Episodes

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2011121420111217Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

2012090120120902 (WS)Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

2020022220200223 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.
2020032820200329 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.
03/03/201220120305Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

03/06/2017 Gmt20170603
04/02/201220120206Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.
04/02/2017 Gmt2017020420170205 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

04/03/2017 Gmt2017030420170305 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

07/01/201220120109
07/04/201220120408Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.
08/10/2016 Gmt20161009The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

10/03/201220120312
11/02/201220120213
11/02/2017 Gmt2017021120170212 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

12/05/201220120513
12/11/2016 Gmt2016111220161113 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

14/01/201220120116
14/04/201220120415
17/03/201220120319
18/02/201220120220
18/03/2017 Gmt20170318
19/11/2016 Gmt2016111920161120 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

20/05/2017 Gmt20170520
2014: A Disruptive Year?2014122720141228 (WS)"What kind of year has it been for the world's workers?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Has it been a good year for the workers of the world? What changes has 2014 brought and do any of them herald a revolution in the way we work? In the Balance's resident commentator, Colm O'Regan, takes the reins this week in a wide-ranging discussion with Sarah Lyall, a social policy researcher with the New Economics Foundation; Richard Dobbs from McKinsey Global Institute; and Peter Antonioni, co-author of Economics for Dummies and a lecturer in management at University College, London.

Is technology the friend or foe workers trying to protect their life outside work? Is the offer to freeze female workers' eggs till they're ready to have children a generous gesture or a company's way of trying to control its workforce? And is mental health finally being taken as seriously physical health by bosses?

Is technology the friend or foe workers trying to protect their life outside work? Is the offer to freeze female workers' eggs till they're ready to have children a generous gesture or a company's way of trying to control its workforce? And is mental health finally being taken as seriously physical health by bosses?"

Is technology the friend or foe workers trying to protect their life outside work? Is the offer to freeze female workers' eggs till they're ready to have children a generous gesture or a company's way of trying to control its workforce? And is mental health finally being taken as seriously physical health by bosses?"

2018: Top Risks20180106What are the biggest economic risks in 2018?

What are the biggest risks to the global economy in 2018? Ed Butler is joined by some of the world's leading economists and political scientists to ask the key questions that will affect us all in the year ahead. Ed hears from Ian Bremmer, American political scientist and the President and founder of Eurasia Group, a political risk research firm; Megan Greene, Chief Economist at Manulife and John Hancock Asset Management in the USA and Guntram Wolf, Director of Bruegel, a leading European think tank, focussing on economics and politics. Comedian Colm O'Regan chips in from Dublin with his take on how the world is changing as 2018 gets underway.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping attend a business leaders event inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"What are the biggest economic risks in 2018?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping attend a business leaders event inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

(Picture: US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping attend a business leaders event inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Credit: AFP/Getty Images) "

(Picture: US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping attend a business leaders event inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)"

21/01/201220120123
21/04/201220120422

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi.

22/10/2016 Gmt20161023

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

24/12/201120111217
25/02/2017 Gmt2017022520170226 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

27/05/2017 Gmt20170527The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.
28/01/201220120130
28/01/2017 Gmt2017012820170129 (WS)The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

28/04/201220120429
31/03/201220120401
A Big Brother World?2013041320130414 (WS)"Do companies know too much about us?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Jamie Robertson and his guests look at what companies know about you, and ask: do they know too much? Every time you go online and buy anything from wrapping paper to a Rolls Royce, or send an email or ask a question about, say, the population of Botswana or the height of the Niagara Falls, the information is stored. So who then uses it and why - to target you with advertising? - or with something more sinister? Three experts give us their views on whether we should be worried, and they are the lawyer Chris Watson, Partner and Head of the Telecoms team at CMS Cameron McKenna; Matthew Heath, Chief Strategy Officer at LIDA, the digital and direct marketing agency; and Michal Kosinski of the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University. And in their midst we find Colm O'Regan musing on his attractiveness to advertisers.

Jamie Robertson and his guests look at what companies know about you, and ask: do they know too much? Every time you go online and buy anything from wrapping paper to a Rolls Royce, or send an email or ask a question about, say, the population of Botswana or the height of the Niagara Falls, the information is stored. So who then uses it and why - to target you with advertising? - or with something more sinister? Three experts give us their views on whether we should be worried, and they are the lawyer Chris Watson, Partner and Head of the Telecoms team at CMS Cameron McKenna; Matthew Heath, Chief Strategy Officer at LIDA, the digital and direct marketing agency; and Michal Kosinski of the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University. And in their midst we find Colm O'Regan musing on his attractiveness to advertisers.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi..."

Jamie Robertson and his guests look at what companies know about you, and ask: do they know too much? Every time you go online and buy anything from wrapping paper to a Rolls Royce, or send an email or ask a question about, say, the population of Botswana or the height of the Niagara Falls, the information is stored. So who then uses it and why - to target you with advertising? - or with something more sinister? Three experts give us their views on whether we should be worried, and they are the lawyer Chris Watson, Partner and Head of the Telecoms team at CMS Cameron McKenna; Matthew Heath, Chief Strategy Officer at LIDA, the digital and direct marketing agency; and Michal Kosinski of the Psychometrics Centre at Cambridge University. And in their midst we find Colm O'Regan musing on his attractiveness to advertisers."

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

A Risky Year Ahead2019011220190113 (WS)A trio of the world's top forecasters and economists take a look at what's ahead in 2019. Will the trade wars, populist political waves and stock market roller-coaster rides carry on well into the New Year? As the World Bank kicks off with a gloomy forecast predicting shrinking economic growth, Ed Butler asks what are the biggest risks to global prosperity? Ed is joined from New York by Ian Bremmer - world-renowned geopolitical risk analyst, and President of the Eurasia Group. From Oxford by Ngaire Woods, the founding Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government and Professor of Global Economic Governance at Oxford University. And in Chicago, Raghuram Rajan. Until recently, he was Governor of the Reserve Bank of India. He is Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth University.

Producer: Audrey Tinline

(Picture: Protesters hold a smoking device in Nantes, France on January 5th 2019. Credit: by Estelle Ruiz/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

What's ahead for the global economy and politics in 2019?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

A Turning Point For Bangladesh2013050420130505 (WS)Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy.

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

"

"Lesley Curwen and Justin Rowlatt get behind the headlines to find out what's really goi...

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)"

A Turning Point For Bangladesh?2013050420130505 (WS)"Who will bring about change in the garment industry in Bangladesh?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

More than 400 workers died in Dhaka when the Rana Plaza factory building collapsed ten days ago. 262 others died in Karachi in Pakistan at the Ali Enterprises fire last year, and over 100 at another Bangladesh fire in the Tazreen factory. Jamie Robertson asks his guests who can bring this death toll to a halt - the factory owners, governments, workers, the retailers or the consumers themselves? Jamie's joined fom Dhaka by Shahriar Alam, a member of the Bangladesh Parliament and the managing director of Renaissance Group of manufacturers; with Shahriar is Ifty Islam founder and managing partner of Asian Tiger Capital Partners; and in London is Peter McAllister Director of the Ethical Trading Initiative, which counts some of the big brands in the fashion industry amongst its members. Plus Colm O'Regan, the programme's regular commentator, reflects on the part played in the Rana Plaza disaster by western consumers' appetite for cheap clothes.

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)"

"Who will bring about change in the garment industry in Bangladesh?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

More than 400 workers died in Dhaka when the Rana Plaza factory building collapsed ten days ago. 262 others died in Karachi in Pakistan at the Ali Enterprises fire last year, and over 100 at another Bangladesh fire in the Tazreen factory. Jamie Robertson asks his guests who can bring this death toll to a halt - the factory owners, governments, workers, the retailers or the consumers themselves? Jamie's joined fom Dhaka by Shahriar Alam, a member of the Bangladesh Parliament and the managing director of Renaissance Group of manufacturers; with Shahriar is Ifty Islam founder and managing partner of Asian Tiger Capital Partners; and in London is Peter McAllister Director of the Ethical Trading Initiative, which counts some of the big brands in the fashion industry amongst its members. Plus Colm O'Regan, the programme's regular commentator, reflects on the part played in the Rana Plaza disaster by western consumers' appetite for cheap clothes.

(Image: A clothing worker at her sewing machine, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

Abenomics2014021520140216 (WS)"Is Abenomics - the economic policies of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe - working in Japan?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Abenomics is the name given to a massive economic project launched a year ago by Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe. In the Balance explores whether the project is paying off and asks what are the dangers, as Japan aims to bring back growth to its moribund economy.

Ed Butler is joined by guests Richard Dobbs of the McKinsey Global Institute, Yuuichiro Nakajima of Crimson Phoenix Limited, a UK and Japan-based consultancy, and Dr Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Director of Global Asian Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. And Colm O Regan asks - what's in a name?

Ed Butler is joined by guests Richard Dobbs of the McKinsey Global Institute, Yuuichiro Nakajima of Crimson Phoenix Limited, a UK and Japan-based consultancy, and Dr Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Director of Global Asian Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. And Colm O Regan asks - what's in a name?

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

"

Ed Butler is joined by guests Richard Dobbs of the McKinsey Global Institute, Yuuichiro Nakajima of Crimson Phoenix Limited, a UK and Japan-based consultancy, and Dr Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Director of Global Asian Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. And Colm O Regan asks - what's in a name?"

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

Aberdeen To Abadan2015101720151018 (WS)As oil prices plunge, Scotland's oil industry looks for new business horizons in Iran

As oil prices plunge, Scotland's oil industry looks for new business horizons in Iran

As global oil prices reach rock bottom, the profits of the Scottish oil industry are being squeezed as never before. So Scotland is looking to Iran for new business opportunities in anticipation of sanctions being lifted there. Could it mean the flowering of a new business partnership between the two countries? With Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and senior business figures from both Iran and Scotland. Presented by Pooneh Ghoddoosi.

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

As global oil prices reach rock bottom, the profits of the Scottish oil industry are being squeezed as never before. So Scotland is looking to Iran for new business opportunities in anticipation of sanctions being lifted there. Could it mean the flowering of a new business partnership between the two countries? With Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and senior business figures from both Iran and Scotland. Presented by Pooneh Ghoddoosi.

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"As oil prices plunge, Scotland's oil industry looks for new business horizons in Iran

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As global oil prices reach rock bottom, the profits of the Scottish oil industry are being squeezed as never before. So Scotland is looking to Iran for new business opportunities in anticipation of sanctions being lifted there. Could it mean the flowering of a new business partnership between the two countries? With Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and senior business figures from both Iran and Scotland. Presented by Pooneh Ghoddoosi.

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

"As oil prices plunge, Scotland's oil industry looks for new business horizons in Iran

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

As global oil prices reach rock bottom, the profits of the Scottish oil industry are being squeezed as never before. So Scotland is looking to Iran for new business opportunities in anticipation of sanctions being lifted there. Could it mean the flowering of a new business partnership between the two countries? With Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and senior business figures from both Iran and Scotland. Presented by Pooneh Ghoddoosi.

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

"As oil prices plunge, Scotland's oil industry looks for new business horizons in Iran

As global oil prices reach rock bottom, the profits of the Scottish oil industry are being squeezed as never before. So Scotland is looking to Iran for new business opportunities in anticipation of sanctions being lifted there. Could it mean the flowering of a new business partnership between the two countries? With Former Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and senior business figures from both Iran and Scotland. Presented by Pooneh Ghoddoosi.

(Photo: (left) A works op technician working at an oilfield technology company, in Aberdeen. Credit: AFP. (right) Iranian women walk in front of a portrait of supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

"

Africa: Risks And Rewards2014053120140601 (WS)Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

"Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

"

"Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

"

"Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa?

Does high risk mean high reward for investors in Africa? It's the old cliché that with high risk comes high reward. Is this true of investing in much of modern Africa, and how has the continent adapted to big changes in recent years such as the influx of money from China?

At the Oxford Africa conference hosted by the Saïd Business School, Manuela Saragosa explores the changing nature of risk across Africa with the chief executive of Barclays Africa; Kennedy Bungane, director of the Senegal headquartered private equity AFIG fund; Stephane Le Bouder; and professor Eric Thun, lecturer in Chinese Business at Saïd Business School.

"

Africa: The Commodity Curse Returns20170617"Can the continent's biggest economies recover from a sharp fall in oil and metal prices?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Sharp falls in commodity prices have dealt serious blows to the prospects of workers, communities, and businesses in large parts of Africa over the last few years.

The World Bank said economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa slumped to its lowest level for more than two decades last year and earlier this month South Africa, the continent’s third largest economy, re-entered recession.

The picture is not uniformly bleak – the outlook is much more positive in East Africa – but the continent’s largest economies are suffering. Can they turn things around and end their reliance on oil and mining? What hope is there for those seeking relief from poverty, and what jobs might they do in the future?

Ed Butler is joined by a panel of guests: Kola Karim, CEO of Shoreline Group, a Nigerian energy and infrastructure company; professor Mthuli Ncube, head of Quantum Global Research Lab and former chief economist of the African Development Bank; and Lorenzo Fioramonti, professor of political economy at the University of Pretoria, in South Africa.

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images)

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images)

"

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images)"

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Sharp falls in commodity prices have dealt serious blows to the prospects of workers, communities, and businesses in large parts of Africa over the last few years.

The World Bank said economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa slumped to its lowest level for more than two decades last year and earlier this month South Africa, the continent’s third largest economy, re-entered recession.

The picture is not uniformly bleak – the outlook is much more positive in East Africa – but the continent’s largest economies are suffering. Can they turn things around and end their reliance on oil and mining? What hope is there for those seeking relief from poverty, and what jobs might they do in the future?

Ed Butler is joined by a panel of guests: Kola Karim, CEO of Shoreline Group, a Nigerian energy and infrastructure company; professor Mthuli Ncube, head of Quantum Global Research Lab and former chief economist of the African Development Bank; and Lorenzo Fioramonti, professor of political economy at the University of Pretoria, in South Africa.

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images)

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Sharp falls in commodity prices have dealt serious blows to the prospects of workers, communities, and businesses in large parts of Africa over the last few years.

The World Bank said economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa slumped to its lowest level for more than two decades last year and earlier this month South Africa, the continent’s third largest economy, re-entered recession.

The picture is not uniformly bleak – the outlook is much more positive in East Africa – but the continent’s largest economies are suffering. Can they turn things around and end their reliance on oil and mining? What hope is there for those seeking relief from poverty, and what jobs might they do in the future?

Ed Butler is joined by a panel of guests: Kola Karim, CEO of Shoreline Group, a Nigerian energy and infrastructure company; professor Mthuli Ncube, head of Quantum Global Research Lab and former chief economist of the African Development Bank; and Lorenzo Fioramonti, professor of political economy at the University of Pretoria, in South Africa.

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images)

"The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

Sharp falls in commodity prices have dealt serious blows to the prospects of workers, communities, and businesses in large parts of Africa over the last few years.

The World Bank said economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa slumped to its lowest level for more than two decades last year and earlier this month South Africa, the continent’s third largest economy, re-entered recession.

The picture is not uniformly bleak – the outlook is much more positive in East Africa – but the continent’s largest economies are suffering. Can they turn things around and end their reliance on oil and mining? What hope is there for those seeking relief from poverty, and what jobs might they do in the future?

Ed Butler is joined by a panel of guests: Kola Karim, CEO of Shoreline Group, a Nigerian energy and infrastructure company; professor Mthuli Ncube, head of Quantum Global Research Lab and former chief economist of the African Development Bank; and Lorenzo Fioramonti, professor of political economy at the University of Pretoria, in South Africa.

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images)

(Picture: Women fill wheelbarrows with coal in South Africa. Credit: Marco Longari, Getty Images) "

African Enterprise2014032220140323 (WS)"What do Africa's entrepreneurs need most urgently to help them start up companies?

The biggest financial stories and why they matter to us all.

What do Africa's entrepreneurs need from their governments and big institutions to help them start up new ventures? The president of the African Development Bank, Donald Kaberuka, answers some of the criticisms over lack of capital. And the founder of Ghana’s biggest home-grown technology company, Herman Chinery Hesse, spells out why foreign aid can hinder – rather than help – business in Africa.

Manuela Saragosa hosts a lively debate with guests Teddy Ruge, founder of Ugandan tech hub Hive Colab, Michelle Essome, chief executive of the African Private Equity and Venture Capital Association and Paddy Docherty, CEO of Phoenix Africa.

Also Colm O'Regan looks at the value of branding.

Also Colm O'Regan looks at the value of branding.

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

"

Also Colm O'Regan looks at the value of branding."

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on in this changing global economy

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily team looks behind the headlines to find out what's really going on i...

The Business Daily tea