fenby, director of the China team at consultants Trusted Sources, Dr. Enze Han, senior lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies, and Joyce Man, a writer and blogger from Hong Kong.

Plus, our resident columnist Colm O'Regan wonders if there is ever a right economic time to leave your home country.

Hong Kong: China's Bridge To The Global Economy?2014100420141005 (WS)

Many regard Hong Kong as China's bridge to the wider global economy, but is that still the case now that Hong Kong's economy is dwarfed by that of its giant neighbour? Economically and financially, how much does Hong Kong still matter to China these days? Joining the discussion are Hong Kong-based independent economist Andy Xie, Jonathan Fenby, director of the China team at consultants Trusted Sources, Dr. Enze Han, senior lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies, and Joyce Man, a writer and blogger from Hong Kong.

Plus, our resident columnist Colm O'Regan wonders if there is ever a right economic time to leave your home country.

Does Beijing still need Hong Kong as its gateway to the wider global economy?

Hong Kong: In China's Shadow?20170701

Is the island still the gateway to Beijing, or is it becoming a second-tier Chinese city?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Can Hong Kong still call itself the gateway to China, or is it in danger of being dwarfed economically by its mainland neighbour?

On the twentieth anniversary of the British handover of power to Beijing, we hear about the mainland Chinese money buying up Hong Kong businesses, properties and land, and discuss the impact it's having on the territory’s economy and society.

As property prices rocket and people are left struggling to afford smaller and smaller flats, what future is there for Hong Kong’s young people?

Have decades of financial might made Hong Kong complacent, and where will future economic growth come from?

Contributors

Allan Zeman, chairman of Lan Kwai Fong Group
Elaine Tsung, co-founder of The Garage Society and Eaton House
Andrew Shuen, from The Lion Rock Institute
John Greenwood, chief economist at Invesco

(Picture: A traditional junk boat sailing across Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong. Credit: Getty Images)

How does China move forward?20121110

Can China continue its world beating growth under new leadership?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The two most powerful nations on the planet are choosing their leaders. This week America re-elected President Obama, next week China will appoint its new steward. So can China continue its world beating growth and will America help or hamper its efforts to rebalance its economy? With the help of In the Balance's resident comedian, Colm O'Regan, we'll also be reflecting on the nature of leadership itself. What makes a great leader and how much influence do leaders, even of powerful nations, really have? Justin Rowlatt's guests are Professor Ann Lee,the author of "What the US can learn from China"; Ian Bremmer political risk analyst and president of Eurasia Group and Professor Kent Deng, reader in Economic History at the London School of Economics.

How does China move forward?20121111

Can China continue its world beating growth under new leadership?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The two most powerful nations on the planet are choosing their leaders. This week America re-elected President Obama, next week China will appoint its new steward. So can China continue its world beating growth and will America help or hamper its efforts to rebalance its economy? With the help of In the Balance's resident comedian, Colm O'Regan, we'll also be reflecting on the nature of leadership itself. What makes a great leader and how much influence do leaders, even of powerful nations, really have? Justin Rowlatt's guests are Professor Ann Lee,the author of "What the US can learn from China"; Ian Bremmer political risk analyst and president of Eurasia Group and Professor Kent Deng, reader in Economic History at the London School of Economics.

How Low Can Rates Go?2016073020160731 (WS)

Turning the laws of economics upside down in the search for growth.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Are central banks running out of options to boost sluggish economic growth?

Five of them have introduced negative rates, violating one of the most fundamental norms in business and economics. And other ideas, once thought utterly shocking, are now being openly considered.

Martin Wolf, chief economic commentator at the Financial Times newspaper, talks with economists and central bankers, past and present, to examine how such policies might affect the way people spend and save in the future.

In an interview conducted in June he discusses “helicopter money” with Bank of Japan governor Haruhiko Kuroda, and asks former Bank of England governor Mervyn King why many economies are still struggling eight years on from the global financial crisis

Plus, how much more tinkering can we expect from these experts and how much further might interest rates fall?

(Photo: Coins being dropped into a jar. Credit: Thinkstock)

How Low Can Rates Go?20160731

Turning the laws of economics upside down in the search for growth.

Are central banks running out of options to boost sluggish economic growth?

Five of them have introduced negative rates, violating one of the most fundamental norms in business and economics. And other ideas, once thought utterly shocking, are now being openly considered.

Martin Wolf, chief economic commentator at the Financial Times newspaper, talks with economists and central bankers, past and present, to examine how such policies might affect the way people spend and save in the future.

In an interview conducted in June he discusses “helicopter money? with Bank of Japan governor Haruhiko Kuroda, and asks former Bank of England governor Mervyn King why many economies are still struggling eight years on from the global financial crisis

Plus, how much more tinkering can we expect from these experts and how much further might interest rates fall?

(Photo: Coins being dropped into a jar. Credit: Thinkstock)

How to Avoid a Bribe20180811

Doing business in parts of the world where corruption is part of everyday life

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Bribery costs individuals, businesses and economies billions of dollars each year, and there are many international laws and conventions against it. But what happens when your firm operates in a part of the world where it's still the norm?

In this episode we speak to three business people with first-hand experience of backhanders and ask how they can be avoided. One of them tells us he pays bribes as a matter of course, but if you're not willing to, does that mean you simply can't do business?

Contributors: Gary Busch, managing director of political risk analysts Chunguza Associates and also Transport Logistics; Ron Cruse, founder and CEO of freight firm Logenix International and author of 'Lies, Bribes & Peril: Lessons for the Real Challenges of International Business'; and Alexandra Wrage, founder and CEO of anti-bribery consultancy TRACE International.

Presenter: Ed Butler
Producer: Simon Tulett

(Picture: Men passing banknotes under a table. Credit: Getty Images)

How To Avoid A Bribe20180811

Doing business in parts of the world where corruption is part of everyday life

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Bribery costs individuals, businesses and economies billions of dollars each year, and there are many international laws and conventions against it. But what happens when your firm operates in a part of the world where it's still the norm?

In this episode we speak to three business people with first-hand experience of backhanders and ask how they can be avoided. One of them tells us he pays bribes as a matter of course, but if you're not willing to, does that mean you simply can't do business?

Contributors: Gary Busch, managing director of political risk analysts Chunguza Associates and also Transport Logistics; Ron Cruse, founder and CEO of freight firm Logenix International and author of 'Lies, Bribes and Peril: Lessons for the Real Challenges of International Business'; and Alexandra Wrage, founder and CEO of anti-bribery consultancy TRACE International.

Presenter: Ed Butler
Producer: Simon Tulett

(Picture: Men passing banknotes under a table. Credit: Getty Images)

IMF: Fit for the Future?2015072520150726 (WS)

Can the IMF meet the needs of the global economy, silencing the critics who say it can't?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Set up in the 1940s to ensure the world never again faced catastrophic economic recession, the International Monetary Fund has become a controversial presence in the management of the global economy. It is powerful, it is bossy and it is largely controlled by the USA and Europe. One of the IMF's top officials David Lipton, comes on to the show to answer the critics and to outline his vision for the IMF's future. He is joined by former IMF economist Professor Kenneth Rogoff and others who argue it's time for the IMF to reform to meet the needs of the 21st Century. PHOTO: A participant of the left-wing activists and members of the Greek community of Hungary holds a slogan to protest against the political and financial situation of Greece (CREDIT: Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images)

IMF: Fit for the Future?20150725

Can the IMF meet the needs of the global economy, silencing the critics who say it can't?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Set up in the 1940s to ensure the world never again faced catastrophic economic recession, the International Monetary Fund has become a controversial presence in the management of the global economy. It is powerful, it is bossy and it is largely controlled by the USA and Europe. One of the IMF's top officials David Lipton, comes on to the show to answer the critics and to outline his vision for the IMF's future. He is joined by former IMF economist Professor Kenneth Rogoff and others who argue it's time for the IMF to reform to meet the needs of the 21st Century. PHOTO: A participant of the left-wing activists and members of the Greek community of Hungary holds a slogan to protest against the political and financial situation of Greece (CREDIT: Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images)

In The Balance20170624

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Has the shock decision to scrap almost all of India's cash been a success or a failure? Last November's withdrawal of 500 and 1,000 rupee notes caused chaos for millions of people and businesses, but now the dust has settled, is there any evidence it was effective in tackling corruption and curbing the black economy?

Have those hardest hit by the demonetisation now managed to recover? What impact, if any, has the move had on India's economy? And in a society where cash is king, are there any signs people have been pushed towards using bank cards or mobile payments?

Contributors

Jayati Ghosh, professor of economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, in New Delhi
Economist Lord Meghnad Desai
Gaurav Daga, owner of Oswal Cable Products in New Delhi
Piritta Sorsa, head of economics research on India at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

(Picture: A man holds old Indian notes at a protest against demonetisation in Bangalore. Credit: Kiran Manjunath, Getty Images)

In The Balance20170701

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Can Hong Kong still call itself the gateway to China, or is it in danger of being dwarfed economically by its mainland neighbour?

On the twentieth anniversary of the British handover of power to Beijing, we hear about the mainland Chinese money buying up Hong Kong businesses, properties and land, and discuss the impact it's having on the territory’s economy and society.

As property prices rocket and people are left struggling to afford smaller and smaller flats, what future is there for Hong Kong’s young people?

Have decades of financial might made Hong Kong complacent, and where will future economic growth come from?

Contributors

Allan Zeman, chairman of Lan Kwai Fong Group
Elaine Tsung, co-founder of The Garage Society and Eaton House
Andrew Shuen, from The Lion Rock Institute
John Greenwood, chief economist at Invesco

(Picture: A traditional junk boat sailing across Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong. Credit: Getty Images)

In the Balance: 2011 - Reaping the Whirlwind20111224

Are we as perilously placed now as we were in the darkest days of 2008?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Are we as perilously placed now as we were in the darkest days of 2008?

Lesley Curwen asks a former British finance minister, Alistair Darling, a former central banker and head of Britain's CBI, Richard Lambert, and a former US presidential adviser, Pippa Malmgren.

All of them were there at the eye of the 2008 storm, and none can find much end-of-year cheer this time around.

However their gloomy forecasts are perhaps to be taken with a pinch of salt, as our resident management consultant-turned-comedian, Colm O'Regan observes, most pundits have a habit of getting it horribly wrong.

How do you think we got into this financial mess in the first place?

In The Balance: 2011 - Reaping The Whirlwind20111226

Are we as perilously placed now as we were in the darkest days of 2008?

Lesley Curwen asks a former British finance minister, Alistair Darling, a former central banker and head of Britain's CBI, Richard Lambert, and a former US presidential adviser, Pippa Malmgren.

All of them were there at the eye of the 2008 storm, and none can find much end-of-year cheer this time around.

However their gloomy forecasts are perhaps to be taken with a pinch of salt, as our resident management consultant-turned-comedian, Colm O'Regan observes, most pundits have a habit of getting it horribly wrong.

How do you think we got into this financial mess in the first place?

In the Balance: 2011 - Reaping the Whirlwind20111226

Are we as perilously placed now as we were in the darkest days of 2008?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Are we as perilously placed now as we were in the darkest days of 2008?

Lesley Curwen asks a former British finance minister, Alistair Darling, a former central banker and head of Britain's CBI, Richard Lambert, and a former US presidential adviser, Pippa Malmgren.

All of them were there at the eye of the 2008 storm, and none can find much end-of-year cheer this time around.

However their gloomy forecasts are perhaps to be taken with a pinch of salt, as our resident management consultant-turned-comedian, Colm O'Regan observes, most pundits have a habit of getting it horribly wrong.

How do you think we got into this financial mess in the first place?

In the Balance: A Marshall Plan for Greece?20120225

Is it time for a rescue strategy for Greece along the lines of the post-war Marshall plan?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

After the latest Greek bail-out, is it now time to offer help in the form of a Marshall Plan for Greece?

Join Stephen Evans in Berlin and guests: Richard Parker from Harvard, a former advisor to the Greek prime minister; Peter Bofinger, a member of the German Council of Economic Experts; Irwin Collier of the Free University in Berlin and Christos Katsioulis of the think tank the Friedrich Ebert Foundation.

They're joined by resident comedian and ex management consultant Colm O'Regan in Dublin.

He muses on national stereotypes - over a glass of Guinness of course.

In the Balance: A Marshall Plan for Greece?20120227

Is it time for a rescue strategy for Greece along the lines of the post-war Marshall plan?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

After the latest Greek bail-out, is it now time to offer help in the form of a Marshall Plan for Greece?

Join Stephen Evans in Berlin and guests: Richard Parker from Harvard, a former advisor to the Greek prime minister; Peter Bofinger, a member of the German Council of Economic Experts; Irwin Collier of the Free University in Berlin and Christos Katsioulis of the think tank the Friedrich Ebert Foundation.

They're joined by resident comedian and ex management consultant Colm O'Regan in Dublin.

He muses on national stereotypes - over a glass of Guinness of course.

In the Balance: Executive pay20120114

Justin Rowlatt and guests tackle the thorny issue of executive pay.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance, brought to you by the Business Daily team, tackles a thorny issue: executive pay.

When a sports star is paid a fortune to change teams or a pop star racks up record sales of their new music, the money they earn is usually talked about approvingly as a measure of success.

When the CEO of a big successful business is paid a record salary the opposite is usually true - the talk is all about excessive earnings and corporate greed. Is that fair?

Justin Rowlatt discusses the issue with the fund manager Nicola Horlick, the Chief Excutive of the accounting firm, RSM , International, Jean Stephens and Dr Catherine Cowley, a former wealth manager who became a nun and now specialises in the ethics of finance.

And should we forgive countries their debts?

Plus who's up and who's down in the world of business and politics this week.

In The Balance: Executive Pay20120116

In the Balance, brought to you by the Business Daily team, tackles a thorny issue: executive pay. When a sports star is paid a fortune to change teams or a pop star racks up record sales of their new music, the money they earn is usually talked about approvingly as a measure of success. When the CEO of a big successful business is paid a record salary the opposite is usually true - the talk is all about excessive earnings and corporate greed. Is that fair? Justin Rowlatt discusses the issue with the fund manager Nicola Horlick, the Chief Excutive of the accounting firm, RSM , International, Jean Stephens and Dr Catherine Cowley, a former wealth manager who became a nun and now specialises in the ethics of finance.

And should we forgive countries their debts?

Plus who's up and who's down in the world of business and politics this week.

Justin Rowlatt and guests tackle the thorny issue of executive pay.

In the Balance: Executive pay20120116

Justin Rowlatt and guests tackle the thorny issue of executive pay.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance, brought to you by the Business Daily team, tackles a thorny issue: executive pay.

When a sports star is paid a fortune to change teams or a pop star racks up record sales of their new music, the money they earn is usually talked about approvingly as a measure of success.

When the CEO of a big successful business is paid a record salary the opposite is usually true - the talk is all about excessive earnings and corporate greed. Is that fair?

Justin Rowlatt discusses the issue with the fund manager Nicola Horlick, the Chief Excutive of the accounting firm, RSM , International, Jean Stephens and Dr Catherine Cowley, a former wealth manager who became a nun and now specialises in the ethics of finance.

And should we forgive countries their debts?

Plus who's up and who's down in the world of business and politics this week.

In the Balance: Risky business2013040620130407 (WS)

How do companies assess the risks of doing business in countries where tension is high?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week we look at the risky business of risk. We are all notoriously bad at assessing risk. Why do so many of us get scared flying in a plane when we know it's statistically far more likely we'll end up under the wheels of a truck on the way to the shops? For businesses there are certain parts of the world that are more risky than others - and now given the fact that the North Koreans are ratcheting up the political tension - will companies continue to invest in South Korea? Assess the risks with Jamie Robertson and guests: Ian Bremmer, the president and founder of Eurasia Group, the leading global political risk research company; David Horgan, CEO of Petrel Resources, an oil and gas exploration company working in Iraq, West Africa and off the coast of Ireland and Paddy Docherty, chief executive of Phoenix Africa, which is setting up an agriculture business in Sierra Leone and specialises in investments in post-conflict areas. He is also now a member of the Global Agenda Council on Fragile States at the World Economic Forum.

In the Balance: Risky business20130406

How do companies assess the risks of doing business in countries where tension is high?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

This week we look at the risky business of risk. We are all notoriously bad at assessing risk. Why do so many of us get scared flying in a plane when we know it's statistically far more likely we'll end up under the wheels of a truck on the way to the shops? For businesses there are certain parts of the world that are more risky than others - and now given the fact that the North Koreans are ratcheting up the political tension - will companies continue to invest in South Korea? Assess the risks with Jamie Robertson and guests: Ian Bremmer, the president and founder of Eurasia Group, the leading global political risk research company; David Horgan, CEO of Petrel Resources, an oil and gas exploration company working in Iraq, West Africa and off the coast of Ireland and Paddy Docherty, chief executive of Phoenix Africa, which is setting up an agriculture business in Sierra Leone and specialises in investments in post-conflict areas. He is also now a member of the Global Agenda Council on Fragile States at the World Economic Forum.

In the Balance: The Good Leader2013031620130317 (WS)

How important is charismatic leadership at the top of a company?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The Catholic church has a new leader, Pope Francis. China has President Xi Jinping and in Kenya Uhuru Kenyatta won the Presidential election. But what makes a good leader? And how important is leadership style to an organisation's performance?

Manuela Saragosa and guests Anders Dahlvig - the former president of IKEA; CEO confidant Steve Tappin and Harvard Business School Professor Rakesh Khurana discuss the issues.

In the Balance: The Good Leader20130316

How important is charismatic leadership at the top of a company?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The Catholic church has a new leader, Pope Francis. China has President Xi Jinping and in Kenya Uhuru Kenyatta won the Presidential election. But what makes a good leader? And how important is leadership style to an organisation's performance?

Manuela Saragosa and guests Anders Dahlvig - the former president of IKEA; CEO confidant Steve Tappin and Harvard Business School Professor Rakesh Khurana discuss the issues.

In the Balance: When to go bust20120218

How do you know when it's time to go bust?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How do you know when it's time to go bust? In The Balance this week looks this very question. Can you choose a time? Can it be managed?

Joining Steve Evans are people who know a thing or two about economic fireworks. Dr Domingo Carvallo, was the former Economics Minister in Argentina at the time when the country went bust. He's now teaching at Yale in the United States. And Artur Fischer, the joint Chairman of the Berlin Stock Exchange who has, in his time, also rescued a few companies from going broke. Plus Paola Subacchi who is a heavy-weight thinker with Chatham House, the international think tank, in London.

Also how can you try and convince a sceptical public or workforce that they need to take a pay cut, do a new job, or use a different currency? Our panel discuss some of the metaphors used by politicians in relation to this crisis. Plus our regular management consultant turned comedian Colm O'Regan observes that leaders have ways of telling the rest of us that something bad may be visited upon us soon.

In the Balance: When to go bust20120220

How do you know when it's time to go bust?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How do you know when it's time to go bust? In The Balance this week looks this very question. Can you choose a time? Can it be managed?

Joining Steve Evans are people who know a thing or two about economic fireworks. Dr Domingo Carvallo, was the former Economics Minister in Argentina at the time when the country went bust. He's now teaching at Yale in the United States. And Artur Fischer, the joint Chairman of the Berlin Stock Exchange who has, in his time, also rescued a few companies from going broke. Plus Paola Subacchi who is a heavy-weight thinker with Chatham House, the international think tank, in London.

Also how can you try and convince a sceptical public or workforce that they need to take a pay cut, do a new job, or use a different currency? Our panel discuss some of the metaphors used by politicians in relation to this crisis. Plus our regular management consultant turned comedian Colm O'Regan observes that leaders have ways of telling the rest of us that something bad may be visited upon us soon.

India and Jobs for the Young2014041220140413 (WS)

How India can find 100 million jobs over the next decade

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

India needs to create about 100 million new jobs over the next decade to meet the needs of its vast and growing population. As the largest democracy in the world goes to the polls this week In the Balance focuses on the future of work for young people who currently make up about 65% of the population.

Ed Butler in Delhi discusses their economic needs and aspirations with eminent development economist Jayati Ghosh, business journalist Mihir S Sharma and Vikas Gupta of the Indian tech company, Tech Mahindra. What can the politicians do to bring work to India's young? How can the education and skills of rural youth be improved and which sectors of the economy can provide them with the most jobs?

India and Jobs for the Young20140412

How India can find 100 million jobs over the next decade

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

India needs to create about 100 million new jobs over the next decade to meet the needs of its vast and growing population. As the largest democracy in the world goes to the polls this week In the Balance focuses on the future of work for young people who currently make up about 65% of the population.

Ed Butler in Delhi discusses their economic needs and aspirations with eminent development economist Jayati Ghosh, business journalist Mihir S Sharma and Vikas Gupta of the Indian tech company, Tech Mahindra. What can the politicians do to bring work to India's young? How can the education and skills of rural youth be improved and which sectors of the economy can provide them with the most jobs?

India's Cash Gamble: Has it Paid Off?20170624

Has the shock withdrawal of almost all the country's cash defeated the black economy?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Has the shock decision to scrap almost all of India's cash been a success or a failure? Last November's withdrawal of 500 and 1,000 rupee notes caused chaos for millions of people and businesses, but now the dust has settled, is there any evidence it was effective in tackling corruption and curbing the black economy?

Have those hardest hit by the demonetisation now managed to recover? What impact, if any, has the move had on India's economy? And in a society where cash is king, are there any signs people have been pushed towards using bank cards or mobile payments?

Contributors

Jayati Ghosh, professor of economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, in New Delhi
Economist Lord Meghnad Desai
Gaurav Daga, owner of Oswal Cable Products in New Delhi
Piritta Sorsa, head of economics research on India at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

(Picture: A man holds old Indian notes at a protest against demonetisation in Bangalore. Credit: Kiran Manjunath, Getty Images)

India's Farming Crisis20180505

How can India's farmers make more money out of their land?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Hundreds of millions of people work on India's millions of small farms, but life on them seems to be becoming increasingly economically challenging. More than sixty thousand Indian farmers have committed suicide over the last 3 decades. Climate change and shifting crop valuations have led to growing levels of debt and hardship. The government is making concessions to prop up farmers' incomes. But In the Balance asks whether there are too many people in India trying to make a living off the land? Ed Butler is joined by three expert guests from Delhi and Mumbai to work out how India can finance its huge agricultural sector.

(Picture: Indian farmers take part in a protest in New Delhi, 2017. Photo credit: SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Inflation: friend or foe?2013020220130203 (WS)

Is inflation still public enemy number one, or a useful economic tool for central bankers?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is inflation still public enemy number one? For most of us it simply means price rises, but is there a positive side to this one-time economic bogeyman? Plus with the help of our resident comedian,Colm O'Regan, we go in search of economic nirvana. Is there's such a thing as a perfect economy, or is it just the stuff of fairytales? Manuela Saragosa's guests are Mohamed El Erian, CEO of the global investment company PIMCO; Jeffrey Frankel, Harvard professor in International Finance and Macroeconomics and previously a member of President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers; and Brigitte Granville, Professor of International Economics and Economic Policy at Queen Mary, University of London.

(Image: A hand counts small piles of coins, Credit: Getty Images)

Inflation: friend or foe?20130202

Is inflation still public enemy number one, or a useful economic tool for central bankers?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is inflation still public enemy number one? For most of us it simply means price rises, but is there a positive side to this one-time economic bogeyman? Plus with the help of our resident comedian,Colm O'Regan, we go in search of economic nirvana. Is there's such a thing as a perfect economy, or is it just the stuff of fairytales? Manuela Saragosa's guests are Mohamed El Erian, CEO of the global investment company PIMCO; Jeffrey Frankel, Harvard professor in International Finance and Macroeconomics and previously a member of President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers; and Brigitte Granville, Professor of International Economics and Economic Policy at Queen Mary, University of London.

(Image: A hand counts small piles of coins, Credit: Getty Images)

Infobesity2014060720140608 (WS)

Is technology surrounding us with more information than we can possibly use?

Is technology surrounding us with more information than we can possibly use? And does all that data make us more productive, or less?

In the week that software giant Apple unveiled its icloud drive - yet another internet-based way for us to manage and store all the data in our lives - we're going to try and put a filter on the global onslaught of information

Is the technology we've invented starting to exceed our capacity to use it? We're asking today whether the sheer volume of information constantly at our fingertips is actually overwhelming us, creating what one of our guests in today's programme calls INFOBESITY, an unhealthy excess of information.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

Infobesity2014060720140608 (WS)

Is technology surrounding us with more information than we can possibly use?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is technology surrounding us with more information than we can possibly use? And does all that data make us more productive, or less?

In the week that software giant Apple unveiled its icloud drive - yet another internet-based way for us to manage and store all the data in our lives - we're going to try and put a filter on the global onslaught of information

Is the technology we've invented starting to exceed our capacity to use it? We're asking today whether the sheer volume of information constantly at our fingertips is actually overwhelming us, creating what one of our guests in today's programme calls INFOBESITY, an unhealthy excess of information.

Infobesity20140607

Is technology surrounding us with more information than we can possibly use?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Is technology surrounding us with more information than we can possibly use? And does all that data make us more productive, or less?

In the week that software giant Apple unveiled its icloud drive - yet another internet-based way for us to manage and store all the data in our lives - we're going to try and put a filter on the global onslaught of information

Is the technology we've invented starting to exceed our capacity to use it? We're asking today whether the sheer volume of information constantly at our fingertips is actually overwhelming us, creating what one of our guests in today's programme calls INFOBESITY, an unhealthy excess of information.

Innovation2013010520130106 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Innovation2013010520130106 (WS)

Innovation \u2013 at the heart of an economy or an optional extra?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Innovation – at the heart of an economy or an optional extra?

In the Balance this week asks whether the global slowdown is the result of the financial crash or a lack of innovation. What conditions are most conducive to encourage it, and what are the impediments? David Williams, CEO of Avanti PLC, a satellite company, Daudi Were from Ushahidi, a new African technology company and Kenneth Cuckier, Data Editor for The Economist magazine will explore this with Justin Rowlatt. Plus, where do ground-breaking ideas actually spring from?

Are they the result of hard work or a flash of brilliance when you are in the bath?

Photo: Getty Images

Innovation20130105

Innovation \u2013 at the heart of an economy or an optional extra?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Innovation – at the heart of an economy or an optional extra?

In the Balance this week asks whether the global slowdown is the result of the financial crash or a lack of innovation. What conditions are most conducive to encourage it, and what are the impediments? David Williams, CEO of Avanti PLC, a satellite company, Daudi Were from Ushahidi, a new African technology company and Kenneth Cuckier, Data Editor for The Economist magazine will explore this with Justin Rowlatt. Plus, where do ground-breaking ideas actually spring from?

Are they the result of hard work or a flash of brilliance when you are in the bath?

Photo: Getty Images

Innovators - Female Entrepreneurs20171028

Why are more women not in the workplace in South Asia?

Could starting up a business be the best way into work for more women across South Asia? Shivaani Kohok asks why only one in four women in India have paid jobs and what's holding them back from entering the workplace. She's joined by three women working with entrepreneurs across South Asia.

(Picture: A mother and baby treated by the Sehat Kahani healthtech business)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Innovators - Female Entrepreneurs20171028

Why are more women not in the workplace in South Asia?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Could starting up a business be the best way into work for more women across South Asia? Shivaani Kohok asks why only one in four women in India have paid jobs and what's holding them back from entering the workplace. She's joined by three women working with entrepreneurs across South Asia.

(Picture: A mother and baby treated by the Sehat Kahani healthtech business)

Innovators - The Secrets of Jugaad20171021

New ideas to improve health, education and business in areas where life is tough

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Are there clever solutions to real life challenges across South Asia? In partnership with the BBC Innovators series, Shivaani Kohok hears from some of the people in India who are coming up with new ideas to improve health, education and business in areas where life is tough. Shivaani and guests discuss how "jugaad" can help. It is a Hindi term that translates as "frugal innovation" - how to make the most of limited resources. But does jugaad have the potential to change lives?

(Photo: A crowd of Indian residents gather outside the Fair Price Shop in the northern district of Jahangirpuri, New Delhi. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Is inequality good for us?20120630

The gap between rich and poor is growing around the world. But should we worry?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The chasm between rich and poor is growing around the world. But should that worry us?

Maybe inequality is actually a good thing, a prerequisite for a productive economy.

To find out, In the Balance has lined up a stellar cast. A Nobel prize-winning critic of the free market: Professor Joseph Stiglitz. A multi-millionaire friend and former colleague of the Republican presidential candidate Edward Conard. And the Rector of Exeter College, Oxford Frances Cairncross.

Plus, are decisions at meetings taken for good logical reasons - or just because the person sitting next to you has a really annoying habit?

Is Inherited Wealth a Curse?20170909

Should inherited wealth be banned?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does passing down large amounts of money within families drive the gap between rich and poor even wider? It seems that some of the world's richest people, like Bill Gates, recognised this and have pledged to give away most, if not all, of their wealth to good causes rather than their children. Is inherited wealth a curse, both on a personal and macro-economic level? Should we tax it much more heavily, or even ban inheritance altogether? Manuela Saragosa is joined by a global panel of guests to unpick the issues on intergenerational fairness.

Contributors: Barbara Blouin, founder of The Inheritance Project, Karen Rowlingson Professor of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham, Edward Wolff, Professor of Economics at New York University and Jørgen Næsje, State Secretary in Norway's Finance Ministry.

(Picture: College Republicans Rally For Repeal Of Estate Tax. Washington DC June 2006. Credit: Getty Imgages)

Is Italy Failing Its Youth?20180210

Can politicians provide jobs for Italy's young unemployed?

Italy's upcoming general election is being seen as the latest test of a populist upsurge in Europe. Manuela Saragosa is in Rome to hear what young people want from the election and the economy. Italy has one of the highest youth unemployment rates in Europe and many young people leave the country to find work. So do politicians have any answers for young people searching for their first jobs? Manuela hears from students, an employer, and a grass-roots politician about what's at stake for the economy.

Contributors: Andrea Prencipe, Deputy Rector of LUISS Guido Carli University in Rome
Stefano Callegari, CEO at Trapizzino
Maurizio Coppola, Power to the People
Students at Sapienza University, Rome

(Picture: A man walks past a board bearing the parties' logos registered at the Italian Interior Ministry on January 20, 2018 for the general elections to be held on March 4, 2018. (Credit:FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Italy Failing its Youth?20180210

Can politicians provide jobs for Italy's young unemployed?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Italy's upcoming general election is being seen as the latest test of a populist upsurge in Europe. Manuela Saragosa is in Rome to hear what young people want from the election and the economy. Italy has one of the highest youth unemployment rates in Europe and many young people leave the country to find work. So do politicians have any answers for young people searching for their first jobs? Manuela hears from students, an employer, and a grass-roots politician about what's at stake for the economy.

Contributors: Andrea Prencipe, Deputy Rector of LUISS Guido Carli University in Rome
Stefano Callegari, CEO at Trapizzino
Maurizio Coppola, Power to the People
Students at Sapienza University, Rome

(Picture: A man walks past a board bearing the parties' logos registered at the Italian Interior Ministry on January 20, 2018 for the general elections to be held on March 4, 2018. (Credit:FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

Is President Trump Bringing Back Jobs?2017031820170319 (WS)

How are President Trump's policies affecting employment?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

On In the Balance we ask how President Trump's policies are affecting jobs and workers. Ed Butler hears from mayors and economic specialists from across the USA, to get a snapshot of how the economy is faring under the new administration - from the coal industry to car manufacturing. The Mayor of Santa Fe in New Mexico - which is home to a large number of Latino immigrants - explains how tighter policies are spreading fear across the immigrant community. And Colm O' Regan reflects on how President Trump's election has complicated his own job - as a stand-up comedian.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump shakes hands with coal miners in the White House. Credit: Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty Images)

Is President Trump Bringing Back Jobs?20170318

How are President Trump's policies affecting employment?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

On In the Balance we ask how President Trump's policies are affecting jobs and workers. Ed Butler hears from mayors and economic specialists from across the USA, to get a snapshot of how the economy is faring under the new administration - from the coal industry to car manufacturing. The Mayor of Santa Fe in New Mexico - which is home to a large number of Latino immigrants - explains how tighter policies are spreading fear across the immigrant community. And Colm O' Regan reflects on how President Trump's election has complicated his own job - as a stand-up comedian.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump shakes hands with coal miners in the White House. Credit: Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty Images)

Is President Trump Bringing Back Jobs?2017031820170319 (WS)

On In the Balance we ask how President Trump's policies are affecting jobs and workers. Ed Butler hears from mayors and economic specialists from across the USA, to get a snapshot of how the economy is faring under the new administration - from the coal industry to car manufacturing. The Mayor of Santa Fe in New Mexico - which is home to a large number of Latino immigrants - explains how tighter policies are spreading fear across the immigrant community. And Colm O' Regan reflects on how President Trump's election has complicated his own job - as a stand-up comedian.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump shakes hands with coal miners in the White House. Credit: Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty Images)

How are President Trump's policies affecting employment?

Is The Global Economy On The Mend?2013011220130113 (WS)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Is the global economy on the mend?2013011220130113 (WS)

Is this the year we put the global financial crisis behind us?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Will this be the year the global economy turns a corner and the US and the eurozone put their financial woes behind them? Manuela Saragosa's guests are Pippa Malmgren, politics and policy expert who used to be Special Assistant to the President of the United States for Economic Policy; Ian Bremmer, President of Eurasia Group, the leading global political risk research and consulting firm; and Iraj Abedian, Chief Executive of the South African company, Pan-African Capital Holdings. They think there are reasons to be cheerful, but before you breathe that sigh of relief we'll hear from them why it may be time to worry about the state of the emerging markets instead. Plus Colm O'Regan gives us his guidance on measuring the risks that lie ahead.

Photo: Getty Images

Is the global economy on the mend?20130112

Is this the year we put the global financial crisis behind us?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Will this be the year the global economy turns a corner and the US and the eurozone put their financial woes behind them? Manuela Saragosa's guests are Pippa Malmgren, politics and policy expert who used to be Special Assistant to the President of the United States for Economic Policy; Ian Bremmer, President of Eurasia Group, the leading global political risk research and consulting firm; and Iraj Abedian, Chief Executive of the South African company, Pan-African Capital Holdings. They think there are reasons to be cheerful, but before you breathe that sigh of relief we'll hear from them why it may be time to worry about the state of the emerging markets instead. Plus Colm O'Regan gives us his guidance on measuring the risks that lie ahead.

Photo: Getty Images

Jobs for the Future20120303

We swap the studio for the city of London to reflect on the future of manufacturing.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance leaves the studio to broadcast from the city of London and reflect on the future of manufacturing.

Do new developments in technology mean that manufacturing jobs will move from China, Germany and Japan back to countries where making things has been in decline?

And looking ahead to the future of work - what will it look like?

Join Lesley Curwen and guests: Robin Southwell, the UK CEO of airline maker and defence contractor EADS and a UK prime ministerial trade ambassador; George Magnus Senior Economic Adviser to UBS Investment Bank and Bronwen Maddox, Editor and Chief Executive of current affairs magazine Prospect.

And management consultant turned comedian, Colm O'Regan, takes a day trip from Dublin to be with them in person with his reflections on the jobs of the future.

Jobs for the Future20120305

We swap the studio for the city of London to reflect on the future of manufacturing.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance leaves the studio to broadcast from the city of London and reflect on the future of manufacturing.

Do new developments in technology mean that manufacturing jobs will move from China, Germany and Japan back to countries where making things has been in decline?

And looking ahead to the future of work - what will it look like?

Join Lesley Curwen and guests: Robin Southwell, the UK CEO of airline maker and defence contractor EADS and a UK prime ministerial trade ambassador; George Magnus Senior Economic Adviser to UBS Investment Bank and Bronwen Maddox, Editor and Chief Executive of current affairs magazine Prospect.

And management consultant turned comedian, Colm O'Regan, takes a day trip from Dublin to be with them in person with his reflections on the jobs of the future.

Kilkenomics20121103

Economists at Ireland's Kilkenomics festival discuss those behind the financial crisis.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The Kilkenomics festival of economics in Kilkenny, Ireland, is the setting for this week's debate on whether enough people have been held to account for what went wrong in the run-up to the financial crisis.

Lesley Curwen and regular contributor, comedian Colm O'Regan, are in conversation with leading Irish economist David McWilliams, former US bank regulator Bill Black, and Peter Antonioni, an economist from University College London, plus . an audience of festival-goers gets to have a say as well.

Kilkenomics20121104

Economists at Ireland's Kilkenomics festival discuss those behind the financial crisis.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The Kilkenomics festival of economics in Kilkenny, Ireland, is the setting for this week's debate on whether enough people have been held to account for what went wrong in the run-up to the financial crisis.

Lesley Curwen and regular contributor, comedian Colm O'Regan, are in conversation with leading Irish economist David McWilliams, former US bank regulator Bill Black, and Peter Antonioni, an economist from University College London, plus . an audience of festival-goers gets to have a say as well.

Kilkenomics2013110920131110 (WS)

Have we mortgaged our children's future? Plus Colm O'Regan's pub quiz.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We make our annual pilgrimage to Kilkenomics, the economics and comedy festival in Ireland. The country's got the green light this week to exit its bailout programme, imposed three years ago. Surely that's good news? Jamie Robertson and his band of economic thinkers - David McWilliams, Deirdre McCloskey and Dan Ariely - discuss whether we've sacrificed our children's future by getting so deeply into debt. And is even having children an act of foolish optimism?

Plus, as the programme's being recorded in a bar, listen out for the inaugural In the Balance pub quiz with our very own quizmaster Colm O'Regan, ably assisted by the audience and the house band.

Kilkenomics20131109

Have we mortgaged our children's future? Plus Colm O'Regan's pub quiz.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

We make our annual pilgrimage to Kilkenomics, the economics and comedy festival in Ireland. The country's got the green light this week to exit its bailout programme, imposed three years ago. Surely that's good news? Jamie Robertson and his band of economic thinkers - David McWilliams, Deirdre McCloskey and Dan Ariely - discuss whether we've sacrificed our children's future by getting so deeply into debt. And is even having children an act of foolish optimism?

Plus, as the programme's being recorded in a bar, listen out for the inaugural In the Balance pub quiz with our very own quizmaster Colm O'Regan, ably assisted by the audience and the house band.

Kilkenomics2013110920131110 (WS)

We make our annual pilgrimage to Kilkenomics, the economics and comedy festival in Ireland. The country's got the green light this week to exit its bailout programme, imposed three years ago. Surely that's good news? Jamie Robertson and his band of economic thinkers - David McWilliams, Deirdre McCloskey and Dan Ariely - discuss whether we've sacrificed our children's future by getting so deeply into debt. And is even having children an act of foolish optimism?

Plus, as the programme's being recorded in a bar, listen out for the inaugural In the Balance pub quiz with our very own quizmaster Colm O'Regan, ably assisted by the audience and the house band.

Have we mortgaged our children's future? Plus Colm O'Regan's pub quiz.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

Kilkenomics 20142014110820141109 (WS)

Economics and comedy at the Kilkenomics festival in Kilkenny, Ireland

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance comes from the Kilkenomics economics and comedy festival in Kilkenny, Ireland. Simon Jack and guests meet in Cleere's pub to discuss the economic issues of the day. Ireland is predicted to be the fastest growing Eurozone economy in 2014, but what dangers lie beneath the surface? And what about the rest of the Eurozone - as the spectre of deflation looms?

Kilkenomics 201420141108

Economics and comedy at the Kilkenomics festival in Kilkenny, Ireland

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance comes from the Kilkenomics economics and comedy festival in Kilkenny, Ireland. Simon Jack and guests meet in Cleere's pub to discuss the economic issues of the day. Ireland is predicted to be the fastest growing Eurozone economy in 2014, but what dangers lie beneath the surface? And what about the rest of the Eurozone - as the spectre of deflation looms?

Kilkenomics 20142014110820141109 (WS)

In the Balance comes from the Kilkenomics economics and comedy festival in Kilkenny, Ireland. Simon Jack and guests meet in Cleere's pub to discuss the economic issues of the day. Ireland is predicted to be the fastest growing Eurozone economy in 2014, but what dangers lie beneath the surface? And what about the rest of the Eurozone - as the spectre of deflation looms?

Economics and comedy at the Kilkenomics festival in Kilkenny, Ireland

Leadership20120204

If you face a difficult problem what is the best style of leadership to solve it?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

If you face a difficult problem what is the best style of leadership to solve it? Should military discipline be the order of the day - or do effective leaders take a more consensual approach? In The Balance's guests draw on their business experience to share leadership strategies. And with Facebook's 27-year-old founder now worth an estimated twenty eight billion dollars, we'll be asking whether it is possible to do too much too young in business? Join Justin Rowlatt and guests: African entrepreneur and director of Viewpoint Africa Ayo Johnson, Indian entrepreneur Rajesh Agrawal of RationalFX and Professor Dominic Swords , a Business Economist at the Henley Business School.

Leadership20120206

If you face a difficult problem what is the best style of leadership to solve it? Should military discipline be the order of the day - or do effective leaders take a more consensual approach? In The Balance's guests draw on their business experience to share leadership strategies. And with Facebook's 27-year-old founder now worth an estimated twenty eight billion dollars, we'll be asking whether it is possible to do too much too young in business? Join Justin Rowlatt and guests: African entrepreneur and director of Viewpoint Africa Ayo Johnson, Indian entrepreneur Rajesh Agrawal of RationalFX and Professor Dominic Swords , a Business Economist at the Henley Business School.

If you face a difficult problem what is the best style of leadership to solve it?

Leadership20120206

If you face a difficult problem what is the best style of leadership to solve it?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

If you face a difficult problem what is the best style of leadership to solve it? Should military discipline be the order of the day - or do effective leaders take a more consensual approach? In The Balance's guests draw on their business experience to share leadership strategies. And with Facebook's 27-year-old founder now worth an estimated twenty eight billion dollars, we'll be asking whether it is possible to do too much too young in business? Join Justin Rowlatt and guests: African entrepreneur and director of Viewpoint Africa Ayo Johnson, Indian entrepreneur Rajesh Agrawal of RationalFX and Professor Dominic Swords , a Business Economist at the Henley Business School.

Lifting the Curse of Oil20120714

How can African countries make the most of their new oil finds?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How can African countries make the most of their new oil finds? Or could the oil be a curse, if it brings corruption and environmental damage flying in its wake?

Lesley Curwen's guests are Paul Adong Deng, Managing Director of Nile Petroleum Corporation, South Sudan's national oil company; Rolake Akinkugbe, an oil and gas specialist from Ecobank, which operates across 32 countries in Africa; and Dr Keith Myers, of Richmond Energy Partners, he's worked with BP and Norway's Statoil and now advises some of the largest funds and institutions investing in oil and gas in Africa.

Plus we hear about Africa's booming entertainment industries - but does comedy translate between Europe and Africa? Our in-house comedian, Colm O'Regan finds out the hard way.

Lifting The Curse Of Oil2012071420120715

How can African countries make the most of their new oil finds? Or could the oil be a curse, if it brings corruption and environmental damage flying in its wake? Lesley Curwen's guests are Paul Adong Deng, Managing Director of Nile Petroleum Corporation, South Sudan's national oil company; Rolake Akinkugbe, an oil and gas specialist from Ecobank, which operates across 32 countries in Africa; and Dr Keith Myers, of Richmond Energy Partners, he's worked with BP and Norway's Statoil and now advises some of the largest funds and institutions investing in oil and gas in Africa. Plus we hear about Africa's booming entertainment industries - but does comedy translate between Europe and Africa? Our in-house comedian, Colm O'Regan finds out the hard way.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

London's Olympic Legacy2013072720130728 (WS)

Have the Games delivered lasting economic benefits to the UK?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As London's Olympic Park comes back to life this weekend with athletes marking the first anniversary of the start of the London Olympics, In the Balance puts its metaphorical trainers on to ask whether the billions of taxpayers' money that went into the Games was worth it. Manuela Saragosa and guests discuss whether there is a lasting economic legacy to those two weeks in the summer of 2012, or to any big sporting event anywhere in the world. And we pull Colm O'Regan off the subs' bench to reflect on what sport can teach business.

Picture: The athletes' accommodation is reflected in the water in the Olympic park in Stratford, London Credit: Getty Images

London's Olympic Legacy20130727

Have the Games delivered lasting economic benefits to the UK?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As London's Olympic Park comes back to life this weekend with athletes marking the first anniversary of the start of the London Olympics, In the Balance puts its metaphorical trainers on to ask whether the billions of taxpayers' money that went into the Games was worth it. Manuela Saragosa and guests discuss whether there is a lasting economic legacy to those two weeks in the summer of 2012, or to any big sporting event anywhere in the world. And we pull Colm O'Regan off the subs' bench to reflect on what sport can teach business.

Picture: The athletes' accommodation is reflected in the water in the Olympic park in Stratford, London Credit: Getty Images

Long Hours, Short Straw2016010920160110 (WS)

Across the world, we're all working longer hours. But do we need to and what's the cost?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What does the long-hours culture mean to you? Working late, missing time with friends and family? Does putting in extra hours make you better at your job or improve your chances of getting head? Or do you stay behind when actually, the job's done and you could leave? Across the world - from Mexico City to Seoul and from London to Tennessee - we're spending ever more hours at work. Today, we're looking at why and asking what the impact is on our health, our wealth and our wellbeing. With guests Bob Pozen author of Extreme Productivity, Alexandra Michel former Investment Banker at Goldman Sachs and author of a report into the impact of long hour on young, virile and upwardly mobile finance sector employees and Professor Sir Cary Cooper Professor of Organizational Psychology at Manchester School of Management. Presented by Ed Butler. (PHOTO: A man makes his way home from work on a bus as darkness falls in Glasgow, Scotland. CREDIT: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Long Hours, Short Straw20160109

Across the world, we're all working longer hours. But do we need to and what's the cost?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What does the long-hours culture mean to you? Working late, missing time with friends and family? Does putting in extra hours make you better at your job or improve your chances of getting head? Or do you stay behind when actually, the job's done and you could leave? Across the world - from Mexico City to Seoul and from London to Tennessee - we're spending ever more hours at work. Today, we're looking at why and asking what the impact is on our health, our wealth and our wellbeing. With guests Bob Pozen author of Extreme Productivity, Alexandra Michel former Investment Banker at Goldman Sachs and author of a report into the impact of long hour on young, virile and upwardly mobile finance sector employees and Professor Sir Cary Cooper Professor of Organizational Psychology at Manchester School of Management. Presented by Ed Butler. (PHOTO: A man makes his way home from work on a bus as darkness falls in Glasgow, Scotland. CREDIT: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Long Hours, Short Straw2016010920160110 (WS)

What does the long-hours culture mean to you? Working late, missing time with friends and family? Does putting in extra hours make you better at your job or improve your chances of getting head? Or do you stay behind when actually, the job's done and you could leave? Across the world - from Mexico City to Seoul and from London to Tennessee - we're spending ever more hours at work. Today, we're looking at why and asking what the impact is on our health, our wealth and our wellbeing. With guests Bob Pozen author of Extreme Productivity, Alexandra Michel former Investment Banker at Goldman Sachs and author of a report into the impact of long hour on young, virile and upwardly mobile finance sector employees and Professor Sir Cary Cooper Professor of Organizational Psychology at Manchester School of Management. Presented by Ed Butler. (PHOTO: A man makes his way home from work on a bus as darkness falls in Glasgow, Scotland. CREDIT: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Across the world, we're all working longer hours. But do we need to and what's the cost?

Love at Work2018051920180520 (WS)

Should more employers bring in so-called "love contracts" for workers in relationships?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Many people meet their future love partner at work. But with the current high profile cases of sexual harassment, employers are becoming much more concerned about managing relationships between their employees. Ed Butler asks whether office dating between co-workers is a potential hazard, not just for staff, but for the company as a whole. And should more employers bring in so-called "love contracts" to be signed by workers who are in a romantic relationship in the office?
(Picture: Businessman with secretary, USA, 1950s. Credit: George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images)

Contributors:
Ali Hall, Associate Fellow of Saïd Business School, Oxford University
Catriona Watt, Partner at Fox & Partners
Bradley Wright, Chief Technology Officer at Verve
Moira Weigel, PhD Yale, Harvard Society of Fellows, founder of Logic magazine.
Author: Labor of Love
Jason Habinsky, Partner, Haynes and Boone

Producer: Audrey Tinline

Love at Work20180519

Should more employers bring in so-called "love contracts" for workers in relationships?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Many people meet their future love partner at work. But with the current high profile cases of sexual harassment, employers are becoming much more concerned about managing relationships between their employees. Ed Butler asks whether office dating between co-workers is a potential hazard, not just for staff, but for the company as a whole. And should more employers bring in so-called "love contracts" to be signed by workers who are in a romantic relationship in the office?
(Picture: Businessman with secretary, USA, 1950s. Credit: George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images)

Contributors:
Ali Hall, Associate Fellow of Saïd Business School, Oxford University
Catriona Watt, Partner at Fox & Partners
Bradley Wright, Chief Technology Officer at Verve
Moira Weigel, PhD Yale, Harvard Society of Fellows, founder of Logic magazine.
Author: Labor of Love
Jason Habinsky, Partner, Haynes and Boone

Producer: Audrey Tinline

Love At Work2018051920180520 (WS)

Should more employers bring in so-called "love contracts" for workers in relationships?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Many people meet their future love partner at work. But with the current high profile cases of sexual harassment, employers are becoming much more concerned about managing relationships between their employees. Ed Butler asks whether office dating between co-workers is a potential hazard, not just for staff, but for the company as a whole. And should more employers bring in so-called "love contracts" to be signed by workers who are in a romantic relationship in the office?
(Picture: Businessman with secretary, USA, 1950s. Credit: George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images)

Contributors:
Ali Hall, Associate Fellow of Saïd Business School, Oxford University
Catriona Watt, Partner at Fox and Partners
Bradley Wright, Chief Technology Officer at Verve
Moira Weigel, PhD Yale, Harvard Society of Fellows, founder of Logic magazine.
Author: Labor of Love
Jason Habinsky, Partner, Haynes and Boone

Producer: Audrey Tinline

Making a Mega City Work2014011120140112 (WS)

How do you make Lagos work for everyone, not just those with a lot of money?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How do you make the vast Nigerian city of Lagos work for all its inhabitants, not just those with a lot of money? There is consensus that it struggles to function, but how do you change that? Lagos is the country's business capital - how it performs affects the rest of the country. It is also a brilliant case study for other mega cities around the world. In the week that the BBC World Service has been focusing on the next wave of emerging economies, dubbed the MINT countries, Nkem Ifejika is joined in Lagos by three people who know and love the city. They live and work there, and have seen it change over time. Papa Omotayo is an architect who runs his own practice in Lagos. Kunle Elebute is Partner & Head of KPMG Advisory Services for Nigeria and West Africa, and Patrick Utomi is a founding professor at the Lagos Business School. And, regular commentator Colm O'Regan travelled from Dublin to Dubai to report on what it is like arriving in a city that is brand new.

Making a Mega City Work20140111

How do you make Lagos work for everyone, not just those with a lot of money?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How do you make the vast Nigerian city of Lagos work for all its inhabitants, not just those with a lot of money? There is consensus that it struggles to function, but how do you change that? Lagos is the country's business capital - how it performs affects the rest of the country. It is also a brilliant case study for other mega cities around the world. In the week that the BBC World Service has been focusing on the next wave of emerging economies, dubbed the MINT countries, Nkem Ifejika is joined in Lagos by three people who know and love the city. They live and work there, and have seen it change over time. Papa Omotayo is an architect who runs his own practice in Lagos. Kunle Elebute is Partner & Head of KPMG Advisory Services for Nigeria and West Africa, and Patrick Utomi is a founding professor at the Lagos Business School. And, regular commentator Colm O'Regan travelled from Dublin to Dubai to report on what it is like arriving in a city that is brand new.

Markets Feel The Fear

In the Balance examines the recent sharp falls in the global markets. Ed Butler asks why volatility is back in the financial markets - after years of relative calm. Ed is joined by one of the world's leading experts in algorithmic computerised trading as well as a fund manager with more than 30 years experience of watching the market highs and lows. But is this time different - is computer driven trading at least partly to blame for an increase in volatility? Should we be in fear of the machines?

Contributors: Gervais Williams, from Miton Group, who has worked in finance in the City of London for more than 30 years
Economics Professor Jeffrey Frankel from Harvard University
Andrei Kirilenko, the Director of the Centre for Global Finance and Technology at London's Imperial College Business School

(Picture: Traders React to market volatility on floor of the Cboe Global Markets exchange on February 6, 2018 in Chicago. Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Markets Feel The Fear20180217

Market swings are back, but is it also fuelled by computers?

In the Balance examines the recent sharp falls in the global markets. Ed Butler asks why volatility is back in the financial markets - after years of relative calm. Ed is joined by one of the world's leading experts in algorithmic computerised trading as well as a fund manager with more than 30 years experience of watching the market highs and lows. But is this time different - is computer driven trading at least partly to blame for an increase in volatility? Should we be in fear of the machines?

Contributors: Gervais Williams, from Miton Group, who has worked in finance in the City of London for more than 30 years
Economics Professor Jeffrey Frankel from Harvard University
Andrei Kirilenko, the Director of the Centre for Global Finance and Technology at London's Imperial College Business School

(Picture: Traders React to market volatility on floor of the Cboe Global Markets exchange on February 6, 2018 in Chicago. Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Markets Feel the Fear20180217

Market swings are back, but is it also fuelled by computers?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

In the Balance examines the recent sharp falls in the global markets. Ed Butler asks why volatility is back in the financial markets - after years of relative calm. Ed is joined by one of the world's leading experts in algorithmic computerised trading as well as a fund manager with more than 30 years experience of watching the market highs and lows. But is this time different - is computer driven trading at least partly to blame for an increase in volatility? Should we be in fear of the machines?

Contributors: Gervais Williams, from Miton Group, who has worked in finance in the City of London for more than 30 years
Economics Professor Jeffrey Frankel from Harvard University
Andrei Kirilenko, the Director of the Centre for Global Finance and Technology at London's Imperial College Business School

(Picture: Traders React to market volatility on floor of the Cboe Global Markets exchange on February 6, 2018 in Chicago. Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Masters of the Universe Handbook2016022020160221 (WS)

How does business stay ahead of the curve in an increasingly competitive global market?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How does business stay ahead of the curve in an increasingly competitive global marketplace? While the world's biggest companies - Google and Apple - wrestle for the top spot and some of the world's smallest start-ups set their eyes on the big time, we offer a masterclass with CEOs sharing the secrets of their success. With CEO of Infosys Vishal Sikka, James Citrin of Spencer Stuart, Marieme Jamme of SpotOne Global Solutions and analyst Steve Denning. Presented by Colm O'Regan.

(Photo: Surfer Dog Tillman rides a wave in the sixth Annual Surf Dog competition at Huntington Beach, California. Credit: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Masters of the Universe Handbook20160220

How does business stay ahead of the curve in an increasingly competitive global market?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

How does business stay ahead of the curve in an increasingly competitive global marketplace? While the world's biggest companies - Google and Apple - wrestle for the top spot and some of the world's smallest start-ups set their eyes on the big time, we offer a masterclass with CEOs sharing the secrets of their success. With CEO of Infosys Vishal Sikka, James Citrin of Spencer Stuart, Marieme Jamme of SpotOne Global Solutions and analyst Steve Denning. Presented by Colm O'Regan.

(Photo: Surfer Dog Tillman rides a wave in the sixth Annual Surf Dog competition at Huntington Beach, California. Credit: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Masters Of The Universe Handbook2016022020160221 (WS)

How does business stay ahead of the curve in an increasingly competitive global marketplace? While the world's biggest companies - Google and Apple - wrestle for the top spot and some of the world's smallest start-ups set their eyes on the big time, we offer a masterclass with CEOs sharing the secrets of their success. With CEO of Infosys Vishal Sikka, James Citrin of Spencer Stuart, Marieme Jamme of SpotOne Global Solutions and analyst Steve Denning. Presented by Colm O'Regan.

(Photo: Surfer Dog Tillman rides a wave in the sixth Annual Surf Dog competition at Huntington Beach, California. Credit: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

How does business stay ahead of the curve in an increasingly competitive global market?

Measuring prosperity20121117

What is it besides the money in people's pockets that makes a society prosperous?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What makes a society prosperous? The obvious answer is wealth but we'll be discovering that there's more to it than just money, prosperity is also about security, health and well-being. And, what's in a thought? Surely in a knowledge economy more than a just penny? Can you measure its value to an economy?
Justin Rowlatt's guests are Will Hutton who chairs the economic research centre, the Big Innovation Centre, and is Principal of Hertford College, Oxford; Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean for International Business and Finance at Tufts University in Boston; and Jeff Gedmin, President of the Legatum Institute, a think tank based in London.

Measuring prosperity20121118

What is it besides the money in people's pockets that makes a society prosperous?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What makes a society prosperous? The obvious answer is wealth but we'll be discovering that there's more to it than just money, prosperity is also about security, health and well-being. And, what's in a thought? Surely in a knowledge economy more than a just penny? Can you measure its value to an economy?
Justin Rowlatt's guests are Will Hutton who chairs the economic research centre, the Big Innovation Centre, and is Principal of Hertford College, Oxford; Bhaskar Chakravorti, Senior Associate Dean for International Business and Finance at Tufts University in Boston; and Jeff Gedmin, President of the Legatum Institute, a think tank based in London.

Millennium Development Goals: Judgement Day2015070420150705 (WS)

Have the MDGs eradicated global poverty and improved things for the world's poorest?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

To what extent have the Millennium Development Goals helped to eradicate global poverty and improved things for the world's poorest? As the MDGs come to the end of their life, the author of the Millennium Development Goals defends his ambition and the strategies employed to meet the goals; with Mark (Lord) Malloch-Brown, Mark Suzman of the Gates Foundation, and Yasmini Aiya of the Centre for Policy Studies in Delhi Photo: Children collect pieces of coal along the roadside in Bujumbura, Burundi (Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Millennium Development Goals: Judgement Day20150704

Have the MDGs eradicated global poverty and improved things for the world's poorest?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

To what extent have the Millennium Development Goals helped to eradicate global poverty and improved things for the world's poorest? As the MDGs come to the end of their life, the author of the Millennium Development Goals defends his ambition and the strategies employed to meet the goals; with Mark (Lord) Malloch-Brown, Mark Suzman of the Gates Foundation, and Yasmini Aiya of the Centre for Policy Studies in Delhi Photo: Children collect pieces of coal along the roadside in Bujumbura, Burundi (Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Minimum wages2014051720140518 (WS)

Will raising minimum wages end wage stagnation?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Will setting higher minimum wages solve the problem of wage stagnation? Ed Butler is joined by Arne Kalleberg, professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Matthew Taylor, chief executive of the RSA, based in London and Paola Subacchi, research director of International Economics at the think tank Chatham House.

Plus, comedian Colm O Regan considers whether the rise of robotic workers will mean the rest of us will be freed up to become more creative?

Minimum wages20140517

Will raising minimum wages end wage stagnation?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Will setting higher minimum wages solve the problem of wage stagnation? Ed Butler is joined by Arne Kalleberg, professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Matthew Taylor, chief executive of the RSA, based in London and Paola Subacchi, research director of International Economics at the think tank Chatham House.

Plus, comedian Colm O Regan considers whether the rise of robotic workers will mean the rest of us will be freed up to become more creative?

Mobile Central Bankers20121201

Does it matter if a foreigner has the top job in a national institution?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Lesley Curwen and her guests debate a burning workplace issue: with Canada's central bank governor being poached by the Bank of England, they ask whether it matters if a foreigner is drafted in to take a top job in a national institution. Is it all about raw ability of the candidate or does nationality matter? And with the help of Colm O'Regan the programme compares and contrasts the world of football managers and central bankers; one big difference - the former are easier to sack. Joining Lesley are Rachel Lomax who served as Deputy Governor of the Bank of England; Dr Guntram Wolff, formerly at the Bundesbank and now deputy director of the Breughel think tank in Brussels; and Professor Michael Mainelli, Chairman of Z/Yen, a commercial think-tank and Emeritus Professor of Commerce at Gresham College in London.

Mobile Central Bankers20121202

Does it matter if a foreigner has the top job in a national institution?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Lesley Curwen and her guests debate a burning workplace issue: with Canada's central bank governor being poached by the Bank of England, they ask whether it matters if a foreigner is drafted in to take a top job in a national institution. Is it all about raw ability of the candidate or does nationality matter? And with the help of Colm O'Regan the programme compares and contrasts the world of football managers and central bankers; one big difference - the former are easier to sack. Joining Lesley are Rachel Lomax who served as Deputy Governor of the Bank of England; Dr Guntram Wolff, formerly at the Bundesbank and now deputy director of the Breughel think tank in Brussels; and Professor Michael Mainelli, Chairman of Z/Yen, a commercial think-tank and Emeritus Professor of Commerce at Gresham College in London.

Monetising Online Content2014111520141116 (WS)

Top tech entrepreneurs share their insights on how to make money out of publishing online

The BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan Jones hears from some of the world's top tech entrepreneurs about how to make money from publishing online. From music to long form journalism - how do you monetise content and make people want to pay to listen or watch the latest news and entertainment? R