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20180320 ()In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.
20201103
20210511In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

20210518In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Inside the brains of the world\u2019s most creative people

A New Moma - Re-opening The Museum Of Modern Art20191022On 15 June 2019 the Museum of Modern Art in New York closed its doors ahead of a four month refurbishment and the final stage of a $400 million overhaul. When it re-opens its doors in October, MoMA will not only have reconfigured its galleries but also rehung the entire collection on show.

In this special edition of In The Studio, Paul Kobrak follows Ramona Bronkar Bannayan, Senior Deputy Director of Exhibitions & Collections, and Lana Hum, Director of Exhibition Design & Production, as they oversee this epic feat of creativity and choreography.

This time, instead of moving to a temporary space as they did for MoMA's last renovation 15 years ago, they are deinstalling and reinstalling nearly 170,000 square feet of gallery space in just under 4 months. Roughly 10,000 art moves are being undertaken between conservation, storage, and the galleries; and around 2,000 individual works of art are going into the frame shop - with 1,550 new frames having to be constructed.

But it is not just the logistical nightmare that is keeping Ramona, Lana and the Museum's curators and staff awake at night. With 40,000 square feet of additional space, as a result of expanding into a new residential skyscraper, they also aim to rethink the way the story of modern and contemporary art is presented to the public – balancing the presentation of Claude Monet's crowd-pleasing Water Lilies and Vincent Van Gogh's The Starry Night, with lesser known works covering the full range of MoMA's massive collection, including photography, sound works, performance, moving image and art forms not yet imagined.

With exclusive access over an eight month period, Paul Kobrak traces the team's progress as they prepare for the Museum's closure and the subsequent re-opening on 21 October 2019.

Presented by Paul Kobrak.

Produced by Paul Kobrak , Ella-mai Robey and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service.

North/south section-perspective through the new gallery spaces at The Museum of Modern Art, looking east along Fifty-third Street. © 2017 Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Following staff at New York's MOMA as they prepare new galleries & rehang the collection

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Abraham Cruzvillegas - Turning Discarded Items Into Art20180313The Mexican artist Abraham Cruzvillegas creates beautiful, thought-provoking sculptures using items that other people have thrown away - from old plastic crates and driftwood to childrens' toys and birdcages. Anything can be transformed into his art. His inspiration comes from growing up on the outskirts of Mexico City, in a house built by his parents using any materials they could find.

He has exhibited across the world including at the prestigious Turbine Hall at the Tate in London. As Abraham constructs his latest exhibition, Autorreconstruccion: Social Tissue at the Kunsthaus in Zurich, Switzerland, he talks to Jo Fahy about his work, his ideas about inclusivity, the importance of beer to his creative process and the challenges when a sculpture collapses.

Producers: Andrea Kidd and Emma Kingsley

(Photo: Abraham Cruzvillegas)

Abraham talks to Jo Fahy about his latest exhibition, Autorreconstruccion: Social Tissue

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo: Abraham Cruzvillegas)

"Abraham talks to Jo Fahy about his latest exhibition, Autorreconstruccion: Social Tissue

(Photo: Abraham Cruzvillegas)"

Adrian Smith: Reaching For The Skies20191210Architect Adrian Smith designs the world's tallest towers. How does he use his creativity to develop new designs for each of these buildings, and how does he ensure each building fits within the cultural landscape of the city or land in which it will be constructed?

Adrian Smith's name and company, Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill Architecture, is synonymous with tall buildings. Millions of people flock to the observation decks of Adrian's buildings every year, desperate to get a glimpse of a city skyline from its highest point, and the Burj Khalifa in Dubai is now firmly in the top ten list of the world's most popular tourist destinations.

In Adrian's studio in Chicago, Eleri Llian Rees sets out to discover what motivates and inspires the man who has created modern day wonders of the world. Adrian describes how he is working creatively with his team at the moment to design a new building for Nanjing, China, incorporating the geography of the land into the design to make it unique.

Adrian tells us that collaboration is at the heart of the firm's work, knowing that designs can change – sometimes significantly – throughout the construction process, and reveals the surprising part played by small chisels and super glue in creating the majestic art of the skyscraper.

Adrian is a fascinating character, a visionary at the cutting edge of his chosen field, pushing the boundaries of architectural possibility with awe-inspiring imagination.

(Photo: Adrian Smith)

How does architect Adrian Smith design the tallest buildings in the world?

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

African Luxury Fashion: Designer Aisha Ayensu20180515Afua Hirsch follows, Aisha Ayensu, as she prepares her Ghanian fashion collection

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Aisha Ayensu is the Founder and Creative Director of leading Ghanaian fashion house, Christie Brown. Infusing modernism into carefully crafted traditional African aesthetics, Christie Brown transcends international tastes, appealing to a diverse clientele, inspiring the cultural opulence of Africa without self compromise and with strong ethical and sustainable ambitions. Liberating and empowering women from the traditional layering of coloured fabrics, her designs are contemporary and charming. Winner of several awards the label has consistently achieved international acclaim, respect and recognition. But at what cost?

In one of the poorer areas of Accra, in a converted clinic, her workshop is home and work to machinists, cutters, designers and seamstresses. Fabrics sourced locally in the bustling markets and from other parts of West Africa and the Far East, are expertly created and cut into bespoke gowns, practical day wear, women's apparel and accessories. Making bold and brazen statements, twice a year they woo and wow the critics at the Collection launches. But how does it all come together? Where does Aisha get her inspiration from and – with constant staffing and sourcing challenges - will her ambitions to produce 40 different designs in less than four months come together?

Broadcaster, author and fashionista Afua Hirsch follows Aisha as she prepares her Autumn/Winter 2018 Collection, from design concept and model searches to runway launch.

"Afua Hirsch follows, Aisha Ayensu, as she prepares her Ghanian fashion collection

Broadcaster, author and fashionista Afua Hirsch follows Aisha as she prepares her Autumn/Winter 2018 Collection, from design concept and model searches to runway launch."

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Ai-da: The World's First A.i. Robot Artist20190604With the announcement of the world's first A.I. robot artist, In the Studio also announces a ‘first' as we follow non-human artist, Ai-Da - a humanoid A.I. robot named after Ada Lovelace, the first female computer programmer in the world.

Karl Bos gains exclusive access to the design and making of what is hoped will be the first robot capable of drawing people from real life. Using A.I. processes and algorithms, cameras in her eyes and a pen in her robotic hand, Ai-Da's ability as a robot to draw from sight has never been achieved before, and could make Ai-Da an artist in her own right.

The project is the brainchild of Gallery Director Aidan Meller who talks Karl through her creation, along with the young engineers making her drawing arm and the team producing her head, face and body. And in the final moments, once she's assembled, will Karl hear from the artist herself?

Presented and Produced by Karl Bos for BBC World Service.

Putting the art into artificial intelligence

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Alain Boublil - The Master Of Musical Theatre20171121"Musical legend Alain Boublil behind the scenes on his latest show Manhattan Parisienne

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The lyricist Alain Boublil is the creator of some of the world's most popular and award winning musicals including Les Misérables, Miss Saigon and Martin Guerre, written with his long-time collaborator, the composer Claude-Michel Schönberg. Les Misérables, a story set on the barricades of post Revolution France, has been performed in 44 countries and is also an Oscar winning film starring Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway.
The BBC's Andrea Kidd follows Alain as he works on his latest show, Manhattan Parisienne. Along with a cast and creative team, they develop and then perform this work in progress in front of a paying audience before asking for their feedback.

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Alain Boublil - The Master Of Musical Theatre20180918Join Alain Boublil as he works on his latest show, Manhattan Parisienne

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The lyricist Alain Boublil is the creator of some of the world's most popular and award winning musicals including Les Misérables, Miss Saigon and Martin Guerre, written with his long-time collaborator, the composer Claude-Michel Schönberg. Les Misérables, a story set on the barricades of post Revolution France, has been performed in 51 countries and is also an Oscar winning film starring Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway.

The BBC's Andrea Kidd follows Alain as he works on his latest show, Manhattan Parisienne. Along with a cast and creative team, they develop and then perform this work in progress in front of a paying audience before asking for their feedback.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

(Photo: Alan Boublil)

"Join Alain Boublil as he works on his latest show, Manhattan Parisienne

(Photo: Alan Boublil)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Alain Boublil €Ⓚ The Master Of Musical Theatre20171121Musical legend Alain Boublil behind the scenes on his latest show Manhattan Parisienne

The lyricist Alain Boublil is the creator of some of the world's most popular and award winning musicals including Les Misérables, Miss Saigon and Martin Guerre, written with his long-time collaborator, the composer Claude-Michel Schönberg. Les Misérables, a story set on the barricades of post Revolution France, has been performed in 44 countries and is also an Oscar winning film starring Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway.
The BBC's Andrea Kidd follows Alain as he works on his latest show, Manhattan Parisienne. Along with a cast and creative team, they develop and then perform this work in progress in front of a paying audience before asking for their feedback.

"Musical legend Alain Boublil behind the scenes on his latest show Manhattan Parisienne

The lyricist Alain Boublil is the creator of some of the world's most popular and award winning musicals including Les Misérables, Miss Saigon and Martin Guerre, written with his long-time collaborator, the composer Claude-Michel Schönberg. Les Misérables, a story set on the barricades of post Revolution France, has been performed in 44 countries and is also an Oscar winning film starring Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway.
The BBC's Andrea Kidd follows Alain as he works on his latest show, Manhattan Parisienne. Along with a cast and creative team, they develop and then perform this work in progress in front of a paying audience before asking for their feedback."

Alan Walker: Behind The Mask20200901Before face masks became compulsory for many of the world's citizens, the Norwegian music producer and DJ Alan Walker was known for wearing a face covering on stage. It lent an air of mystery to his persona but there's been no mystery about the popularity of the music he makes. From his first hit Faded, which has been streamed over a billion times, to packed-out stage gigs the world over and recent collaborations with musical giants like film composer Hans Zimmer, Alan – who's still in his early 20s - has become a global phenomenon.

Recorded during a visit to London on his 2018 UK tour, long before Covid-19 devastated live shows, Alan talks to John Wilson about his early upbringing in the UK, how he creates his music, and the crucial importance of ‘the drop' to electronic dance music.

Presenter and producer: John Wilson for BBC World Service

Image of Alan Walker by Mohammed Sarmadawy

Norwegian music producer and DJ Alan Walker on how he makes his music

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Alice Sara Ott - Pianist20190618Barefoot, sitting cross-legged at the piano, sometimes even with her own blood streaked across the keys, German-Japanese pianist Alice Sara Ott believes everything should come from your hands.

We meet Alice in her rehearsal room at Steinway Haus on a hot day in Munich as she prepares for new live performances in France, Germany and the UK. Alice shares her sense of humour, explores how she interprets music, talks about the colours she adds, what kind of piano she favours, and why she always travels with a rubik's cube.

And as Alice says; you don't have to be educated to listen to classical music; you get educated by listening to it. T-shirts, flip flops, popcorn, all are welcome at a concert with Alice Sara Ott.

The pieces come from her new album Nightfall with piano music from Satie, Debussy and Ravel. The album is a personal project for Alice, the recording last year coinciding with her 30th birthday and a sudden illness in her family. The album has taken on an even stronger personal significance for Alice, following her recent diagnosis with Multiple Sclerosis.

Producer: Sasha Edye-Lindner

(Photo: Alice Sara Ott. Credit: Esther Haase)

In rehearsal with concert pianist Alice Sara Ott as she prepares for live shows in Europe

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In rehearsal with Alice Sara Ott, a concert pianist with Multiple Sclerosis

Allen Coulter - American Tv Director20190226Allen Coulter is a pioneer director of premium television drama in the United States. His career changed after he worked on The Sopranos, perhaps the most ground-breaking show ever to hit TV screens. Since then he has won multiple Emmy and Directors Guild of America awards for long running shows like Sex and the City, Boardwalk Empire and House of Cards.

Gretchen Mol, who starred in five series of Boardwalk Empire, joins Allen on the streets of New York. They linger on the Lower East Side where he used iconic tenement buildings for his period dramas. Gretchen's glad Allen often chose overhead shots rather than traditional close ups to tell her character's story.

At a nearby editing suite, Allen looks at episodes he has just filmed in LA. It is a drama (still largely under wraps) about Nasa for Apple TV. He shows Gretchen his thick ‘book' where he's mapped out every camera angle and every movement for the actors. He watches each frame and gives notes to his post-production team. Allen Coulter is known for getting great performances and establishing atmospheric detail. He is like a film ‘auteur' Gretchen tells him, but like most TV directors, he prefers to avoid the limelight.

Producer: Judith Kampfner

Allen Coulter peels back the secrets of directing pioneering TV drama hits

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

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Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

Andile Vellem: Hearing Through Movement20190917Music and dance are so tied together, it might be hard to imagine how a profoundly deaf dancer can become an international star in the contemporary dance world - but South African Andile Vellem has done it. Vellem lost his hearing at the age of five, but that hasn't stopped him from dancing, or becoming the Artistic Director of one of South Africa's leading integrated dance companies, Unmute.

Andile grew up in a house full of dance. His parents were famous ballroom dancers - one of the few professional dance genres open to non-whites - and as a small child he remembers his sister holding his hand to a speaker so he could feel the vibrations created by the music. As he grew older, inspired first by Michael Jackson, and later by the rich musical history of the Cape, he learned to sense music through vibration - creating his own style of dance, including sign dance.

Our presenter, British singer and musician Nathaniel Mann, travels to Cape Town for a close encounter with the talented dancer, as he embarks on a new production called Trapped Man, in which he and another dancer are bound tightly together, struggling for release.

Nathaniel follows Andile through the work's creation, from the inspiration for the choreography, through rehearsals and the composition of its unique soundtrack – inspired by a century of South African music – as he builds towards the all-important public performance.

Presented by Nathaniel Mann
Produced by Sara Jane Hall for the BBC World Service

(Photo: South African dancer Andile Vellem. Image courtesy of Bronwyn Lloyd)

South African dancer Andile Vellem, prepares for his new production called Trapped Man

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Andre Rieu: Welcome To His World20180724Andre Rieu creates, produces and performs up to 100 concerts a year. How does he maintain his stamina, preserve his creativity and sustain his interest for audiences around the world?

Andre Rieu is one of the world's biggest classical music stars. His concerts bring audiences to their feet, dancing in the aisles, humming along and crying tears of joy to Shostakovich's The Second Waltz and Strauss' The Blue Danube. His Johann Strauss Orchestra is the biggest private orchestra in the world and his home – his castle – houses a state-of-the-art recording studio for their exclusive use.

Eleri Llian Rees follows Andre through the process of creating his new concert series for his home city of Maastricht. She watches as Maastricht's Vrijthof is transformed from a quiet square to a concert venue, complete with a huge stage and seating for 11,000 people. She hears how Andre's creative process builds from working alone on his set list, then bringing in his wife and family, to rehearsing with his Johann Strauss Orchestra and huge production team to create an experience for his audience that is both musically and visually spectacular. How does Andre keep himself motivated, interested and in love with the music he performs?

(Photo: Andre Rieu)

How does classical music star Andre Rieu create a concert series for Maastricht in 2018?

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"How does classical music star Andre Rieu create a concert series for Maastricht in 2018?

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Andre Rieu is one of the world’s biggest classical music stars. His concerts bring audiences to their feet, dancing in the aisles, humming along and crying tears of joy to Shostakovich’s The Second Waltz and Strauss’ The Blue Danube. His Johann Strauss Orchestra is the biggest private orchestra in the world and his home – his castle – houses a state-of-the-art recording studio for their exclusive use.

Eleri Llian Rees follows Andre through the process of creating his new concert series for his home city of Maastricht. She watches as Maastricht’s Vrijthof is transformed from a quiet square to a concert venue, complete with a huge stage and seating for 11,000 people. She hears how Andre’s creative process builds from working alone on his set list, then bringing in his wife and family, to rehearsing with his Johann Strauss Orchestra and huge production team to create an experience for his audience that is both musically and visually spectacular. How does Andre keep himself motivated, interested and in love with the music he performs?

(Photo: Andre Rieu)

"

Andrey Kurkov: Creating Mysteries Across Time20180731"One of Ukraine's most famous writers researches his latest novel

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Andrey Kurkov is one of Ukraine's most famous and prolific writers. His novel Death and the Penguin is a worldwide best seller and his books are full of black humour and intrigue.

As Andrey starts on his, as yet untitled, 23rd novel, set between the 11th Century and the 1970s Soviet Union, the BBC's Olga Smirnova follows him from his studio in central Kiev to the calm of the capital's St Sophia Cathedral, where he draws inspiration for this latest book.
Unusually Andrey will be collaborating with another Ukrainian writer who lives 500km away. We find out how this novel partnership is impacting his creativity.

(Image: Andrey Kurkov)

"

Andrey Kurkov is one of Ukraine’s most famous and prolific writers. His novel Death and the Penguin is a worldwide best seller and his books are full of black humour and intrigue.

As Andrey starts on his, as yet untitled, 23rd novel, set between the 11th Century and the 1970s Soviet Union, the BBC’s Olga Smirnova follows him from his studio in central Kiev to the calm of the capital’s St Sophia Cathedral, where he draws inspiration for this latest book.
Unusually Andrey will be collaborating with another Ukrainian writer who lives 500km away. We find out how this novel partnership is impacting his creativity.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Ann Goldstein: The Art Of The Translator20180703Daniel Hahn and Ann Goldstein are translators, inhabiting a strange world between creation and publication, but with their own literary and linguistic creativity shaping the final form. Goldstein has been translating for decades, turning the words of Elena Ferrante, Primo Levi and Jhumpa Lahiri, amongst others, into English. She works prolifically, and in this episode Daniel, himself a prize-winning author and literary judge, will spend time with her over the course of three days as she translates a new, award-winning Italian book.

Daniel Hahn discuss with her how to know where to translate exactly and where to get the sense, how to translate phrases which have no translation, and share experiences about the politics of translation. He finds out how this literary great came to translating, how she chooses the books she wishes to translate and to what extent she acts – as so many translators do – as an advocate for foreign-language books to English-language publishers. And implicit in all this is what is core to the translator's art – intercession between cultures, sharing ideas and stories which would otherwise go unshared.

What are the challenges of translating foreign language books into the English language?

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"What are the challenges of translating foreign language books into the English language?

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Daniel Hahn discuss with her how to know where to translate exactly and where to get the sense, how to translate phrases which have no translation, and share experiences about the politics of translation. He finds out how this literary great came to translating, how she chooses the books she wishes to translate and to what extent she acts – as so many translators do – as an advocate for foreign-language books to English-language publishers. And implicit in all this is what is core to the translator's art – intercession between cultures, sharing ideas and stories which would otherwise go unshared.

"

Ann Goldstein: The Art Of The Translator20201110Daniel Hahn and Ann Goldstein are translators, inhabiting a strange world between creation and publication, but with their own literary and linguistic creativity shaping the final form. Goldstein has been translating for decades, turning the words of Elena Ferrante, Primo Levi and Jhumpa Lahiri, amongst others, into English. She works prolifically, and in this episode Daniel, himself a prize-winning author and literary judge, spends time with her over the course of three days in 2018 as she translates an award-winning Italian book.

Daniel Hahn discusses with her how to know where to translate exactly and where to get the sense, how to translate phrases which have no translation, and shares experiences about the politics of translation. He finds out how this literary great came to translating, how she chooses the books she wishes to translate and to what extent she acts – as so many translators do – as an advocate for foreign-language books to English-language publishers. And implicit in all this is what is core to the translator's art – intercession between cultures, sharing ideas and stories which would otherwise go unshared.

What are the challenges of translating foreign language books into the English language?

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Anna Meredith And Richard Slaney20180807Scottish composer Anna Meredith has been writing music for a new commission to be premiered at the opening of the BBC Proms to mark the centenary of the First World War. Entitled “Five Telegrams”, the piece is based on the theme of communication during the conflict. Anna's music will be complemented by large scale projections on the Royal Albert Hall in London created by Richard Slaney and his team at 59 Productions. A further performance will take place in Edinburgh in August.

Emma Kingsley follows Anna and Richard as they prepare for the first performance- a curtain raiser the evening before the official First Night of the Proms. There are numerous challenges in getting the music and the visuals to work together successfully and in time with each other. And with only short summer nights to test out the projections during the hours of darkness, practice time is short.

Presented and produced by Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

(Image of Anna Meredith by Anna Victoria Best)

Anna Meredith and Richard Slaney create the first performance of Five Telegrams

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"create the first performance of Five Telegrams

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Scottish composer Anna Meredith has been writing music for a new commission to be premiered at the opening of the BBC Proms to mark the centenary of the First World War. Entitled “Five Telegrams ?, the piece is based on the theme of communication during the conflict. Anna's music will be complemented by large scale projections on the Royal Albert Hall in London created by Richard Slaney and his team at 59 Productions. A further performance will take place in Edinburgh in August.

(Image of Anna Meredith by Anna Victoria Best)

"

Scottish composer Anna Meredith has been writing music for a new commission to be premiered at the opening of the BBC Proms to mark the centenary of the First World War. Entitled “Five Telegrams ?, the piece is based on the theme of communication during the conflict. Anna’s music will be complemented by large scale projections on the Royal Albert Hall in London created by Richard Slaney and his team at 59 Productions. A further performance will take place in Edinburgh in August.

"Anna Meredith and Richard Slaney create the first performance of Five Telegrams

Anna Starobinets20190219"

“Life is really merciless…it is the truth we don't want to see ?, that's according to the Russian award-winning writer Anna Starobinets, who has made her name by exploring our deepest fears, even earning her the title ‘Russian Queen of Horror'. Her debut work, An Awkward Age - a collection of chilling short stories set in the streets of Moscow and various creepy parallel worlds - kick-started her career and earned her international acclaim.

Although Anna is probably most famous for her dystopian and metaphysical novels and short stories, she refuses to be defined by a particular genre. As a mother of two, she delved into children's literature because she felt there was a lack of good quality children's reading, which engaged both kids and parents.

After the tragic death of her husband in 2017, Anna suffered from writer's block. But 18 months later she recovered her ability. Natalia Golysheva joins Anna as she begins the process of creating a brand new book for her children's series, The Beastly Crimes, and hears how she approaches the process of inventing new characters and plots - especially ones which explore complex and, at times, cruel things in a way that young people can relate to.

Produced by Natalia Golysheva for BBC World Service

(Image: Anna Starobinets with kind permission)

The \u2018Russian Queen of Horror' takes us through the process of creating her next book

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

“Life is really merciless…it is the truth we don't want to see”, that's according to the Russian award-winning writer Anna Starobinets, who has made her name by exploring our deepest fears, even earning her the title ‘Russian Queen of Horror'. Her debut work, An Awkward Age - a collection of chilling short stories set in the streets of Moscow and various creepy parallel worlds - kick-started her career and earned her international acclaim.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Anthony Horowitz2019040220200121 (WS)The British writer Anthony Horowitz is known throughout the world for his Alex Rider series of novels, which have sold millions and been translated into over 40 languages. His latest novel, Nightshade, will be published later this year, and in this week's In the Studio there's another chance to hear how he creates his characters and plot as he gives the BBC's Olga Smirnova a rare glimpse into his writing process.

In this programme, first broadcast in April 2019, Olga follows Anthony as he completes chapter after chapter, gathering clues about the way he likes to write. From choosing the perfect pen and ink to the so-called 'divorce door' in his study, we hear how he creates the right setting to research scenarios, invent (and kill off) villains and develop the adventures of his hero.

We also follow Anthony outside the rigour of his study, as he gathers inspiration from walks with his dog and meets his publisher as the work nears completion.

Produced and presented by Olga Smirnova for BBC World Service.

(Image: British writer Anthony Horowitz, with kind permission)

We follow British writer Anthony Horowitz as he works on his next novel, Nightshade

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The British writer Anthony Horowitz is known throughout the world for his Alex Rider series of novels which have sold millions and been translated into over 40 languages. In this week's In the Studio he gives the BBC's Olga Smirnova a rare glimpse into his writing process as he works on his next novel in the series, called “Nightshade”.

Olga follows Anthony as he completes chapter after chapter, gathering clues about the way he likes to write. From choosing the perfect pen and ink to the so-called “Divorce door” in his study, we hear how he creates the right setting to research scenarios, invent (and kill off) villains and develop the adventures of his hero.

(Image: British writer Anthony Horowitz)

We follow British writer Anthony Horowitz as he works on his next novel \u201cNightshade\u201d

The British writer Anthony Horowitz is known throughout the world for his Alex Rider series of novels, which have sold millions and been translated into over 40 languages. His latest novel, Nightshade, will be published later this year, and in this week's In the Studio there's another chance to hear how he creates his characters and plot as he gives the BBC's Olga Smirnova a rare glimpse into his writing process.

(Image: British writer Anthony Horowitz, with kind permission)

We follow British writer Anthony Horowitz as he works on his next novel, Nightshade

The British writer Anthony Horowitz is known throughout the world for his Alex Rider series of novels which have sold millions and been translated into over 40 languages. His latest novel “Nightshade” will be published later this year and in this week's In the Studio there's another chance to hear how he creates his characters and plot as he gives the BBC's Olga Smirnova a rare glimpse into his writing process.

In this programme, first broadcast in April 2019, Olga follows Anthony as he completes chapter after chapter, gathering clues about the way he likes to write. From choosing the perfect pen and ink to the so-called “Divorce door” in his study, we hear how he creates the right setting to research scenarios, invent (and kill off) villains and develop the adventures of his hero.

We follow British writer Anthony Horowitz as he works on his next novel \u201cNightshade\u201d

Ar Rahman: The Man Behind The Music2019010120201229 (WS)AR Rahman is known as the ‘Mozart of Madras' and for good reason. He has won two Academy Awards, two Grammy Awards, a BAFTA Award, a Golden Globe, four National Film Awards, 15 Filmfare Awards. Perhaps most incredibly he has crossed film genres, languages, nationality and film industries across the globe, conquering Bollywood, Hollywood and Kollywood. It is 10 years since the debut of Slumdog Millionaire but Rahman's songs still linger in the imagination.

Rahman is prolific and instinctual; working not just as a musical director but now as producer, director, teacher and visual artist. To each project he brings a touch of magic whether it be his latest virtual reality film Musk, his incredible catalogue of Hindi and Tamil film scores, global pop hits such as Jai Ho or in his superstar collaborations such as Super Heavy with Mick Jagger, Dave Stuart, Joss Stone and Damian Marley.

Lifelong fan, producer and DJ Bobby Friction meets Rahman as he reaches the end of his biggest US tour in Houston, Texas. We learn how the melodies he creates alone in the quiet of night are recreated by a cast of India's greatest singers and musicians and performed to entertain thousands across America.

For Rahman, and Bobby, music is God. Spirituality is deeply entwined with the process of composition for both men and together they will explore some of the tracks which resonate with their belief in the true power of music.

(Photo: AR Rahman. Credit: Azhar Khan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

AR Rahman on music, God and how spirituality is entwined in the process of composition

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Lifelong fan, producer and DJ Bobby Friction meets Rahman as he reaches the end of his biggest US tour in Houston, Texas. We learn how the melodies he creates alone in the quiet of night are recreated by a cast of India's greatest singers and musicians and performed to entertain thousands across America.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Arash - Making Music In The Sun20210323The singer/songwriter Arash Labaf is a global superstar, having racked up billions of views for hits like “Boro Boro” and “She Makes Me Go”. He's in demand as a collaborator with artists like Marshmello, Shaggy and Snoop Dogg, he's a TV personality as well and he's won numerous awards.

Arash's roots are Persian- he was born in Iran although his family left for Sweden when Arash was a boy and he stayed living there until recently. A few years ago he moved to Dubai, but he's continually looking for ways to incorporate his heritage into his music. One way he does so is by singing in Farsi, his mother tongue, on most of his songs.

Georgia Tolley follows Arash in Dubai as he works on his music. She meets Arash's longtime collaborators, producer Robert Uhlmann and his brother Henrik who's Arash's manager, and hears how Arash creates songs and draws on his rich cultural background.

Presented by Georgia Tolley
Produced by Georgia Tolley and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

The singer/songwriter superstar Arash creates new music in his studio in Dubai.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Argentine Ballet Dancer Marianela Nuf1ez20190319Argentine dancer Marianela Nuñez is considered one of the greatest ballerinas in the world. As she celebrates 20 years of dancing with the Royal Ballet - and prepares to perform not one, but two, roles in a new production of the classic ballet, La Bayadère - she shares what it means to be a leading dancer in today's world by letting Beaty Rubens into the studio with her.

We join Marianela as she attends specially designed Pilates classes and studio rehearsals with the leading Russian dancer who partners her, Vadim Muntagirov, as well as the great Russian ballerina, Natalia Makarov. There are glimpses of Marianela at home in her native San Martin, a suburb of Buenos Aires, and Beaty discovers what impact a lifetime of dancing at this level has on the feet – leaving Marianela in her dressing room after opening night with her feet in a bucket of ice, and surrounded by bouquets of pink roses.

Produced and Presented by Beaty Rubens

(Photo: Argentine dancer Marianela Nuñez. Credit: Bill Cooper/ROH)

Argentine dancer Marianela Nu\u00f1ez prepares for her latest ballet production, La Bayad\u00e8re

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

(Image: Argentine dancer Marianela Nuñez. Credit to: Bill Cooper / ROH)

Arnd Henning Heissen - The Art Of Mixology20171205Top mixologist Arnd Henning Heissen creates the cocktails for his latest menu

Frankincense, tonka beans and a steam iron. Just some of the elements that top mixologist Arnd Henning Heissen uses to create his cocktails. Inspired by aromatherapy and the perfumes people wear, he searches the globe for unusual ingredients to recreate that smell in drink form, blending together bark juices and fragrant herbs, working with smell and memories to craft what he calls ‘liquid sculptures.' Lindsay Leonard meets him in Berlin, Germany as he creates new tastes and sensations for his latest menu.

Producers: Lindsay Leonard and Andrea Kidd

"Top mixologist Arnd Henning Heissen creates the cocktails for his latest menu

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Producers: Lindsay Leonard and Andrea Kidd"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Aron Warner: Animating For China20171003Animator Aaron Warner invites us behind the scenes of creating an animation for China

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Aron Warner won an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature as a producer of the blockbuster Shrek and has also worked on films such as Trolls and Book of Life. We join him in his Hollywood studio as he animates a film solely for a China audience.

Chinese markets have opened up to Hollywood but Aaron reveals that making a successful film in China is quite different to the normal Hollywood animation. For a start the lead has to be male, the story has be about a collective experience rather than from the point of view of the individual and Aron has to have in mind that instead of parents taking children to the cinema, the general trend in China is that young adults take their aging parents to the cinema.

Not only do we get a fascinating insight into the production of an animation we also get a greater understanding of how the Chinese audience differs, contrasting the different cultures Hollywood is trying to animate for.

"Animator Aaron Warner invites us behind the scenes of creating an animation for China

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Not only do we get a fascinating insight into the production of an animation we also get a greater understanding of how the Chinese audience differs, contrasting the different cultures Hollywood is trying to animate for."

Not only do we get a fascinating insight into the production of an animation we also get a greater understanding of how the Chinese audience differs, contrasting the different cultures Hollywood is trying to animate for."

"""Animator Aaron Warner invites us behind the scenes of creating an animation for China

Not only do we get a fascinating insight into the production of an animation we also get a greater understanding of how the Chinese audience differs, contrasting the different cultures Hollywood is trying to animate for."""

Artificial Improvisation20200225Professor Gil Weinberg has created the world's first robot musician. Shimon is a marimba-playing robot with eight arms that can improvise live music in any genre.

The world is familiar with musical robots that can play programmed music, but Gil has created robotic musicians. This means they are musicians first, and robots second. In real time, these robot musicians come up with fresh ideas designed to inspire human musicians to play music in new ways.

Award-winning jazz composer Kris Bowers (Green Book, Dear White People, How They See Us) is in the studio with Gil, and many of Gil's students and local jazz musicians. Together, they are exploring how artificial intelligence can push our understanding of what humans are capable of, and examine whether AI can enhance the abilities of musicians. They also ponder the question of whether a robot can truly be as creative as a human being.

Kris is examining three aspects of Gil's robotic musicians, and taking part in some experiments that are happening publicly for the first time. The first aspect that Kris examines is Shimon's ability to mirror the playing style of his fellow musicians; through this, Kris will be able to objectively analyse his own playing, with the hope of improving his craft in unprecedented ways. The second is exploring how Shimon has now been given the ability to improvise lyrics in a live rap battle, and the third is Gil's work in the field of prosthetics. Kris plays with amputee drummer Jason Barnes, whose prosthetic drumming arm holds a stick that Kris can control with the music he plays.

Producer: Anishka Sharma

Composer Kris Bowers meets Shimon, a robot that can improvise live music

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Arwa Al-ammari: Putting Saudi Elegance On The Fashion Map20200114Saudi fashion designer Arwa al-Ammari is one of a handful of haute couture designers to emerge in recent years. She has recently begun combining traditional Saudi design with striking modernity and elegant modesty. Her latest line reaches back into the textures, history and geography of her nation and fuses them with the catwalk elegance of Milan.

Arwa's journey into design began as a painter and sculptor and she brought those multimedia disciplines, and attention to detail, to the fashion scene with her brand ArAm Designs in 2013. In 2016 she won the international reality show Fashion Star and remains determined to put Saudi elegance on the fashion map.

Reporter Cyma Aziz visits Arwa at the design table in her workshop as she prepares a new range for the catwalk.

Presenter: Cyma Aziz
Producer: Mark Burman

Saudi designer Arwa al-Ammari prepares a new range for the catwalk

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Belarus Free Theatre: Directing From A Distance20200505Belarus Free Theatre - directing a play down a Skype line from London to Minsk

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The award-winning Belarus Free Theatre was founded 15 years ago to create drama around issues of human rights and creative freedom in a country which has been called Europe's last surviving dictatorship. It creates provocative physical shows attended by audiences in secret locations around Minsk and has achieved international recognition and support.

BFT's founding artistic directors Natalia Kaliada and Nicolai Khalezin cannot rehearse the actors face to face because they are now political refugees living in the United Kingdom. So, for the past nine years they have been using a Skype line to connect with the performers hundreds of miles away.

Natalia and Nicolai have been rehearsing the actors in a new play called Dogs of Europe, based on the novel by the contemporary Belarusian author Alhierd Bacharevic, which depicts life in a dystopian super state where individual freedoms are taken away. As well as performing in Minsk, the actors were also set to come to London and perform at the Barbican Theatre. But Covid-19 has put an end to that plan. So what will the company do instead?

The BBC's Olga Smirnova follows Natalia and Nikolai during the process of rehearsal and performance and hears from them and the actors about the techniques of directing from a distance. She also talks to the British actor and writer Stephen Fry who is taking part in BFT's newest venture.

Presenter: Olga Smirnova

Producer: Olga Smirnova and Emma Kingsley

Photo credits: Daniella Kaliada/Kolya Kuprich

Ben Okri20210223In the Studio enters the creative mind of the celebrated Nigerian poet and author Ben Okri.

Ben takes us on the journey of a new poem as it forms in his mind and makes its way to the page. Coinciding with a newly published anthology of his poems, A Fire in My Head, he reflects on the poetry writing process and the role of the poet in the 21st century.

Through a mixture of audio diary recorded in London during lockdown and in conversation with the BBC's Bola Mosuro, Ben offers an unique insight into his way of bringing one of the most ancient literary forms to life.

Presented by Bola Mosuro
Produced by Neil McCarthy for the BBC World Service
Image by Mat Bray

The Nigerian writer on how a poem forms in his mind and makes its way onto the page

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Bert And Bertie20200211There are very few female film directors in Hollywood, but directing duo Bert and Bertie, are forging a name for themselves.

Aleks Krotoski joins Bert and Bertie as they direct their latest film, Troop Zero, which stars McKenna Grace and Oscar winners Allison Janney and Viola Davis. The film is set in 1977 in rural Georgia, where a misfit girl dreams of life in outer space. When a competition offers her a chance to be recorded on Nasa's Golden Record, she recruits a makeshift troop of Birdie Scouts, forming friendships that last a lifetime.

To get a real insight into the Hollywood system and the role of directors in the making of a film, Aleks joins the Berts on location in Louisiana as they shoot the film, and in the studio during the edit. Not only are the directors both women with young children, but the writers, producers and the majority of the production crew are also women. Bert and Bertie talk to Aleks about how they are proactively trying to change women's opportunities in the industry through their hiring practices.

Other contributors to the programme include co-writer Lucy Alibar, executive producer Jenny Hinkey and cinematographer James Whitaker.

Producer: Kate Bissell

A directing duo making a name for themselves in Hollywood

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Bicycles Of The Future2019070920200922 (WS)From Picasso to Ai Weiwei, from Iris Murdoch to H G Wells, cycling has long been the inspiration for artists and creative minds. Yet the fundamental design of a bicycle has remained unchanged for over a hundred years and the material of choice to build the frames is usually metal or carbon.

Top endurance cyclist Lee Craigie travels to Denmark to meet cutting edge bicycle designers Paul Harder Cohen and Mette Walsted, who are taking a very different approach and crafting bikes from a material that's been around for millions of years: wood. Paul and Mette take Lee through their creative process in their buzzing dockside studio workshop in Copenhagen, as they design and construct their bike frames from Danish ash. Each bike takes over two months to make and each one is unique thanks to the organic nature of the wood they are crafted from.

As well as getting involved in the creation of a new bicycle, Lee finds out about ways that form and function intersect, and hops into the saddle to reflect on how this design gives a highly distinctive feeling of interaction between rider and machine.

Produced by Alex Anderson. A Tandem Production for the BBC World Service.

(Image: Bike designers Mette Walsted and Paul Harder Cohen, with kind permission)

Lee Craigie meets cutting edge bike designers Paul Harder Cohen and Mette Walsted

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

From Picasso to Ai Weiwei, from Iris Murdoch to H G Wells, cycling has long been the inspiration for artists and creative minds. Yet the fundamental design of a bicycle has remained unchanged for over a hundred years and the material of choice to build the frames is usually metal or carbon.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Bjarke Ingels: Big Art In Copenhagen20181211"

Bjarke Ingels is a Danish architectural wunderkind. He has has projects all over the world – from eco-skyscrapers in China to a flood resistant water park in Manhattan, from zoos and museums to hotels and public swimming pools in the reworking of old industrial ports. He has offices in New York and London but we catch up with him in the Copenhagen studio, an airy former Carlsberg factory in the industrial quarter.

Here Bjarke and his team are at work putting the finishing touches to a new addition to the Copenhagen skyline. A waste to energy plant – a vast silvery building may not seem very glamorous but Bjarke is turning its huge slanting roof into a ski slope. Copenhagen has plenty of snow after all, but no hills. The plant's chimney, which emits steam not toxins, Bjarke is fashioning to blow vast ‘smoke rings', fluffy donuts into the sky…that's a work in progress.

Bjarke explains his philosophy as an architect, why he is obsessed with Darwin and we are with him for the opening of BIG ART in Copenhagen's Charlottenborg Gallery – a celebration of how Bjarke and his team collaborate with artists - and manages to have fun.

Bjarke Ingels is currently one of the hottest young architects on the planet

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

Bolanle Austen-peters €Ⓚ Creating New Theatre In Lagos20180109In the Studio follows Bolanle Austen-Peters, artistic director of Terra Kulture in Lagos,

From the first script meeting to the final rehearsals, In the Studio follows Bolanle Austen-Peters, the artistic director of Terra Kulture in Lagos, as she develops and crafts her latest musical play. Called Fela and the Kalakuta Queens, the show tells the story of the legendary Nigerian musician Fela Kuti and his 27 wives, or his Queens as he called them.

Presenter: Peter Okwoche
Producer: Andrea Kidd

"In the Studio follows Bolanle Austen-Peters, artistic director of Terra Kulture in Lagos,

Presenter: Peter Okwoche
Producer: Andrea Kidd "

Bolanle Austen-peters: Creating New Theatre In Lagos20180109Follow Bolanle Austen-Peters, artistic director of Terra Kulture as she creates a play

From the first script meeting to the final rehearsals, In the Studio follows Bolanle Austen-Peters, the artistic director of Terra Kulture in Lagos, as she develops and crafts her latest musical play. Called Fela and the Kalakuta Queens, the show tells the story of the legendary Nigerian musician Fela Kuti and his 27 wives, or his Queens as he called them.

Presenter: Peter Okwoche
Producer: Andrea Kidd

"Follow Bolanle Austen-Peters, artistic director of Terra Kulture as she creates a play

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Presenter: Peter Okwoche
Producer: Andrea Kidd"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Boris Akunin - Creator Of Russia's Crime Fiction Hero20180116"Russian Boris Akunin aka Grigory Chkhartishvili on the art of writing crime novels

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Boris Akunin is one of Russia's most widely read contemporary novelists. His crime fiction series with the impossibly brilliant detective Erast Fandorin has sold over 30 million copies worldwide. But Boris Akunin is a pen name. The author's latest work is written under his real name Grigory Chkhartishvili and is something entirely different – a historical novel set in the time of Peter the Great. Andrea Kennedy meets Grigory in his London home to find out how he writes a novel, finds a plot, uncovers his characters and why moving from country to country every three weeks is essential to his writing.

Producer: Andrea Kennedy

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Boris Akunin €Ⓚ Creator Of Russia’s Crime Fiction Hero20180116Russian Boris Akunin aka Grigory Chkhartishvili on the art of writing crime novels

Boris Akunin is one of Russia's most widely read contemporary novelists. His crime fiction series with the impossibly brilliant detective Erast Fandorin has sold over 30 million copies worldwide. But Boris Akunin is a pen name. The author's latest work is written under his real name Grigory Chkhartishvili and is something entirely different – a historical novel set in the time of Peter the Great. Andrea Kennedy meets Grigory in his London home to find out how he writes a novel, finds a plot, uncovers his characters and why moving from country to country every three weeks is essential to his writing.

Producer: Andrea Kennedy

"Russian Boris Akunin aka Grigory Chkhartishvili on the art of writing crime novels

Producer: Andrea Kennedy "

Brazilian Artist Vik Muniz Wants To Tickle Your Brain20170425Brazilian artist Vik Muniz likes to trap and fool his audience with trickery and illusion

Vik Muniz says he owes his artistic career to being shot as a young man, not because he had an epiphany about the meaning of his life, but because he won enough compensation from the accident to move to New York and kick start his career in the art world. He is now probably one of Brazil's most successful visual artists and he divides his time between Rio and New York. His pieces can range from tiny specs that are photographed by microscopes to giant landscapes captured from helicopters. He's arguably most known for working with unconventional materials; some of his most famous works have been created out of sugar, chocolate and a plate of left over spaghetti. Andrea Kennedy went to New York to meet him as he prepared for a recent exhibition, full of illusions designed to fool and trap his audience.

"Vik Muniz says he owes his artistic career to being shot as a young man, not because he had an epiphany about the meaning of his life, but because he won enough compensation from the accident to move to New York and kick start his career in the art world. He is now probably one of Brazil's most successful visual artists and he divides his time between Rio and New York. His pieces can range from tiny specs that are photographed by microscopes to giant landscapes captured from helicopters. He's arguably most known for working with unconventional materials; some of his most famous works have been created out of sugar, chocolate and a plate of left over spaghetti. Andrea Kennedy went to New York to meet him as he prepared for a recent exhibition, full of illusions designed to fool and trap his audience.

"

"Brazilian artist Vik Muniz likes to trap and fool his audience with trickery and illusion

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Vik Muniz says he owes his artistic career to being shot as a young man, not because he had an epiphany about the meaning of his life, but because he won enough compensation from the accident to move to New York and kick start his career in the art world. He is now probably one of Brazil's most successful visual artists and he divides his time between Rio and New York. His pieces can range from tiny specs that are photographed by microscopes to giant landscapes captured from helicopters. He's arguably most known for working with unconventional materials; some of his most famous works have been created out of sugar, chocolate and a plate of left over spaghetti. Andrea Kennedy went to New York to meet him as he prepared for a recent exhibition, full of illusions designed to fool and trap his audience.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

British Composer Hannah Kendall20170905Andrew McGregor follows Hannah Kendall as she creates her latest work Molten Madness

Molten Madness, silver sheen and the fortress of flames – some of the words that have inspired British composer Hannah Kendal's latest work The Spark Catchers. Hannah was chosen by Chineke! the UK's first black and ethnic minority orchestra, to create a celebratory piece for them and her World Premiere will be performed at the BBC Proms, the world's biggest music festival.

Hannah often turns to literature for ideas and this piece was inspired by Lemn Sissay's poem The Spark Catchers, written for the 2012 London Olympics and Hannah has transferred the story and the energy of the text into her music.

Andrew McGregor follows Hannah as she creates the piece from her living room studio to a performance at The Royal Albert Hall in London.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

"Creating a new work for the BBC Proms.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

Andrew McGregor follows Hannah Kendall as she creates her latest work Molten Madness"

"Andrew McGregor follows Hannah Kendall as she creates her latest work Molten Madness

Producer: Andrea Kidd "

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

British Percussionist Colin Currie20190212British percussionist Colin Currie is in demand as a soloist the world over and includes the American contemporary composer Steve Reich amongst his fans. As well as performing the classics, he's also a pioneering figure in the world of new music, inspiring composers to create works highlighting the percussionist as so much more than the xylophone or marimba player (with a few bells and drums), but rather as a solo performer leading a musical argument.

In the Studio this week follows Colin as he prepares for the World Premiere of the Percussion Concerto by the acclaimed composer Helen Grime. The work will be premiered in London by the London Philharmonic Orchestra and then in the US by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, with both concerts led by the world famous conductor Marin Alsop.

Colin Currie has given Nicky Barranger exclusive access into his world as he prepares for the concert in London, discussing the new piece with Helen Grime even before it is finished and inviting us into his music room to hear parts of the work in development.

Producer: Nicky Barranger and Emma Kingsley

(Image: British percussionist Colin Currie, credit Nicky Barranger)

Percussionist Colin Currie prepares for the premiere of Helen Grime's Percussion Concerto

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

Camilo: The Making Of A Latin Superstar20210504If there is a winning formula for moving from songwriter to performer, Camilo has found it.

At the time of writing, the 27-year-old Colombian star and Latin Grammy-winner has amassed 5.2 billion streams of his song Por Primera and his album, Mis Manos – released just two months ago - has had over 2 billion streams worldwide.

Through his open, warm, and personal approach on social media he has gained 21 million Instagram followers and nearly 23 million TikTok followers - making him the most followed Latin artist on the platform. In 2021 he has already been nominated for a Grammy Award and made his late-night US television debut on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon.

As Mis Manos is released, Colombian reporter Natalia Guerrero talks to Camilo - and those working closest to him - as he prepares to break into the Brazilian market by recording his hit song, BEBÉ in Portuguese and dreams of his first ever show in front of a live audience. Will his dream come true?

Presented and Produced by Natalia Guerrero
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service
Photograph of Camilo by Cristian Saumeth

The Colombian singer and performer on his tribe, his first live audience and\u2026beekeeping

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Cecilia Paredes20191203You might think the aim of most artists and performers is to stand out from the crowd, but not Peruvian-born Cecilia Paredes. Her aim is to blend in, quite literally.

In her series of ‘camouflage' self-portraits, Cecilia's body is painstakingly painted - during a ‘performance' which lasts many hours - to precisely match a colourful and patterned wallpaper or fabric in the background.

The resulting photograph challenges the viewer gaze, to seek out Cecilia's form from the scene behind. It is an idea which began 20 years ago, when Cecilia first arrived in the United States and found herself trying to blend in.

Céline Ottenburgh finds the camouflage artist amongst a crowded airport, and accompanies her as she goes in search of the perfect wallpaper for her latest project, amongst the walls of an 18th century castle in Belgium.

Presenter: Céline Ottenburgh
Producer: Céline Ottenburgh and Ella-mai Robey
Music: Céline Ottenburgh

(Photo: Cecilia Paredes. Credit: Cecilia Paredes art)

Peruvian-born camouflage artist Cecilia Paredes on blending into the walls of a castle

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

You might think the aim of most artists and performers is to stand out from the crowd, but not Peruvian-born Cecilia Paredes. Her aim is to blend in, quite literally.
In her series of ‘camouflage' self-portraits, Cecilia's body is painstakingly painted - during a ‘performance' which lasts many hours - to precisely match a colourful and patterned wallpaper or fabric in the background.
The resulting photograph challenges the viewer gaze, to seek out Cecilia's form from the scene behind. It is an idea which began 20 years ago, when Cecilia first arrived in the United States and found herself trying to blend in.
Céline Ottenburgh finds the camouflage artist amongst a crowded airport, and accompanies her as she goes in search of the perfect wallpaper for her latest project, amongst the walls of an 18th century castle in Belgium.
Presented by Céline Ottenburgh
Produced by Céline Ottenburgh and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service
Music by Céline Ottenburgh

Celeste Mountjoy, Aka Filthyratbag20200331Best known by her alias Filthyratbag, 20 year old artist Celeste Mountjoy's brightly coloured line-drawn illustrations and phrases are at once confessional and relatable, humorous and heart-breaking. Their appeal, as her 384k Instagram followers testify, extends far beyond Celeste's native Melbourne.

From partying and relationships to mental illness and social media vanity, the artist's satirical observations about everyday life encapsulate her experience as a Generation Z'er, and a young woman navigating today's world.

As work begins on new illustrations, reporter Rosa Ellen meets up with Celeste to find out what makes her tick, how she creates her artwork - and why her alias is Filthyratbag.

Presented by Rosa Ellen
Produced by Rosa Ellen and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Artist Celeste Mountjoy's satirical illustrations have made her an Instagram hit

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Celeste Mountjoy, Aka Filthyratbag20210413Best known by her alias Filthyratbag, 21 year old artist Celeste Mountjoy's brightly coloured line-drawn illustrations and phrases are at once confessional and relatable, humorous and heart-breaking. Their appeal, as her 439k Instagram followers testify, extends far beyond Celeste's native Melbourne.

From partying and relationships to mental illness and social media vanity, the artist's satirical observations about everyday life encapsulate her experience as a Generation Z'er and young woman, navigating today's world.

In 2020, as work began on new illustrations, reporter Rosa Ellen met up with Celeste to find out what makes her tick, how she creates her artwork…and why her alias is Filthyratbag.

Presented and Produced by Rosa Ellen
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

The artist whose satirical illustrations have made her an Instagram hit

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Charli Xcx20180911Charli XCX has been the mastermind behind songs for the likes of Rita Ora, David Guetta, Icona Pop, Iggy Azalea, Camilla Cabello, all while being a well respected artist in her own right, with her own devoted fan base: her 'Angels'.

Kate Mossman explores Charli XCX's duality as both a songwriter and a performer with exclusive behind-the-scenes access. Follow Charli into the studio to hear all about her creative process, travel with her to Wembley stadium where she supports Taylor Swift on her Reputation tour, hear exclusive new music in a feedback session she hosts with her fans and experience a rare headline show in London for one of Charli's Pop 2 shows.

You'll get to know Charli more personally and hear her discuss never before talked about topics like her favourite part of her studio process and what it means to her. Charli speaks honestly and articulately about how she combats loneliness on the road and what parts of her work are her least favourite.

Produced by Zoë Marcuzzi, A We Are Grape production for BBC World Service.

Image: Charli XCX (Credit: Andrew Thomas Huang)

Follow pop star Charli XCX into the studio and onto the stage

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"Follow pop star Charli XCX into the studio and onto the stage

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Image: Charli XCX (Credit: Andrew Thomas Huang)

"

Chef Esben Holmboe Bang - Norway On A Plate20170912"He's the youngest chef to hold three Michelin stars

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

He's the youngest chef in the world holding three Michelin Stars and he has invited us into his kitchen as he prepares a brand new dish worthy of his restaurant - Maaemo. For Esben, every flavour is a note and the secret is to build those notes into a symphony. Although Danish by birth his food is designed to take you on a journey, telling the story of the culture and landscape of the country he calls home – Norway. From langoustines with pickled spruce and rapeseed, to a traditional sour cream porridge served with shavings of reindeer heart. The presenter is Andrea Kennedy.

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Chef Esben Holmboe Bang €Ⓚ Norway On A Plate20170912He's the youngest chef to hold three Michelin stars

He's the youngest chef in the world holding three Michelin Stars and he has invited us into his kitchen as he prepares a brand new dish worthy of his restaurant - Maaemo. For Esben, every flavour is a note and the secret is to build those notes into a symphony. Although Danish by birth his food is designed to take you on a journey, telling the story of the culture and landscape of the country he calls home – Norway. From langoustines with pickled spruce and rapeseed, to a traditional sour cream porridge served with shavings of reindeer heart. The presenter is Andrea Kennedy.

"He's the youngest chef to hold three Michelin stars

He's the youngest chef in the world holding three Michelin Stars and he has invited us into his kitchen as he prepares a brand new dish worthy of his restaurant - Maaemo. For Esben, every flavour is a note and the secret is to build those notes into a symphony. Although Danish by birth his food is designed to take you on a journey, telling the story of the culture and landscape of the country he calls home – Norway. From langoustines with pickled spruce and rapeseed, to a traditional sour cream porridge served with shavings of reindeer heart. The presenter is Andrea Kennedy."

Chick Corea: Accomplishing The Goal Of Art2020111720210309 (WS)Chick Corea is one of the legendary figures of jazz. He's a pianist, a 23-times Grammy award winner and he's played with all the jazz greats, like Miles Davis. He's also recognised the world over as a composer, with hits like “Spain” and work ranging from bebop to fusion, works for children and symphonic works for classical players.

In January this year, reporter Renata Sago began recording with Chick as he composed a new Trio Concerto for bass, drums and himself on piano. It was to have its first performance at the MUPA concert hall in Hungary's capital Budapest in March. In his studio in Florida USA, Renata talks to him about how he writes and where his many sources of inspiration come from. And she hears from Chick that although he's composed the music he'll be performing, sometimes it's not easy to play and he has to do a lot of practising.

The pandemic meant that the premiere was later cancelled – but Covid-19 hasn't slowed Chick down. In fact during the past few months he's been taking on new projects and is looking forward to playing in front of a live audience again for the first time for months.

Renata catches up with him again to find out what he's working on now, how he's found a new audience in lockdown and how he turns to all kinds of musical styles to help him accomplish the goal of art.

Presented by Renata Sago
Produced by Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

Photograph of Chick Corea

Jazz legend Chick Corea on composing a new work for jazz trio

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In January this year, reporter Renata Sago began recording with Chick as he composed a new Trio Concerto for bass, drums and himself on piano. It was to have its first performance at the MUPA concert hall in Hungary's capital Budapest in March. In his studio in Florida USA, Renata talks to him about how he writes and where his many sources of inspiration come from. And she hears from Chick that although he's composed the music he'll be performing, sometimes it's not easy to play and he has to do a lot of practising!

Chinese Novelist Chan Koonchung20190312Chan Koonchung is a bestselling novelist who was born in Shanghai, grew up in Hong Kong and later lived in Taipei. He writes in Chinese yet none of his work is published in China. Even the pirated online version of his most famous book The Fat Years was deleted by the Chinese authorities. Why, then, would he move to Beijing and make his home there?

This is one of the questions Julian May puts to Chan when he meets him for this edition of In the Studio, in the room where he writes, on the 27th floor of a tower block with a balcony overlooking the Chinese capital. The answer is simple - because contemporary Chinese society is his subject. He is driven to write about the people, their lives and the system that governs these.

The Fat Years is a work of dystopian science fiction which investigates the unquestioning happiness of the Chinese and the apparent disappearance of a month - no one seems to remember it - when the country entered a golden age of prosperity, just as the rest of the world faced the financial crisis of 2008.

Chan describes the book he is working on during Julian May's visit as 'speculative literary fiction'. He has not decided on a title, but knows it will contain the name Beijing. There are three main characters - one of whom is a ghost - little else seems fixed.

In his studio, lined from floor to ceiling with books, Chan Koongchung describes the laborious way he works, using three computers - an old Chinese character system PC, a newer online device for checking facts and one other. He gets up every morning, shuts out the bright Beijing sun, or the smog, and writes. He is happy in his vocation, and hopeful, but without any certainty that what he creates will ever see the light of day in the country that is his subject and inspiration.

(Image: Chinese novelist Chan Koonchung, with kind permission)

Bestselling Chinese novelist Chan Koonchung talks about the book he is working on now

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Christian Louboutin - Shoe Designer20171107Christian Louboutin takes us through his design processes for Paris Fashion Week

Christian Louboutin is one of the world's best-known shoe designers. His famously red soled, beautifully-crafted creations can be spotted on film stars, royalty, even America's first lady.
Oscar-nominated actress, Dame Kristin Scott Thomas, meets the designer in his private studio on the Rue Jean Jacques Rousseau in central Paris, France.

Despite being friends for over 20 years, Kristin has never been in this space before. As she discovers, the previous owner was an eccentric photographer, once married to Brigitte Bardot's sister, who had three obsessions: ski chalets, bullfighting and boats. And the highly unusual decor was created for him by a famous 1950s French set designer Alexander Trauner.

It's coming up to Paris Fashion Week and Christian is preparing to launch his collection for Spring Summer 2018. Christian gives us detailed insight into his creative process from the initial sketches to working with prototypes and the big reveal of the finished collection.

He describes himself as being a bit like Asterix the Gaul, in the famous French comic strip, who loved roasted boar and would see things everywhere transformed as his favourite dish. Except Christian sees things transformed as a shoe. For example, he shows Kristin a bow inspired by a cake decoration.

One of Christian's major inspirations is travel, particularly India, and we learn how this influences his designs. And together they touch on the psychology of shoes in what is a fun and refreshingly intimate conversation between friends.

(Photo: Christian Louboutin with Dame Kristin Scott Thomas)

"Christian Louboutin takes us through his design processes for Paris Fashion Week

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo: Christian Louboutin with Dame Kristin Scott Thomas)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Cinematographer Christopher Doyle20171010Andrea Kennedy went to meet him on the set of his latest production - The White Girl

Christopher Doyle, one of the most highly acclaimed cinematographers in the world right now. He has a string of awards, creating the visuals for epic productions like In the Mood for Love, Chungking Express and Hero. He is Australian born but has been based in Hong Kong for three decades, working mostly in Chinese language films.

Andrea Kennedy went to meet him on the set of his latest production – The White Girl – his own film that he has co-written and co-directed with Jenny Suen. It is something of a love letter to Hong Kong, the place he now calls home. We follow him as he frames and shoots and muses aloud about how a master of the craft creates cinema.

(Photo: Christopher Doyle. Credit: Getty Images)

"Follow Christopher Doyle as he frames, shoots and muses on the filming of The White Girl

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo: Christopher Doyle. Credit: Getty Images)

Andrea Kennedy went to meet him on the set of his latest production - The White Girl"

"Andrea Kennedy went to meet him on the set of his latest production - The White Girl

(Photo: Christopher Doyle. Credit: Getty Images) "

"""Andrea Kennedy went to meet him on the set of his latest production - The White Girl

(Photo: Christopher Doyle. Credit: Getty Images) """

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Cinematographer Christopher Doyle20180814Christopher Doyle, one of the most highly acclaimed cinematographers in the world right now. He has a string of awards, creating the visuals for epic productions like In the Mood for Love, Chungking Express and Hero. He is Australian born but has been based in Hong Kong for three decades, working mostly in Chinese language films.

Andrea Kennedy went to meet him on the set of his production – The White Girl – his own film that he has co-written and co-directed with Jenny Suen. It is something of a love letter to Hong Kong, the place he now calls home. We follow him as he frames and shoots and muses aloud about how a master of the craft creates cinema.

Presented by Andrea Kennedy

(Image: Christopher Doyle. Credit: Getty Images)

Follow Christopher Doyle as he frames, shoots and muses on the filming of The White Girl

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"Follow Christopher Doyle as he frames, shoots and muses on the filming of The White Girl

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Image: Christopher Doyle. Credit: Getty Images)

"

Andrea Kennedy went to meet him on the set of his production – The White Girl – his own film that he has co-written and co-directed with Jenny Suen. It is something of a love letter to Hong Kong, the place he now calls home. We follow him as he frames and shoots and muses aloud about how a master of the craft creates cinema.

Colin Currie20190212"

British percussionist Colin Currie is in demand as a soloist the world over and includes the American contemporary composer Steve Reich amongst his fans. As well as performing the classics, he's also a pioneering figure in the world of new music, inspiring composers to create works highlighting the percussionist as so much more than the xylophone or marimba player (with a few bells and drums), but rather as a solo performer leading a musical argument.

In the Studio this week follows Colin as he prepares for the World Premiere of the Percussion Concerto by the acclaimed composer Helen Grime. The work will be premiered in London by the London Philharmonic Orchestra and then in the US by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, with both concerts led by the world famous conductor Marin Alsop.

Colin Currie has given Nicky Barranger exclusive access into his world as he prepares for the concert in London, discussing the new piece with Helen Grime even before it is finished and inviting us into his music room to hear parts of the work in development.

Producer: Nicky Barranger and Emma Kingsley

(Image: British percussionist Colin Currie, credit Nicky Barranger)

We follow British percussionist Colin Currie preparing for the premiere of a new concerto

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

British percussionist Colin Currie is in demand as a soloist the world over and includes the American contemporary composer Steve Reich amongst his fans. As well as performing the classics, he’s also a pioneering figure in the world of new music, inspiring composers to create works highlighting the percussionist as so much more than the xylophone or marimba player (with a few bells and drums), but rather as a solo performer leading a musical argument.

Comic Book Artist, Frank Quitely20170808Denise Mina joins acclaimed comic book artist Frank Quitely as he draws his superheroes

Denise Mina meets comic book artist Frank Quitely in his Glasgow studio. Frank is one of the biggest names in the comic world, responsible for drawing superheroes like Superman and Batman and Robin alongside his latest collaboration with writer Mark Millar “Jupiter's Legacy ?

Starting on Scottish underground cult comic 'Electric Soup' he progressed to working for Judge Dredd magazine and then The New X-Men gathering an international reputation.

As he completes the final few pages of comic book 'Jupiter's Legacy 2', artist Frank explains his artistic process as he completes the project that took over 3 years of his life. He will explain how he turns the written concepts from writer Mark Millar into a coherent visual story and finally put pencil to paper to painstakingly produce his signature style.
Denise follows his pencil strokes as he explains artistic and cultural influence as well as soaking in the landscape and atmosphere of his hometown of Glasgow. A real Superhero master class in storytelling, lines and shapes perspective, space and most importantly colour as he creates these last few pages.
They cross to the Glasgow Art Galleries where Frank's career retrospective exhibition is being held and meet up with his writing partner Mark Millar. We'll learn about their working relationship in this competitive industry of graphic storytelling.
During the conversation, Frank discusses with Denise the thoughts that go through his mind in these final stages and talk us through the pressures of creating, plus making, and breaking, deadlines.

(Photo: Frank Quitely. Credit: Demus Productions)

Denise Mina meets comic book artist Frank Quitely in his Glasgow studio. Frank is one of the biggest names in the comic world, responsible for drawing superheroes like Superman and Batman & Robin alongside his latest collaboration with writer Mark Millar “Jupiter's Legacy ?

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"Denise Mina joins acclaimed comic book artist Frank Quitely as he draws his superheroes

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo: Frank Quitely. Credit: Demus Productions)

(Photo: Frank Quitely. Credit: Demus Productions) "

Composer And Pianist Nils Frahm20180327Nils Frahm 0n the creative, emotional and physical processes involved in his new material

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

All Melody is the latest work and tour by contemporary composer and pianist, Nils Frahm. This programme reveals the creative, emotional and physical processes involved when new material is combined with vast stage shows for an international schedule of truly daunting proportions.

Captured during a number of visits to his studio, Nils opens up to his good friend, Sebastian Schipper, director of single-take Berlin heist, Victoria, for which Nils composed the award-winning original score. He also chats to his biggest fan, British TV, film and stage writer, Sam Bain. Not only does the show combine three incredible minds of music, film and TV, the audience is also treated to an immersive binaural experience, recorded at London's Barbican Centre during a run of sold out concerts.

"Nils Frahm 0n the creative, emotional and physical processes involved in his new material

Captured during a number of visits to his studio, Nils opens up to his good friend, Sebastian Schipper, director of single-take Berlin heist, Victoria, for which Nils composed the award-winning original score. He also chats to his biggest fan, British TV, film and stage writer, Sam Bain. Not only does the show combine three incredible minds of music, film and TV, the audience is also treated to an immersive binaural experience, recorded at London's Barbican Centre during a run of sold out concerts."

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Composer Tarik O'regan: The Phoenix Rises20190507This April a new opera with music by the composer Tarik O'Regan had its premiere at Houston Grand Opera. Called The Phoenix, it's based on the life of Lorenzo Da Ponte, best known as Mozart's librettist.

The opera has been years in the making, from Tarik's first idea to the final rewrites. In the Studio follows Tarik through the months of creating the music, the orchestrations and the workshop processes with his collaborator, the librettist and director John Caird.

From Tarik's original base in the former Swaziland, now known as eSwatini, to meetings in London and rehearsals in Houston with singers, opera chorus and the Houston Grand Opera Orchestra led by Artistic and Music Director Patrick Summers, we hear how the music evolves over many months from first sketches to opening night.

Presenter: Sophie Ribstein
Producer: Emma Kingsley

(Image: composer Tarik O' Regan, photo credit: Pedro Greig)

In the Studio follows Tarik O'Regan in the process of creating his new opera The Phoenix

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Conserving The Works Of The Van Gogh Museum20181002Repairing and caring for paintings with conservator Ren\u00e9 Boitelle

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam in The Netherlands is one of the most visited museums in the world. It houses the largest collection of works by the hugely popular 19th century Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, as well as many paintings by his contemporaries. All of these pictures need to be looked after and preserved for future generations and in this programme, the BBC's Karl Bos goes behind the scenes to discover the hidden art of conservation.

Once a painting leaves an artist's studio, it is at risk of physical damage from poor storage, movement or accident and only becomes more vulnerable as it ages and the materials weaken. You can add to the list of dangers past repairs by well-meaning museum staff that have gone terribly wrong. It's a hard life being a work of art. We meet Senior Conservator at the Van Gogh Museum, René Boitelle as he restores a badly damaged painting by Dutch artist Jacob Marris and shows us how Van Gogh's painting The Furrows, is being cleaned.

The Van Gogh Museum's next exhibition features works of famous French painters, Paul Gauguin and Charles Laval, made on a trip to Martinique in 1887. ‘Gauguin & Laval in Martinique' runs from 5 October 2018 to 13 January 2019.

Produced by Karl Bos for the BBC World Service.

(Image: Conservator René Boitelle. Photo Courtesy of Heleen van Driel/Van Gogh Museum)

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Contemporary Artist Tome1s Saraceno20190129If you think of an artist's studio you might picture a room, bright with light and splattered with paint. You must forget that image when you visit the Argentinian artist Tomás Saraceno. His studio is two big and old industrial units, covered in graffiti, in what was East Berlin. This was where the company AGFA developed and made the chemicals that made colour photography possible. The ground is so polluted Saraceno's lease forbids him from growing any vegetables - and this matters to this environmentally concerned artist. But the industrial past of Studio Saracen is fitting as Tomás' work is highly technical. Here he has an architecture department, an arachnid research laboratory and an engineering works. He has about 40 people working on different projects.

The project preoccupying Tomas at the moment, he calls Aerocene - sculptural hot air balloons that ascend and fly without the use of any fossil fuels, by capturing the reflected heat of the sun. He talks to the BBC's Julian May as he is working on an installation for Miami Beach to demonstrate this. Tomas's ambition is to create a kind of slow aviation, in which his balloons will travel around the globe on predictable air currents. That might sound far-fetched but the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Nasa are interested, and working with him.

(Image: Argentinian artist Tomás Saraceno, with kind permission)

Argentinian artist Tom\u00e1s Saraceno tells us about his hot air balloon creation, Aerocene

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

If you think of an artist's studio you might picture a room, bright with light and splattered with paint. You must forget that image when you visit the Argentinian artist Tomကs Saraceno. His studio is two big and old industrial units, covered in graffiti, in what was East Berlin. This was where the company AGFA developed and made the chemicals that made colour photography possible. The ground is so polluted Saraceno's lease forbids him from growing any vegetables - and this matters to this environmentally concerned artist. But the industrial past of Studio Saracen is fitting as Tomကs’ work is highly technical. Here he has an architecture department, an arachnid research laboratory and an engineering works. He has about 40 people working on different projects.

The project preoccupying Tomas at the moment, he calls Aerocene - sculptural hot air balloons that ascend and fly without the use of any fossil fuels, by capturing the reflected heat of the sun. He talks to the BBC’s Julian May as he is working on an installation for Miami Beach to demonstrate this. Tomas's ambition is to create a kind of slow aviation, in which his balloons will travel around the globe on predictable air currents. That might sound far-fetched but the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Nasa are interested, and working with him.

(Image: Argentinian artist Tomကs Saraceno, with kind permission)

Costas Cacoyannis - Cyprus's One-man Orchestra20180522Composing in the beauty of the Troodos Mountains

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Costas Cacoyannis is one of Cyprus's most prolific composers – turn on the TV or head to the cinema on this Mediterranean island and there's a good chance you'll hear his music. Add to that his compositions for ballet, theatre, Hollywood soundtracks, and the more than 25 albums he has released and you get a sense of the scale of his creativity. He lives and works from his studio high up in the Troodos Mountains in central Cyprus and it's there that the BBC's Karl Bos goes to meet Costas as he prepares for a major upcoming performance of his music in June.

His biggest live concert in over 18 years, it will performed at the Maison de l'UNESCO in Paris. Follow Costas on a walk through a nearby forest as he derives inspiration from nature, then to a rehearsal in Limassol with his choir, as he guides them on how to express and perform his music as the concert quickly approaches.

Produced by Karl Bos for BBC World Service

(Photo of Cypriot composer Costas Cacoyannis)

"Composing in the beauty of the Troodos Mountains

Producer: Karl Bos

(Photo: Cypriot composer Costas Cacoyannis)

(Photo of Cypriot composer Costas Cacoyannis)"

His biggest live concert in over 18 years, it will be performed at the Maison de l'UNESCO in Paris. Follow Costas on a walk through a nearby forest as he derives inspiration from nature, then to a rehearsal in Limassol with his choir, as he guides them on how to express and perform his music as the concert quickly approaches.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Creating An Icon20191224For this special Christmas episode, In the Studio goes on a journey with one of the world's most renowned iconographers. Not just to witness the creation of a beautiful painting - but to witness a transformation. The moment a physical image becomes a religious icon - a prayer in paint that, for the faithful, acts as a door between heaven and earth.

Aidan Hart, a former hermit and Greek Orthodox monk whose icons you will find all over the world in churches and private collections - including that of Prince Charles - will paint an icon to celebrate the season of Advent.

Phil Pegum joins Aidan in rural England for five days as he paints a Christmas icon, and shares the secrets of the art form by explaining their symbolism and strange perspectives.

Presented and Produced by Phil Pegum for the BBC World Service

World renowned iconographer Aidan Hart creates an icon for Christmas

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Creature And Costume Designers, The Frouds20190813Brian Froud is not just an artist and illustrator; he is the conceptual designer behind the 1982 movie, The Dark Crystal, the first ever to have an all-puppet cast.

Now decades later, Netflix return to the world of Thra where the film was based, with a new 10 part prequel series. Ahead of its release on 30 August, Clem Hitchcock joins Brian - who is back on board as Creature and Costume Designer for the new series - at his home in rural Southwest England, where his characters begin their lives on his drawing board. As he sketches, Brian explains how the brooding surrounding landscape of Dartmoor inspires his ideas for Thra and all its weird and wonderful inhabitants.

But turning his drawings into physical puppets is a family affair – on set at a secret London location Brian is joined by Wendy, his wife, and Toby, their son. Brian and Wendy first met on the original Dark Crystal and they have collaborated together ever since. Wendy is a sculptor and a doll maker and was part of the team that built the original Yoda for Star Wars. Whereas sculptor and fabricator Toby was literally born into the business, playing the baby in another cult classic the Frouds worked on – Labyrinth, starring David Bowie.

Working on their most complex creation to date – a creature with a human performer and several puppeteers to bring it to life as its filmed – the Frouds explain how they struggle to keep the spirit of Brian's original designs – with all the quirks and imperfections of real life

Produced by Paul Kobrak and Clem Hitchcock for BBC World Service.

(Image: Artist and illustrator Brian Froud and his wife, sculptor and doll maker Wendy)

Brian Froud reveals how to create characters for a new 10-part series of The Dark Crystal

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Cressida Cowell - Thrilling Children With Dragons And Magic20180508Cressida Cowell explores the magical world of magic and Iron Age warriors

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Enter the magical world of children's writer Cressida Cowell. She created the hugely successful How to Train Your Dragon series, which continues to excite children across the globe and has been turned into Oscar nominated animated films.

For her latest series, Cressida explores teenage magic and Iron Age warriors. As she works on the illustrations for the second book in this new trilogy, The Wizards of Once: Twice Magic, she gives fellow children's author Michael Rosen an insight into how she creates these worlds.

From enchanted keys and philosophical giants to unlikely friends coming together to defeat evil witches, she explains what continues to inspire her about the legends and ancient sites of the British Isles, why creating maps of her imagined lands are vital to her writing and the importance of having a bed in her writing shed.

(Image of author Cressida Cowell)

"Cressida Cowell explores the magical world of magic and Iron Age warriors

(Image of author Cressida Cowell)"

Dada Masilo: From Soweto Street Dancer To Ballet Star20200324Growing up in the township of Soweto, Dada Masilo never thought to dream of ballet training or world tours. She liked street dancing to Michael Jackson and was only introduced to ballet two years after the end of Apartheid, at the age of 10. It was a strange world, she says, of pink shoes and tights. But she loved the discipline and went on to train internationally as a classical ballerina. Still only 34, she now tours the world with her very contemporary takes on traditional ballet. Her Swan Lake tackled Africa's AIDs epidemic with male dancers playing the love triangle. Her Giselle is a feminist revenge story conceived long before #MeToo. She's celebrated at Arts festivals from Perth to California, but the themes of her work make it less welcome in parts of Africa.
Now for In The Studio on the BBC World Service, we accompany her on a very personal journey that takes in the struggles of contemporary South Africa and asks what sacrifice means today. She begins with the complicated music of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, but she and her dancers take a route that goes far beyond that. There is laughter as they imitate meerkats in traditional tswana rituals that celebrate life, the land and tradition; there is anger as they consider their own stories of homophobia, abandonment and fear. Masilo herself comes to terms with the father she never knew. They emerge from it all with an exhilarating new work - The Sacrifice.

The choreographer and performer re-imagines Stravinksy's The Rite of Spring

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Dana Gioia - Poet Laureate Of California20171128Poet Dana Gioia reveals the inspiration for his new poem The Ballad of Jesus Ortiz

Dana Gioia is a man with a mission: to take poetry to the whole state, reading his own work and listening to other poets' and students, in all its 58 counties. He lives on an isolated hilltop and writes in a studio resembling a barn, lined with his 6,000 books. Sometimes, when he needs to get away, he works in a beautiful hut, with just a table and a stove, overlooking the hills and the oaks. He takes the BBC's Julian May to these places and reveals the inspiration of a major new poem, The Ballad of Jesus Ortiz, and the surprisingly physical way he is working on it. There is, however, grave danger, from wildfires that are threatening to destroy his studio-barn, his writing hut, and his home.

"Poet Dana Gioia reveals the inspiration for his new poem The Ballad of Jesus Ortiz

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Dana Gioia is a man with a mission: to take poetry to the whole state, reading his own work and listening to other poets' and students, in all its 58 counties. He lives on an isolated hilltop and writes in a studio resembling a barn, lined with his 6,000 books. Sometimes, when he needs to get away, he works in a beautiful hut, with just a table and a stove, overlooking the hills and the oaks. He takes the BBC's Julian May to these places and reveals the inspiration of a major new poem, The Ballad of Jesus Ortiz, and the surprisingly physical way he is working on it. There is, however, grave danger, from wildfires that are threatening to destroy his studio-barn, his writing hut, and his home."

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Dancing With The Stars In Myanmar20191105Known in the UK as Strictly Come Dancing and across the globe as Dancing with the Stars, this BBC brand is known for pairing celebrities with professional dancers, having their performances scrutinised by a panel of judges and allowing the public to vote for their favourite. This autumn the show is being created for the first time in Myanmar. What does it take to bring this format to a new audience and create the programme from scratch?

The venture is the passion project of French brothers Henri and Benoit de Lorme. They've already brought formats like Masterchef to the country. But dancing is a very different proposition, and in Myanmar there are many cultural sensitivities to be aware of. One is around the design of the costumes, where the need to create something flamboyant which works for camera also needs to take into account local sensitivities around how much flesh can be exposed.

It's also a challenging country to work in as the media companies are still in their infancy and there are shortages of people with the necessary skills to realise these big projects.

In addition there is the deadline to build the set, the process of getting the celebrities and new judges trained and the last minute cast changes. With so much to do in a short space of time, it's going to be a challenge to get everything in place by the first broadcast.

Ali Fowle follows the show as it evolves and finds out how the de Lorme brothers work together- and what legacy they plan to create.

Producer Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

Photo Credit: used with permission of `Dancing With The Stars', Forever Group Ltd

Behind the sequins and glitter as this hit TV show comes to the country's screens

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Known in the UK as “Strictly Come Dancing” and across the globe as “Dancing with the Stars”, this BBC brand is known for pairing celebrities with professional dancers, having their perfomances scrutinised by a panel of judges and allowing the public to vote for their favourite. This autumn the show is being created for the first time in Mynamar. What does it take to bring this format to a new audience and create the programme from scratch?
The venture is the passion project of French brothers Henri and Benoit de Lorme. They've already brought formats like Masterchef to the country. But dancing is a very different proposition and in Myanmar there are many cultural sensitivities to be aware of. One is around the design of the costumes, where the need to create something flamboyant which works for camera also needs to take into account local sensitivities around how much flesh can be exposed.
It's also a challenging country to work in as the media companies are still in their infancy and there are shortages of people with the necessary skills to realise these big projects.
In addition there is the deadline to build the set, the process of getting the celebrities and new judges trained and the last minute cast changes. With so much to do in a short space of time, it's going to be a challenge to get everything in place by the first broadcast.
Ali Fowle follows the show as it evolves and finds out how the de Lorme brothers work together- and what legacy they plan to create.

Sequins and glitter, the TV show takes shape

Daniel Lee: Revitalising A Fashion House20201124The young British-born designer Daniel Lee was appointed Creative Director of the classic Italian fashion house, Bottega Veneta, in 2018 with the task of reinventing the brand. Since then he's picked up numerous awards and several of his designs have already become “cult” items.

John Wilson joins the VIP audience – along with music stars Stormzy and Kanye West - to watch the launch of Daniel Lee's latest Bottega Veneta collection held in London this Autumn. The designer discusses the brand's trademark of woven leather handbags and shoes, what it takes to create some of the world's most sought after garments and accessories, and the challenges of putting on a show in the midst of a global pandemic.

Presented and Produced by John Wilson for the BBC World Service

*Photo of Daniel Lee by: Tyrone Lebon*

British fashion designer, Daniel Lee on reinventing classic Italian brand, Bottega Veneta

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Danielle De Niese - Opera's 'coolest Soprano'20190514Danielle de Niese, “opera's coolest soprano”, opens the door of her rehearsal room to Edwina Pitman, as she prepares to make her London West End stage debut. Swapping the world of baroque opera for musical theatre, Danielle will be starring opposite Kelsey Grammer in the award-winning classic musical Man of La Mancha.

The daughter of Sri Lankan immigrants in Australia, who began her career aged nine winning a TV pop talent contest, Danielle de Niese has a ferocious work ethic which she applies to every role she takes on, whilst also maintaining the gruelling schedule of one of the most sought-after opera singers on the planet. From her rigorous technique and intense training to careful scrutiny of all her rehearsal footage, de Niese reveals her process of perfecting the emotional heart of a role, which to her is the most important aspect of her performance.

We also catch a glimpse of her home life at Glyndebourne, in her off-stage role as one half of the husband-and-wife team behind one of opera's oldest festivals, where de Niese herself became an overnight sensation in 2005, when she made her debut there as Cleopatra in Handel's Giulio Cesare.

Presented and Produced by Edwina Pitman

(Image: Opera singer Danielle de Niese. Photo credit: Dan Kennedy)

Soprano Danielle de Niese prepares to star in classical musical Man of La Mancha

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

David Baddiel20181218"

David Baddiel is one of Britain's best-known comedians whose recent stage shows have blended comedy with deeply personal, and sometimes shockingly truthful, storytelling. Now he is at work on a new show, and the pressure is on to entertain the audience and say something meaningful about his chosen subject - online trolling.

Giles Edwards, who has worked with Baddiel for several years as his radio producer, spends time with him over several weeks as he prepares for and then debuts a work-in-progress version of the new show, and dissects it afterwards.

Starting their conversation en route to a radio recording, continuing at Baddiel's home, and concluding backstage after his shows, we hear Baddiel discuss what works as comedy, the mechanics of putting the show together, and why understanding trolls – and not just dismissing them – matters so much.

(Image: David Baddiel)

Comedian David Baddiel invites listeners behind the scenes of his new show.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

David Baddiel is one of Britain's best-known comedians whose recent stage shows have blended comedy with deeply personal, and sometimes shockingly truthful, storytelling. Now he is at work on a new show, and the pressure is on to entertain the audience and say something meaningful about his chosen subject - online trolling.

(Image: David Baddiel)

Comedian David Baddiel invites listeners behind the scenes of his new show.

David Mclay Kidd - Golf Course Designer2019040920200811 (WS)Ashley Ahearn visits the rugged wilderness of North America's Pacific North West to take a walk with David McClay Kidd: golf course designer, storyteller, and sculptor of landscapes in their wildest form.

David is a revolutionary in the field of golf design: an artist who dared to shun the manicured parkland and neatly-trimmed grass of the typical American golf course to bring the sport right back to its roots.

His designs work in harmony with nature – creating symphonies of wind, sand, and raw coastal landscapes familiar from his Scottish homeland. It's all about the thrill of adventure – a visceral experience that plunges the player deep into the essence of a place - involving them in a challenge that walks a tightrope between intoxicating…and maddening.

“I'm a sculptor on a big scale”, David says. He's also part landscape architect, part visual artist, part project manager and chief engineer…and above all, a storyteller.

Bandon Dunes is the course that made David McClay Kidd's name more than two decades ago, and it's there that Ashley finds him as he prepares to make alterations in advance of the US Amateur Championships in 2020.

As David takes us through his creative process – in both his wild outdoor “studio”, plotting bulldozers with his head greenkeeper, sketching with pencil and paper in hand indoors – it becomes clear that the relationship between golf course design and the natural environment is more complex and symbiotic than one might have ever imagined.

Produced by Steven Rajam for Tandem Productions.

(Image: Golf course designer, storyteller, and sculptor David McLay Kidd, with kind permission)

David McClay Kidd: golf course designer, storyteller and sculptor of wild landscape

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In an episode first broadcast in April 2019, Ashley Ahearn visits the rugged wilderness of North America's Pacific North West to take a walk with David McLay Kidd: golf course designer, storyteller, and sculptor of landscapes in their wildest form.

Bandon Dunes is the course that made David McLay Kidd's name more than two decades ago, and it's there that Ashley finds him as he prepares to make alterations in advance of the US Amateur Championships in 2020.

David McLay Kidd: golf course designer, storyteller and sculptor of wild landscape

Demond Melancon: The Bead Master Of New Orleans20200623Following Big Chief Demond Melancon in New Orleans as he prepares for Mardi Gras

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

This week's In The Studio is presented by acclaimed actor and New Orleans resident Wendell Pierce (The Wire, Suits, Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan). We join him as he meets Demond Melancon, a fine artist from New Orleans who is also the Big Chief of a Black Masking Indian tribe, the Young Seminole Hunters.

The Black Masking culture of New Orleans is a centuries-old African-American tradition. Around 45 neighbourhood groups - or tribes - spend thousands of hours each year hand-sewing exquisitely beaded ceremonial suits, trimmed with rhinestones, velvet ruffles, and hundreds of brightly coloured feathers. On Mardi Gras day they take to the streets to compete against each other for the prettiest suit.

Every suit tells a story, and this year Demond is depicting Ethiopian history and culture, beading an ancient Nyabinghi warrior on a white horse as the centerpiece of his front ‘apron'. Surrounding it on the left and right sides will be beaded portraits of Empress Menen Asfaw and her husband King Haile Selassie of Ethiopia. On his arms are patches with portraits of reggae music icon Vaughn Benjamin and an Ethiopian soldier.

Usually it takes 12 months of beading to make a suit, but Demond is a rising star of New Orleans' contemporary art scene, and in high demand for exhibitions and art fairs across the USA, so this year he has just three months to prepare. We join him and his wife Alicia as he works night and day in his Bywater studio doing ‘the needle dance', as he calls it, in the run up to the city's world-famous Mardi Gras celebrations.

Produced by Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio Production for BBC World Service

Image: Big Chief Demond Melancon of the Young Seminole Hunters on Mardi Gras day in New Orleans (Credit: David Favret)

Designing The New Aston Martin20191217The makers of James Bond's car are entering new territory. Aston Martin, the British manufacturer usually associated with 007's sports car, are launching their first family motor - an SUV.

In The Studio has gained exclusive access to the design and manufacturing process. We join head of design, Marek Reichman, in his studio, follow the car through rigorous testing, and finally, see it launched to the public.

Presenter: Andy Jaye
Producer: Francesca Bent

(Image: Aston Martin SUV. Credit: Dean Smith)

The manufacturers of James Bond's sports car, Aston Martin, design an SUV

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Dj - The Black Madonna20170725What's it like to be a woman in dance music - a male dominated industry?

Curator, composer. DJ and feminist - the Black Madonna is the hottest DJ in the world right now and is determined to do things her own way. Already a veteran of the USA's mid-west rave scene, she is set to conquer the main stages of Europe with her unique blend of House, Techno and Disco. But it is not always an easy ride.

With no formal training The Black Madonna cannot read sheet music. Instead, she has created her own system of notation, totally impenetrable to outside eyes. We join her and engineering partner Rupert in the studio as they put the finishing touches to her next single We Still Believe. The Black Madonna writes and produces all her own records but sometimes worries that pervasive sexism within the music industry means she does not always get the credit she deserves.

She is responsible for the revival of Chicago's infamous ‘Smart Bar' the cities home of House since the early '80s. To her, supporting and being supported by a scene of like minded artists is crucial. We join The Black Madonna at a festival she has curated in Lyon, France called Nuits Sonores. It is here we discover why she believes it is so important to build an inclusive and open community. As an excited mob surround the stage demanding photos, the struggles that accompany fame become apparent.

As a touring DJ, The Black Madonna's life is constant movement, regularly playing shows in five different countries over the course of a weekend. We manage to catch a rare moment of peace as she relaxes in Ibiza, before joining her in the basement of Lonond club XOYO for the final night of her 13-week residency. DJing is not just pressing play. It takes a remarkable amount of passion, skill and dedication to rise to the top whilst remaining true to her art.

"What's it like to be a woman in dance music - a male dominated industry?

As a touring DJ, The Black Madonna's life is constant movement, regularly playing shows in five different countries over the course of a weekend. We manage to catch a rare moment of peace as she relaxes in Ibiza, before joining her in the basement of Lonond club XOYO for the final night of her 13-week residency. DJing is not just pressing play. It takes a remarkable amount of passion, skill and dedication to rise to the top whilst remaining true to her art."

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

As a touring DJ, The Black Madonna's life is constant movement, regularly playing shows in five different countries over the course of a weekend. We manage to catch a rare moment of peace as she relaxes in Ibiza, before joining her in the basement of London club XOYO for the final night of her 13-week residency. DJing is not just pressing play. It takes a remarkable amount of passion, skill and dedication to rise to the top whilst remaining true to her art.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Doris Salcedo - Colombian Artist Honouring The Dead2017111420180410 (WS)A lifetime of works dedicated to mourning

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo is one of the most significant Latin American artists working today. For the last thirty years she has been making pieces on the theme of mourning. Her latest work is no exception, an installation that honours those who died during the ongoing migrant crisis. The names of the dead appear and disappear through water droplets that emerge out of stone. An immense technical challenge, the effect is that the stone appears to weep the names of those who died. Long term friend Tim Marlow joins Doris Salcedo at the peak of the process, in the final weeks before the piece is opened to the public, for unique access into the creative thinking behind her work.

Photo credit: David Heald

"A lifetime of works dedicated to mourning

Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo is one of the most significant Latin American artists working today. For the last thirty years she has been making pieces on the theme of mourning. Her latest work is no exception, an installation, called Palimpsest, that honours those who died during the ongoing migrant crisis. The names of the dead appear and disappear through water droplets that emerge out of stone. An immense technical challenge, the effect is that the stone appears to weep the names of those who died. Palimpsest is heading to London, where it will be showing at White Cube Bermondsey from September 2018. In this programme, long term friend Tim Marlow joins Doris at the peak of the installation process, in the final weeks before the piece is first opened to the public at the Palacio de Cristal in Madrid, for unique access into the creative thinking behind her work.

(Photo Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo. Credit: David Heald)

Photo credit: David Heald"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

(Photo Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo. Credit: David Heald)

Doris Salcedo €Ⓚ Colombian Artist Honouring The Dead20171114A lifetime of works dedicated to mourning

Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo is one of the most significant Latin American artists working today. For the last thirty years she has been making pieces on the theme of mourning. Her latest work is no exception, an installation that honours those who died during the ongoing migrant crisis. The names of the dead appear and disappear through water droplets that emerge out of stone. An immense technical challenge, the effect is that the stone appears to weep the names of those who died. Long term friend Tim Marlow joins Doris Salcedo at the peak of the process, in the final weeks before the piece is opened to the public, for unique access into the creative thinking behind her work.

Photo credit: David Heald

"A lifetime of works dedicated to mourning

Photo credit: David Heald"

Edmund De Waal: Creating A Memorial20210420In The Studio follows internationally acclaimed artist and writer Edmund de Waal as he creates new site-specific work for the Musée Nissim de Camondo, a hidden gem in a quiet corner of Paris.

Once a flourishing household at the centre of Belle Époque Parisian society, the magnificent building and its spectacular collection of French eighteenth-century art became a quiet memorial for the son who was to have inherited it, but who tragically, died in the First World War.

Edmund de Waal guides us through his creative response to the haunting history of the Camondo family, the last of whom were killed at Auschwitz. We follow him in his studio as he works on a multi-faceted installation for a unique setting, navigates the challenges of creating during lockdown and grapples with the notions of what it means to create a fitting memorial.

Presented and Produced by Edwina Pitman.
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service.

The British artist, master potter and author on creating a deeply personal exhibition

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Eimear Noone And Craig Garfinkle: Composers In Isolation20200630Racing to create a film score in lockdown

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Cellist Matthew Barley connects with composer and conductor team Eimear Noone and Craig Garfinkle, as they race to complete a film score from their temporary lockdown studio in rural Ireland.

Eimear and Craig create soundscapes and soundtracks for feature films and video games, including the global hit World of Warcraft. Early in 2020 Eimear and Craig and their two young children travelled from the US to Dublin to compose and record the score for the animated movie Two by Two: Overboard. They recorded the first half of the score in February but then the Covid-19 restrictions radically changed their plans. They had to leave Dublin with what little equipment they could carry and head to Eimear's family home on the West Coast of Ireland.

With an out of tune piano, limited IT resources, no access to a recording studio or live musicians, and the delivery date looming, the pressure is on. From trying to write upbeat music at a moment of crisis, to managing the baby's nap time and homeschooling while working out the perfect chord progression for a scene of utopia, Craig and Eimear are navigating new territory. Will they do it?

All musical excerpts are courtesy of Moetion Films

A Tandem production for the BBC World Service
Presenter: Matthew Barley
Produced by Faith Waddell

Image: Craig Garfinkle (Credit: Wendy Tigerman) and Eimear Noone (Credit: Steve Humphreys)

Elif Shafak: Writing In Lockdown20200707Writer Elif Shafak describes how Covid-19 and lockdown have affected her creative process

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The British-Turkish writer Elif Shafak is renowned for her award-winning novels including The Forty Rules of Love and her most recent 10 Minutes 38 Seconds In This Strange World. She's also known for being an advocate for women's rights, LGBTQ rights and freedom of speech, which have led to her being investigated by the Turkish government. Now she's writing a new novel and has completed a Manifesto on staying sane in an age of division which will be published later this year.

Covid-19 has meant that Elif has been experiencing what it's like to create and write in lockdown in her London home. In conversation with Emma Kingsley, she describes her new routines, how ideas come to her and the way in which her working life has been altered by the pandemic. She also talks about the importance of using fiction as a space to ask questions about contentious issues and the role of literature as a means of keeping people connected during this new age of self-isolation.

Produced by Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

Elijah Moshinsky: Dissecting The Work Of A World Renowned Opera Director20170718He's had a long and celebrated career but each production still fills him with fear

He's had a long and prolific career as a theatre, television and opera director working with some of the world's greatest opera singers and now he's opened up his rehearsal studio as he prepares for his latest production of Verdi's opera Macbeth. Lindsay Leonard joins Elijah Moshinsky as he coaxes and cajoles his leads and chorus, from the first cup of coffee in a South London gymnasium, to curtain up at the grand Buxton Opera House. We get a taste of his mercurial directing style – a mix of humour, charisma and confrontation as he teases out rich layers of music, drama and human interaction. And we tap into the tension as he cuts through the complexity of bringing his own vision to a Verdi classic. It's a test of enormous practical and emotional stamina.

(Photo credit:Jeff Busby)

"He's had a long and celebrated career but each production still fills him with fear

(Photo credit:Jeff Busby) "

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo credit:Jeff Busby)

He's had a long and celebrated career but each production still fills him with fear"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Emily Young: Stone Carver And Environmental Artist20210302Artists and architects have for centuries been drawn to the stone in the hills of southern Tuscany. It's the home of Carrara marble and the quarry where Michelangelo found the stone for his work. Now it's home to Emily Young – acclaimed as Britain's greatest living stone carver.

Her sculptures are collected and displayed around the world, but as a passionate conservationist she also takes her work on to the front line of environmental activism; using sculptures to protect green spaces and take on gangs fishing illegally off the coast of Italy.

Over the course of 4 months In the Studio follows Emily Young as she turns a 3 and a half tonne block of stone into her latest work of art. And it becomes a race against time as the days shorten, the light closes in and the deadline looms for Britain to leave the European Union. This is an intimate portrait of an artist for whom the creative process is meditative and usually very private.

Presented and Produced by Phil Pegum
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

On turning a 3.5 tonne block of stone into her latest work of art

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Eric Van Hove - Sculpture That Goes 'vroom'20180123"How Eric van Hove creates a working motorbike using traditional Moroccan craft techniques

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Eric van Hove makes sculpture that goes “vroom ? For the past few years, this conceptual artist has been working in Morocco on a project called the Mahjouba Initiative, which involves building a series of motorbikes using only traditional craft materials. Eric calls this work “a socio-economic sculpture ?, the idea being that the pieces can be exhibited as artworks but also used as the prototype for a new vehicle.
Anna McNamee meets Eric and his team as he works on the latest model – the Mahjouba III – which will be put on show at the 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair in Marrakech.

Producers: Anna McNamee and Emma Kingsley.

"

Eric van Hove makes sculpture that goes “vroom”. For the past few years, this conceptual artist has been working in Morocco on a project called the Mahjouba Initiative, which involves building a series of motorbikes using only traditional craft materials. Eric calls this work “a socio-economic sculpture”, the idea being that the pieces can be exhibited as artworks but also used as the prototype for a new vehicle.
Anna McNamee meets Eric and his team as he works on the latest model – the Mahjouba III – which will be put on show at the 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair in Marrakech.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Eric Van Hove €Ⓚ Sculpture That Goes 'vroom'20180123How Eric van Hove creates a working motorbike using traditional Moroccan craft techniques

Eric van Hove makes sculpture that goes “vroom ? For the past few years, this conceptual artist has been working in Morocco on a project called the Mahjouba Initiative, which involves building a series of motorbikes using only traditional craft materials. Eric calls this work “a socio-economic sculpture ?, the idea being that the pieces can be exhibited as artworks but also used as the prototype for a new vehicle.
Anna McNamee meets Eric and his team as he works on the latest model – the Mahjouba III – which will be put on show at the 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair in Marrakech.

Producers: Anna McNamee and Emma Kingsley.

"How Eric van Hove creates a working motorbike using traditional Moroccan craft techniques

Producers: Anna McNamee and Emma Kingsley."

Eric Whitacre - Creating The Virtual Choir20200728As Covid-19 has swept the world we've become used to seeing musicians in lockdown presenting videos of virtual performances. But for the Grammy-award winning American composer and conductor Eric Whitacre, the idea of a virtual choir is nothing new because he pioneered the concept over 10 years ago. His first choir of 185 singers became a global phenomenon and has been seen by millions on YouTube. More virtual choir projects followed and the choir videos have featured as installations and as part of the 2012 Olympics and the Davos World Economic Forum.

Now Eric's just released his largest Virtual Choir project to date, which premiered on YouTube a few days ago. It features 17,572 singers from around the world performing his new piece “Sing Gently” for which he's written the words and the music.

Eric talks to Emma Kingsley about creating this latest project, the inspirations for his other compositions, the idea of the musical “golden brick” and how his early dreams of becoming a pop star changed through singing Mozart in the college choir.

Produced by Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

Photo of Eric Whitacre by Marc Royce

Composer Eric Whitacre on creating his latest Virtual Choir project with 17,572 singers

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Es Devlin: Artist And Stage Designer20201013Es Devlin is an artist and one of the world's most influential stage designers - conceiving what she calls stage ‘sculptures' with the likes of Louis Vuitton, Beyoncé, Adele, Kanye West, the Weeknd and U2, as well as designing the opening ceremony of the Rio 2016 Olympics and the closing ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics.

Her striking creations are equally well-known in the world of opera and theatre, from Bizet's Carmen to Pinter's Betrayal, all of which she does alongside her own solo work as an artist.

From her studio in London, Es Devlin talks to Ella-mai Robey about her work and creative process.

Presented by Ella-mai Robey
Produced by Hannah Robins and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

A British artist who creates shows for the Olympics, Adele, the Weeknd and Louis Vuitton

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Es Devlin is an artist and one of the world's most influential stage designers - conceiving what she calls stage ‘sculptures' with the likes of Louis Vuitton, Beyoncé, Adele, Kanye West, The Weeknd and U2, as well as designing the Opening Ceremony of the Rio 2016 Olympics and the Closing Ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics.

Her striking creations are equally well-known in the world of opera and theatre - from Bizet's Carmen to Pinter's Betrayal - all of which she does alongside her own solo work as an artist.

The British artist who creates shows for the Olympics, Adele, The Weeknd and Louis Vuitton

Ever Inventive Artist And Composer Samson Young20170801He's worked with ‘sonic weapons' and created an orchestra of laptops

Samson Young's career is on something of a meteoric rise. He's won a series of awards and has just represented Hong Kong at the Venice Biennale – one of the most important international art fairs in Europe. He is an artist and composer with a fascination for sound and experimentation. During his career he's worked with a long range acoustic device, a sound cannon usually used to disperse crowds and wildlife; he's created an orchestra of smartphones and laptops. He is witty and wonderfully unpredictable.

For this edition of In the Studio we are following his latest project, a work that begins with a 17th century mythical story of a group of Chinese migrants who are said to have traveled all the way from China to the UK, on foot! Andrea Kennedy follows Samson through the months of preparations of this piece, from the first spark of an idea through to a journey to the remotest parts of China, to a final performance in front of a live audience.

For this edition of In the Studio we are following his latest project, a work that begins with a 17th century mythical story of a group of Chinese migrants who are said to have traveled all the way from China to the UK, on foot! Andrea Kennedy follows Samson through the months of preparations of this piece, from the first spark of an idea through to a journey to the remotest parts of China, to a final performance in front of a live audience at the Manchester International Festival.

"He's worked with ‘sonic weapons' and created an orchestra of laptops

For this edition of In the Studio we are following his latest project, a work that begins with a 17th century mythical story of a group of Chinese migrants who are said to have traveled all the way from China to the UK, on foot! Andrea Kennedy follows Samson through the months of preparations of this piece, from the first spark of an idea through to a journey to the remotest parts of China, to a final performance in front of a live audience at the Manchester International Festival."

"He's worked with \u2018sonic weapons' and created an orchestra of laptops

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

For this edition of In the Studio we are following his latest project, a work that begins with a 17th century mythical story of a group of Chinese migrants who are said to have traveled all the way from China to the UK, on foot! Andrea Kennedy follows Samson through the months of preparations of this piece, from the first spark of an idea through to a journey to the remotest parts of China, to a final performance in front of a live audience at the Manchester International Festival.

For this edition of In the Studio we are following his latest project, a work that begins with a 17th century mythical story of a group of Chinese migrants who are said to have traveled all the way from China to the UK, on foot! Andrea Kennedy follows Samson through the months of preparations of this piece, from the first spark of an idea through to a journey to the remotest parts of China, to a final performance in front of a live audience."

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Faberge9: The Iconic Maker Of Bespoke Jewellery20210406The internationally renowned jewellery company Fabergé is best known for its iconic jewelled eggs, which are synonymous with extreme wealth and luxury.

In the Studio has been allowed rare entry inside its doors, where the inner workings of the commissioning process, resulting in the acquisition of a bespoke Fabergé objet d'art, is revealed.

Felicity Finch follows the company's unusual partnership with The Craft Irish Whiskey Co. who have commissioned the first Celtic jewelled egg, as part of a seven-piece set featuring the oldest triple distilled Irish whiskey in the world.

Felicity speaks with Fabergé's Global Sales and Business Development Director Josina von dem Bussche-Kessell and Marcus Mohr, the Workmaster who oversees the craftspeople keeping alive the rare, traditional enamelling techniques in their German workshop.

She also meets the whiskey company founder and CEO Jay Bradley, who is hoping his deadline will be met despite the difficulties thrown up by the pandemic. Will the dream of holding his very own Fabergé egg in his hands be fulfilled?

Presented and Produced by Felicity Finch
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image courtesy of Fabergé

A rare glimpse into the inner workings of this internationally recognised brand

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Fashion Designer Iris Van Herpen2019052820210316 (WS)This May the musical superstar Björk has been performing a series of concerts in New York, entitled Cornucopia. One of the costumes she appears in is a dress specially created for her by the pioneering Dutch designer Iris Van Herpen. Iris is renowned for her fluid designs and pioneering use of techniques such as 3D printing and has dressed many international celebrities. This new dress for Björk will be made of many different parts, blending design, art and science to create something truly unique.

Anik See visits Iris in her Amsterdam studio to observe the garment being created and worked on. We also hear from Björk herself in a special interview for this programme.

Iris has worked with Björk several times before, but with this project, the pressure is on as there's a tight timescale and logistics to sort out of getting the dress fitted and shipped in time. Anik watches as the different components are made separately and sees the team at work assembling and fitting. As well as being striking, the dress must be able to move in the way Björk requires for the show - and be durable enough to withstand many nights of wear.

Presented by Anik See and produced by Anik See and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

(Image: Fashion designer Iris Van Herpen, credit to: Jean-Baptiste Mondino)

We follow Iris Van Herpen in her Amsterdam studio creating a dress for singer Bj\u00f6rk

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Fashion Designers: Opening Ceremony20180925The fashion label Opening Ceremony is led by its Asian-American creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, who are also the co-creative directors at fashion house Kenzo. Since it began in 2002, the pair have developed Opening Ceremony into a brand known for its bold clothing design, social activism and for artistic partnerships with film-maker Spike Jonze and the New York City Ballet amongst others.

In an exclusive programme, In The Studio follows Humberto and Carol through the entire process of creating their Pre-Spring 2019 collection. Simon Pitts joins the pair at their NYC Chinatown offices, learning about the cycle from initial design through to the final show. We hear how Carol and Humberto's background as children of immigrants inspires their work and Simon meets the wider OC team who shape the designs, source materials and work out the crucial price points for each garment.

(Photo: Carol Lim and Humberto Leon. Credit: Inez and Vinoodh)

Simon Pitts follows OC's Humberto Leon and Carol Lim as they create a new collection

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Fashion Designers: Opening Ceremony20190430The fashion label Opening Ceremony is led by its Asian-American creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, who are also the co-creative directors at fashion house Kenzo. Since it began in 2002, the pair have developed Opening Ceremony into a brand known for its bold clothing design, social activism and for artistic partnerships with film-maker Spike Jonze and the New York City Ballet amongst others.

In an exclusive programme, In The Studio follows Humberto and Carol through the entire process of creating their Pre-Spring 2019 collection. Simon Pitts joins the pair at their NYC Chinatown offices, learning about the cycle from initial design through to the final show. We hear how Carol and Humberto's background as children of immigrants inspires their work and Simon meets the wider OC team who shape the designs, source materials and work out the crucial price points for each garment.

This programme was originally broadcast in September 2018 and has been updated to show what happened to the fashion collection once it went into the stores.

(Photo: Carol Lim and Humberto Leon. Credit: Inez and Vinoodh)

Simon Pitts follows OC's Humberto Leon and Carol Lim as they create a new collection.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Francis K㩀r㩀 €Ⓚ Architect From Burkina Faso20170627Architect Francis Kéré is bringing a slice of Burkina Faso to a London Royal Park.

Every year the Serpentine Gallery in London's Kensington Gardens invites an international architect to create an original temporary structure in this iconic park, showcasing what's possible in architectural design. This year the architect who has taken up the challenge is Francis Kéré. Originally from a village in Burkina Faso where no one could read or write, his father sent him away to school. Now a highly acclaimed architect he's bringing a bit of Burkina Faso to London with his Pavilion inspired by a tree - a place where people can come together under the shade of the branches to discuss everything from love to village affairs. For In the Studio, Nicky Barranger follows the creation from the first doodle in his notepad, through the design and construction to the final reveal.

"Architect Francis Kéré is bringing a slice of Burkina Faso to a London Royal Park.

Every year the Serpentine Gallery in London's Kensington Gardens invites an international architect to create an original temporary structure in this iconic park, showcasing what's possible in architectural design. This year the architect who has taken up the challenge is Francis Kéré. Originally from a village in Burkina Faso where no one could read or write, his father sent him away to school. Now a highly acclaimed architect he's bringing a bit of Burkina Faso to London with his Pavilion inspired by a tree - a place where people can come together under the shade of the branches to discuss everything from love to village affairs. For In the Studio, Nicky Barranger follows the creation from the first doodle in his notepad, through the design and construction to the final reveal."

Francis Ke9re9 - Architect From Burkina Faso20170627"Architect Francis K\u00e9r\u00e9 is bringing a slice of Burkina Faso to a London Royal Park.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Every year the Serpentine Gallery in London's Kensington Gardens invites an international architect to create an original temporary structure in this iconic park, showcasing what's possible in architectural design. This year the architect who has taken up the challenge is Francis Kéré. Originally from a village in Burkina Faso where no one could read or write, his father sent him away to school. Now a highly acclaimed architect he's bringing a bit of Burkina Faso to London with his Pavilion inspired by a tree - a place where people can come together under the shade of the branches to discuss everything from love to village affairs. For In the Studio, Nicky Barranger follows the creation from the first doodle in his notepad, through the design and construction to the final reveal.

"

Francis Kere - Architect From Burkina Faso20170627Architect Francis K\u00e9r\u00e9 is bringing a slice of Burkina Faso to a London Royal Park.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Gabo Arora - Recreating The Memory Of Hiroshima Through Vr20180612"Gabo Arora's The Day The World Changed is an immersive VR film in memory of Hiroshima

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

In his studio in Dumbo, Brooklyn, Gabo Arora is working to finalise a fully immersive virtual reality experience called The Day The World Changed. The experience premiers at the Tribeca Film Festival and is in memory of the victims of Hiroshima. Using photogrammetry scans of everyday objects found after the bomb and survivor testimonies attached to them, the experience creates a moving first -hand account. It is a new way of experiencing VR as The Day The World Changed is experienced by four people at a time. This use of co- presence helps to create a more powerful social experience. Instead of seeing each other in the traditional physical representation people will see each other as shadows. It is a VR experience like no other and there is a great sense of nervousness, excitement, stress and collaboration as we take a look at the creative process of putting something like this together.

Presenter and producer: Kate Bissell

(Photo: Gabo Arora)

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Gabo Arorarecreating The Memory Of Hiroshima Through Vr20180612"Gabo Arora's The Day The World Changed is an immersive VR film in memory of Hiroshima

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

In his studio in Dumbo, Brooklyn, Gabo Arora is working to finalise a fully immersive virtual reality experience called The Day The World Changed. The experience premiers at the Tribeca Film Festival and is in memory of the victims of Hiroshima. Using photogrammetry scans of everyday objects found after the bomb and survivor testimonies attached to them, the experience creates a moving first -hand account. It is a new way of experiencing VR as The Day The World Changed is experienced by four people at a time. This use of co- presence helps to create a more powerful social experience. Instead of seeing each other in the traditional physical representation people will see each other as shadows. It is a VR experience like no other and there is a great sense of nervousness, excitement, stress and collaboration as we take a look at the creative process of putting something like this together.

Presenter and producer: Kate Bissell

(Photo: Gabo Arora)

"

Gabriel Be1 And Fe1bio Moon20180710Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon are not only twins, but they work in an identical artistic field - the world of comic books. The brothers, who are based in Brazil, have gained a worldwide reputation for their ability to convey whole worlds in a series of cartoon panels, which fuse drawings and script to create a powerful storyline.

The brothers often work together, with successes like “How to Talk to Girls at Parties” and “DayTripper” to their names. More recently they have been completing separate projects, with Gabriel working on “The Umbrella Academy ” and Fábio on “Casanova.”

But even when they work separately, they share the same studio space, sitting together for hours at a time and patiently sketching.

Camilla Costa visits Fábio and Gabriel to see them at work and follows them through the process of creating their drawings. We hear all stages of the process, from the first drawing to the final inking and explore the surprising potency of comic book images.

Producer: Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

(Image: Brazilian artists Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon)

We follow F\u00e1bio and Gabriel through the process of creating their drawings

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"We follow F\u00e1bio and Gabriel through the process of creating their drawings

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The brothers often work together, with successes like “How to Talk to Girls at Parties ? and “DayTripper ? to their names. More recently they have been completing separate projects, with Gabriel working on “The Umbrella Academy  ? and Fábio on “Casanova. ?

(Image: Brazilian artists Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon)

"

Gandini Juggling - Weaving Patterns In The Air20180821"Felicity Finch follows Gandini Juggling as they prepare for their latest piece, Cascade

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Formed in 1992 by world-renowned jugglers Sean Gandini and Kati Ylä-Hokkala, Gandini Juggling are trailblazers in their field. Fusing contemporary dance and circus, they have been delighting audiences in over 50 countries across the world.

This Summer they will be performing in the courtyard of London's Somerset House working with the rise and fall of its 55 water jet fountains. Visual theatre producers Crying Out Loud have brought together the 27 jugglers accompanied by the French acrobat-musicians Circa Tsuica to celebrate the 250th anniversary of modern circus. Felicity Finch joins Sean and his company as they prepare to weave patterns in the air for their latest piece, Cascade.

(Image: Sean Gandini juggling some balls. Photography by Ash)

"

Formed in 1992 by world-renowned jugglers Sean Gandini and Kati Ylä-Hokkala, Gandini Juggling are trailblazers in their field. Fusing contemporary dance and circus, they have been delighting audiences in over 50 countries across the world.

This Summer they will be performing in the courtyard of London’s Somerset House working with the rise and fall of its 55 water jet fountains. Visual theatre producers Crying Out Loud have brought together the 27 jugglers accompanied by the French acrobat-musicians Circa Tsuica to celebrate the 250th anniversary of modern circus. Felicity Finch joins Sean and his company as they prepare to weave patterns in the air for their latest piece, Cascade.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Ghanaian Artist Ibrahim Mahama20190521In this week's In the Studio, we meet the man who is helping to put Ghana on the map when it comes to contemporary art.

Ibrahim Mahama's architectural installations have already been seen in cities such as New York, Athens and London - but now the 31 year olds work is being shown in Ghana's first ever National Pavilion, at one of the most prestigious contemporary art exhibitions in the world, the Venice Biennale.

Ibrahim's grand-scale installations can be years in the making because he often collaborates with local workers and uses salvaged materials which he carefully sources from Ghana, where he lives and works – materials like the jute sacks found in food markets, and which he's become synonymous with.

Frenny Jowi travels to Ghana and Venice to meet Ibrahim and follow him as he prepares for one of the highest profile shows of his career.

Presenter: Frenny Jowi
Producers: Frenny Jowi and Ella-mai Robey for BBC World Service

(Image: Ibrahim Mahama, Ghanaian artist. Credit: White Cube George Darrell)

We meet the artist who is putting Ghana on the map when it comes to contemporary art

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Guggenheim Bilbao: From Covid To Kandinsky20201208As Guggenheim Museum Bilbao prepares to open a major show of work by abstract artist, Wassily Kandinsky, In the Studio is behind-the-scenes and discovers how the museum continues to emerge and manage during the Coronavirus pandemic.

Basque journalist Olatz Arrieta speaks to the people at the heart of this cultural institution – from Director General, Juan Ignacio Vidarte and Eva Eguiren in the Visitor's Centre, to those working closely on the Kandinsky and the exhibitions of the future.

But as Spain records more than one million coronavirus cases, and authorities in the Basque Country close the regions borders, will the Kandinsky show still open? Join Olatz to find out.

Presented by Olatz Arrieta

Produced by Neil McCarthy and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao prepares to open a Kandinsky show during the Covid pandemic.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Haroon Mirza20190122"

Multi-award winning British artist Haroon Mirza is renowned for his immersive installations that generate light and sound compositions. In 2018 he won a residency at CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research) in Geneva, the largest particle physics laboratory in the world. The residency aims to combine the “creative power of art and science to explore and make sense of the universe ?

Following his time at CERN, Haroon has been creating a major installation based on his research which has recently opened in Liverpool, England and which will be taken on a global tour for the next 5 years. The piece, made with his collaborator Jack Jelfs, is a sculptural art work which uses a circle of 8 speakers, a large screen and an octagonal chandelier sculpture of LEDs to compose light, sound and video. Combined with a careful manipulation of spatial acoustics, the viewer is cocooned in a truly immersive experience.

Oonagh Cousins joins Haroon in his studio as he and Jack work together on the installation, to discover the creative processes behind his art. What are the technical challenges in creating this kind of piece which has to be reassembled in different spaces – and will the final installation and rehearsals go according to plan?

(Image: Multi-award winning British artist Haroon Mirza. Credit: Gaia Fugazza)

We join Haroon Mirza in his studio as he works on his latest installation in Liverpool

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

Multi-award winning British artist Haroon Mirza is renowned for his immersive installations that generate light and sound compositions. In 2018 he won a residency at CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research) in Geneva, the largest particle physics laboratory in the world. The residency aims to combine the “creative power of art and science to explore and make sense of the universe”.

Oonagh Cousins joins Haroon in his studio as he and Jack work together on the installation, to discover the creative processes behind his art. What are the technical challenges in creating this kind of piece which has to be reassembled in different spaces – and will the final installation and rehearsals go according to plan?

Multi-award winning British artist Haroon Mirza is renowned for his immersive installations that generate light and sound compositions. In 2018 he won a residency at CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research) in Geneva, the largest particle physics laboratory in the world. The residency aims to combine the “creative power of art and science to explore and make sense of the universe”.

Hofesh Shechter20180501Razia Iqbal follows the evolution of a Hofesh Shechter show with a new group of dancers

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Hofesh Shechter - Dancing To Political Times20180501Follow Israeli choreographer Hofesh Shechter as he brings to life a new show

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Hofesh Shechter was born in Israel, but increasingly disillusioned by conflict and the politics of the region, he came to London in 2002, and is now one of the most exciting and sought after choreographers in the UK. Ten years ago he established his own company, which now tours the world performing to global audiences.

Razia Iqbal follows the evolution of a new show with a new group of dancers, from the initial idea to inspiring the dancers who ultimately bring his vision to life with energy and passion.

(Photo: Hofesh Shechter, Credit: Hugo Glendinning)

"Follow Israeli choreographer Hofesh Shechter as he brings to life a new show

(Photo: Hofesh Shechter, Credit: Hugo Glendinning)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

How To Create A Circus Production20170704Giffords Circus brings together acts from all around the world

The horses are learning their dance routines, the acrobats are perfecting their tumbles and sequins are being sewn onto leotards and leggings - In the Studio this week has ringside seats to the circus. Antonia Quirke meets the inner circle of Giffords Circus as they conceive and craft their current show where the theme this year is the 17th Century Spanish court. The team are led by circus creator Nell Gifford, who left home aged 18 to join her first circus. She then set up her own travelling troupe based in the West of England featuring performers from all over the world.

"Giffords Circus brings together acts from all around the world

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The horses are learning their dance routines, the acrobats are perfecting their tumbles and sequins are being sewn onto leotards and leggings - In the Studio this week has ringside seats to the circus. Antonia Quirke meets the inner circle of Giffords Circus as they conceive and craft their current show where the theme this year is the 17th Century Spanish court. The team are led by circus creator Nell Gifford, who left home aged 18 to join her first circus. She then set up her own travelling troupe based in the West of England featuring performers from all over the world."

The horses are learning their dance routines, the acrobats are perfecting their tumbles and sequins are being sewn onto leotards and leggings - In the Studio this week has ringside seats to the circus. Antonia Quirke meets the inner circle of Giffords Circus as they conceive and craft their current show where the theme this year is the 17th Century Spanish court. The team are led by circus creator Nell Gifford, who left home aged 18 to join her first circus. She then set up her own travelling troupe based in the West of England featuring performers from all over the world."

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

How To Train Your Dragon: Author Cressida Cowell20180508Cressida Cowell explores the magical world of magic and Iron Age warriors

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Enter the magical world of children's writer Cressida Cowell. She created the hugely successful How to Train Your Dragon series, which continues to excite children across the globe and has been turned into Oscar nominated animated films.

For her latest series, Cressida explores teenage magic and Iron Age warriors. As she works on the illustrations for the second book in this new trilogy, The Wizards of Once: Twice Magic, she gives fellow children's author Michael Rosen an insight into how she creates these worlds.

From enchanted keys and philosophical giants to unlikely friends coming together to defeat evil witches, she explains what continues to inspire her about the legends and ancient sites of the British Isles, why creating maps of her imagined lands are vital to her writing and the importance of having a bed in her writing shed.

(Image of author Cressida Cowell)

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Htein Lin: Finding Artistic Freedom As A Political Prisoner20170815On finding inspiration in the streets and solitary confinement.

Htein Lin is one of Burma's leading artists. A student activist against the oppressive military junta, he spent four years hiding in the jungle before being imprisoned for his pro-democracy views. It was during his many years as a political prisoner that he found his voice as an artist. A painter, sculptor and performance artist, he uses his own life and experiences in his works, from prison uniforms as canvases to reclaiming and reworking rubbish thrown away on the streets of Yangon, even the plaster cast from when his arm was broken has become part of a sculpture. Htein Lin shows the BBC's Dixi Stewart around his studio in Myanmar where ongoing art includes a sculpture made from the offcuts of signs to his famous continuing political project A Show of Hands.

"On finding inspiration in the streets and solitary confinement.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Htein Lin is one of Burma's leading artists. A student activist against the oppressive military junta, he spent four years hiding in the jungle before being imprisoned for his pro-democracy views. It was during his many years as a political prisoner that he found his voice as an artist. A painter, sculptor and performance artist, he uses his own life and experiences in his works, from prison uniforms as canvases to reclaiming and reworking rubbish thrown away on the streets of Yangon, even the plaster cast from when his arm was broken has become part of a sculpture. Htein Lin shows the BBC's Dixi Stewart around his studio in Myanmar where ongoing art includes a sculpture made from the offcuts of signs to his famous continuing political project A Show of Hands."

Htein Lin is one of Burma's leading artists. A student activist against the oppressive military junta, he spent four years hiding in the jungle before being imprisoned for his pro-democracy views. It was during his many years as a political prisoner that he found his voice as an artist. A painter, sculptor and performance artist, he uses his own life and experiences in his works, from prison uniforms as canvases to reclaiming and reworking rubbish thrown away on the streets of Yangon, even the plaster cast from when his arm was broken has become part of a sculpture. Htein Lin shows the BBC's Dixi Stewart around his studio in Myanmar where ongoing art includes a sculpture made from the offcuts of signs to his famous continuing political project A Show of Hands."

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Icelandic Novelist Sj㳀n’s Secret Weapon20170606How a second hand bookstore and a small black hut inspire his creativity

As well as being one of Iceland's most popular novelists, Sjón is also a poet, screenwriter and lyricist - he was Oscar nominated for “I've seen it all, ? the song he created with the singer Björk. He takes his inspiration from the country's rugged, icy landscape, Icelandic history and myths. He shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd his secret research weapon, his favourite antiquarian bookstore in central Reykjavik, as he scours its shelves for books to inform and inspire his latest novel, based on the dark history of Icelandic neo-Nazis. We then travel to his small hut on the south coast of the island, a place where he finds the peace and quiet he needs in order to create his works.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

"How a second hand bookstore and a small black hut inspire his creativity

Producer: Andrea Kidd "

Producer: Andrea Kidd

Icelandic Novelist Sj㳀n’s Secret Weapon20180213How a second hand bookstore and a small black hut inspire his creativity

As well as being one of Iceland's most popular novelists, Sjón is also a poet, screenwriter and lyricist - he was Oscar nominated for “I've seen it all, ? the song he created with the singer Björk. He takes his inspiration from the country's rugged, icy landscape, Icelandic history and myths. He shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd his secret research weapon, his favourite antiquarian bookstore in central Reykjavik, as he scours its shelves for books to inform and inspire his latest novel, based on the dark history of Icelandic neo-Nazis. We then travel to his small hut on the south coast of the island, a place where he finds the peace and quiet he needs in order to create his works.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

"

Producer: Andrea Kidd

How a second hand bookstore and a small black hut inspire his creativity"

Icelandic Novelist Sjf3n's Secret Weapon2017060620180213 (WS)As well as being one of Iceland's most popular novelists, Sjón is also a poet, screenwriter and lyricist - he was Oscar nominated for “I've seen it all,” the song he created with the singer Björk. He takes his inspiration from the country's rugged, icy landscape, Icelandic history and myths. He shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd his secret research weapon, his favourite antiquarian bookstore in central Reykjavik, as he scours its shelves for books to inform and inspire his latest novel, based on the dark history of Icelandic neo-Nazis. We then travel to his small hut on the south coast of the island, a place where he finds the peace and quiet he needs in order to create his works.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

How a second hand bookstore and a small black hut inspire his creativity

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"How a second hand bookstore and a small black hut inspire his creativity

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

As well as being one of Iceland's most popular novelists, Sjón is also a poet, screenwriter and lyricist - he was Oscar nominated for “I've seen it all, ? the song he created with the singer Björk. He takes his inspiration from the country's rugged, icy landscape, Icelandic history and myths. He shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd his secret research weapon, his favourite antiquarian bookstore in central Reykjavik, as he scours its shelves for books to inform and inspire his latest novel, based on the dark history of Icelandic neo-Nazis. We then travel to his small hut on the south coast of the island, a place where he finds the peace and quiet he needs in order to create his works.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

"

Imran Qureshi: Beauty And Carnage20190716An internationally renowned artist from Lahore in Pakistan, Imran Qureshi is a master of the very delicate and the very brutal: combining tiny brushstrokes inspired by the 16th Century Mughal masters with large-scale installations evoking the carnage left after a bomb attack, his work has the power to shock and intrigue in equal measure.

An unlikely friendship connects him with Christian Louboutin, one of the world's best-known shoe designers, whose trademark red-soled, beautifully crafted pumps are worn by the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow and Rihanna.

For this programme, Christian meets Imran at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, a huge warehouse turned art gallery in Paris. It is the venue of a major solo exhibition, and Christian joins Imran as crates are unpacked and last-minute changes made to individual paintings and the exhibition as a whole, with some new work inspired by the bomb attacks on two mosques in New Zealand in March 2019.

“There is an element of violence in the work,” Imran says, “at the same time, when you get close to it, it becomes poetic as well.”

He has even brought a piece of his studio with him from Lahore, which becomes part of his installation in its own right – and as he and Christian discuss each other's art, it emerges that these two creative giants have a surprising amount in common.

The Pakistani artist meets his friend, French shoe designer Christian Louboutin, in Paris

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In The Studio20170620takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Kwame Kwei Armah is an award-winning playwright, actor, and for the last six years artistic director of Baltimore's Center Stage theatre. In June 2017, he is directing the world premiere of Jazz, an adaptation of Toni Morrison's 1992 novel, a twisted love triangle set in 1920s Harlem.

During the frantic second week of rehearsals, Kwame talks to fellow Baltimorean David Simon (American TV producer, writer, journalist, and creator of The Wire and Treme) about the challenges of bringing this brand new play to the stage. The novel explores the African-American experience in 1920s Harlem and evokes jazz through its musical, improvisational structure - full of repetitions and revisions. For Kwame, the challenge is to open up this complex story in a theatrical way.

We join cast and crew as they sweat it out in rehearsals. The play's World Premiere is in 10 days, and Kwame has just received the last 40 pages of script. It is a rough and ready process, and Kwame expects his actors to be ready to fly by the seat of their pants. We eavesdrop on the costume shop, props workshop and set builders who must bring Kwame's vision to life and evoke the musical worlds of Toni Morrison's book.

Kwame and David also discuss the energy and terror of being at the helm of an artistic institution in Baltimore. This is a city with a long history of racial tension, but hit global headlines in April 2015 when the death of Freddie Gray - a 25 year old black man in police custody - sparked mass protests and civil uprisings on a scale not seen since the death of Martin Luther King Jr, almost half a century ago. For Kwame, now is a time for artists to speak truth to power. At heart, he is a political playwright who is learning to be a responsible curator. His artistic mission is to sometimes gently lead the Baltimore community, sometimes gently poke it, and use metaphor to talk to the here and now.

(Photo: David Simon (L) and (R) Kwame Kwei-Armah)

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

"takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

In The Studio: Creating An Icon20191224
Itay Mautner - Dissolving Boundaries Through The Arts20171017"Artistic director Itay Mautner on creating Jerusalem's Mekudeshet arts festival

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

A volcano billowing smoke high on the rooftops of Jerusalem, documentary theatre bus trips and a big Kulna music festival performed by musicians from different parts of the city - just some of the events being created for Mekudeshet, a three and a half week season of arts and culture taking place across Jerusalem. Mekudeshet's artistic director is Israeli Itay Mautner, who wants to dissolve boundaries through the arts. We follow Itay as he prepares for this big city wide festival, with the problems and joys of designing a season in the one of the most beloved and disputed cities in the world.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

(Image: Itay Mautner. Credit: Noam Sharon)

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

(Image: Itay Mautner. Credit: Noam Sharon)

"In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Image: Itay Mautner. Credit: Noam Sharon) "

"""In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Image: Itay Mautner. Credit: Noam Sharon) """

Jakub Jf3zef Orli\u0144ski: Countertenor In Karlsruhe20200421Countertenor Jakub J\u00f3zef Orli\u0144ski prepares for the title role in Handel's opera Tolomeo

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The Polish countertenor Jakub Józef Orliński is rapidly becoming one of the most sought-after performers on opera stages and in concert halls around the world. A YouTube video of him singing Vivaldi has had more than 5 million views, his many prizes include a recent Gramophone Classical Music Award and he's released 2 critically acclaimed albums.

And he's not just known as a singer- he also has an impressive record as a breakdancer and a fashion model.

Earlier this year, Jakub was preparing to sing the title role in Handel's opera Tolomeo at the Badisches Staatstheater in the German city of Karlsruhe. Emma Kingsley joined him there to watch him in rehearsal and to hear how he goes about not just perfecting his singing voice, but also writing his own musical ornaments and cadenzas for the solos and duets that he will be performing for these performances and the production's revival in 2021.

Presented and produced by Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

Photograph of Jakub Józef Orliński (credits: Honorata Karapuda/Chi Chi Ude)

Jamaican Reggae Star Protoje20190827Grammy nominated Jamaican reggae star Protoje gives us an exclusive insight into his creative and thought process as he begins to produce his fifth studio album. Following on the heels of the Grammy nominated A Matter of Time album, we visit Jamaica to catch up with the man who is being heralded as spearheading a new movement in the Caribbean with a new wave of young, energetic and passionate artists. Protoje has helped the likes of Chronixx, Lila Ike and Koffee by giving them a platform to develop their talents and present the emerging sound of Jamaica to a global audience.

We delve into the success of his previous album, his approach to the new set, why he felt having his own studio would aid his creativity as well as visiting the new space. We focus on his lyrical ability, and the importance he places on being lyrically astute and rhythmically different from what would be expected from a Jamaican artist.

Presented by award winning BBC reggae DJ Seani B, this is a rarely seen insight into a highly anticipated piece of work from Protoje.

DJ Seani B gets a rare insight into a highly anticipated piece of work from Protoje

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Janet Echelman: Bending Arc20200721The artist and sculptor Janet Echelman works on huge pieces of public art that combine high tech design, history and visual imagination to soar above the heads of the public and interact with the environment. Her latest, Bending Arc, has been waiting out the Covid crisis before finally being unveiled to the public in St Petersburg Florida.

Spanning 427 feet, and held by some 180 miles of twine, this giant net sculpture has needed a team of architects, model makers, computer scientists, aeronautical and structural engineers - all led by Echelman - to create a billowing, multi-coloured artwork that will cast shade and inspire the pier walkers of St Petersburg. It is also an artwork that draws directly on Echelman's own family history in ready-to-wear fashion.

Andrea Shea has been documenting Echelman's creative processes and now, all that awaits, is the grand opening scheduled for July when the artist's imagination will billow and dazzle in the sea breeze.

Presented by Andrea Shea
Produced by Mark Burman for the BBC World Service

Main image:- the photo of Bending Arc is by Brian Adams and the portrait of Janet is by Andrew Sachs.

The making of a monumental aerial sculpture in Florida during the Covid pandemic

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Jason Decaires Taylor - Underwater Sculptor20181113"

Miranda Krestovnikoff puts on her diving suit and invites underwater sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor to guide her through his studios, both under the ocean and on land.

Jason is a sculptor, marine conservationist and scuba diver who combines all his passions to take the art gallery to a whole new realm - the ocean floor. The life-like human figures he creates take on an often breathtaking guise in their underwater gallery, as algae, fish and the refracted light filtering down from the surface, all combine to form an otherworldly kind of art.

Miranda finds Jason tackling several different projects - not least moving his studio from Lanzarote in Spain's Canary Islands back to the UK. She discovers the huge variety of skills required in his work, from the detail of creating a human sculpture (at one point she finds herself covered in plaster in Jason's casting room) to the global task of drawing attention to the current threat to our oceans.

It also becomes clear that for Jason, creating sculptures and raising awareness of marine conservation often gets overshadowed by complex logistical and technical challenges - such as what to do when sculptures are broken by cavalier delivery drivers, and how to prevent heavy sculptures crashing through the studio floor.

And there is one area over which even Jason has no control – politics. Sometimes projects are frustratingly delayed, while at other times there is far more at stake.

Producer: Alex Anderson

(Image: Jason deCaires Taylor. Credit: Tandem Productions)

Creating an art gallery on the ocean floor

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

Miranda Krestovnikoff puts on her diving suit and invites underwater sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor to guide her through his studios, both under the ocean and on land.

Jeff Staple: Designing For Timberland20191112Jeff Staple is an acclaimed American fashion and graphic designer, founder of New York Design agency Staple Design, Staple Clothing and Reed Space boutique. He has collaborated and released lines with brands such as Nike, Coca-Cola, Oakley, Uniqlo, PUMA and Clarks. He serves as Creative Director for TGS Holdings, Inc - an innovative group of retail outlets.

As a designer he is respected for his keen eye and his dynamic yet practical and diligent approach. We get an exclusive insight into Jeff's design philosophy, approach and process, as we spend time with him in his studio in New York City, as he works on his collaborative release with leading footwear titan, Timberland.

In addition, we hear from key figures within the industry about what makes Jeff and his work so iconic. These contributors include Chris McGrath (Vice President, Timberland Global Footwear Design), Rob Stone (Co-Founder of Cornerstone and The Fader), Sophia Chang (Illustrator), Upscale Vandal (Consultant - Roc Nation / PUMA / Billionaire Boys Club) and Bernie Gross (Artistic Director, Extra Butter).

The show is presented by Bobbito Garcia, the New York based critically acclaimed author, award-winning film-maker, presenter and DJ.

The process of designer Jeff Staple as he completes his collaboration with Timberland

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Joana Vasconcelos: Mask Out Of Mirrors2018062620190611 (WS)"In The Studio follows renowned Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos is renowned for her large scale sculptural pieces which have featured in galleries across the world. She's used materials such as fabric, plastic and even tampons to construct her works.

Her new exhibition will open at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain in June and for this she is working on a series of sculptures, including an enormous Venetian-style mask, made of overlapping mirrors. The construction and installation of the piece will be full of challenges as it takes shape in her Lisbon studio and is then moved to the exhibition space.

Anna McNamee follows Joana through the process of working with the mirrors and explores how the piece is designed, shaped and constructed.

Produced by Emma Kingsley and Anna McNamee

(Image of Joana Vasconcelos) Kenton Thatcher/© Unidade Infinita Projectos

"

The Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos is renowned for her large scale sculptural pieces which have featured in galleries across the world.She has used materials such as fabric, plastic and even tampons to construct her works.

In June 2018 her new exhibition called I'm Your Mirror opened at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. For this Joana made a series of new sculptures, including an enormous Venetian-style mask, made of overlapping mirrors. After being shown in Bilbao, the mask is now on display at the Museu de Serralves in Porto, Portugal with another version of it also on show in Venice at the Kempinski on San Clemente Island.

The construction of the huge mask was a process full of challenges as the enormous structure took shape in Joana's Lisbon studio. In this programme Anna McNamee follows Joana through the process of working with the mirrors and explores how the piece is designed, shaped and packed up ready to begin its journey to Bilbao.

Producer: by Emma Kingsley and Anna McNamee

(Photo: Joana Vasconcelos. Credit: Kenton Thatcher/© Unidade Infinita Projectos)

Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos goes through the process of designing a Venetian mask

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Johan Holmstrf6m's Lo-fi Masterpiece20181016Johan Holmström's music is heard by millions of people every day but very few would know his name, what he looks like, or be able to give you the title of one of his compositions. That is because Johan is the resident composer and sound designer at King, the makers of the incredibly successful Candy Crush - a social game that has been installed over 1.7 billion times around the globe.

Downton Abbey composer, John Lunn, joins Johan and follows every step of his creative process. Together, they discover how creating music for TV and film compares with scoring for social games.

(Photo: Johan Holmström)

Johan Holmstr\u00f6m shows Downton Abbey composer John Lunn how to create music for games

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

"

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

John Eliot Gardiner And The Monteverdi Orchestra20190723In 1744, in the grand surroundings of London's Royal Opera House, a musical scandal occurred. During the austere Christian season of Lent, George Frederick Handel (composer of Messiah, The Water Music, and Zadok the Priest) premiered his new opera Semele. Drawing on ancient writings by Ovid and more recent ones by playwright William Congreve, Handel's ‘musical drama' Semele broke the rules, social and musical – with the story of a disastrous love affair between the mortal Princess Semele and Jupiter, King of the Gods.

Sir John Eliot Gardiner is one of the world's leading musicians specialising in the ‘restoration' of early music. With a peerless 50-year track record, he strives to recreate the sounds that composers like Handel and JS Bach would have imagined and heard. His approach combines musicology, scholarship, and an uncompromising passion for the music: rather like a picture restorer, he painstakingly strips away the layers of musical varnish and tarnish that have accumulated over generations, to present the music afresh, as its composers intended.

Composer and musician Lloyd Coleman follows John Eliot Gardiner's work to prepare a brand new 2019 production of Semele. Visiting rehearsals just across London's Waterloo Bridge from where Semele was first heard 275 years ago, Lloyd talks to John Eliot Gardiner about his philosophy and strategies, and asks some of Gardiner's many colleagues about how they collaborate with him to realise this ambitious and thrilling project.

(Photo: John Eliot Gardiner)

Lloyd Coleman gets alongside legendary classical conductor John Eliot Gardiner

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

John Saunderson - The Number One Hitmaker20191001He's not a singer, writer or a musician but he's earned a reputation as a Number One hitmaker across the globe with credits like “Bonkers” by Dizzee Rascal.

John Saunderson has been in the music business for over 40 years and has an uncanny knack of working with his team of songwriters and colleagues at Notting Hill Music to choose exactly the right song for the right artist. He has had over 30 number one hits in 15 countries around the world and is always looking for the next big thing.

Anna Bailey follows John to find out what the different processes are in the life of a hitmaker. She watches as his team work on composing with the former Pussycat Doll singing star Melody Thornton and hears how a song is created, often in a very short space of time.

Anna also follows the initial steps of choosing a song for the South Korean pop phenomenon J.Fla who is looking for something to appeal to a Western audience. Her team have a very specific set of requirements, including wanting a “hook” or earworm that will be distinctive. Will John and the team be able to deliver?

Presenter: Anna Bailey

(Image: John Saunderson. Credit: Gary Thomas KYPA)

We follow in the footsteps of hitmaker John Saunderson

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

He's not a singer, writer or a musician but he's earned a reputation as a Number 1 hitmaker across the globe with credits like “Bonkers” by Dizzee Rascal.

John Saunderson has been in the music business for over 40 years and has an uncanny knack of working with his team of songwriters and colleagues at Notting Hill Music to choose exactly the right song for the right artist. He's had over 30 number 1 hits in 15 countries around the world and is always looking for the next big thing.

Presented by Anna Bailey

(Image: John Saunderson. Credit to: Gary Thomas KYPA)

John Saunderson: The Number One Hitmaker20191001He's not a singer, writer or a musician but he's earned a reputation as a Number One hitmaker across the globe with credits like “Bonkers” by Dizzee Rascal.

John Saunderson has been in the music business for over 40 years and has an uncanny knack of working with his team of songwriters and colleagues at Notting Hill Music to choose exactly the right song for the right artist. He has had over 30 number one hits in 15 countries around the world and is always looking for the next big thing.

Anna Bailey follows John to find out what the different processes are in the life of a hitmaker. She watches as his team work on composing with the former Pussycat Doll singing star Melody Thornton and hears how a song is created, often in a very short space of time.

Anna also follows the initial steps of choosing a song for the South Korean pop phenomenon J.Fla who is looking for something to appeal to a Western audience. Her team have a very specific set of requirements, including wanting a “hook” or earworm that will be distinctive. Will John and the team be able to deliver?

Presenter: Anna Bailey

(Image: John Saunderson. Credit: Gary Thomas KYPA)

We follow in the footsteps of hitmaker John Saunderson

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Jordi Savall20201201Catalan conductor and violist Jordi Savall is the ringmaster of a unique, uproarious musical circus: a time-traveller who bridges centuries and cultures to make six hundred year-old music sound like it was composed yesterday.

He reveals to journalist Lluis Amiguet how he makes the music of the past sound utterly compelling – and relevant – to 21st century ears, as we move back and forth between his home studio in Barcelona and rehearsals for a musical celebration of the life of the 16th century French heroine Joan of Arc in Troyes, France.

What drives Jordi Savall to revive, remix and rejuvenate music from a long distant past? And what makes him seek out musical cultures across the globe – West Africa, South America, Asia and Ireland – and bring them together to help us understand the world in a new way?

Producer: Steven Rajam
An Overcoat Media production

Image: Jordi Savall (Credit: David Ignaszewski)

A musical time-traveller who bridges centuries and cultures

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Juan Gabriel Ve1squez: Literature In The Centre Of My Life20200929The Colombian novelist and journalist Juan Gabriel Vásquez is widely regarded as one of the most important Latin American writers today – known for his novels published in 28 languages, including the award-winning The Sound Of Things Falling, The Shape of the Ruins, and five other works of fiction, plus stories, literary essays, and political commentary.

Born outside the capital city of Bogotá and having lived there as a student, Vásquez says it's a place that helped shaped his creative life and consciousness as a writer. After 16 years in Paris and Spain, he returned to Colombia to live and write. Now, as he embarks on his latest novel due to be published in December, Natalia Guerrero talks to Vasquez in Bogotá to find out how he works on his books.

As he writes he describes his creative process from thought to page and start to finish. We hear how Bogotá has influenced his writing as "a life calling" with "literature in the centre of my life"; and how he keeps to a daily writing routine – including wearing noise-cancelling headphones so that he can have the silence he needs to create his work.

And there are the very intimate moments of writing the final words and sharing his new book with its very first reader - his wife.

Reporter: Natalia Guerrero
Producers: Natalia Guerrero, Emma Wallace and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

Photograph of Juan Gabriel Vásquez by Diana Matar

The acclaimed Colombian writer Juan Gabriel V\u00e1squez creates his new novel.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Julie Baines - Making Movies Happen20180828"Following the roller coaster world of the British film producer

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

British film producer Julie Baines knows all about long lead times. She often has to work for years to get a project financed before any filming can happen at all. For over six years, Julie has been fighting to bring ‘Four Kids and It', a script she loves, from page to screen. The story is based on the hugely popular children's writer Jacqueline Wilson's retelling of the 1902 book ‘Five Children and It'.

When we first meet Julie in March 2017, filming is scheduled to start in just a few months but there are still deals to be done and actors to be cast. Film stars including Academy Award winner Michael Caine are on board and the locations have been earmarked but will the money start flowing in time for filming to begin?

Film director Joseph Adesunloye follows Julie through the ups and downs of wrangling with lawyers and financiers as she works to get the cameras rolling.

Produced by Hilary Dunn and Karl Bos for BBC World Service.

(Image: Film producer Julie Baines)

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

(Image: Film producer Julie Baines)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Julie Baines: The Making Of A Movie, Part One20200602Film producer Julie Baines on filming of `Four Kids and It' starring Russell Brand

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

British film producer Julie Baines knows all about long lead times. She often has to work for years to get a project financed before any filming can happen at all. For over six years, Julie had been fighting to bring ‘Four Kids and It', a script she loves, from page to screen. The story is based on a retelling of the 1902 book ‘Five Children and It' by the hugely popular children's writer Jacqueline Wilson.

When we first met Julie in March 2017, filming was scheduled to start in just a few months but there were still deals to be done and actors to be cast. Film stars, including Russell Brand and Academy Award winner Michael Caine, were on board and the locations had been earmarked but would the money start flowing in time for filming to begin?

Film director Joseph Adesunloye followed Julie through the ups and downs of wrangling with lawyers and financiers as she worked to get the cameras rolling.

Produced by Hilary Dunn and Karl Bos for the BBC World Service

(Image: Film producer Julie Baines)

Julie Baines: The Making Of A Movie, Part Two20200609Film Producer Julie Baines on the making of Four Kids and It starring Russell Brand

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Starring Russell Brand and Matthew Goode – and featuring Michael Caine – the film Four Kids and It is a culmination of 8 years hard graft by award-winning British independent film producer Julie Baines.

Never afraid to take risks to achieve her cinematic dreams this film demands more of her talent, insight and sheer hard work than ever before.

Based on Jacqueline Wilson's best-selling novel, itself inspired by the E Nesbitt classic 5 Children and It, the story requires an array of sophisticated special effects including flying, dare devil rock climbing and the staging of a pop concert at the O2 in London.

After two failed attempts to finance the film, it was finally given the go ahead and shot in Ireland in the summer of 2018. It's a wrap, the film is in the can – but this is where our story starts.

Will the film be completed on time avoiding hefty financial penalties? Will the special effects make the grade, without access to the type of budget Hollywood studios can command? And finally, how well will it sell in a very competitive marketplace in a bid to get it in front of the family audiences it was made for?

Hilary Dunn follows British independent film producer Julie Baines for a period of nearly two years, on a revealing journey into the little known art – and science – of post-production.

Presented and Produced by Hilary Dunn for the BBC World Service

Junya Ishigami: Architect Of London's Serpentine Pavilion20190806Every year since 2000 London's Serpentine Gallery has offered an architect who has never built in the UK a very special challenge - to design a boundary pushing temporary building to stand in the heart of Kensington Gardens, London. They have just six months, a sixth of the average amount of time it takes to design and construct a building.

Architect Maria Smith follows Junya Ishigami and the pavilion team as they use their experience and ingenuity to try to construct the design. It's a forest of slender white columns supporting a 61 ton roof of Cumbrian slate, a structure Junya refers to as 'a black bird flying through the rain'. How can they realise such a technically demanding building in such a short time and what will the public and the critics think when it's finally complete?

Featuring a diverse selection from the huge team which contribute to the building, including architect Sir David Adjaye, curator Amira Gad, Project Manager Ted Featonby, Engineer Michael Orr and Serpentine Head of Construction and Buildings Julie Burnell. With access to almost every facet of the project Maria takes us into the normally unseen corners of this complex, challenging and internationally unparalleled architectural event.

The Japanese architect's vision for the pavilion - 'a black bird flying through the rain'

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Kadir Lf3pez : Lighting Up Havana2019100820200915 (WS)As Cuba's capital city Havana celebrates its 500th birthday, one artist has been making it his mission to recreate the famous neon signs that used to adorn the buildings and light up the streets and squares.

Kadir López has had his multimedia work exhibited worldwide, but over the past few years he has been driven by a passion for neon and the concept of connecting Havana's present with its colourful past. He and his small team of skilled craftspeople remake the signs in a workshop in the centre of Havana, often in searing heat and soaring temperatures. There are specialist procedures needed for the bending of the neon and the colouring and design. Then the signs have to be carefully re-positioned on buildings, using scaffolding and cranes.

Julia Galiano-Rios watches Kadir as he brings the signs to life and hears how the use of neon can throw new light – both physical and spiritual- on a city.

Producers: Juliana Galiano-Rios and Emma Kingsley

(Photo: Artist Kadir López, with kind permission)

The artist Kadir L\u00f3pez remakes the neon signs which once shone on Havana's boulevards

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

A year ago, as Cuba's capital city Havana was celebrating its 500th birthday, one artist was making it his mission to recreate the famous neon signs that used to adorn the buildings and light up the streets and squares.

In a revised edition of a programme first broadcast in 2019, Julia Galiano-Rios watches Kadir as he brings the signs to life. She hears how the use of neon can throw new light – both physical and spiritual- on a city and finds out how Covid-19 has affected his work.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Kari Kola: Lighting Up The World20200414Finnish light artist Kari Kola on creating his largest site-specific artwork to date

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Kari Kola developed his love of working with light in his native Finland, one of the world's most northern countries, where the winters are long and very dark. Teaching himself to use light in those months - to utilise the darkness – is what inspired Kari to become a light artist.

For Galway 2020, European Capital of Culture, Kari and his team of Finns are setting their sights on the wild and beautiful Connemara mountain range, as he attempts to create Savage Beauty, the largest lit artwork ever made.

Using the latest technology, and transporting a vast amount of kit to an Irish mountain range in the middle of March, has its own unique set of challenges. It's a challenge that seems second nature to Kari, who taught himself to play piano without ever learning a note, and has overcome accidents which have left him unable to walk and hear at various times in his life. No wonder, perhaps, that the artist's motto is “Nothing is impossible; it is just a matter of deciding how much you want to use your energy towards achieving it".

Reporter Orla Higgins pursues the creative process in Galway, and we spend time with Kari in his studio in the easternmost province of Finland, but as the 4 day event approaches amid gales and a Coronavirus pandemic, will it all come together?

Presenter: Orla Higgins
Producer: Ella-mai Robey and Karl Bos

Kazuhiro Tsuji - Sculpting Jimi Hendrix20190305"

Japanese sculptor Kazuhiro Tsuji is an artist fascinated by faces. A special effects make-up expert, he has spent over 20 years transforming Hollywood actors in films such as Men In Black and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, winning an Oscar in 2018 for his work on Darkest Hour - where his prosthetics turned actor Gary Oldman into former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

Kazuhiro's love of sculpting has become his main creative outlet in recent years and he has used his unique ability for crafting faces to create hyper-realistic head sculptures of the famous figures who inspire him, from Frida Kahlo to Salvador Dali and Abraham Lincoln. These heads are twice life-size and displayed on bespoke pedestals which make them stand over 2 metres tall, in a celebration of the people they represent.

Laura Hubber meets Kazuhiro in his Los Angeles studio as he embarks on his latest subject – rock legend Jimi Hendrix. There she follows his creative process through clay sculptures and digital enlargement with 3D printers, to the arduous process of attaching Jimi's hair, strand by strand, as the exhibition deadline fast approaches.

Producer: Karl Bos for the BBC World Service.

(Image: Kazuhiro Tsuji with his sculpture of Jimi Hendrix. Photo courtesy of the artist)

Capturing the essence of a rock legend in a hyper-realistic 3D portrait

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

Kwame Kwei Armah - Theatre Director20170620"Join Kwame in rehearsals for Jazz, an adaptation of Toni Morrison's 1992 novel

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Kwame Kwei Armah is an award-winning playwright, actor, and for the last six years artistic director of Baltimore's Center Stage theatre. In June 2017, he is directing the world premiere of Jazz, an adaptation of Toni Morrison's 1992 novel, a twisted love triangle set in 1920s Harlem.

During the frantic second week of rehearsals, Kwame talks to fellow Baltimorean David Simon (American TV producer, writer, journalist, and creator of The Wire and Treme) about the challenges of bringing this brand new play to the stage. The novel explores the African-American experience in 1920s Harlem and evokes jazz through its musical, improvisational structure - full of repetitions and revisions. For Kwame, the challenge is to open up this complex story in a theatrical way.

We join cast and crew as they sweat it out in rehearsals. The play's World Premiere is in 10 days, and Kwame has just received the last 40 pages of script. It is a rough and ready process, and Kwame expects his actors to be ready to fly by the seat of their pants. We eavesdrop on the costume shop, props workshop and set builders who must bring Kwame's vision to life and evoke the musical worlds of Toni Morrison's book.

Kwame and David also discuss the energy and terror of being at the helm of an artistic institution in Baltimore. This is a city with a long history of racial tension, but hit global headlines in April 2015 when the death of Freddie Gray - a 25 year old black man in police custody - sparked mass protests and civil uprisings on a scale not seen since the death of Martin Luther King Jr, almost half a century ago. For Kwame, now is a time for artists to speak truth to power. At heart, he is a political playwright who is learning to be a responsible curator. His artistic mission is to sometimes gently lead the Baltimore community, sometimes gently poke it, and use metaphor to talk to the here and now.

(Photo: David Simon (L) and (R) Kwame Kwei-Armah)

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Lady Pink: The First Lady Of Graffiti20200317Nicknamed the “first lady of graffiti ?, Lady Pink's work is known for its celebration of women. The Ecuadorian-American artist was one of the first women active on the New York graffiti scene at the end of the 1970s and early 1980s, earning her a lead role in the seminal hip hop film, Wild Style in 1983.

While still at high school Pink began exhibiting in art galleries and by the age of 21 she had her first solo show. More recently she has designed a perfume bottle for Lancôme and turned her signature designs into a clothing range.

Pink's latest project is to create a 33 foot long mural on the walls of one of the new World Trade Center buildings, built to replace those destroyed by terrorist attacks on September 11 2001. The artist's creation for this particular space will be based on her Unity Tree design, because she says, “The world has never been the same, but what we can celebrate is all the peacefulness and happiness that we enjoy in New York City with all the nations and nationalities living together ?

New York reporter Tara Gadomski joins Lady Pink over the course of a week to witness her new painting come to life.

Presenter: Tara Gadomski

Producer: Emma Betteridge and Ella-mai Robey

Lady Pink on creating a 33 foot long mural at the World Trade Center in New York

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Nicknamed the “first lady of graffiti”, Lady Pink's work is known for its celebration of women. The Ecuadorian-American artist was one of the first women active on the New York graffiti scene at the end of the 1970s and early 1980s, earning her a lead role in the seminal hip hop film, Wild Style in 1983.

Pink's latest project is to create a 33 foot long mural on the walls of one of the new World Trade Center buildings, built to replace those destroyed by terrorist attacks on September 11 2001. The artist's creation for this particular space will be based on her Unity Tree design, because she says, “The world has never been the same, but what we can celebrate is all the peacefulness and happiness that we enjoy in New York City with all the nations and nationalities living together”.

Lady Skollie, South African Artist20170411Lady Skollie on symbolic fruit and the pressures of creating a mural in just 2 days

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Lady Skollie is a visual artist, passionate about defying taboos. Her works are explosions of colour often featuring symbolic fruit such as open ripened paw paws and bananas representing male/female relationships and highlighting the enormous problems of HIV/Aids and sexual violence in her native South Africa. The BBC's Victoria Uwonkunda follows her from her studio in Johannesburg to the Tyburn Gallery in London, where as part of her first UK solo exhibition, she creates a mural on the wall in just 2 days.

"Lady Skollie on symbolic fruit and the pressures of creating a mural in just 2 days

"

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Lady Skollie is a visual artist, passionate about defying taboos. Her works are explosions of colour often featuring symbolic fruit such as open ripened paw paws and bananas representing male/female relationships and highlighting the enormous problems of HIV/Aids and sexual violence in her native South Africa. The BBC's Victoria Uwonkunda follows her from her studio in Johannesburg to the Tyburn Gallery in London, where as part of her first UK solo exhibition, she creates a mural on the wall in just 2 days.

Lee Child: Creating Jack Reacher20171031Best-selling author Lee Child on crafting a new mystery for his character Jack Reacher

The Jack Reacher novels are a publishing phenomena, selling millions of copies worldwide and launching a film franchise starring Tom Cruise. And their author Lee Child, has allowed the World Service astonishing access to his writing room to record the first three days of writing on the next Reacher novel.

Producer Kevin Core is at his side as he sets to work on a 23rd bestseller, which will again dominate the book charts. He gets a glimpse into Child's unusual technique, a free-wheeling lurch into story – with only a loose plot idea, no outline plan and no skeleton of events – a process he describes as like a fall from a building in the hope a crash mat will appear.

From his apartment near New York's Central Park, he looks back on the drabness of an uninspiring post-war upbringing in Birmingham, UK, and sets out how he feels modern writers can succeed by taking on streaming TV and gaming in the war for readers' attention. Between grappling with his opening pages and crafting a new mystery for a character loved by millions – he sets out a defence of the popular thriller, saying despite the condescension of critics and from some sections of the literary world – that the creation of a gripping story is an ancient and difficult craft.

(Photo: Lee Child)

"Best-selling author Lee Child on crafting a new mystery for his character Jack Reacher

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo: Lee Child)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Leila Aboulela: Writing The Stories Of Scotland And Sudan20181204Leila Aboulela is a writer inspired by two very different continents. Born in Egypt, she grew up in Khartoum in Sudan and now lives in Aberdeen in the north east of Scotland. She won the first ever Caine Prize for African writing for her short story The Museum and her works reflect the interwoven history and cultures of the UK and Sudan.

Leila is normally a secretive writer, but in a complete change to her usual creative process, she has decided to take up a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation in Bellagio and share her ideas for her latest novel, which has the working title of Rammed Earth, Smooth River. The BBC's Andrea Kidd joins her on the shore of Lake Como, to find out how this Italian retreat and the conversations taking place with fellow residents, are impacting her story about the rebuilding of Khartoum following the siege it endured in the late 19th century.

(Image: Writer Leila Aboulela)

Sudanese author Leila Aboulela develops the storyline for her latest novel

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"

Leila Aboulela is a writer inspired by two very different continents. Born in Egypt, she grew up in Khartoum in Sudan and now lives in Aberdeen in the north east of Scotland. She won the first ever Caine Prize for African writing for her short story The Museum and her works reflect the interwoven history and cultures of the UK and Sudan.

Leila is normally a secretive writer, but in a complete change to her usual creative process, she has decided to take up a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation in Bellagio and share her ideas for her latest novel, which has the working title of Rammed Earth, Smooth River. The BBC's Andrea Kidd joins her on the shore of Lake Como, to find out how this Italian retreat and the conversations taking place with fellow residents, are impacting her story about the rebuilding of Khartoum following the siege it endured in the late 19th century.

(Image: Writer Leila Aboulela)

Sudanese author Leila Aboulela develops the storyline for her latest novel

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

Leila Aboulela is a writer inspired by two very different continents. Born in Egypt, she grew up in Khartoum in Sudan and now lives in Aberdeen in the north east of Scotland. She won the first ever Caine Prize for African writing for her short story The Museum and her works reflect the interwoven history and cultures of the UK and Sudan.

(Image: Writer Leila Aboulela)

Sudanese author Leila Aboulela develops the storyline for her latest novel

Linda Wong Davies: Staging Semele In Shanghai - Part One20200128The mythological story of Semele - a woman so confident in her own desires and ambition that she attracted the King of the Gods as her lover - became the first-ever baroque opera to be performed in China, just over a decade ago.

Ten years on and completely re-imagined Semele is back, this time in the city of Shanghai, to help celebrate the 140th anniversary of the Shanghai Symphony Orchestra.

With rare and unrestricted access to the creation of such a cultural event in China, Ella-mai Robey joins the multi-national cast and crew for all the drama involved in taking the show from planning stages to first-night performance.

The production is the brainchild of Lady Linda Wong Davies, founder of the KT Wong Foundation, which aims to foster a mutual understanding between China and the rest of the world through creative projects. Together, with Royal Opera House director Julia Burbach, conductor Maestro Long Yu and a cast including soprano Jane Archibald - they have just six weeks to prepare the production from scratch.

The clock is ticking. Will the arrival of a theatrical set – the first in the history of Shanghai Symphony Hall – prove too much?

Presenter/producer: Ella-mai Robey

Producer Linda Wong Davies creates a show for China in just six weeks

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Linda Wong Davies: Staging Semele In Shanghai - Part Two20200204In the second of this two-part documentary….the pressure is mounting.

Producer Linda Wong Davies and the multinational cast and crew have reached Shanghai and have little more than a week before opening night, so there is a lot to do in a very short amount of time.

The Shanghai Symphony Orchestra – who are celebrating their 140th anniversary – have no experience of performing the baroque music required for Handel's musical drama, Semele.

Shanghai Symphony Hall – a concert hall not designed to house a theatrical set – is about to welcome one through its doors for the first time.

Plus, the lighting and petals are causing a bit of a stir!

With unrestricted access to the making of this cultural event in China, Ella-mai Robey tries to keep up with the action.

Presented and produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Producer Linda Wong Davies and the team on what it takes to create a new show in Shanghai

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Lisa Reihana - Maori History In 3d20171212"New Zealand visual artist Lisa Reihana on her portrayal of Pacific life and a new 3D film

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Lisa Reihana is one of New Zealand's most important artists. Her most recent work In Pursuit of Venus [infected] became one of the highlights of the 2017 Venice Biennale. It is a 26 metre long animated wallpaper that was many years in the making. It is a reinterpretation of a 200-year-old panoramic wallpaper created by Joseph Dufour that painted an exotic portrait of the life of Pacific people as described by Captain Cook. Now, Lisa is working on something brand new, a short 3D film which again looks at the meeting of two cultures, featuring an epic encounter between two female warriors. Presenter Tim Marlow joins Lisa Reihana in her New Zealand studio to talk about art, film and creativity.

(Photo: Lisa Reihana)

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Lisa Reihana €Ⓚ Maori History In 3d20171212New Zealand visual artist Lisa Reihana on her portrayal of Pacific life and a new 3D film

Lisa Reihana is one of New Zealand's most important artists. Her most recent work In Pursuit of Venus [infected] became one of the highlights of the 2017 Venice Biennale. It is a 26 metre long animated wallpaper that was many years in the making. It is a reinterpretation of a 200-year-old panoramic wallpaper created by Joseph Dufour that painted an exotic portrait of the life of Pacific people as described by Captain Cook. Now, Lisa is working on something brand new, a short 3D film which again looks at the meeting of two cultures, featuring an epic encounter between two female warriors. Presenter Tim Marlow joins Lisa Reihana in her New Zealand studio to talk about art, film and creativity.

(Photo: Lisa Reihana)

"New Zealand visual artist Lisa Reihana on her portrayal of Pacific life and a new 3D film

(Photo: Lisa Reihana) "

Liz Gerring - Master Of Movement20180220"The choreographer who sees dancers onstage like paint on canvas

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The American choreographer Liz Gerring specialises in abstract, intricately crafted modern dance pieces. For the past twenty years, she's been creating works for her own dance company and her latest piece is the third in a trilogy – following the critically acclaimed Glacier (2013) and Horizon (2015). Tara Gadomski meets Liz at her rehearsal studio in New York as she starts exploring ideas and movements for this new dance show, which has the working title ‘Field'. Due to be premiered in New Jersey in Autumn 2018, we follow Liz as she works with her dancers to get the creative process moving.

Produced by Karl Bos

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Liz Gerring €Ⓚ Master Of Movement20180220The choreographer who sees dancers onstage like paint on canvas

The American choreographer Liz Gerring specialises in abstract, intricately crafted modern dance pieces. For the past twenty years, she's been creating works for her own dance company and her latest piece is the third in a trilogy – following the critically acclaimed Glacier (2013) and Horizon (2015). Tara Gadomski meets Liz at her rehearsal studio in New York as she starts exploring ideas and movements for this new dance show, which has the working title ‘Field'. Due to be premiered in New Jersey in Autumn 2018, we follow Liz as she works with her dancers to get the creative process moving.

Produced by Karl Bos

Produced by Karl Bos

"

The choreographer who sees dancers onstage like paint on canvas"

Lorna Goodison: Jamaican Poet Laureate20170829The Jamaican Poet Laureate creates a new work for Jamaican Emancipation Day

Lorna Goodison has recently been appointed Poet Laureate of Jamaica and has decided to mark her first Emancipation Day in the role with a special poem.

The public holiday of Emancipation Day on the 1st of August commemorates the end of slavery in Jamaica and as a poet who feels it's her duty to document the slave history of her native island in her work, this day is a very important one for Lorna, both professionally and personally – it's also her birthday.

The BBC's Andrea Kidd follows Lorna as she creates a poem fit for a nation. As someone who can spend years crafting a poem, will she meet her deadline?

"The Jamaican Poet Laureate creates a new work for Jamaican Emancipation Day

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The BBC's Andrea Kidd follows Lorna as she creates a poem fit for a nation. As someone who can spend years crafting a poem, will she meet her deadline?"

The BBC's Andrea Kidd follows Lorna as she creates a poem fit for a nation. As someone who can spend years crafting a poem, will she meet her deadline? "

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Louise Penny - Why Creativity Can Look Like Doing Nothing20170711"Louise Penny on taking inspiration from the changing landscape of Quebec

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

In the tranquil village of Three Pines, murder and mystery lurk. But like the Mounties, chief inspector Gamache always gets his man. The kindly cop is the creation of leading Canadian writer Louise Penny. As she completes her latest novel - Glass Houses - she reveals to Jennifer Chevalier how she gets inspiration from the changing Quebec landscape and despite publishing a a book a year, why her creative process can look like she's doing nothing at all.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Louise Penny €Ⓚ Why Her Creativity Can Look Like Doing Nothing At All20170711Louise Penny - taking inspiration from the changing landscape of Quebec

In the tranquil village of Three Pines... murder and mystery lurk. But like the Mounties, Chief Inspector Gamache always gets his man. The kindly cop is the creation of leading Canadian writer Louise Penny. As she completes her latest novel - Glass Houses - she reveals to Jennifer Chevalier how she gets inspiration from the changing Quebec landscape and despite publishing a a book a year, why her creative process can look like she's doing nothing at all.
Producer: Andrea Kidd

In the tranquil village of Three Pines, murder and mystery lurk. But like the Mounties, chief inspector Gamache always gets his man. The kindly cop is the creation of leading Canadian writer Louise Penny. As she completes her latest novel - Glass Houses - she reveals to Jennifer Chevalier how she gets inspiration from the changing Quebec landscape and despite publishing a a book a year, why her creative process can look like she's doing nothing at all.

"Louise Penny - taking inspiration from the changing landscape of Quebec

Producer: Andrea Kidd "

Loyiso Gola Wants To Make You Laugh20170926Loyiso Gola prepares to perform at the Edinburgh Festival in Scotland

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

What does it take to prepare a new stand- up show for the world's biggest comedy festival? Loyiso Gola is one of South Africa's most loved comedians he has performed across the globe and his satirical TV show Late Nite News with Loyiso Gola has had two Emmy nominations, one of television's greatest accolades.

In the Studio follows Loyiso as he embarks on the challenge of taking his latest show, Unlearning, to the Edinburgh Festival in Scotland. With Unlearning, Loyiso takes on those everyday ideas that we've learnt throughout our lives, such as who we are as people and how our perceptions of culture and history, race and politics shape how we see and treat each other. But how do you make an audience laugh for an hour, as well as question their perception of the world?

Producer and Presenter: Mugabi Turya

Photo: Loyiso Gola (c) Getty Images

"Loyiso Gola prepares to perform at the Edinburgh Festival in Scotland

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Photo: Loyiso Gola (c) Getty Images"

Photo: Loyiso Gola (c) Getty Images "

"""Loyiso Gola prepares to perform at the Edinburgh Festival in Scotland

Photo: Loyiso Gola (c) Getty Images """

Lynette Wallworth - Changing The Way We See Reality20180904"Australian artist and director Lynette Wallworth pushes the boundaries of immersive film

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Australian artist and director Lynette Wallworth loves to push the limits of technology and works with mixed reality developers, inventing new ways of experiencing art. Laura Hubber joins Lynette as she works with the team at the Technicolour Experience Center in Los Angeles, where she's visiting artist in residence, to create a new immersive interactive walk around section to her film Awavena.

Awavena explores the way of life led by the Yawanawa community of the Amazon and their first female Shaman Hushahu and this new section will be shown for the first time at the Venice Film Festival.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

(Image: Lynette Wallworth. Photo Credit: Reuben Lehr)

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Madeleine Thien: The First Draft20200303The Canadian writer Madeleine Thien is working on her next novel, the follow-up to her prizewinning 2016 book Do Not Say We Have Nothing. But she's finding that it's difficult to find the internal peace and privacy to begin again, especially after having being catapulted into the public eye after the previous novel's success.

As the narrative and characters shift and evolve in the author's mind, there's much painstaking research and many rewrites to be done. How can Madeleine blend the aspects of past and present which are pre-occupying her at the moment? And will she ever be satisfied enough with the novel to allow it to see the light of day?

Paul Kobrak follows her over several months as she creates different versions of the first draft of the new novel. It's a process which moves from Berlin in Germany (and a coffee shop which is central to Madeleine's writing process) to Brooklyn USA (where she teaches Creative Writing to University students) and finally to Portugal's capital city Lisbon, where she hopes to complete it.

Presented by Paul Kobrak

Produced by Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

Paul Kobrak follows the writer Madeleine Thien's process as she works on her next novel

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Making Midge Ure's New Guitar With Jimmy Moon20190108Scottish guitar maker Jimmy Moon receives an order to make a custom-built acoustic guitar from musician Midge Ure, as the craft of handmade musical instrument making is put in the spotlight in this edition of In the Studio.

We follow the process from Midge's initial specifications of size and finish, to the picking of wood, joinery, engineering work and finishing by Jimmy and his assistant Stephen Devine, to final delivery to Midge.

Midge needs a new acoustic to use on stage for a series of shows where he's stripping back his solo hits and those as front man with electronic 80s band Ultravox to perform them with just an acoustic guitar.

Jimmy has eight weeks before Midge returns to Glasgow, and we follow this master instrument maker as he creates the guitar that will accompany Midge's catalogue of classic tunes including If I Was, Vienna, Dancing with Tears in My Eyes and the Band Aid classic Do They Know It's Christmas.

Along the way, Midge talks to guitarist supremo Martin Taylor about the different requirements for him as a jazz guitarist compared to Midge's rock style. Midge throws up a challenge requesting an all-black matt finish, a first for Jimmy's order book, so he has to juggle design as well as creating musical tonal perfection.

A Demus production for BBC World Service
Producer: Nick Low

Image: Jimmy Moon (Credit: Struan Adam)

Guitar maker Jimmy Moon builds a custom-made guitar for Midge Ure

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Manoj Malde - Garden Designer2017052320170530 (WS)An insight into what a former fashion designer brings to the world of garden design

"Landscape Designer Manoj Malde designs his first garden for the RHS Chelsea Flower Show

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

British landscape designer Manoj Malde has just designed and constructed his first garden for this year's Chelsea Flower Show in London. But he is not your typical landscape artist. Having been an acclaimed fashion designer, his design is a homage to Mexican architect Luis Barragan. Manoj's garden Beneath the Mexican Sky, celebrates standing out from the crowd with dramatic colours, vibrancy, and the use of raw, natural materials.

Fellow landscape designer Jack Dunckley is following Manoj from the first sketches to the last pebble in place. Whilst they share the same artistic passion, Jack is very much the opposite in style. Breaking with the rules of nature, Jack's work is steeped in technology and conceptual design.

Jack explores how creative worlds can merge – and what a fashion designer can bring to the world of landscaping, as Manoj sees art through an entirely different lens.

Producer: Anishka Sharma
Assistant Producer: Gordon Radley

An insight into what a former fashion designer brings to the world of garden design"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Manoj Malde - Garden Designer20170530Landscape Designer Manoj Malde designs his first garden for the RHS Chelsea Flower Show

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Marc Quinn: Creating 100 Sculptures Of Refugees20200519Marc Quinn's new artwork sees him cast sculptures of 100 refugees from around the world

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

British artist Marc Quinn has been one of the world's leading contemporary artists for over 30 years. A prominent member of the group known as the Young British Artists (or YBAs) who dominated the British art scene in the 1990s, his high-profile works have included Alison Lapper Pregnant, for the inaugural fourth plinth sculpture in London's Trafalgar Square; and Self, a series of self-portraits of his own head - made out of ten pints of his own blood - cast and frozen every five years.

In this episode of In the Studio, Marc Quinn takes Edwina Pitman behind the scenes of an ambitious new work called 100 Heads, in which he documents the stories, and casts in concrete the heads, of 100 refugees. Spurred by the images and news reports of the refugee crisis in 2015, Marc began to make plans for not-for-profit public artworks to both raise awareness and money for refugees around the world. 100 Heads is being created in part therefore to raise funds for another ongoing Marc Quinn public artwork called Our Blood, in which 2,000 litres of frozen human blood - drawn from 10,000 resettled refugees, celebrities and other participants - will be encased in a pavilion on the steps of the New York Public Library in 2022.

From the initial meeting and interviewing refugees, through scanning, moulding and casting the concrete, Marc reveals the many processes as well as the technical and logistical challenges of creating 100 portrait heads of people from all over the world. The eventual creation will, he hopes, be a monument to our common humanity, one that emphasises through the power of art, that more unites than divides us.

Presented and Produced by Edwina Pitman for the BBC World Service
Image is copyright and courtesy Marc Quinn studio

Marlon James - Jamaican Novelist20170418Marlon James reveals how he works and discusses his latest novels The Dark Star Trilogy

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"Marlon James reveals how he works and discusses his latest novels The Dark Star Trilogy

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Since winning the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2015 for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings, based around the assassination attempt on Bob Marley in 1970s, Jamaica, Marlon has been researching and writing his much anticipated Dark Star Trilogy.

He has lived in Minneapolis, in the northern U.S. state of Minnesota for the past ten years and he shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd around his new office near downtown, where he works surrounded by books and by African and sci-fi images on the wall. He also reveals some of the characters that are exciting his imagination – from three hundred year old women to African vampires who attack in daylight.

"

Marlon James - Jamaican Novelist20171226Marlon James - Jamaican Novelist

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Since winning the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2015 for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings, based around the assassination attempt on Bob Marley in 1970s Jamaica, Marlon has been researching and writing his much anticipated Dark Star Trilogy.
He now lives in Minneapolis, in the northern U.S. state of Minnesota and he shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd around his new studio near downtown, where he works surrounded by books and by African and sci-fi images on the wall. He also reveals some of the characters that are exciting his imagination – from three hundred year old women to African vampires who attack in daylight.

Since winning the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2015 for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings, based around the assassination attempt on Bob Marley in 1970s Jamaica, Marlon has been researching and writing his much anticipated Dark Star Trilogy.
He now lives in Minneapolis, in the northern U.S. state of Minnesota and he shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd around his new studio near downtown, where he works surrounded by books and by African and sci-fi images on the wall. He also reveals some of the characters that are exciting his imagination – from three hundred year old women to African vampires who attack in daylight.

"In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Since winning the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2015 for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings, based around the assassination attempt on Bob Marley in 1970s Jamaica, Marlon has been researching and writing his much anticipated Dark Star Trilogy.
He now lives in Minneapolis, in the northern U.S. state of Minnesota and he shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd around his new studio near downtown, where he works surrounded by books and by African and sci-fi images on the wall. He also reveals some of the characters that are exciting his imagination – from three hundred year old women to African vampires who attack in daylight."

Marlon James, Jamaican Novelist20170418Marlon James reveals how he works and discusses his latest novels The Dark Star Trilogy

Since winning the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2015 for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings, based around the assassination attempt on Bob Marley in 1970s, Jamaica, Marlon has been researching and writing his much anticipated Dark Star Trilogy.

He has lived in Minneapolis, in the northern U.S. state of Minnesota for the past ten years and he shows the BBC's Andrea Kidd around his new office near downtown, where he works surrounded by books and by African and sci-fi images on the wall. He also reveals some of the characters that are exciting his imagination – from three hundred year old women to African vampires who attack in daylight.

"Since winning the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2015 for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings, based around the assassination attempt on Bob Marley in 1970s, Jamaica, Marlon has been researching and writing his much anticipated Dark Star Trilogy.

"

Matt Leacock And Pandemic Legacy20181009Matt Leacock, creator of the blockbuster board game Pandemic, tests his next project

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

"Matt Leacock, creator of the blockbuster board game Pandemic, tests his next project

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

Board games are big business. And one of the biggest titles on the tabletop gaming scene is Pandemic, created by Matt Leacock.

Presenter Kevin Core catches up with Matt at Indianapolis Gen Con, the world's biggest board game convention, to gain exclusive access to the creation of the next game in the series – Pandemic Legacy Season Three.

Matt has chosen four gamers from the internet, and BBC World Service has an extra seat as they thrash their way through the latest prototype of the game, which calls on players to co-operate to battle a deadly global virus. Along the way, Matt reveals his formative work as an early developer of social media – and how he migrated to the offline world of board games. As he tests his latest offline blockbuster, he wonders if these games are booming because we are increasingly looking for human connections in an exhaustingly digital world.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Max Richter: Writing Music Based On The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights20210126Composer Max Richter has created his own genre of classical music. His ground breaking eight-and-a-half-hour concert work SLEEP has been broadcast and performed all over the world, addressing the need to pause and seek a sense of community. Elizabeth Alker now follows Max as he works on one of his most ambitious and profound pieces of music about the human condition.

The new piece is based on the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states that "All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights." The plan was for artist and film-maker Yulia Mahr to create a full-length video for live performances of the music, but Max only finished the piece a few days before its premiere in London in February 2020.

Then Covid-19 struck. Max and Yulia spent months in lockdown together as their working relationship evolved.

So when will the project be finished and ready to perform in full?

Presented by Elizabeth Alker.

Image: Max Richter and Yulia Mahr (Credit: Mike Terry)

The composer collaborates in lockdown with artist Yulia Mahr

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Michael Rakowitz - Crafting 'ghosts' From Iraq's Lost Culture20181120US artist Michael Rakowitz has been creating thought-provoking work for the past two decades – from designing inflatable shelters for homeless people in New York, to a 14ft long statue of an Assyrian winged bull, made of over 10,000 date syrup cans, which currently stands in London's Trafalgar Square.

Michael's Iraqi heritage is a cultural thread running through much of his art. He's currently working on the latest instalment of a long-running project called The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist, which creates what he calls ‘ghosts' of archaeological objects that have been destroyed or looted from Iraq in the past 15 years.

Sarah Geis meets Michael at his Chicago studio and follows him throughout the process of recreating carved reliefs which adorned a room of the Northwest Palace of Nimrud, destroyed in 2015 by the Islamic State group. However, he's not making them from stone but colourful Arabic food packaging and cardboard – for a fast-approaching exhibition this November.

Produced by Karl Bos for BBC World Service.

Sculpting likenesses of destroyed ancient artefacts using Arabic food packaging

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

Michael Rakowitz: Crafting 'ghosts' From Iraq's Lost Culture20200407US artist Michael Rakowitz has been creating thought-provoking work for the past two decades – from designing inflatable shelters for homeless people in New York, to a 14ft long statue of an Assyrian winged bull, made of over 10,000 date syrup cans, which stood over Trafalgar Square in London from 2018 to early 2020.

Michael's Iraqi heritage is a cultural thread running through much of his art. We follow him at work on a new installment of a long-running project called The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist, which creates what he calls ‘ghosts' of archaeological objects that have been destroyed or looted from Iraq in the 21st century.

Sarah Geis meets Michael at his Chicago studio and follows him throughout the process of recreating carved reliefs which adorned a room of the Northwest Palace of Nimrud, destroyed in 2015 by the Islamic State group. However, he's not making them from stone but colourful Arabic food packaging and cardboard – for a fast-approaching exhibition.

We check back in with Michael in March 2020 to see how the project has progressed.

Sculpting likenesses of destroyed Assyrian wall reliefs using Arabic food packaging

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Mira Nair: The Making Of A Suitable Boy20200804Mira Nair is one of the world's great film directors. Born in India, but now a self-called ‘global citizen', she has spent over 30 years making her mark, from Hollywood to Bollywood, and from the fun and laughter of Monsoon Wedding to the sharp politics of The Reluctant Fundamentalist.

In the Studio joins Mira on location in the ancient city of Maheshwar, for her biggest and most ambitious project to date - a six-part television series for the BBC, based on Vikram Seth's epic novel, A Suitable Boy.

The novel encompasses many of the filmmaker's favoured topics - family conflict, the portrayal of India, love, humour, beauty and politics. So when she heard it was being made into a TV series she says, “I threw my sari into the ring…It was something I had to do with every fibre of my creative journey. “

Mira Nair talks exclusively to Ravinder Bawa about her own creative journey - from small town girl, to world famous director – and shows how some of the most evocative and dynamic scenes are put together, with the film crew she uses in almost every film she makes.

Presenter: Ravinder Bawa
Producers: Mohini Patel and Sara Jane Hall
Executive Producer: Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

On location with film director Mira Nair

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Mo Abudu - Creating Blockbuster Movies In Nigeria20181225"

Mo Abudu has been described as one of the most successful women in Africa. She made her name presenting the chat show Moments with Mo, that earnt her the title of Africa's ‘first lady of chat.'

She is the CEO of Ebony Life Television, Africa's first global black entertainment and lifestyle network. Five years ago she set up Ebony Life Films and as Executive Producer is behind films such as the comedies The Wedding Party and its sequel, The Wedding Party 2, which became the highest-grossing Nigerian film in the country's box office history.

Anna Cunningham follows Mo onto the set of her latest film Chief Daddy – which tells the story of what happens when a flamboyant billionaire industrialist suddenly dies and his family and friends uncover hidden secrets and discover who's getting the money.

With a star studded cast including Funke Akindele, Kate Henshaw, Folarin ‘Falz' Falana, Mo hopes Chief Daddy will be this year's Christmas blockbuster in Nigeria.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

(Image: Mo Abudu, CEO of Ebony Life Films)

Anna Cunningham follows Mo Abudu onto the set of her latest film Chief Daddy

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Mo Abudu: Creating Blockbuster Movies In Nigeria20200428On the set of 2018 Nollywood hit Chief Daddy

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Mo Abudu has been described as one of the most successful women in Africa. She made her name presenting the chat show Moments with Mo, that earnt her the title of Africa's ‘first lady of chat.'

She is the CEO of Ebony Life Television, Africa's first global black entertainment and lifestyle network. In 2013 she set up Ebony Life Films and as Executive Producer is behind films such as the comedies The Wedding Party and its sequel, The Wedding Party 2, which became the highest-grossing Nigerian film in the country's box office history.

In 2018 Anna Cunningham followed Mo onto the set of her film Chief Daddy – which tells the story of what happens when a flamboyant billionaire industrialist suddenly dies and his family and friends uncover hidden secrets and discover who's getting the money.

With a star studded cast including Funke Akindele, Kate Henshaw, Folarin ‘Falz' Falana, Mo hoped Chief Daddy would be a Christmas blockbuster in Nigeria. In this updated episode, find out if she got her wish.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

(Image: Mo Abudu, CEO of Ebony Life Films)

Nelson Makamo: Celebrating Children From Rural South Africa20200825Eighteen months ago the work of South African artist, Nelson Makamo, featured on the iconic cover of Time magazine. It placed the already popular artist - with fans like Oprah Winfrey, Ava DuVernay and Giorgio Armani – firmly onto the global stage.

The painting Makamo created for the cover was of Mapule, his now 12 year old cousin, who he's been painting ever since she was a child. In a touching and practical exchange, he pays for Mapule's studies.

As he prepares for an exhibition, In the Studio's Mpho Lakaje meets Nelson at his studio in Johannesburg, to watch him at work and discover why he so often places children from rural South Africa centre stage.

Presented by Mpho Lakaje

Produced by Mpho Lakaje and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Meet Nelson Makamo at his studio in Johannesburg, the \u201cmost sacred place in the world\u201d

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Nii Obodai: Finding The Image20190903The acclaimed Ghanaian photographer Nii Obodai is renowned for his distinctive black and white hazy silhouettes of distant landscapes and his stark compassionate portraits. As a youngster he spent time in England and now he's back as artist-in-residence in the East Riding of Yorkshire, where he's working on a new exhibition on environmental themes.

Nii is spending time in the marshes and woodland of the nearby nature reserve, photographing wildlife and the people who tend the landscape. But he's not using the latest digital camera to take his pictures – instead he's interweaving the techniques of the past by learning to photograph with an old-fashioned large format Deardorff camera, shooting in black and white and making prints. The work is based on techniques used by one of the founding fathers of British photography, William Henry Fox Talbot.

Felicity Finch joins Nii as he explores the marshlands and prepares to take his pictures which will be displayed in the Beverley Art Gallery. She follows him through the process – which can take hours - of waiting for the birds to come into shot, pressing the shutter and reloading the films. She also watches as he takes portraits of the workers at the reservoir.

Later in the seaside town of Scarborough we hear how Nii develops the films in the total darkness of an ad hoc darkroom and uses the traditional method of salt printing to create images in a variety of monochrome tones of rich earthy browns. It's a learning process for Nii and while most of the images turn out the way he wants, others are less successful. We hear how he begins to make his final selections and how he is influenced by the potency of memory and landscape.

Presented by Felicity Finch
Produced by Felicity Finch and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

(Photo: Nii Obodai behind his Deardorff camera, photo by David Chalmers)

Nii's exhibition, ‘Of Natural Magic‘ is part of ‘Surroundings', a three-year partnership project between Humber Museums Partnership and the arts organisation Invisible Dust.

Acclaimed Ghanaian photographer Nii Obodai prepares for his new exhibition

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Nnedi Okorafor: Creating Sci-fi Worlds20200616The award-winning writer Nnedi Okorafor on creating sci-fi and life in lockdown.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The award-winning science fiction author Nnedi Okorafor always has a project - or three - on the go. From her home outside Chicago she creates stories driven by what she describes as Africanfuturism and Africanjujuism for children and adults -a legacy of her Nigerian roots. Her work now ranges across comics for Marvel, screenplays and yet another new novel due out in the summer.

But she wasn't always destined to be a writer. She spent her youth training hard to be a top class athlete until she developed curvature of the spine, which put an end to her dreams. After corrective surgery she became temporarily paralysed and it was then, during her darkest time, that she began to create stories.

Now, as Chicago, like the rest of the US endures lockdown, Nnedi's been adapting to her changed life and restricted movements. Mark Burman talks to her about her work and how her creative process has been affected during the Covid-19 pandemic. During recordings made in April and early May he eavesdrops on some of her writing moments including her fruitful collaboration with the Kenyan director Wanuri Kahiu and their story of an A.I. traffic police robot – and hears about the therapeutic distraction of her trumpet-playing daughter and magnificent cat which now has his own Twitter account!

Reader: Keziah Joseph
Reporter: Mark Burman.
Produced by Mark Burman and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

Image: Nnedi Okorafor (Credit: Colleen Durkin)

Ocean Vuong: Becoming Briefly Gorgeous20200908The young Vietnamese writer Ocean Vuong has been called “one of our most gifted poets”. He came to public attention when his poetry collection “Night Sky With Exit Wounds” was showered with awards. His first novel “On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous” followed last year and has also been critically acclaimed.

Ocean's work often mirrors his own experience as an immigrant. He was born in Saigon, Vietnam but at a young age he and members of his family left Vietnam, as refugees for the United States. After attempting a degree in business, Ocean found his true vocation as a writer and now divides his time between creating new work and teaching university students.

Oonagh Cousins talks to Ocean about the way he creates his work, how ideas and images come to him and the importance of being uncomfortable when he's writing.

Presenter: Oonagh Cousins
Producer: Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

Image of Ocean Vuong by Peter Bienkowski

The acclaimed young writer Ocean Vuong on creating images and being uncomfortable

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Olafur Eliasson: Creating \u201clife\u201d20210427The award-winning Danish–Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson is renowned for his work with sculptures, photography and installation art which explores issues around perception, climate and public response. For the past months he's been working on his next project called “Life”, at the Fondation Beyeler in Switzerland this April and has granted In The Studio special access to follow his creative process.

Olafur is on a mission to ensure that he doesn't pre-empt his audience's response to the final work- and that includes not releasing much detail about the project beforehand. But, as reporter Neil McCarthy finds out, it involves a major reconfiguration of the gallery – including removing the famous full-length gallery windows and flooding it with water from the outside lily pond.

Reporter Neil McCarthy talks to Olafur at different stages in the execution of the work and also hears from the gallery's Director Sam Keller about the technical challenges which will need to be overcome to create a work which poses many questions about the nature of space and environment – and which stays watertight!

Reporter: Neil McCarthy.
Produced by Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service.
Photograph of Olafur Eliasson by Brigitte Lacombe

The artist Olafur Eliasson prepares to flood the Beyeler museum for his new exhibition

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Opening Ceremony2018092520190430 (WS)"Simon Pitts follows OC's Humberto Leon and Carol Lim as they create a new collection

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The fashion label Opening Ceremony is led by its Asian-American creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, who are also the co-creative directors at fashion house Kenzo. Since it began in 2002, the pair have developed Opening Ceremony into a brand known for its bold clothing design, social activism and for artistic partnerships with film-maker Spike Jonze and the New York City Ballet amongst others.

In an exclusive programme, In The Studio follows Humberto and Carol through the entire process of creating their Pre-Spring 2019 collection. Simon Pitts joins the pair at their NYC Chinatown offices, learning about the cycle from initial design through to the final show. We hear how Carol and Humberto's background as children of immigrants inspires their work and Simon meets the wider OC team who shape the designs, source materials and work out the crucial price points for each garment.

(Photo: Carol Lim and Humberto Leon. Credit: Inez and Vinoodh)

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Operation Night Watch20200714This week our guest is a Dutch icon - The Night Watch.

This masterpiece by Rembrandt is nearly 400 years old and sits centre stage at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, where more than 2 million visitors come to see it every year. So when it became clear the painting needed a serious makeover, taking years to complete, the idea of removing it from display was rejected. Instead the museum's Director, Taco Dibbits, decided to make Operation Night Watch accessible to all, by building a specially-constructed glass chamber for restorers, scientists and conservators to work under the public's watchful eye; both in the museum and online.

Anik See follows Taco and his team during this key phase of Operation Night Watch, diving into state-of-the-art imaging techniques and discovering the masterpiece's secrets and storied past, to find out why this painting remains so important to us.

Presented by Anik See

Produced by Anik See and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image: Copyright: The Rijksmuseum

Uncovering the secrets behind one of the most famous paintings in the world.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Patrick Woodroffe: Lighting The Stars20210202Patrick Woodroffe is one of the world's foremost lighting designers. He has lit shows for stars ranging from Michael Jackson to Bob Dylan, from Lady Gaga to Elton John, as well as being creative director of the Rolling Stones live shows since 1982.

In 2013 he was made a Royal Designer for Industry (RDI) by the Royal Society of Arts, and he was awarded an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2014, for services to the arts.

We join Patrick while he takes charge of the technical rehearsal period for the Last Domino? Tour, as show director for the sold-out arena tour that sees the remaining original Genesis band members reform for the first time since 2007.

Via a combination of Zoom calls, exclusive access to the fully Covid-19 compliant bubble of the London rehearsal team, actual performance recording, and personal contributions from Genesis founder members Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks, Grammy Award-winning record producer Steve Levine joins Patrick to examine his creative process.

As Steve and Patrick unravel the intimate relationship between sound and vision, they illuminate an artistic canvas that - in this case - is actually a leap of faith in the live events industry.

Not only does the country enter full lockdown during the rehearsal process, but Patrick has to work his lighting magic knowing there's no guarantee the tour will take place on time… or at all.

Presenter: Steve Levine
Producer: Lewis Borg-Cardona

A Magnum Opus Broadcasting production for BBC World Service

The acclaimed lighting designer rehearses the Last Domino? Tour with rock greats Genesis

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Peter Kimani - Bringing The World To Kenya20180619Peter Kimani was chosen to compose a poem for Barack Obama's inauguration as President

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The Kenyan author and poet Peter Kimani has won the country's highest literary honour and was one of the poets chosen by National Public Radio in the United States to compose a poem to mark Barack Obama's inauguration as President.

The BBC's Anthony Irungu meets Peter as he writes his latest novel. Its working title is Kalifornia and it follows three young characters, one Kenyan and two Somali refugees, from the 1990s Nairobi neighbourhood of California, named after the film screenings that used to happen there, to its more famous name sake, half way across the world in the United States.

Resisting the temptation to go back to the neighbourhood, Peter is using music, his diaries and an old photograph to conjure up the memories of his youth.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

(Image of Peter Kimani. Credit to Yusuf Wachira)

"Peter Kimani was chosen to compose a poem for Barack Obama's inauguration as President

(Image of Peter Kimani. Credit to Yusuf Wachira)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Phil Grucci And The Art Of Fireworks20180102Phil Grucci prepares for another record-breaking pyrotechnic performance.

Some people have called Phil Grucci "the firework king," but that's a title he politely rejects, adding that if anything it really belongs to his father and his uncle – older generations of a family-owned fireworks business that was founded in Italy in 1850. Phil Grucci is president and creative director, and is responsible for planning and designing award-winning pyrotechnic spectaculars all over the world. He invites the BBC World Service into his studio as he prepares for another record-breaking performance.

Producer: Martin Williams

(Photo credit: Getty Images)

"Phil Grucci prepares for another record-breaking pyrotechnic performance.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Photographer Wolfgang Tillmans20180206Award-winning photographer Wolfgang Tillmans prepares for his summer 2018 exhibition

Wolfgang Tillmans is an award-winning photographer and visual artist. In 2017, he completed two career defining exhibitions - The Tate Modern, London and Foundation Beyeler, Basel.

We join him in his Berlin studio as he attempts to keep up the momentum, with the final preparations for his debut African exhibition. We then travel from Berlin to Nimes in the south of France, the site of his summer 2018 show. This is the first time he has visited the exhibition space, giving a unique insight into his creative planning process, and exactly what it takes to put on a full scale gallery show.

(Photo: Wolfgang Tillmans)

"Award-winning photographer Wolfgang Tillmans prepares for his summer 2018 exhibition

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo: Wolfgang Tillmans)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Poet Imtiaz Dharker20170502Poet Imtiaz Dharker's creative journey

"'s creative journey

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

From the clatter of trains and the rumble of meat lorries to the light over the River Thames, the Pakistani born British poet Imtiaz Dharker finds inspiration from the world around her. In 2014 she was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in recognition of her contribution to poetry and this week, Imtiaz takes us on an intimate journey from the midnight quiet of her studio, carefully crafting her poems, to performing live to an audience of thousands of schoolchildren.

's creative journey"

From the clatter of trains and the rumble of meat lorries to the light over the River Thames, the Pakistani born British poet Imtiaz Dharker finds inspiration from the world around her. In 2014 she was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in recognition of her contribution to poetry and this week, Imtiaz takes us on an intimate journey from the midnight quiet of her studio, carefully crafting her poems, to performing live to an audience of thousands of schoolchildren.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Pretty Yende: Taking On The Lead Role Of Verdi's La Traviata20191126Pretty Yende is a young South African opera singer at the top of her game. Having enjoyed a meteoric rise performing in opera houses internationally, this autumn she took on the lead role of Violetta in Verdi's La Traviata at Paris Opera. The cellist Abel Selaocoe talks to her about her preparations for the role, follows her as the challenging production takes shape, and meets her after her triumphant first performance to find out what it means to her.

‘Even if I want to admit it or not, being the first black person to sing this role at Paris Opera is a huge deal' Yende tells Abel after opening night. For someone who became interested in opera aged 16 after hearing the Flower Duet on a TV advert, success has come swiftly. She made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2013 when she was just 27, and released her first album in 2016.

Abel talks to Yende about her background in a Zulu speaking home in Piet Retief in South Africa, and asks what it took for her to get where she is. She reveals the way she approaches her work, and reflecting on the opportunities she has had, says: “I represent every person that was never given the chance to be here. Every one of my brothers and sisters with tremendous talent that never got here. I get to be entrusted with the honour of saying ‘it's possible'.

(Photo: Pretty Yende. Credit: Gregor Hohenberg/Sony Entertainment)

'Being the first black person to sing this role at Paris Opera is a huge deal' says Yende

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Rab Macinnes Stained Glass Artist20171024Scottish stained glass artist Rab MacInnes explains his glass art restoration craft

Art expert Anne Ellis visits stained glass expert Rab MacInnes in his Glasgow basement studio where he creates and restores high end stained glass works. Rab reveals the tools of his trade and his painstaking attention to detail to authentically restore and recreate glass pieces some of which are centuries old.

He's embarking on a couple of projects by esteemed architect Charles Rennie Macintosh famous for his “Glasgow Style ? designs and stained glass work. Macintosh aficionado Anne and Rab discuss his glass art restoring the original Macintosh Willow Tea Rooms building in Glasgow and the recently fire damaged Art School. Unlike some art processes, stained glass, true to the original design and creation is expensive and Rab has to balance budgets with faithful reproduction.

In his studio he talks about the arduous process of achieving the exact stain colouring on the glass, some sheets of which cost thousands of pounds. He shows Anne his notebooks with the stain mix recipes, originally created using chemicals that are now deemed too hazardous to use. Then he introduces his firing kiln, nicknamed “Lola ? who is more “temperamental ? and less accurate the older she gets.

Then it's over to the Macintosh designed Windyhill House 30 miles from Glasgow, where Rab restored all the glass work including the magnificent light fittings for Rab to sum up how he feels about seeing his work in location with natural daylight and in context in a working and living building.

"Scottish stained glass artist Rab MacInnes explains his glass art restoration craft

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Then it's over to the Macintosh designed Windyhill House 30 miles from Glasgow, where Rab restored all the glass work including the magnificent light fittings for Rab to sum up how he feels about seeing his work in location with natural daylight and in context in a working and living building.

Then it's over to the Macintosh designed Windyhill House 30 miles from Glasgow, where Rab restored all the glass work including the magnificent light fittings for Rab to sum up how he feels about seeing his work in location with natural daylight and in context in a working and living building."

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Rachel Barrie: Master Whisky Blender20201222Nick Low follows master whisky blender Dr Rachel Barrie on the final year of a three-year journey, as the launch date looms for her new range of whiskies from the Benriach Distillery in the north of Scotland. Her reputation is on the line as she comes up with 10 new whiskies for a range that includes some whiskies which have matured for up to 30 years.

With whisky containing three basic ingredients of water, malted barley and yeast, Rachel explains the process and skill that goes into making her whiskies world-beating, with expressions containing a myriad of flavours. With her own background being in chemistry, we join Rachel in her whisky lab, as she reveals how she puts scientific theories to work on the ancient art of whisky making and the blending of these natural ingredients. She describes the wooden casks and blends of whiskies she uses in the process like a painter's palette, fine-tuning the flavours, as this precious liquid, stamped with her name, is bottled up and sent to whisky connoisseurs around the world.

Having personally tasted and “nosed” over 150,000 whiskies in her professional life, and become a judge at the World Whisky Competitions, Rachel is one of the most respected blenders in the business. She will give a lesson in whisky tasting with tips of what to look for and how to get all the spectrum of flavours from a sip of “the water of life”.

Image: Rachel Barrie (Credit: Nick Low)

A three-year journey to create a new range of whiskies for a Scottish distillery

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Rafael Lozano-hemmer's Border Tuner20191119Imagine huge searchlights which can be seen over a ten mile, 15 kilometer radius talking to one another across two countries. This is exactly what electronic media artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer is creating this November between Ciudad Juárez in Mexico and El Paso in Texas.

Called Border Tuner, the project will see enormous bridges of light connecting the US-Mexico border for the first time.

When lights from the stations (three on each side) are directed at each other and they manage to make a connection, a massive bridge of light is formed. This activates microphones and speakers allowing participants to communicate with one another across the border. The “light bridge” flickers like morse code as the participants listen and speak to one another. If they don't like what they are hearing they can retune to a different light beam.

This is not the first time Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has used search lights in his art but he's never done anything on this scale or with this complexity before. Born in Mexico City in 1967, he first produced a remote-controlled searchlight project in 1999 for the Zócalo Square in Mexico City. Since then he has created installations in dozens of cities around the world where the public controls the searchlights using the internet, mobile phones, megaphones or heart rate sensors.

Presented by Monica Ortiz Uribe
Produced by Emma Betteridge for the BBC World Service

Huge searchlights shine across the Mexico-US border in a new work of art.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Rene9 Redzepi On Noma's Autumn Menu20201215Every season of every year, chef René Redzepi reinvents Noma, the two Michelin-starred establishment in Copenhagen that is renowned as the most ground-breaking restaurant in the world. It spearheaded a revolution in Nordic cuisine, and its reputation has made Copenhagen a gastronomic capital. The restaurant has spawned the world-famous Nordic Food Lab food research institute, and hosts an annual international food symposium.

Dan Saladino has unprecedented access to the restaurant team. He follows them from their reopening in May as a neighbourhood burger bar, to the evening in October when diners experience their autumn ‘game and forest season' menu for the first time. He explores Noma's famous development kitchen, where Mette Søberg, head of research and development, and her team have previously pioneered dishes like the magnificent rotating celeriac shawarma and the delicate butterfly flatbread decorated in flower petals and pollen. He watches the physical transformation of the restaurant, as greenery is replaced by antlers, fungi and moss in the hands of acclaimed designer Christina Rudolph. And he eavesdrops on the restaurant kitchen and head sommelier Mads Kleppe on their first autumn service of 2020.

Presented by Dan Saladino and produced by Clare Salisbury for BBC Audio Bristol

Image: René Redzepi (Credit: Robin van Lonkhuijzen/AFP via Getty Images)

Copenhagen's two Michelin-starred restaurant prepares for its autumn reincarnation

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Rex, King Of Mardi Gras20210216As the Mardi Gras season draws near, In the Studio goes behind the scenes with the Krewe of Rex, New Orleans's oldest parading organisation, to see how the masters of carnival create their mobile sculptures.

New Orleans reporter, Betsy Shepherd follows Rex's creative team for a year - the length of time it takes to make the ornate floats that are the fixture of Mardi Gras street parades. But 2020 turned out to be anything but typical. She speaks with creative director Henri Schindler and his team of artisans about the history and craft surrounding this most ephemeral of art forms as well as the challenges and delights of building a fantasy world amidst a pandemic.

What will the 2021 Mardi Gras season bring? Join Betsy for a parade of sounds from Mardi Gras's most ardent practitioners as they work to keep the spirit of carnival alive.

Presented by Betsy Shepherd

Produced by Betsy Shepherd and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image courtesy of the Rex Organization

New Orleans's oldest parading organisation on keeping the spirit of carnival alive

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Richard Curtis - Part One20190625This month a new film by the award-winning screenwriter Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, Love Actually) will be launched in cinemas across the world. Yesterday is inspired by the music of the Beatles, and although the germ of the idea was not his, the story, its construction and the characters created are all Richard Curtis originals.

Yasmeen Khan has been talking to Richard as the film developed over the last two years with the various drafts shaped, reshaped and edited. She hears how his first attempts failed to satisfy his fiercest critic, his partner Emma, who also operates as his script editor. There has also been the addition of a director, the Oscar-winning Danny Boyle, who provides another set of ideas that need incorporating. All the while Richard strives to ensure that the music of the Beatles, that has been so important to him throughout his life, should remain at the heart of the final film.

Presenter: Yasmeen Khan.
Producer: Tom Alban

(Image: screenwriter Richard Curtis, with kind permission)

Yasmeen Khan talks to screenwriter Richard Curtis about his latest film Yesterday

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Richard Curtis - Part Two20190702This month a new film by the award-winning screenwriter Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, Love Actually) will be launched in cinemas across the world. ‘Yesterday' is inspired by the music of the Beatles and although the germ of the idea was not his, the story, its construction and the characters created are all Richard Curtis originals.

Yasmeen Khan has been talking to Richard as the film developed over the last two years with the various drafts shaped, reshaped and edited. In this, the second of a special two-part In The Studio, Yasmeen joins Richard on the film set as the words he's worked on so carefully are brought to life by actors and the Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle. Yet even here there's a role for the writer as tweaks and changes are made during filming as the raw material of the screenplay becomes the digital material ready for editing. Yasmeen also joins Richard as the film gets its first trial screening in preparation for its release.

Presented by Yasmeen Khan. Produced by Tom Alban for the BBC World Service

(Image: screenwriter Richard Curtis, with kind permission)

Yasmeen Khan talks to screenwriter Richard Curtis about his latest film Yesterday

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

This month a new film by the award-winning screenwriter Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, Love Actually) will be launched in cinemas across the world. ‘Yesterday' is inspired by the music of the Beatles and although the germ of the idea was not his, the story, its construction and the characters created are all Richard Curtis originals.

(Image: screenwriter Richard Curtis, with kind permission)

Yasmeen Khan talks to screenwriter Richard Curtis about his latest film Yesterday

Roller Coaster Designer Daniel Schoppen2019082020201006 (WS)Inside a simple, white walled office in one of the world's smallest countries, Daniel Schoppen is busy designing roller coasters that will scare, excite and delight riders from all over the globe.

Swiss journalist, Sarah Fluck, travels to Liechtenstein to meet the German born rollercoaster designer as he puts the finishing touches to his latest creation, ‘Taiga', for Linnanmäki Amusement Park in Helsinki, Finland.

With the park located just north of the city centre on top of a rocky terrain, placing the coaster was always going to be a challenge. Have the limitations of a small footprint
impacted on Daniel's plans to create Finland's longest and fastest ride yet?

Sarah then joins Daniel as they travel to Linnanmäki to experience his new creation for the very first time, questioning whether roller coaster design is mere mathematics, or indeed a
piece of art?

Producer: Chelsea Dickinson

(Photo: Daniel Schoppen)

Roller coaster designer, Daniel Schoppen, experiences his new creation for the first time

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

(Photo: Daniel Schoppen)

Romany - Diva Of Magic20180605We hear how Romany works to create the perfect blend of magic and illusion

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

What does it take to create magic? How do you produce birdcages out of nowhere, turn a feather into a cane or pass a silk scarf through your neck?

For Romany, the British self-styled Diva of Magic, these tricks have been mastered through years of practice. She's one of only a few female magicians in the industry, she's won awards and performed in front of members of the British Royal Family. Now she has a new challenge. She's preparing a show for the prestigious Magic Castle in Hollywood and she's working on one very special effect in particular involving a mirror, a rose and a pair of glasses. This trick and many others will be tightly packed into a 4 minute opening routine. There's a lot of work for Romany to do in a short space of time to get the act to work.

Natasha Serlin follows Romany through the process of creating her new act and watches as the effect with the rose and mirror takes shape. We hear how Romany works alone in her studio and with friends and mentors to create the perfect blend of magic and illusion.

Produced by Natasha Serlin and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

(Photo of magician Romany, by Eddie Adams)

"We hear how Romany works to create the perfect blend of magic and illusion

(Photo of magician Romany, by Eddie Adams)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Romesh Gunesekera - Breathing Life Into Every Word20180306Recreating reality from memory and imagination

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Sri Lankan born author Romesh Gunesekera does not transcribe reality, he recreates it from a mixture of memory and imagination. Nominated for one of the world's most prestigious literary awards, the Man Booker Prize for Fiction, for his debut novel Reef – Romesh has been publishing novels, short stories and poetry for more than 30 years.

Harriett Gilbert meets Romesh at his London home to find out how he is crafting his latest novel. Its working title is Suncatcher and it tells the story of two boys growing up in 1960s Sri Lanka, examining their friendship and the beginnings of a political awakening. Romesh has been working on his book for several years and is now meticulously revising the text – questioning each word – as he prepares to send his precious manuscript out into the world.

Producer: Karl Bos

(Photo: Author Romesh Gunesekera)

"Recreating reality from memory and imagination

(Photo: Author Romesh Gunesekera)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Romesh Gunesekera €Ⓚ Breathing Life Into Every Word20180306

Sri Lankan born author Romesh Gunesekera doesn't transcribe reality, he recreates it from a mixture of memory and imagination. Nominated for one of the world's most prestigious literary awards, the Man Booker Prize for Fiction, for his debut novel Reef – Romesh has been publishing novels, short stories and poetry for more than 30 years.

Harriett Gilbert meets Romesh at his London home to find out how he is crafting his latest novel. Its working title is Suncatcher and it tells the story of two boys growing up in 1960s Sri Lanka, examining their friendship and the beginnings of a political awakening. Romesh has been working on his book for several years and is now meticulously revising the text – questioning each word – as he prepares to send his precious manuscript out into the world.

Producer: Karl Bos for the BBC World Service

(Photo: Author Romesh Gunesekera)

Sri Lankan born author Romesh Gunesekera does not transcribe reality, he recreates it from a mixture of memory and imagination. Nominated for one of the world's most prestigious literary awards, the Man Booker Prize for Fiction, for his debut novel Reef – Romesh has been publishing novels, short stories and poetry for more than 30 years.

"

(Photo: Author Romesh Gunesekera)

"

Ron Arad20200218In The Studio enters the endlessly surprising and shape-shifting world of industrial and architectural designer Ron Arad.

Born in Israel but based in London for over four decades, Arad's multi-disciplinary career has seen him design and produce everything from sunglasses to skyscrapers, and from hats to hotels.

A Royal Academician and Professor Emeritus at the Royal College of Art, he has designed for numerous major international furniture and design brands, and his public art work can be found in cities across the world including Tokyo, Milan, Toronto, Tel Aviv and Singapore.

Like the man himself, Arad's work has always evaded categorization. His constant experimentation with the boundaries and possibilities of materials and his keen interest in cutting edge technology means that nothing is ever as it seems. What at first glance appears to be a map on the wall, turns out to be a bookcase, a vast mirrored sculpture is in fact a ping pong table, a quartz pendant on a necklace doubles as a magnifying glass.

In this programme, Ron welcomes Edwina Pitman into his labyrinthine studio, filled with prototypes and iconic design pieces, to chart the making of one of his many ongoing projects. Inspired by an object found in a flea market forty years ago, Ron's idea is to create a string quartet that plays itself. Over the course of a year, he reveals how he and his team work on the technology, the design and the commercial possibilities to make this ghostly vision a reality.

Produced and presented by Edwina Pitman for BBC World Service

Industrial and architectural designer Ron Arad creates a string quartet that plays itself

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In The Studio enters the endlessly surprising and shape-shifting world of architect, designer and artist Ron Arad.

Designer and architect Ron Arad creates a string quartet that plays by itself

Rsc: The Bard, The Theatre And A Pandemic20210330With a star studded cast including David Tennant and Noma Dumezweni, and a backstage team featuring Artistic Director Greg Doran and Deputy Artistic Director Erica Whyman - In The Studio presents the tale of the Royal Shakespeare Company...

In March 2020, Covid-19 brought the curtain down on productions from this major British theatre organisation. The annual million plus ticket sales of the RSC's shows in Stratford-upon-Avon, London's West End and touring productions all over the world dried up overnight - threatening the organisation's future.

The BBC's Karl Bos has been following the RSC over several months to find out how they are adapting to the ‘new normal' - moving their huge international education programmes online and finding innovative ways to keep performing in a digital space. All the while, waiting for news on a crucial government loan that will affect the shape of the organisation.

Shakespeare himself was no stranger to pandemics - the theatres were closed for long stretches in his lifetime due to the plague. We'll hear how the Great Bard's words have helped these theatre makers make it through a difficult year and how they've been plotting ways to get back onstage amidst constantly changing restrictions.

Presented by Karl Bos
Produced by Karl Bos and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image
The Royal Shakespeare Theatre auditorium - Peter Cook (c) RSC
Noma Dumezweni as Calpurnia in Julius Caesar, 2009 - Photo by Ellie Kurttz (c) RSC
David Tennant as Hamlet in Hamlet, 2008 - Photo by Ellie Kurttz (c) RSC

The Royal Shakespeare Company \u2013 what happens when the show can't go on ?

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Rufus Norris - Artistic Director Of The Uk's National Theatre20190730How is a script transformed into a staged play? The UK's National Theatre is one of the world's most prolific producing houses and its artistic director Rufus Norris might have the biggest job in British theatre: balancing its commercial success with the need to take a chance on a new play. His latest production, Small Island, is the first theatrical adaptation of the well-known novel by Andrea Levy about Caribbean migration. Set in the 1940s, it deals with the experiences of Jamaicans and Britons around the arrival of the Empire Windrush in London.

Arts broadcaster and journalist Fiona Lindsay talks to Rufus Norris, as well as members of the cast and crew, to explore the technical and creative challenges of this epic production. With unique access to the rehearsal room, she takes us behind the scenes at the National Theatre to discover how a complex and much-loved story is brought to new life on stage

Rufus Norris and the cast and crew of Small Island, a new play about Caribbean migration

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Russian Synchronised Swimming Champion Aleksandr Maltsev20190416Russian synchronised swimming champion Aleksandr Maltsev knew he wanted to become a synchronised swimmer after his parents enrolled him in a group at a local sports school, aged seven. Now aged 23, he's a two-time World Champion, a four-time European champion and the first man to represent Russia in mixed-gender synchronised swimming at world championship level.

Being male, in what is a predominantly female sport, hasn't always been easy, with some female synchronised swimmers arguing it should stay a female-only sport, and others suggesting that it is not a sport that ‘real' men should do. However, Aleksandr is unfazed, and remains a vocal advocate of gender-equality in the sport - his aim being to get men to compete at the next Olympics as a part of the mixed duet.

Alina Isachenka meets Aleksandr in Moscow on one of his days off, which he decides to spend looking at paintings by one of his favourite artists, Frida Kahlo. She then travels with him to the closed sports base on the outskirts of the city, where Aleksandr lives and trains from dawn until dusk with his mixed duet partner Maya Gurbanberdieva, and their perfectionist coach. It's here, in and around the pool they practice in, that Alina gains unique insight into the process of creating - what is hoped will be - a gold-winning routine for the FINA Artistic Swimming World Series taking place in Kazan in April.

(Image: Synchronised swimming champion Aleksandr Maltsev, with kind permission)

Aleksandr Maltsev on the process of creating a routine for the world championships

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Sebastian Errazuriz’s Dangling Piano20170404For five years, artist Sebastian Errazuriz worked with a piano dangling over his head

Chilean artist and designer Sebastian Errazuriz is best known for his innovative, provocative and playful designs from wooden cabinets that open out like paper fans to major public art projects and 3-D printed women's shoes. For five years he worked in his studio with a piano suspended overhead. For him, it was a tool, a reminder of the transience of life and to knuckle down and get to work! His suspended piano has since become a feature at the New York Armoury Art Show. The BBC's Tara Gadomski went to meet Errazuriz and his piano to find out about the extraordinary techniques this artist uses to focus the mind and encourage the creative muse to flow.

"For five years, artist Sebastian Errazuriz worked with a piano dangling over his head

"

Sebastian Errazuriz's Dangling Piano20170404"For five years, artist Sebastian Errazuriz worked with a piano dangling over his head

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Chilean artist and designer Sebastian Errazuriz is best known for his innovative, provocative and playful designs from wooden cabinets that open out like paper fans to major public art projects and 3-D printed women's shoes. For five years he worked in his studio with a piano suspended overhead. For him, it was a tool, a reminder of the transience of life and to knuckle down and get to work! His suspended piano has since become a feature at the New York Armoury Art Show. For the BBC, Tara Gadomski went to meet Errazuriz and his piano to find out about the extraordinary techniques this artist uses to focus the mind and encourage the creative muse to flow.

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Serge Attukwei Clottey - Making Art From Ghana's Plastic Waste20180529"Using plastic containers to create a major sculpture for Facebook's HQ in San Francisco

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Serge Attukwei Clottey is one of Ghana's leading artistic figures, renowned for his outsize sculptures and paintings. During the last few months he's been working on a commission for the social media giant Facebook. The piece is a huge tapestry which will hang in the company's new headquarters in San Francisco.

But the tapestry won't be made of cotton or thread – instead, like many of Serge's works, it will be made from the distinctive yellow gallons, or jerry cans, plastic containers which were originally brought to Ghana containing cooking oil, but have now become a huge environmental waste problem. Serge collects old gallons and along with his team, cuts them into squares and weaves them together to make artworks.

Sammy Darko follows Serge through Accra, from the relative quiet of his studio, to his busy workshop and the bustling streets of the La district. Serge collects the raw materials and with the help of the local community, puts the finishing touches to the piece.

Producers: Caroline Steel and Emma Kingsley

(Photo: Artist Serge Attukwei Clottey)

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Seven Worlds, One Planet20191029The coldest, driest, windiest and most daunting continent on the Planet is Antarctica. This is home to Gentoo Penguins. When the chicks fledge and head to the water's edge for the very first time, they can have little idea of what lies ahead. Not only do they have to navigate huge blocks of glacial ice to reach the open water where they can feed, but patrolling the bay are leopard seals. These are powerful, fierce predators and an encounter can be fatal for the young birds.

After Blue Planet and Dynasties we go behind the scenes of the BBC's latest Nature blockbuster Seven Worlds, One Planet and join wildlife cameraman John Aitchison on location to discover how the dramatic story of the challenges facing these young penguins is filmed. This hugely ambitious series narrated by David Attenborough transports viewers around the globe to tell the remarkable stories of how the landscape and conditions of each continent have shaped the unique animal life found there.

Major wildlife series are some of the most ambitious programmes on television. Each six to seven minute sequence can take a year or two to plan and several weeks to film and edit. They are made by highly specialised teams which combine technical expertise with an artist's eye, natural history knowledge and the hardiness of old-time Antarctic explorers.

As we discover, it doesn't matter how much preparation you do, the unexpected can and usually does happen and the Natural World can be thrilling, challenging and horrifying.

Behind the scenes of Seven Worlds, One Planet nature series filming in Antarctica

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Sharon Olds: Poetry Coming Down My Arm20201020The American poet Sharon Olds has been one of the leading voices in contemporary poetry since her first book was published in 1980. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 2013 for Stag's Leap, her extraordinary collection of poems chronicling the breakup of her marriage, with its themes of love, family, sorrow, desire and memory, which have echoed throughout her work.

But her career as a poet nearly didn't happen. Her first poems were dismissed by some editors who saw them as not literary enough, perhaps objecting to the intense way she wrote about sexual love and the minutiae of being a woman. But it's precisely those qualities that have won her new generations of fans and critical praise across the world.

After a period of long isolation due to the pandemic, Sharon talks to Emma Kingsley about her work and how lockdown has affected her perception of the world. She describes how she creates new poems and how the words and images travel down her arm and out through the pen.

Photo of Sharon Olds by Brett Hall Jones

Presented and produced by Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning American poet Sharon Olds discusses how she writes her poetry

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Shobana Jeyasingh - Recreating The 1918 Flu Pandemic Through Dance2018110620201103 (WS)"

Choreographer and director Shobana Jeyasingh has been creating dynamic, fearless and ground breaking dance works for 30 years. Born in Chennai India, her acclaimed pieces have toured internationally, tapping into both the intellectual and physical power of dance. Her major new work Contagion is inspired by the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918 which infected a third of the world's population. It's estimated that this flu killed between 50 and 100 million people, more than the First World War itself.

Felicity Finch joins Shobana and her company of eight female dancers, along with the show's composer and video designer, as they explore the challenge of how to portray the Spanish flu virus and its devastating effects through contemporary dance.

Producer: Felicity Finch

Contagion is part of 14-18 NOW, a five-year programme of arts experiences connecting people with World War One.

(Image: Choreographer and director Shobana Jeyasingh)

Felicity Finch follows Shobana Jeyasingh as she creates her latest piece, Contagion

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

Felicity Finch joins Shobana and her company of eight female dancers, along with the show's composer and video designer, as they explore the challenge of how to portray the Spanish flu virus and its devastating effects through contemporary dance.

Producer: Felicity Finch

Felicity Finch follows Shobana Jeyasingh as she creates her latest piece, Contagion

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Singing For The Pope20191231Glyn Tansley goes behind the façade of the Vatican to meet the members of the oldest choir in the world, as they prepare for the biggest night on their calendar.

The Sistine Chapel Choir has a history dating back 1500 years, but it is still one of the most active cultural institutions at the very heart of the Vatican.

It also has the prestige of being the Pope's personal choir, performing for him whenever he's in St Peter's Basilica. As the Holy Father's personal choir, it is called upon to play an ecumenical role, contributing to bringing together in art what has been separated by history and politics.

In their rehearsal room, we meet the men and boys who make up the choir as they prepare for Christmas mass, an event watched around the world by millions of worshipers. We'll come to understand why being in this choir so important to them, and the pressures of being always on display through the Vatican's global TV and radio services.

This is a rare glimpse into the real lives at the heart of an ancient tradition.

Join the Sistine Chapel Choir as they prepare for Christmas mass

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Sir Antonio Pappano - The Maestro Of A New La Boh㨀me20180227Tom Alban follows Sir Antonio Pappano during their new production of La Bohème

All major opera houses around the world have favourite much loved classics that they will repeat across the years. The Royal Opera House at London's Covent Garden has been using the popular sets, costumes and staging of Puccini's La Bohème for over 40 years. They have decided the time has now come to replace it with a new production for a 21st century audience and the challenge to do that falls to the team of world renowned conductor and Music Director Sir Antonio Pappano and stage director Richard Jones.

The BBC's Tom Alban follows Sir Antonio Pappano and his team as their new production of La Bohème takes shape – from working with the singers to preparing the huge stage, we hear candid insights into the often perilous journey to an opening night at the very highest level of operatic performance

Producer: Tom Alban

Producer: Tom Alban

"

Tom Alban follows Sir Antonio Pappano during their new production of La Bohème"

Sir Antonio Pappano - The Maestro Of A New La Bohe8me20180227All major opera houses around the world have favourite much loved classics that they will repeat across the years. The Royal Opera House at London's Covent Garden has been using the popular sets, costumes and staging of Puccini's La Bohème for over 40 years. They have decided the time has now come to replace it with a new production for a 21st century audience and the challenge to do that falls to the team of world renowned conductor and Music Director Sir Antonio Pappano and stage director Richard Jones.

The BBC's Tom Alban follows Sir Antonio Pappano and his team as their new production of La Bohème takes shape – from working with the singers to preparing the huge stage, we hear candid insights into the often perilous journey to an opening night at the very highest level of operatic performance

Producer: Tom Alban

Tom Alban follows Sir Antonio Pappano during their new production of La Boh\u00e8me

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"Tom Alban follows Sir Antonio Pappano during their new production of La Boh\u00e8me

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Producer: Tom Alban

"

Skating To Gold20170919Join ice skaters Eric Radford and Meagan Duhamel, as they create a routine

What does it take to win an ice skating Olympic gold medal? Eric Radford and Meagan Duhamel are Canada's double World Champions and one of the favourites for gold in the Pairs discipline in South Korea in 2018.

The Winter Games might not be until February, but their Olympic dream begins in June - seven months before they take to the ice to skate for gold.

In The Studio has been given exclusive access to Eric and Meagan's training base in Montreal, Canada, to see how they create one of the two routines that they hope will see them reach the top of the podium in Pyeongchang.

From key decisions about music, to the choreography and the costumes, we are with them every step of the creative process. We hear from coaches and their support team about how they create a gold medal winning routine. Plus, we join Radford and Duhamel in training, on and off the ice.

Eric is unique amongst skaters. He is the only athlete in his sport to come out as gay whilst at the top of his career. Meanwhile, it is a family affair for Meagan, who is married to their Coach and is the sister-in-Law of their choreographer.

"Join ice skaters Eric Radford and Meagan Duhamel, as they create a routine

Eric is unique amongst skaters. He is the only athlete in his sport to come out as gay whilst at the top of his career. Meanwhile, it is a family affair for Meagan, who is married to their Coach and is the sister-in-Law of their choreographer."

"""Join ice skaters Eric Radford and Meagan Duhamel, as they create a routine

Eric is unique amongst skaters. He is the only athlete in his sport to come out as gay whilst at the top of his career. Meanwhile, it is a family affair for Meagan, who is married to their Coach and is the sister-in-Law of their choreographer."""

Skating To Gold - Meagan Duhamel And Eric Radford20170919"Join ice skaters Eric Radford and Meagan Duhamel, as they create a routine

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

What does it take to win an ice skating Olympic gold medal? Eric Radford and Meagan Duhamel are Canada's double World Champions and one of the favourites for gold in the Pairs discipline in South Korea in 2018.

The Winter Games might not be until February, but their Olympic dream begins in June - seven months before they take to the ice to skate for gold.

In The Studio has been given exclusive access to Eric and Meagan's training base in Montreal, Canada, to see how they create one of the two routines that they hope will see them reach the top of the podium in Pyeongchang.

From key decisions about music, to the choreography and the costumes, we are with them every step of the creative process. We hear from coaches and their support team about how they create a gold medal winning routine. Plus, we join Radford and Duhamel in training, on and off the ice.

Eric is unique amongst skaters. He is the only athlete in his sport to come out as gay whilst at the top of his career. Meanwhile, it is a family affair for Meagan, who is married to their Coach and is the sister-in-Law of their choreographer.

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Sophie Hannah: Recreating Poirot20180403A unique insight into the last days of the author's work on her draft manuscript

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The crime writer Agatha Christie remains the best-selling novelist of all time even though her death was over 40 years ago. Her fictional detective Hercule Poirot has attained legendary status, so for a modern novelist to breathe new life into the character is a considerable challenge. However, the English psychological crime author Sophie Hannah has been doing just that. In 2014 she wrote her first novel using Poirot as the central character and she is now preparing her third Poirot novel for publication, entitled “The Mystery of Three Quarters ?

Taking over another author's character is a complex business. Sophie has to work with the Christie estate and make sure that they and her publishers are happy with the way the novel progresses - and most importantly, ends.

Felicity Finch has been following Sophie during the process of completing the novel and this programme gives a unique insight into the last days of the author's work on the draft manuscript. We'll hear how Sophie writes and have access to her discussions with her publisher. How do these shape her creative process - and will she be able to solve the problem of how to create a satisfactory ending?

Produced by Felicity Finch and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

(Photo: Sophie Hannah)

"A unique insight into the last days of the author's work on her draft manuscript

(Photo: Sophie Hannah)"

The crime writer Agatha Christie remains the best-selling novelist of all time even though her death was over 40 years ago. Her fictional detective Hercule Poirot has attained legendary status, so for a modern novelist to breathe new life into the character is a considerable challenge. However, the English psychological crime author Sophie Hannah has been doing just that. In 2014 she wrote her first novel using Poirot as the central character and she is now preparing her third Poirot novel for publication, entitled “The Mystery of Three Quarters ?

Felicity Finch has been following Sophie during the process of completing the novel and this programme gives a unique insight into the last days of the author's work on the draft manuscript. We'll hear how Sophie writes and have access to her discussions with her publisher. How do these shape her creative process - and will she be able to solve the problem of how to create a satisfactory ending?

Produced by Felicity Finch and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

(Photo: Sophie Hannah)"

South African Singer-songwriter Sisana20170822Taking control of her music through starting her own label.

Despite being homeless on the streets of Johannesburg and desperate to record her first album, South African singer-songwriter Sisana turned down the chance of a recording contract in order to keep control of her music.

After scraping together the money to record a demo, Sisana caught the attention of a music publisher in the UK and together they set up a label – Kalimba Music. She explains how she finds inspiration for her intensely personal lyrics in her own experiences which range from admiring the natural beauty of people around her to yearning for a place to call home.

The BBC's Justine Lang follows the young Zulu singer-songwriter as she starts to realise her dream, from recording her title track Africa in a professional studio, to hearing her songs getting nationwide play on TV and radio.

Photo credit: Through The Lens Photography Studio

"Taking control of her music through starting her own label.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Photo credit: Through The Lens Photography Studio"

Photo credit: Through The Lens Photography Studio "

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Steppenwolf Theatre Company20190910Nick Duncalf follows Tina Landau and Tarell Alvin McCraney of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company as they rehearse their revolutionary new stage show, Ms Blakk for President.

In Chicago, Illinois, two of the ensemble's key creatives, Tina Landau and Tarell Alvin McCraney, are bringing a theatrically daring and politically charged new show to life. Ms Blakk for President tells the extraordinary true story of an African-American drag queen who ran for president of the United States in 1992, at the height of the Aids crisis. Tarell is a critically acclaimed playwright who won an Oscar for his screenplay for the film Moonlight, based on his own childhood growing up in Miami, Florida. Not only has this show been created from scratch at breakneck speed, but Tarell is playing the lead role, after a 15-year absence from the stage. Inspired and supported by the company's history and success, Tarell, Tina, and Steppenwolf's artistic director, Anna D. Shapiro, are determined that this cultural institution must be theatrically and politically revolutionary in order to not just survive, but thrive in the 21st century.

Founded 45 years ago in a leafy suburb of Chicago, the Steppenwolf Theatre Company has forged a reputation as one of the world's foremost producers of electrifying, actor-led theatre, from their breakthrough productions of Balm in Gilead and Sam Shepard's True West, to the Pullitzer Prize-winning August: Osage County, written by one of their own ensemble members, actor-turned-playwright Tracy Letts. The ensemble, expanding over the years to include 50 members, has won Tonys, Emmys, Pullitzers and multiple Oscar nominations, and includes John Malkovich, Laurie Metcalf, Gary Sinise, Joan Allen, Bruce Norris, and many more.

Producer: Nick Duncalf and Eve Streeter

Image: Tarell Alvin McCraney in Ms Blakk for President (Credit: Michael Brosilow)

In rehearsals at Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre for their new show Ms Blakk for President

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Tina Landau and Tarell Alvin McCraney of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company rehearse their revolutionary new stage show, Ms Blakk for President.

In Chicago, Illinois, two of Steppenwolf's key creatives, Tina Landau and Tarell Alvin McCraney, are bringing a theatrically daring and politically charged new show to life. Ms Blakk for President tells the extraordinary true story of an African-American drag queen who ran for president of the United States in 1992, at the height of the Aids crisis. Tarell is a critically acclaimed playwright who won an Oscar for his screenplay for the film Moonlight, based on his own childhood growing up in Miami, Florida. Not only has this show been created from scratch at breakneck speed, but Tarell is playing the lead role, after a 15-year absence from the stage. Inspired and supported by the company's history and success, Tarell, Tina, and Steppenwolf's artistic director, Anna D. Shapiro, are determined that this cultural institution must be theatrically and politically revolutionary in order to not just survive, but thrive in the 21st Century.

Producer: Eve Streeter

Steve Hellier - Sound Artist20171219Follow Steve Hellier to Seoul in South Korea on his latest commission

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Sewing machines, 1980s computer games and cuckoo clocks - just some of the noises that have inspired the British sound artist Steve Hellier's piece, Sound Systems. Steve manipulates everyday sounds to create an audio experience and In the Studio follows him, on his latest commission, to Seoul in South Korea, where he's influenced, not only by the sounds, but also the architecture and the tensions within of the city.

Producer: Nick Luscombe

"Follow Steve Hellier to Seoul in South Korea on his latest commission

Producer: Nick Luscombe"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Steve Hellier €Ⓚ Sound Artist20171219Follow Steve Hellier to Seoul in South Korea on his latest commission

Sewing machines, 1980s computer games and cuckoo clocks - just some of the noises that have inspired the British sound artist Steve Hellier's piece, Sound Systems. Steve manipulates everyday sounds to create an audio experience and In the Studio follows him, on his latest commission, to Seoul in South Korea, where he's influenced, not only by the sounds, but also the architecture and the tensions within of the city.

Producer: Nick Luscombe

"Follow Steve Hellier to Seoul in South Korea on his latest commission

Producer: Nick Luscombe "

Superflex: Design For Humans And Marine Life20200107What do you get when you put a Danish artist group together with oceanographers, material scientists, and marine biologists? The answer is an idea which might just change the way we imagine and design our environments in response to rising sea levels.

As warnings about the effects of global warming escalate, Superflex - an art group founded by Jakob Fenger, Bjørnstjerne Christiansen and Rasmus Nielsen in 1993 – have been working on a long term project to imagine a world where the original function and aesthetics of our carefully designed world may be lost to the tide.

Commissioned by TBA21-Academy, the project is called Deep Sea Minding and it considers whether it's possible to design and create structures that could serve the needs and desires of both humans and marine life.

So in their headquarters in Copenhagen, the team at Superflex are mixing concrete and amino acids together to see whether they can create bricks to make houses and schools which can be occupied by humans first and then fish. They're also preparing a prototype structure to be placed on the seabed to test the responses of fish to this new material.

Over the course of nine months Laura Hubber joins Rasmus Nielsen from Superflex for one leg of their epic journey –taking in California, Copenhagen and Jamaica - and meeting a Mermaid along the way.

Presented by Laura Hubber and produced by Emma Kingsley and Ella-mai Robey for BBC World Service.

Original music from Dive-In composed by Dark Morph (Jón Þór Birgisson and Carl Michael von Hausswolff)

The Danish artists Superflex work on turning bricks of houses into food for fish

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Tamara Kvesitadze - Kinetic Artist20190423Tamara Kvesitadze, a kinetic artist from Georgia, is best known for Man and Woman, a 26-feet tall moving sculpture located in the coastal city of Batumi. Each evening, along the seafront, the two huge steel figures move closer together, and momentarily merge, before passing through one another.

Tamara's large scale kinetic sculptures often combine elaborate moving mechanisms with evocative imagery, and her latest project, Sigh, is no exception. Due for installation at a Buddhist resort in the Chinese city of Wuxi, Sigh has been commissioned to be a reflection on the country's traditional philosophy, as well as the more progressive thinking of modern-day China. The installation features a human figure which stands in the water at nearly 60 feet tall. The sculpture then splits into eight exotic trees which come back together to reform the figure, completing the cycle. The grand size and movement of the work is intended to symbolise the beginning and the end of human experience and - to chime with the Buddhist philosophy - the surpassing of it.

Natalia Golysheva follows the story of Sigh by joining Tamara as she works on the project across several months, taking her from London to Georgia and back, and searches for the perfect way to balance the modern and the traditional.

Presenter / Producer: Natalia Golysheva for BBC World Service

(Image: Tamara Kvesitadze, Georgian artist. Credit to Robert Presutti)

Georgian sculptor Tamara Kvesitadze on Sigh, her large-scale installation set for China

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Tamara Kvesitadze, Kinetic Artist2019042320200512 (WS)Georgian sculptor Tamara Kvesitadze on Sigh, her large-scale installation set for China

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Tamara Kvesitadze, a kinetic artist from Georgia, is best known for Man and Woman, a 26-feet tall moving sculpture located in the coastal city of Batumi. Each evening, along the seafront, the two huge steel figures move closer together, and momentarily merge, before passing through one another.

Tamara's large scale kinetic sculptures often combine elaborate moving mechanisms with evocative imagery, and her latest project, Sigh (also known as Buddha's Smile), is no exception. Due for installation at a Buddhist resort in the Chinese city of Wuxi, Sigh has been commissioned to be a reflection on the country's traditional philosophy, as well as the more progressive thinking of modern-day China. The installation features a human figure which stands in the water at nearly 60 feet tall. The sculpture then splits into eight exotic trees which come back together to reform the figure, completing the cycle. The grand size and movement of the work is intended to symbolise the beginning and the end of human experience and - to chime with the Buddhist philosophy - the surpassing of it.

Natalia Golysheva follows the story of Sigh by joining Tamara as she works on the project across several months, taking her from London to Georgia and back, and searches for the perfect way to balance the modern and the traditional.

Presenter / Producer: Natalia Golysheva (Geyser Media) for BBC World Service

(Image: Tamara Kvesitadze, Georgian artist. Credit to Robert Presutti)

Tamara Kvesitadze: Kinetic Artist20200512Georgian sculptor Tamara Kvesitadze on her 60 foot kinetic sculpture, \u2018Sigh'

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Tamara Kvesitadze is a Georgian artist best known for her visually striking kinetic sculpture, ‘Man and Woman' which is positioned on the edge of the Black Sea in Batumi, Georgia and features two 26 feet tall figures made from steel discs. Every evening ‘Man and Woman' begin to move together, before merging and eventually passing through one another.

Tamara works using a technique called kinetic sculpture - sculptures that contain movement or depend on motion - and her creations often combine elaborate moving mechanisms with evocative imagery.

Her work ‘Sigh' – bound for a Buddhist resort in Wuxi in China - is a reflection on both the country's traditional philosophy and the progressive thinking of modern China. The idea is that the installation will feature a giant figure of a man which slowly rises out of the water to reach a height of nearly 60 feet, before splitting into eight leaf-like pieces that slowly submerge back into the water and form a lotus flower. The grand size of the piece is intended to encompass the beginning and the end of human experience, and to chime with Buddhist philosophy of surpassing it.

Natalia Golysheva was lucky enough to witness the birth of ‘Sigh' at the end of 2018, by joining Tamara as she worked on the project across several months – taking her from London to Georgia – to find the perfect combination of modernity and tradition.

Presented and Produced by Natalia Golysheva for the BBC World Service

Tania Bruguera20181023Tim Marlow visits Tania as she develops her new installation at London's Tate Modern.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

"

Tim Marlow follows the Cuban artist Tania Bruguera as she prepares her new installation at Tate Modern in London.

The Cuban artist Tania Bruguera has become renowned for her politically-engaged projects and activism, resulting in what she describes as Arte Útil - useful art. Her previous works have explored themes of the movement of people and the power of the state in a range of provocative and thought-provoking pieces, often involving performance art.

Now she is bringing her unique perspective to the famous Turbine Hall at Tate Modern in London, where her new installation has just opened.

The centrepiece is a seemingly empty black floor. But concealed in the floor tiles will be an image and words, exploring themes of neighbourliness and migration. It will be up to the visitors to unveil them, using their own body heat. Tania has been using military technology to make this possible, but it is a complicated process and time is short.

Tim Marlow talks to Tania as she develops the piece and hears about the ideas and inspirations behind the work as it takes shape. He also meets the mystery Tate Neighbour who will be celebrated as part of the installation.

(Photo: Cuban artist Tania Bruguera. Credit: Claudio Fuentes)

Tim Marlow visits Tania as she develops her new installation at London's Tate Modern.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

Tim Marlow follows the Cuban artist Tania Bruguera as she prepares her new installation at Tate Modern in London.

Tim Marlow talks to Tania as she develops the piece and hears about the ideas and inspirations behind the work as it takes shape. He also meets the mystery Tate Neighbour who will be celebrated as part of the installation.

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Tattoo Artist Evan Kim2019032620201027 (WS)Evan Kim is one of the most in-demand tattoo artists in New York, thanks to a glamorous list of celebrity clientele which includes Brooklyn Beckham and Frank Ocean.

He's famed for his minimalist, fineline tattoos in black and grey. This is a new style of delicate, intricate graphic art which appeals to the Instagram generation.

Evan's joined by hip hop artist, documentary-maker and fellow Korean American, Jaeki Cho, in his new studio just a few blocks from the Empire State Building. He's about to start a fiendishly difficult task: creating a design which incorporates elements of Japanese anime, mythology and magic - but it has to be small enough to fit on the client's upper arm.

We follow Evan as he works on the tricky design, and then the even trickier application. One slip could ruin those perfect circles and lines. Along the way, Evan shares with us his passion for tattoo design history. On his self-built shelves, there's an entire library of books from traditional American Sailor Jerry works to Japanese tattoo master Horiyoshi III. But it's not just a question of beautifying the body. Evan tries to take meaning from his clients' stories and incorporate them into his designs.

Image: Evan Kim (Credit: Andrew T. White)

New York tattoo artist Evan Kim is tasked with a challenging brief. Can he pull it off?

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Teatro La Fenice - Venice Opera House20180417How you put on world class opera when everything has to be brought in my boat

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

How do you put on great art on an island in the middle of a salt water lagoon when everything on stage, from the Soprano singers to the spare lightbulbs and the tall scenery, must be brought in on a tiny barge twisting its way around narrow canals and under low bridges? The BBC's Simon Pitts explores the passions and determination of singers, technicians and designers of Teatro La Fenice, Venice's opera house, as it puts on a new production of “Die Lustige Witwe, known in English as “The Merry Widow. ?
The programme gives a rare backstage view into one of Italy's great cultural institutions. Featuring interviews with star opera director Damiano Michieletto, conductor Stefano Montanari, singer Nadja Mchantaf, as well as musicians and even the ‘La Traviata' boat driver.
Produced by Andrea Kidd for BBC World Service.

(Photo: Gran Teatro La Fenice, Venice – Italy. Credit: Getty Images)

"How you put on world class opera when everything has to be brought in my boat

(Photo: Gran Teatro La Fenice, Venice – Italy. Credit: Getty Images)"

How do you put on great art on an island in the middle of a salt water lagoon when everything on stage, from the soprano singers to the spare lightbulbs and the tall scenery, must be brought in on a tiny barge, twisting its way around narrow canals and under low bridges? The BBC's Simon Pitts explores the passions and determination of the singers, technicians and designers of Teatro La Fenice, Venice's opera house, as it puts on a new production of Die Lustige Witwe, known in English as The Merry Widow.

The programme gives a rare backstage view into one of Italy's great cultural institutions. Featuring interviews with star opera director Damiano Michieletto, conductor Stefano Montanari and singer Nadja Mchantaf, as well as musicians and even the La Traviata boat driver.

How you put on world class opera when everything has to be brought in by boat

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The Big Fix Up: A New, Digital Venture For Wallace And Gromit20210105Wallace and Gromit – the eccentric inventor and his loyal dog – are one of Britain's best-loved comedy duos. Created in plasticine clay by Nick Park of Aardman Animations, their stop motion adventures have won three Academy Awards and a BAFTA.

Now, Wallace and his faithful hound are heading into exciting new territory. The pair's new business venture, Spick & Spanners, needs employees to help them ‘Fix Up' the British city of Bristol. This interactive story, which takes place on smart phones and uses augmented and mixed reality, is a daring departure from their traditional claymation films. For the first time ever, fans can step directly into the world of Wallace and Gromit.

In The Studio goes behind-the-scenes of the production's final stage, as the technical team grapple with bugs and the directors shoot final takes with their first ever real human character.

Eliza Lomas talks to Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park about his own childhood dreams of being an inventor, and he opens up his sketchbooks to reveal some very recent, very silly Wallace and Gromit doodles.

Presenter: Eliza Lomas

Producers: Eliza Lomas and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

Image copyright Aardman Animations/W&G Ltd. & copyright Fictioneers Ltd. 2020

The plasticine heroes leave stop motion animation for an interactive phone app

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The Bold And The Beautiful: Returning To Our Screens20200818U.S. daily television soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful has been running since 1987, and at roughly 8,300 episodes and counting is a huge hit all around the world, making 250 new programmes a year.

When coronavirus hit, filming stopped as the industry went into lockdown, but the makers are pioneering new creative ground as they go back into production in Los Angeles, and onto our television screens, at a time when Coronavirus is still rife.

Laura Hubber follows the producers, directors and actors of the daily soap, which includes a lot of intimate scenes, as they use their Hollywood creativity to get the series safely back on air.

How can they show an on-screen kiss in a world of masks and social distancing? We hear about a ‘new normal' where actors' real-life partners' now work as ‘kissing doubles', joined by a cast of mannequins, dedicated Coronavirus Coordinators, and strict new acting rules.

Presented by Laura Hubber

Produced by Laura Hubber, Emma Wallace and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

How mannequins and actors' real-life partners are getting the show safely back on air

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The Final Take: Bowie In The Studio20180130A dramatised account of David Bowie working on his last album, Blackstar

This special drama is an imagined account of David Bowie as he works on his last album, Blackstar, to give a moving and revealing portrait of the star as he reflects on music, love, drugs, fame and death.

Impressionist Jon Culshaw, in a rare serious role, plays David Bowie. It is 2015, and music star David Bowie is secretly working in New York's The Magic Shop studio, with his long-time producer Tony Visconti. The resulting tracks will become David Bowie's final album, Blackstar, which was released in January 2016, just two days before his death. The dialogue in this drama is partly constructed from Bowie's own words, taken from the many hundreds of interviews he gave since the 1960s.

(Photo: Jon Culshaw, who plays David Bowie in The Final Take Credit: BBC)

"A dramatised account of David Bowie working on his last album, Blackstar

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

** For rights reasons, this programme is no longer available.

(Photo: Jon Culshaw, who plays David Bowie in The Final Take Credit: BBC)

(Photo: Jon Culshaw, who plays David Bowie in The Final Take Credit: BBC) "

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The Haptic Baton20190115How do you play in an orchestra if you are visually impaired? German born US composer and inventor, Rolf Gehlhaar works with his son, the artist and digital developer Vahakn Matossian-Gehlhaar, to create digital musical instruments and technologies for disabled people. Their latest project is a conductors' baton that sends wireless signals to wearable vibration devices, enabling visually impaired musicians to feel signals from a conductor and to play with traditional orchestras.

Zoe Cormier joins Rolf and Vahakn at the rehearsals for a crucial concert that will establish whether their prototype baton works - if it does, their creation and all the research, computing, and designing they are putting into it could provide new possibilities for visually impaired musicians.

The concert at the St George's concert hall in Bristol in the UK, brings together performers from the British Paraorchestra and an ensemble of visually impaired musicians from South Korea. The Korean ensemble stars the celebrated percussionist Kyungho Jeon who has long dreamed of playing in an orchestra - what will he and other visually impaired musicians think of the baton prototype? Also featuring interviews with conductor Charles Hazlewood.

Producer: Julia Johnson

(Photo: Rolf Gehlhaar and Vahakn Matossian-Gehlhaar, with kind permission)

A new device helping visually impaired musicians be in an orchestra

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The Immersive Hyper Reality World Of Star Wars20180717"In The Studio explores the hyper reality experience Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Welcome to Mustafar, the molten lava home planet of Darth Vader and to an inter-galactic adventure taking place in…a shopping mall. Edwina Pitman goes on a mission with the creative team behind Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire, a multi-sensory, immersive hyper-reality experience produced by Lucasfilm, ILMxLAB and The VOID. Speaking to Mohen Leo, Creative Director and Vicki Dobbs Beck, Executive in Charge of ILMxLAB, In the Studio explores the way that the burgeoning virtual reality industry, which has evolved at the junction of film, CGI and gaming, is pushing the boundaries of storytelling.

We also hear how creatives using VR technology, still in its infancy, foresee its development. With the help of neuroscientist Professor Sophie Scott, the programme looks at the psychological appeal of this new entertainment form and why virtual memories and experiences can feel as authentic as those created in the real world.

(Image: Star Wars Stormtrooper. Credit: Getty Images)

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Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition20170613Behind-the-scenes look at the 249th annual Royal Academy Summer Exhibition

The annual Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts in London is the largest open-submission art exhibition in the world. It attracts over 12,000 entries. Only 1,200 paintings and sculptures will make it onto its walls and floors, including works from Gilbert and George, Yinka Shonibare and Tracey Emin.

The exhibition which takes place every June and July, attracts a quarter of a million visitors. It is an collection of works by Royal Academicians, invited professional artists and selected works from professional and amateur artists from all over the world. The open submissions form nearly 70% of the show.

An artist co-ordinator is chosen to oversee the show; this year it's the job of Eileen Cooper RA, the Keeper of the Royal Academy. She works with a small committee of Academicians to select an exhibition which is then hung in the RA galleries, with the committee members each taking responsibility for a room.

We go behind the scenes at the Royal Academy as the Academicians decide on what is worthy of their imprimatur.

Producer: Divya Mittal and Roger James Elsgood.

(Photo: Installation view of the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 2017. Credit: David Parry)

"Behind-the-scenes look at the 249th annual Royal Academy Summer Exhibition

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo: Installation view of the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 2017. Credit: David Parry)"

Behind-the-scenes look at the 249th annual Royal Academy Summer Exhibition"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The Royal Ballet - The Unknown Soldier20181127"

Conceived by choreographer Alastair Marriott, with a score by Oscar-winning composer Dario Marianelli, sets by visionary designer Es Devlin and inspired by personal testimony, the Unknown Soldier is a new work by the Royal Ballet to commemorate the centenary of the ending of World War I. Edwina Pitman steps behind the velvet curtains of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden in London, to see how this world-class creative team is blurring the lines between choreographer, designer and composer as they work together to create a powerful new work.

(Image: The Royal Opera House production of The Unknown Soldier. Credit: The Royal Opera House/Helen Maybanks)

Backstage at the Royal Opera House, with the creatives behind a new ballet

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

The Xyz Show: Kenya's Satirical Puppets20190924Since 2009, the XYZ Show has been holding Kenyan politicians and other global figures to account, with a hilarious and cutting form of satire, starring... puppets! The brainchild of widely syndicated political cartoonist Gado, the XYZ Show aims to get people talking about issues through humour – in the tradition of famous satirical puppet shows like the UK's Spitting Image and France's Les Guignols. From President Uhuru Kenyatta to Donald Trump – a latex avatar is ready and waiting to spring into life.

After a break of over a year, the XYZ Show is back on air for its 13th season, and the BBC's Anthony Irungu has gained exclusive access to go behind the scenes. Follow him as he meets the puppet masters and makers, scriptwriters, directors, producers and voice artists that create each carefully crafted episode from scratch in just 10 days – and asks why puppets are so effective in satire.

Produced by Karl Bos and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

(Image: Puppets from the XYZ show, with kind permission)

The team from the satirical Kenyan XYZ show prepare for an episode

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Theaster Gates: Dream Whisperer For Old Materials20170509American artist Theaster Gates on his recent Hong Kong show

"American artist Theaster Gates on his recent Hong Kong show

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

We head to Hong Kong, where Chicago based American artist Theaster Gates is installing his latest work in a show called Tarry Skies and Palms For Now, at the White Cube Gallery there. Presenter Tim Marlow takes a path through Theaster Gates' creative thinking. As the son of a roofer he spent many hours, with his father, fixing leaking Chicago rooftops with tar and felt. Now he is using those same materials to create paintings and sculptures that celebrate not only his dad but all the unsung black hands that built the USA.

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Tod Machover - Composer And Inventor20180424U.S Composer and inventor Tod Machover talks about his latest piece 'Philadelphia Voices'

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

From the famous Mummers' New Year's Day Parade to the sizzling of celebrated cheesesteaks, acclaimed U.S composer and inventor Tod Machover has been collecting sounds for his latest piece 'Philadelphia Voices,' a composition inspired by the heritage, sights and sounds of Philadelphia, the city known as the birthplace of American democracy.

Then in his barn studio, next to his Boston home, he manipulates these hours and hours of recording, crafting them into the music and soundscape for the piece. We also have behind the scenes access as the composition receives its premiere performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra and local choirs.

Presenter: Andrea Shea
Producers: Andrea Kidd and Isabel Sargent

(Photo: Tod Machover, U.S composer and inventor)

"U.S Composer and inventor Tod Machover talks about his latest piece 'Philadelphia Voices'

(Photo: Tod Machover, U.S composer and inventor)"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Top Kenyan Hip Hop Artist Octopizzo20170516How Kibera, Africa's biggest slum, inspires his music

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

"How Kibera, Africa's biggest slum, inspires his music"

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Octopizzo is one of the biggest names in Kenyan hip hop, whose music continues to be inspired by his childhood growing up in Africa's biggest slum. He takes the BBC's Anthony Irungu on a night-time journey around Kibera, on the outskirts of Nairobi, as he explores the sights, sounds and people who influence his songs including his latest single Nu Afrika.
Octopizzo raps in the street slang of Sheng, but in a big new endeavour, his latest album has a jazz feel to it, a homage to the music his late father used to love. We also follow Octopizzo into his recording session as he departs from rap and sings on one of his songs for the very first time.

Tyler Childers: Run These Roads20200526A Grammy-nominated country musician tells stories of his native Kentucky

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Tyler Childers was nominated for a Grammy in early 2020. He's an emerging talent who is true to his Appalachian roots.

He grew up in the foothills of East Kentucky, his father worked in the coal industry, and his songs reflect the tough life in that part of the world - unemployment, broken relationships, drugs, alcohol. He draws on these themes in order to stay faithful to the place: "I hope that people in the area that I grew up in find something they can relate to. I hope that I'm doing my people justice and I hope that maybe someone from somewhere else can get a glimpse of the life of a Kentucky boy."

The lyrics of one of his songs describes the exhilaration of driving recklessly: “A damn good feeling to run these roads". For his most recent Country Squire album, Tyler says much of it was written on the road, including love songs dedicated to his wife. He also drew inspiration from unusual sources, including Allen Touissant's 1970s album Southern Nights.

We take will a deep dive into contemporary life, music and culture of East Kentucky, with help from Brett Ratliff, programme director of community radio station WMMT in Whitesburg, Kentucky, in the heart of Appalachia's coal fields, and hear about Kentucky story-telling from author Silas House.

And with his US tour suspended because of the coronavirus lockdown, we hear how Tyler and his wife Senora May - also a singer songwriter - are drawing on their home, and their own relationship, for creative inspiration.

A Voiceworks Production for the BBC World Service
Produced by Philip Reevell

Image: Tyler Childers performing in Berlin (Credit: Frank Hoensch/Redferns via Getty Images)

Unique Tour Of Ai Weiwei's Studio20170328Inside the underground warren that is artist Ai Weiwei's Berlin studio

Ai Weiwei is the most famous Chinese artist working today and in 2011 he was named the most powerful artist in the world. He makes works, often on an epic scale, to draw attention to freedom of speech and human rights and consequently is sometimes in conflict with the Chinese authorities. For the first edition of In the Studio Ai Weiwei invites Tim Marlow (Artistic Director of London's Royal Academy) into the underground warren that is his Berlin studio for a unique tour of older pieces and works in progress. We're here to find out how Ai Weiwei thinks and what drives his creative process.

Image: Ai Weiwei, Credit: Getty Images

"Inside the underground warren that is artist Ai Weiwei's Berlin studio

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

(Photo: Ai Weiwei, Credit: Getty Images)

"

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Unleashing The Olagf3n20180320The ancient Irish legend Táin Bó Cúailnge is a tale of greed, envy and hubris which has been passed down from generation to generation for centuries. At the centre of it is the Olagón - a cry of anguish from deep within.

Best selling author Colm Tóibín meets the international artists who have come together for the premier of the retelling of The Táin, and how, through poetry, music and an ancient singing style, they reimagine and retell the story as a commentary on modern day Ireland

He meets Pulitzer Prize winning poet Muldoon, Ó'Lionáird, the lead singer of The Gloaming and master of the ancient sean-nós style of singing, who made a cameo in the film version of Tóibín's novel Brooklyn, and American composer Dan Trueman who has put the rich and varied themes of Olagón to music, along with the four-time GRAMMY award-winning Chicago sextet Eighth Blackbird.

As they put the last touches to the piece at Princeton University, Colm explores with the cast the reasons they are retelling this tale. What does this tale of an epic battle and tragic outcome tell us about Ireland now?

The ancient Irish folktale T\u00e1in B\u00f3 C\u00faailnge and its musical and poetical retelling

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

As they put the last touches to the piece at Princeton University, Colm explores with the cast the reasons they are retelling this tale. What does this tale of an epic battle and tragic outcome tell us about Ireland now?

"The ancient Irish folktale T\u00e1in B\u00f3 C\u00faailnge and its musical and poetical retelling

As they put the last touches to the piece at Princeton University, Colm explores with the cast the reasons they are retelling this tale. What does this tale of an epic battle and tragic outcome tell us about Ireland now?"

Updating Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot: Sophie Hannah20180403"A unique insight into the last days of the author's work on her draft manuscript

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

The crime writer Agatha Christie remains the best-selling novelist of all time even though her death was over 40 years ago. Her fictional detective Hercule Poirot has attained legendary status, so for a modern novelist to breathe new life into the character is a considerable challenge. However, the English psychological crime author Sophie Hannah has been doing just that. In 2014 she wrote her first novel using Poirot as the central character and she is now preparing her third Poirot novel for publication, entitled “The Mystery of Three Quarters ?

Taking over another author's character is a complex business. Sophie has to work with the Christie estate and make sure that they and her publishers are happy with the way the novel progresses - and most importantly, ends.

Felicity Finch has been following Sophie during the process of completing the novel and this programme gives a unique insight into the last days of the author's work on the draft manuscript. We'll hear how Sophie writes and have access to her discussions with her publisher. How do these shape her creative process - and will she be able to solve the problem of how to create a satisfactory ending?

Produced by Felicity Finch and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

(Photo: author Sophie Hannah. Credit: Onur Pinar)

(Photo: author Sophie Hannah. Credit: Onur Pinar)"

The crime writer Agatha Christie remains the best-selling novelist of all time even though her death was over 40 years ago. Her fictional detective Hercule Poirot has attained legendary status, so for a modern novelist to breathe new life into the character is a considerable challenge. However, the English psychological crime author Sophie Hannah has been doing just that. In 2014 she wrote her first novel using Poirot as the central character and she is now preparing her third Poirot novel for publication, entitled “The Mystery of Three Quarters”.

Felicity Finch has been following Sophie during the process of completing the novel and this programme gives a unique insight into the last days of the author's work on the draft manuscript. We'll hear how Sophie writes and have access to her discussions with her publisher. How do these shape her creative process - and will she be able to solve the problem of how to create a satisfactory ending?

Produced by Felicity Finch and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

(Photo: author Sophie Hannah. Credit: Onur Pinar)

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

The crime writer Agatha Christie remains the best-selling novelist of all time even though her death was over 40 years ago. Her fictional detective Hercule Poirot has attained legendary status, so for a modern novelist to breathe new life into the character is a considerable challenge. However, the English psychological crime author Sophie Hannah has been doing just that. In 2014 she wrote her first novel using Poirot as the central character and she is now preparing her third Poirot novel for publication, entitled “The Mystery of Three Quarters ?

(Photo: author Sophie Hannah. Credit: Onur Pinar)

Victor Ehikhamenor20181030"

Victor Ehikhamenor, hailed as one of Africa's most innovative contemporary artists, is a true polymath. He writes, paints, creates sculpture, and designs book covers for bestselling authors, including his old friend and fellow Nigerian, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Chimamanda is no stranger to Victor's vibrant Lagos studio, where visitors are likely to be welcomed with a glass of whiskey and lively conversation about all aspects of Nigerian culture. In this programme she finds him working on a whole new piece for an upcoming exhibition: a recreation of the outfit worn by kings of Benin, but made with thousands of catholic rosaries.

Between Victor's Lagos studio and the thronging Idumota market where he sources many of his materials, we hear two of Nigeria's most notable artists discuss the vibrant and dualistic culture of their home country, the joy felt when an artwork takes on a life of its own, and the frustration when it refuses to cooperate.

Join Victor and Chimamanda for this thoughtful and often funny exploration of art, music, sprituality, words and ideas.

Nigerian visual artist Victor Ehikhamenor talks to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world."

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Viet Thanh Nguyen: The Art Of Memoir20210112Pulitzer Prize-winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen brings listeners inside the writing of his new book: a memoir, of sorts. In a departure from fiction, the Vietnamese-American writer takes on a new, deeply personal challenge.

When he was only four years old, Viet's family fled the war in Vietnam, eventually settling in California. Too young to remember these events, his writing often explores secondhand memories of war, inherited trauma and refugee experiences.

Eliza Lomas catches up with Viet a few times over a twelve-month period: in the early months of 2020, again in the summer, and finally towards the end of the year. Throughout this time, Viet is finishing the final edits on his forthcoming novel, The Committed, and dives into writing his next book.

This journey requires him to dig deep into his past and make difficult decisions about what to include and how personal he should be. Sometimes he gets so stuck all he can do is change the font on the manuscript. Yet he also has success, some days reaching his target of 1000 words a day.

For Viet, writing is a political act: he believes that sharing his family's experiences is crucial to reshaping American representations of Vietnam and of refugees more widely. Central to his philosophy as a refugee author is to “write with all the privileges of the majority, but with the humility of a minority.”

Produced and presented by Eliza Lomas

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author takes on a new, deeply personal challenge

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Virgil Abloh20190205"

Virgil Abloh is an architect, founder of the OFF-White clothing brand, and long time creative collaborator of Kanye West. He has conquered the world of visual arts, high end fashion and music, appealing to a young and devoted audience of fans. In 2019 Abloh's taking on a new challenge, designing mass produced furniture.

Presenter and DJ, Benji B reunites with Virgil to find out why he decided to move away from music and fashion to collaborate with IKEA on a furniture range called ‘Markerad'.

Benji explores Virgil's approach to design and his aim to ‘edit' past concepts by 3%, just enough to twist them into something new. Virgil likens the process to sampling records in Hip Hop music. He also uses the language of the internet to subvert consumers expectations or shape their experience of a product.

Virgil explains how his design signatures, such as the use of text in inverted commas, have developed and why they speak so directly to young consumers who have grown up with the Internet as part of their lives.

(Photo: Virgil Abloh, architect and founder of the OFF-White clothing brand)

Virgil Abloh on why he moved away from music and fashion to collaborate with IKEA

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people"

Virgil Abloh is an architect, founder of the OFF-White clothing brand, and long time creative collaborator of Kanye West. He has conquered the world of visual arts, high end fashion and music, appealing to a young and devoted audience of fans. In 2019 Abloh’s taking on a new challenge, designing mass produced furniture.

Presenter and DJ, Benji B reunites with Virgil to find out why he decided to move away from music and fashion to collaborate with IKEA on a furniture range called ‘Markerad’.

Benji explores Virgil’s approach to design and his aim to ‘edit’ past concepts by 3%, just enough to twist them into something new. Virgil likens the process to sampling records in Hip Hop music. He also uses the language of the internet to subvert consumers expectations or shape their experience of a product.

World Of Warcraft20191015World of Warcraft is one of the most popular computer games on the planet and it has managed to sustain that popularity for 15 years, outlasting countless rivals. The game is produced by creative artists, designers and programmers who work together to create the mystical land of Azeroth.

Presenter and gamer Alex Humphreys spends time with the sound department, who play a critical role in the development of the game. The key to the success of World of Warcraft is maintaining the desire of players to come back for more, day after day. They have to be immersed in the game and feel like they are playing in a real place.

Following the team as they prepare for their next content update, Alex talks to writers, producers and sound designers to find out how each of them play their part in creating Azeroth. From the meeting room, to the recording studio and the edit suit, each step along the way contributes to the player experience and the success of the game.

How writers, producers and sound designers create the hit game World of Warcraft

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Youtube's Life In A Day: The Making Of A Documentary20210209Ten years ago, YouTube launched a global experiment to create the world's largest user-generated feature film. The result was a documentary made from footage all shot on a single day, “by you”.

Exactly 10 years on, executive producer Ridley Scott (Alien, Gladiator) and Academy Award-winning director Kevin Macdonald (Whitney, Last King of Scotland) reunite for Life In A Day 2020.

Over the course of six months In the Studio follows the team – hearing from Kevin, the editors and Ridley - as they wrestle with 324,000 videos from 192 countries and create a new film.

We also catch up with award-winning composer Matthew Herbert, as he endeavours to score the film by using a myriad of sounds from the submitted footage.

Presenter/producer: Ella-mai Robey

Director Kevin Macdonald and executive producer Ridley Scott on making Life In A Day 2020

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.

Zanele Muholi: Giving A Voice To South Africa's Black Lgbtqi+ Community2020031020210119 (WS)Meet Zanele Muholi, the pioneering non-binary visual activist from South Africa, who wants to give the marginalised a place in history with their powerful portraits of the black LGBTQI+ community in South Africa.

Marking a major retrospective of their work at London's Tate Modern, reporter Mpho Lakaje joins the artist in Johannesburg and Durban as they work on their series “Faces and Phases”. This evolving photographic record is part of Muholi's life's work, to map and preserve an often invisible community, while addressing the serious issue of hate crime in South Africa and its neighbouring countries, where the stigma of being queer can often lead to rape, violence, and murder.

Mpho follows Muholi as they capture images, interview participants and hear their stories before creating striking and challenging images in black and white, highlighting and celebrating the beauty of black skin.

Presenter: Mpho Lakaje
Producer: Edwina Pitman and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

The \u2018visual activist' who wants to give the black LGBTQI+ community a place in history

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Zanele Muholi: Photographer And Visual Activist20200310What does it mean to be a visual activist? Pioneering non-binary South African photographer Zanele Muholi, who aims to give the marginalised a presence in the visual archive with their striking portraits of the black South African LGBTI community.

Ahead of Muholi's first major UK retrospective at Tate Modern this Spring, reporter Mpho Lakaje follows Muholi, in Johannesburg and Durban as they work on their ongoing series “Faces and Phases ? This is an evolving photographic record and part of Muholi's life's work to map and preserve an often invisible community for posterity. It also serves to address the serious issue of hate crime in South Africa and its neighbouring countries, where the stigma of homosexuality can often lead to rape, violence, and murder.

We follow Muholi capturing images, interviewing participants and hearing their stories before creating their powerful images in black and white, highlighting and celebrating the beauty of black skin.

Presenter: Mpho Lakaje
Producer: Edwina Pitman and Ella-mai Robey

The artist and activist using photography to reframe black visual history in South Africa

Inside the brains of the world's most creative people

Ahead of Muholi's first major UK retrospective at Tate Modern this Spring, reporter Mpho Lakaje follows Muholi, in Johannesburg and Durban as they work on their ongoing series “Faces and Phases”. This is an evolving photographic record and part of Muholi's life's work to map and preserve an often invisible community for posterity. It also serves to address the serious issue of hate crime in South Africa and its neighbouring countries, where the stigma of homosexuality can often lead to rape, violence, and murder.

In the Studio takes us into the minds and processes of leading and emerging figures from across the creative world.