Episodes

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20171102

The Inquiry gets beyond the headlines to explore the trends, forces and ideas shaping the world.

The growth and reach of a group labelled a ‘terror force’ by President Trump. On 13 October President Trump announced new sanctions against Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corp for supporting terrorism. But what is the Revolutionary Guard and what is its role in Iran and the Middle East?

The group started as an army to protect the values of the Iranian revolution of 1979, but their role in fighting a long and brutal war with Iraq strengthened their military clout considerably. Today their forces work beyond their borders and have played a key role in the fight against so-called Islamic State. But they are no longer just an army, they run construction projects, run most of the telecommunications industry and even have a news agency. So how powerful is the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps?

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producers: Phoebe Keane and Jo Casserly

(Photo: Iran's elite Revolutionary Guard special forces participating in military manoeuvers. Credit: Getty Images)

20190401
20190408
2019042920190504 (R4)

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

20190525
05/10/20192019093020191005 (R4)

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Can We Eradicate Polio?20191228

Despite heroic efforts to vaccinate against this crippling disease, why does it persist? The fight to eradicate polio is an amazing story: It began with a grassroots movement in the United States and led to a global campaign to wipe out a disease that can cause paralysis and even death. There is no cure, but countless cases have been prevented by an extraordinary campaign to vaccinate every child aged five and under. It’s an operation that requires access to some of the poorest and most remote regions of the world.

But polio was supposed to have been eliminated by the year 2000. Nearly two decades later, new cases are still springing up. Why? Neal Razzell examines the challenges and the triumphs in the effort to rid the world of polio.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Can You Reduce Central American Migration?2019072920190803 (R4)

Families from the Northern Triangle countries of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador now make up the majority of migrants arriving at the US southern border. Many from urban areas are fleeing endemic gang violence, while those from rural regions are affected by droughts and food security issues.

The Mexican government is increasing security along their borders, while the Trump administration has been changing asylum law.
Could these measures help to lower the number of people choosing to make the dangerous journey? Or is there another way to make sure migrants don't feel like they need to leave their homes?

More and more families from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are travelling to the US

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Coronavirus: What Can The World Learn From South Korea?2020040220200404 (R4)

After China, South Korea was next in line to be struck by the Coronavirus outbreak. And in the early days, the number of cases was going up fast – many of them related to a secretive religious sect. But the country rapidly managed to get a grip on the outbreak and has kept its mortality rate low. It has done this without an official lockdown. The secret appears to be preparation, widespread testing and acting fast. With the help of four expert witnesses, Kavita Puri investigates what else we can learn from South Korea in its battle against Covid-19.

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: John Murphy

Without a lockdown, South Korea has had great success against Covid-19. How?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Coronavirus: What Can The World Learn From South Korea?20200411

After China, South Korea was next in line to be struck by the Coronavirus outbreak. And in the early days, the number of cases was going up fast – many of them related to a secretive religious sect. But the country rapidly managed to get a grip on the outbreak and has kept its mortality rate low. It has done this without an official lockdown. The secret appears to be preparation, widespread testing and acting fast. With the help of four expert witnesses, Kavita Puri investigates what else we can learn from South Korea in its battle against Covid-19.

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: John Murphy

Without a lockdown, South Korea has had great success against Covid-19. How?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

How Can We Feed 11 Billion People?20190511

The world’s population is set to grow from 7.7 to 11 billion by the end of this century. The challenge is to produce enough food to feed this number of people. In the 1960s the Green Revolution provided answers to similar problems – but the projected population growth of the future is on a much greater scale than before, and so new measures are required. In east Africa they’re working to reduce the amount of food that’s lost before it even gets to market – globally this stands at around 30 per cent. In the United States scientists are working to improve the natural process of photosynthesis – to make plants themselves function more efficiently. And in India they’re working to preserve genetic diversity – conserving rice varieties that can flourish in salt water or in conditions of drought.

Presenter: Kate Lamble
Producer: Tim Mansel

The world's population is set to grow to 11 billion. Can we feed this number of people?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

How Can We Save Our Forests?2019092320190928 (R4)

In the afternoon of August 20th this year, the sky over Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo turned dark. The cause of this premature night was the smoke from fires burning thousands of kilometres away in the Amazon rainforest.

The scale of the fires caught the attention of the world, but the Amazon is one story among many. The global community has long worried about deforestation, five years ago nations agreed to work to halve global tree loss by 2020 and end it by 2030. This month, those targets were acknowledged to be missed.

This week we investigate what tactics are being used to preserve forests around the world, and ask if any of them are effective.

This summer fires in the Amazon rainforest caught the world's attention.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

In the afternoon of August 20th this year, the sky over Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo turned dark. The cause of this premature night was the smoke from fires burning thousands of kilometres away in the Amazon rainforest.

The scale of the fires caught the attention of the world, but the Amazon is one story among many. The global community has long worried about deforestation, five years ago nations agreed to work to halve global tree loss by 2020 and end it by 2030. This month, those targets were acknowledged to be missed.

This week we investigate what tactics are being used to preserve forests around the world, and ask if any of them are effective.

This summer fires in the Amazon rainforest caught the world's attention

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

This summer fires in the Amazon rainforest caught the world's attention.

How Did Trump Get Into Trouble With Ukraine?20200125

How did Trump’s personality and way of dealing with people lead to a trial in the Senate?
The answer involves Trump’s long standing belief in conspiracy theories, his transactional way of doing business, the revolving door of staff turnover at the White House and his admiration for Russian president Vladimir Putin. With Tanya Beckett.

How did Trump's personality and way of dealing with people lead to a trial in the Senate?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

How Is Space Changing Earth?20190420

Many nations have now entered the space race. China first sent a man into space in 2003 and in the last few months made a successful, unmanned, landing on the far side of the moon. This was a world first. India has its own record. A few years ago it launched more satellites into space, in one go, than any other nation. Nigeria is talking about sending an astronaut into space. And Kyrgyzstan is developing its first satellite, built entirely by female engineers. The Inquiry explores what lies behind all this activity. Is the power of national prestige giving way to different goals; education, economic progress and human rights?

Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Rosamund Jones

This edition of The Inquiry was first broadcast in March 2019 on the BBC World Service.

What motivates the global space race - power, prestige or social progress?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

How Soon Can We Go Carbon Zero?20200111

Activists all over the world have taken over city centres, demanding urgent action to halt climate change. They say we need to eliminate all carbon emissions by 2025. Most people think that’s impossible. But scientists are warning that if we want to stop global warming, we need to cut our CO2 emissions fast. So how soon can the planet achieve carbon zero?

Helen Grady speaks to:

Chukwumerije Okereke, Director of the Centre for Climate Change and Development, Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Nigeria
Mercedes Maroto-Valer, Director of the Research Centre for Carbon Solutions at Herriot Watt University, Scotland
Roger Pielke Jr, Professor at the University of Colorado, US;
Rachel Moncrief, Deputy Director at the International Council on Clean Transportation

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

If we want to stop global warming, we need to cut our CO2 emissions fast - but can we?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is Africa Facing Another Debt Crisis?2019093020191005 (R4)

It’s been almost 15 years since a successful campaign to erase the crushing debts of Africa’s poorest countries. Now, debt levels are again creeping up, thanks in part to a risky mix of easy credit and easy spending. We hear from a former Liberian cabinet minister, a Mozambican anti-corruption campaigner, an expert in Chinese financial flows to the continent and the World Bank’s chief economist for Africa. With Neal Razzell.

A risky mix of easy credit and easy spending.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

It’s been almost 15 years since a successful campaign to erase the crushing debts of Africa’s poorest countries. Now, debt levels are again creeping up, thanks in part to a risky mix of easy credit and easy spending. We hear from a former Liberian cabinet minister, a Mozambican anti-corruption campaigner, an expert in Chinese financial flows to the continent and the World Bank’s chief economist for Africa. With Neal Razzell.

A risky mix of easy credit and easy spending.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is Germany Ok?2019081920190824 (R4)

It’s known for precision and punctuality but Europe’s engine is slowing down. Germany’s economy relies heavily on selling its products abroad. Famed for luxury cars like Porsche, BMW and Mercedes-Benz, exports are nearly half the German economy. So if countries decide they don’t want to buy, or can’t afford to buy, the things that Germany makes, it’s a problem. And that’s what’s been happening to Germany today. China – the most important market for most German car makers - is slowing down. Much of Europe is struggling and the US is pursuing its own protectionist policies, to get Americans to buy US-made goods.

On top of that, the German car industry is facing tough new EU emissions tests (prompted by the Volkswagen emissions’s scandal of 2015), with crippling penalties if they don’t comply. So, buffeted by these adverse winds in part self-inflicted, in part beyond its control, the German government is being urged to boost its economy at home – by spending more on roads, bridges and broadband networks. But, as Neal Razzell discovers, despite having plenty of cash in the coffers, events in its past means Germany is reluctant to loosen the purse strings.

Picture: German sports fan / Credit: Getty images

It's known for precision and punctuality, but Europe's engine is slowing down.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is Nato Obsolete?20191221

Donald Trump is threatening to withdraw the US from NATO while the French President Emmanuel Macron has called it “brain dead”. Charmaine Cozier asks if the 70-year-alliance can survive?

She speaks to:

• Jacob Heilbrunn from The National Interest think tank – a right of centre foreign policy think tank based in Washington.
• Fabrice Pothier - Senior Defence Consulting Fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies and former NATO policy planning director
• Sara Bjerg Moller - Assistant Professor of International Security at the School of Diplomacy and International Relations, Seton Hall University in the US.
• Elisabeth Braw, Senior Research Fellow, RUSI's Modern Deterrence project

Producer: Helen Grady

With the US and French President questioning its future, can Nato survive?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is Recycling Broken?20200201

With countries shutting their doors to foreign recyclable waste and a lack of processing capacity back home, is the recycling system broken?

China used to accept 55% of the world’s plastic and paper waste. But it closed its doors in 2018. Initially other countries in South East Asia, like Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam took over China’s waste processing role. But they too are now sending much of the waste back, arguing it is contaminated and is harming their own environments.

This has created major problems for countries in the West who traditionally relied on others to process their recycling waste. In addition, there’s confusion about what households can and cannot put into their recycling bins, along with that lack of recycling capacity back home. So what is the answer to the growing mountains of what was supposed to be recyclable waste? Could Sweden, which has reduced the amount of household waste it sends to landfill to under one per cent, have an answer? It’s not one everyone agrees with.

Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Producer: John Murphy

Were we wrong to think that recycling was the answer to our waste problem?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is Rock Music Doomed?20190921

Bruce Springsteen is turning 70; rock’s gods are getting on. It’s not clear who’s there with electric guitars to replace them. Younger acts are failing are to make hit singles. Veteran rock journalist Mark Coles believes rock music has lost its ability to surprise and innovate. Record label boss Vanessa Higgins describes how the writing of hit songs no longer favours the rock format. Music critic Michael Hann blames the high costs of making rock as part of the reason for its decline. But Chris Woltman, manager of the band Twenty One Pilots, believes bands have adapted rock for a new generation of fans and industry veteran Sat Bisla details how rock is making headway in non-traditional markets like India and Indonesia. With Neal Razzell.

Bruce Springsteen is turning 70; rock's gods are aging. Who can replace them?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Bruce Springsteen is turning 70; rock’s gods are getting on. It’s not clear who’s there with electric guitars to replace them. Younger acts are failing are to make hit singles. Veteran rock journalist Mark Coles believes rock music has lost its ability to surprise and innovate. Record label boss Vanessa Higgins describes how the writing of hit songs no longer favours the rock format. Music critic Michael Hann blames the high costs of making rock as part of the reason for its decline. But Chris Woltman, manager of the band Twenty One Pilots, believes bands have adapted rock for a new generation of fans and industry veteran Sat Bisla details how rock is making headway in non-traditional markets like India and Indonesia. With Neal Razzell.

Bruce Springsteen is turning 70; rock's gods are aging. Who can replace them?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is The Deep Ocean The Answer To Some Of Our Biggest Problems?2019081220190817 (R4)

Our species is facing a whole lot of problems. Antibiotic resistance is on the rise, land based minerals are depleting and there are serious concerns about how warm everything’s becoming.

As the population grows these problems are only going to get worse, but what if we could find some of the solutions to our most pressing problems beneath the waves? Scientists have discovered that deep sea sponges could help fight MRSA, your smart phone could be powered by minerals located thousands of metres beneath the sea, and there are even enzymes that could help your washing machine run on a colder cycle, saving both energy and your new cashmere sweater. Is the deep sea the answer to some of our biggest problems? There’s a lot of promise, but what are the risks?

Humanity has many problems. Does the solution to some lie deep beneath our oceans' waves?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is Time Travel Possible?2019081920190824 (R4)

Ever wanted to meet your historical heroes or explore the inventions of the future? Travelling in time has long been a dream of writers and filmmakers, but what does science tell us about how possible this would be to achieve in real life?

We explore how physics shows us that time runs at different rates depending on where we are and how we’re moving - time goes more slowly for astronauts on the international space station for example. We hear about the very dangerous ways we could possibly exploit this to skip forwards through time and into Earth’s future, and we do the maths on wormholes, to see if they offer a possible portal to our past.

What does science tell us about the possibility of travelling in time?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is Time Travel Possible?20200104

Ever wanted to meet your historical heroes or explore the inventions of the future? Travelling in time has long been a dream of writers and filmmakers, but what can science tell us about whether it could ever become a reality?

We explore why time goes more slowly for astronauts on the international space station, hear about the very dangerous ways we could possibly exploit this to skip forwards through time and into Earth’s future, and we do the maths on wormholes, to see if they offer a portal to our past.

Contributors include:

James Gleick - author
Dr Natasha Hurley-Walker - Radio astronomer, Curtin University
Professor Katie Mack - Theoretical astrophysicist, North Carolina State University
Dr Luke Butcher - Theoretical physicist, University of Edinburgh

Presenter: Kate Lamble
Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton
Researcher: Lizzy McNeill

One question, four expert witnesses and an answer.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Is Vaping Safe?20191130

After deaths in the US and bans around the world, how risky are e-cigarettes? In some countries, smokeless cigarettes are all the rage. In the UK, doctors say if smokers switch from tobacco to e-cigarettes, it will save lives. But in the US, where the authorities are investigating an outbreak of lung injury linked to vaping, they’re advising vapers to consider stopping. In India, Mexico and dozens of other countries, vaping is banned altogether. It’s a confused international picture.

Vaping is still relatively new and scientists are still researching how harmful it may be in the long-term. What we do know is that every year, eight million people die worldwide as a consequence of smoking tobacco. What are the potential health risks associated with vaping? We’ll find out from our expert witnesses, who include a neuroscientist, a pulmonary critical care doctor and a professor of nicotine and tobacco studies.

(A young woman smoking an electronic cigarette at the vape shop. Credit: Getty images)

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Should We Ban Billionaires?20191214

Excluding dictators and royalty, there are around 2,000 people in the world who are billionaires. Some inherit wealth while others might build fortunes through inventions, businesses or investments. Some say individuals holding onto extreme amounts of money is wasteful because it could be diverted to other areas that would benefit more people such as education and healthcare. Others reason than some billionaires should keep what they have because they drive economic growth and inspire others to innovate. Are billionaires the right focus or should attention move to the systems and processes that enable them to make and keep huge amounts of money?

Contributors:
Dr Paul Segal, Senior Lecturer in Economics, King’s College London
Roxanne Roberts, Reporter, Washington Post
Caroline Freund, Global Director of Trade, Investment and Competitiveness, the World Bank
Will Wilkinson, Vice President for research at the Niskanen Center

Presenter: Celia Hatton
Producer: Charmaine Cozier

It is time to curb extreme wealth?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Should We Rethink The Ban On Child Labour?20190504

Most countries in the world have signed up to the idea that no child should work at all under a certain age – but is this the best approach? This week Nicolle, a 17 year old from Peru, has been part of a delegation of child labourers visiting the UN to ask them to rethink their ban on child labour. She’s been working since she was 8 years old, and says not only did her family need the money she earned, but working brought her status and respect. Some charities and experts working with child labourers agree that there are safe forms of child work. They say non-hazardous work can allow children to help their families, gain life skills, and even pay for the school uniforms and equipment they need to stay in education. But the UN and other former child labourers disagree, saying an outright ban is the only way to protect children from exploitation. We ask whether it’s time to rethink the ban on child labour.

Contributors include:

Benjamin Smith – Senior Officer for Child Labour, International Labour Organization
Jo Boyden – Professor of International Development, Oxford University
Zulema Lopez – former child labourer
Kavita Ratna - Director of Advocacy and Fundraising, Concerned for Working Children

Presenter: Helena Merriman
Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

This edition of The Inquiry was first broadcast in October 2018 on the BBC World Service.

Most countries have pledged to ban child labour \u2013 but is this the best approach?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

What's Next For Sudan?2019051320190518 (R4)

Is the country heading towards democracy or another autocratic regime?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Why Are We Having Less Sex?20190831

Porn, smart phones and the ‘slutty transmitter’. Adults in the US have sex on average about 50 times a year, which has dropped by 20 per cent over the last two decades. It’s a similar story in the UK, Australia, Germany, Finland and Japan. Could it be down to porn or our smart phones? Or is it actually down to something much harder to switch off? Some of the answers might surprise you.

Porn, smart phones and the \u2018slutty transmitter'.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Why Does Donald Trump Lie So Much?20190831

Fact-checkers say the President of the United States has made more than 10,000 false or misleading statements since coming to office. Whether it’s the size of the crowd at his inauguration, the pay rise offered to the military or where his father was born, Donald Trump often says things that are untrue. And he doesn’t rush to correct them, even when they’re outright fabrications. Ruth Alexander examines Donald Trump’s long record of falsehoods, which stretch back even to his schooldays. And she explores his motives, both political and psychological.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Sally Abrahams

Examining some of the many false or misleading claims made by the US president

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Why Does Donald Trump Seem To Have Such A Problem With The Truth?20190907

Fact-checkers say the President of the United States has made more than 10,000 false or misleading statements since coming to office. Whether it’s the size of the crowd at his inauguration, the pay rise offered to the military or where his father was born, Donald Trump often says things that are untrue. And he doesn’t rush to correct them, even when they’re outright fabrications. Ruth Alexander examines Donald Trump’s long record of falsehoods, which stretch back even to his schooldays. And she explores his motives, both political and psychological.

Examining some of the many false or misleading claims made by the US president.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Why Does Ukraine Have Such A Corruption Problem?20200118

On 25 July 2019, the President of the United States made a phone call to the recently-elected President of Ukraine - congratulating him on his party’s election victory. What Donald Trump said in that call to Volodymyr Zelensky has ended up threatening his own presidency, triggering the impeachment of the president. Donald Trump says his interest was in rooting out corruption. Meanwhile Joe Biden’s role in Ukraine was to do the same - root out corruption. The Inquiry asks why Ukraine has such a corruption problem. Presented by Tanya Beckett.

How has Ukraine's chequered past lead to the impeachment of president Trump?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Why Has The Crisis In Kashmir Lasted So Long?20190427

In February a bomb blast killed at least 40 Indian paramilitary police officers in Kashmir; the worst attack by Pakistani militants in years. Indian military jets were deployed and one was shot down. As concerns over the pilot’s fate grew, fears mounted that India and Pakistan might go to war over Kashmir – again. The countries have been at war four times since partition in 1947. And Kashmir, which both countries claim in entirety but each one controls only in part, has been a key factor in the conflicts. But even when there is no war, there is no stable peace in Kashmir. Violent protests and street fighting are commonplace and daily life is made hard in numerous other ways. Unemployment is high, communication blackouts frequent and security fears constant. The Inquiry explores why the crisis has been so difficult to solve and what it might take for a resolution to emerge.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Rosamund Jones

For 70 years India and Pakistan have fought over Kashmir. What has fuelled the violence?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Why Is There A Backlash Against Climate Policies?20191207

A year ago more than a quarter of a million people took to the streets across France, in what became known as the “gilets jaunes” protests. They began as a reaction to an increase in fuel tax - a tax which was supposed to help the environment, but which the protesters said meant they could no longer afford to drive their cars or get to work.

These were the first high profile demonstrations against policies designed to tackle climate change, but they put a spotlight on a sense of unrest that has spread far beyond France.

So if it is widely accepted that climate change is a real threat, why is there a backlash against climate policies?

Contributors include:

Jacline Mouraud - Original member of the “gilets jaunes”
Matias Turkkila - Editor of the Finns Party
Carol Linnitt - Co-founder of The Narwhal
Simone Tagliapietra - Research Fellow at Bruegel think tank

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Producers: Beth Sagar-Fenton & Josephine Casserly

A year on from the 'gilets jaunes' protests, are environmental policies in trouble?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Why The Race To Build A Quantum Computer?20190914

Quantum computers could transform our lives. Based on a branch of Physics that even Einstein found "spooky", the machines are still in their infancy. But governments and corporations are spending billions trying to turn them into workable technology. Neal Razzell finds out why by talking to four experts:
* Shohini Ghose, Professor of Physics and Computer Science at Wilfred Laurier University in Canada
* Stephanie Wehner, Professor in Quantum Information at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands
* Winifried Hensinger, Professor or Quantum Technologies at the University of Sussex
* Jonathan Dowling, Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Louisiana and author of 'Quantum Technology - The Second Quantum Revolution' and 'Schrödinger's Killer App - Race to Build the World's First Quantum Computer'.

Why governments and corporations are racing to build the first workable quantum computer.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Quantum computers could transform our lives. Based on a branch of Physics that even Einstein found "spooky", the machines are still in their infancy. But governments and corporations are spending billions trying to turn them into workable technology. Neal Razzell finds out why by talking to four experts:
* Shohini Ghose, Professor of Physics and Computer Science at Wilfred Laurier University in Canada
* Stephanie Wehner, Professor in Quantum Information at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands
* Winifried Hensinger, Professor or Quantum Technologies at the University of Sussex
* Jonathan Dowling, Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Louisiana and author of 'Quantum Technology - The Second Quantum Revolution' and 'Schrödinger's Killer App - Race to Build the World's First Quantum Computer'.

Why governments and corporations are racing to build the first workable quantum computer.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Will China Crack Down On Hong Kong?2019080520190810 (R4)

Last month Hong Kong witnessed its largest ever protests, the most violent in decades. A proposed law to allow extradition of criminals to mainland China caused uproar. This bill exposed the cracks in relations between Hong Kong and the Beijing government. The current ‘one country, two systems’ arrangement gives the region some autonomy from Beijing. Pro-democracy protesters worry that this is being eroded as the Communist party is trying to bring it further under its influence. Complicating matters is Hong Kong’s significant but shrinking economic importance to China.

With this year being the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen square massacre the international community is nervously watching to see how modern China will respond to the civil disobedience on such a large scale.

In June Hong Kong witnessed its largest ever protests. How will China respond?

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

This summer Hong Kong has witnessed its largest ever protests, the most violent in decades. A proposed law to allow extradition of criminals to mainland China caused uproar. This bill exposed the cracks in relations between Hong Kong and the Beijing government. The current ‘one country, two systems’ arrangement gives the region some autonomy from Beijing. Pro-democracy protesters worry that this is being eroded as the Communist party is trying to bring it further under its influence. Complicating matters is Hong Kong’s significant but shrinking economic importance to China.

With this year being the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen square massacre the international community is nervously watching to see how modern China will respond to the civil disobedience on such a large scale.

This summer Hong Kong has witnessed its largest ever protests. How will China respond?