Episodes

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2020081120200812 (R4)A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

2020102020201021 (R4)Covid-19 damages the lungs, leaving people struggling to get enough oxygen into their body. In the early stages of the pandemic many patients needed a lot of support in intensive care - including artificial ventilation. But there are other ways of boosting oxygen levels in the body - which are being studied in the Recovery-RS trial. Professor Gavin Perkins from the University of Warwick is comparing oxygen delivered by a mask called CPAP with both regular and high-flow oxygen to see which works best.

Physiotherapy is one of the hands-on therapies which has been disrupted by the lockdown. Patients who need to do bespoke exercises following a fall or a heart attack might have been offered online sessions instead. But Manchester University researcher Dr Helen Hawley-Hague says these don't suit everyone - including people who don't have access to the internet or a smartphone. We hear from Jennifer and George - both of them have taken part in Helen's studies and have accessed physiotherapy either face-to-face or via a phone app.

An Inside Health listener wanted to know if live vaccines like the polio vaccine could protect us against Covid. Oxford University's Andy Pollard explains about the theory behind this idea and how it might help.

Dr Margaret McCartney looks at whether it makes a difference if you do a Covid throat and nose yourself - or if it's carried out by a healthcare professional.

What's the best way to boost oxygen levels in Covid-19 patients?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Covid-19 damages the lungs, leaving people struggling to get enough oxygen into their body. In the early stages of the pandemic many patients needed a lot of support in intensive care - including artificial ventilation. But there are other ways of boosting oxygen levels in the body - which are being studied in the Recovery-RS trial. Professor Gavin Perkins from the University of Warwick is comparing oxygen delivered by a mask called CPAP with both regular and high-flow oxygen to see which works best.

Physiotherapy is one of the hands-on therapies which has been disrupted by the lockdown. Patients who need to do bespoke exercises following a fall or a heart attack might have been offered online sessions instead. But Manchester University researcher Dr Helen Hawley-Hague says these don't suit everyone - including people who don't have access to the internet or a smartphone. We hear from Jennifer and George - both of them have taken part in Helen's studies and have accessed physiotherapy either face-to-face or via a phone app.

An Inside Health listener wanted to know if live vaccines like the polio vaccine could protect us against Covid. Oxford University's Andy Pollard explains about the theory behind this idea and how it might help.

Dr Margaret McCartney looks at whether it makes a difference if you do a Covid throat and nose yourself - or if it's carried out by a healthcare professional.

What's the best way to boost oxygen levels in Covid-19 patients?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

2020102720201028 (R4)A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Acid Attacks And Corneal Grafts, Bowel Cancer Screening, Sports Prosthesis For Children2018032720180328 (R4)The UK has one of the highest recorded rates of acid attacks in the world, nearly 500 cases in 2016. Most of the victims are men and most have corrosive liquid, typically acid or bleach, squirted into their faces while they are being mugged for their phone, bag or car. Andrew Keene was attacked in London last year while he sat in his car, and blinded by a robber who then drove off in his car. He's had five operations, including two corneal grafts, to try to restore the sight in his right eye. Dr Mark Porter talks to Andrew at Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, where sight-saving eye surgery was pioneered over sixty years ago. This hospital set up the UK's first Eye Bank for donor eyes and it is from these donations that eyes, damaged like Andrew's, are repaired using grafts. Mark hears about the shortage of donated corneas which mean long waiting lists for eye surgery and Eye Bank head Dr Nigel Jordan tells him they're having to import donor eyes from the USA to meet demand.

BBC News anchor George Alagiah has gone public with the news that his bowel cancer has come back three years after it was diagnosed at an advanced stage. He has questioned why screening starts at different ages in different parts of the UK. If he lived in Scotland where the bowel cancer screening programme starts at 50, up to 10 years before the rest of the country, he would have been screened earlier and his cancer might have been picked up earlier, making it easier to treat. Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney discusses the complexities involved in rolling out national screening programmes and tells Mark why there's a difference in Scotland and the rest of the UK about the starting age for bowel screening.

Until a couple of years ago, children who were born without a limb, or those who lost a limb after illness or injury, could get a traditional prosthesis, or artificial limb fitted, but it was a limb of the most basic kind which would enable them to walk, but not to run or do sports. But thanks to money released into a special fund by the Department of Health in England, for the last 18 months these children have been fitted with the high-tech futuristic-looking prostheses - racing blades - that allow them to run, jump and compete in all sorts of activities and sports. Mark visits a paediatric rehabilitation clinic at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore and meets the children who are benefiting from these new activity blades.

Dr Mark Porter talks to Andrew who was blinded by a robber in an acid attack.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Addiction Services; Schizophrenia; Hearts And Cancer20170919Inside Health reveals the poor state of addiction services in England.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Ageing Brain, Fish Oils, Adaptive Trials, Yoga2018032020180321 (R4)Deciding between healthy ageing and early dementia; how useful are modern imaging techniques in deciphering this difficult question that many families are grappling with. Margaret McCartney tries to make sense of conflicting research on the impact of fish oils on children's reading ability and memory - how can the same research group, in the same university run two trials and get completely opposite results? And recently Baroness Tessa Jowell called for more access to adaptive trials but what does this type of research actually mean for patients taking part? Plus the evidence for the health benefits of yoga.

Deciding between healthy ageing and early dementia, fish oils, adaptive trials and yoga.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Air Pollution; Infectious Disease And Healthcare Staff; Hymenoplasty2020021820200219 (R4)Evidence is building about the impact of air pollution on health, but the relationship between the cocktail of chemicals, gases and particles in the air we breathe and the direct effect on an individual's health is a tricky one to prove. Dr Farrah Jarral cycles to Kings College London to hear about a new study by researcher in respiratory toxicology, Dr Ian Mudway, which revealed, to the surprise of Ian and his colleagues, that particles from brake dust had the same damaging impact on our lung immune system as that familiar culprit, diesel exhaust. It's a result that demonstrates that the toxic risk to our health doesn't just come out of the exhaust pipe and suggests the concept of a zero emissions vehicle might need further work.

COPD or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is an umbrella term for a range of respiratory conditions that used to be known by names like emphysema or chronic bronchitis. COPD flare ups or exacerbations are the second largest cause of emergency hospital admissions in the UK. Dr Jennifer Quint, consultant physician in respiratory medicine at the Royal Brompton Hospital tells Dr Farrah Jarral about a world-first study where the individual air pollution exposure of COPD patients was tracked in real time to find out how toxic air can make their condition worse.

What's it like for healthcare professionals working on the front line of infectious disease outbreaks? Dr Michael Kiuber, a consultant in emergency medicine at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, volunteered to treat patients with the deadly infection, Ebola, in Sierra Leone and he describes the challenges to Farrah of caring for very sick adults and children while taking every safety step to avoid contracting the Ebola virus himself. And Inside Health regular contributor, Dr Margaret McCartney outlines the challenges for the NHS in planning how to protect staff as the UK grapples with the global outbreak of Covid-19.

There's a growing trade in female cosmetic genital surgery including hymenoplasty, which claims to the restore the hymen to its virginal state. Scores of private clinics in the UK are offering the procedure with advertising claims like "Get your virginity back!" and "Restore your innocence within one hour!". Dr Leila Frodsham, consultant gynaecologist, specialist in psychosexual medicine and spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists discusses the ethics of the procedure.

Producer: Fiona Hill

Keen cyclist and GP, Dr Farrah Jarral investigates the health effects of air pollution.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Farrah Jarral demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Alzheimer's And Parkinson's Research, Hpv Vaccine, Brca Genes2018011620180117 (R4)News that the pharmaceutical giant Pfizer has pulled out of research into Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease is casting doubt over the future of long promised breakthroughs in this area. Mark Porter hears from two leading experts who explain that due to the complexity of the disease the pharmaceutical industry's single agent 'magic bullet' approach needs to change. And while over the last 15 years nearly every trial into new treatments for Alzheimer's has ended in failure, lifestyle and medical prevention are starting to make a difference.

Plus clarity on headlines that women who've had the HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer will need far fewer smear tests in future. But how will the national screening programme know for sure who has been vaccinated - and who hasn't? And Margaret McCartney's thoughts on other news that women treated for breast cancer who carry the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations that dramatically increase the risk of developing the disease, are just as likely to survive their illness as women who don't.

Alzheimer's and Parkinson's research, HPV vaccine, BRCA genes and breast cancer survival.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Antibiotics, Lung Cancer, Dying Of A Broken Heart, Gender Bias2017080120170802 (R4)Margaret McCartney unpicks recent headlines suggesting its okay not to finish antibiotics.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Antibiotics, Statins And Pneumonia, Neurosurgery For Epilepsy2017102420171025 (R4)Antibiotic apocalypse, statins and treating pneumonia, and neurosurgery for epilepsy.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Antibodies To Covid In Kids, Covid And Colds, Pims-ts2020092920200930 (R4)The story of one child's recovery from PIMS-TS, the rare new condition that caught doctors by surprise in April. James Gallagher visits specialists at the Evelina London Children's Hospital to hear how they coped with identifying and treating a condition they'd never seen before. Dr Jenni Handforth and Dr Sara Hanna explain how 'they had to reinvent and tweak the rule book' to manage PIMS-TS, where 'the immune system has gone a bit crazy' and treatments worked 'like a fire blanket to dampen down the immune system'. And scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered that children can have Coronavirus-fighting antibodies from before the pandemic started. Dr George Kassiotis explains how kids could have them and what this might mean. And Dr Margaret McCartney unpicks the tricky issue of spotting Covid and cold symptoms in children.

Antibodies to Covid found in kids before the pandemic; Covid and colds, PIMS-TS.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Antidepressant Withdrawal; Chemotherapy Backpacks; Dizziness; Over The Counter Gels For Pain Relief2019102220191023 (R4)Antidepressants and revised guidance from NICE reflecting that, for some people, they can be difficult drugs to come off; Margaret McCartney explains why this initiative is long over due. Chemotherapy backpacks - a novel way of giving cancer therapy that allows people to stay at home, improves quality of life during treatment and takes pressure off the NHS. Plus dizziness - or vertigo - is a common problem but it can mean different things to different people and occasionally can be a sign of stroke; so what are the clues? And our insider's guide to over the counter treatment: this week anti-inflammatory gels for pain relief.

Antidepressant withdrawal; chemotherapy backpacks; dizziness; gels for pain relief

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Anti-inflammatories And Ovulation; Probiotics And Parkinson's; Blood Interval And Patient Forums Online2019072320190724 (R4)Dr Mark Porter finds out why non-steroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers can affect female fertility by preventing ovulation. Prof Richard Anderson from Edinburgh explains. And the link between gut bacteria and Parkinson's disease and why a new trial that is finding out if a particular probiotic can improve symptoms of the disease. Prof Ray Chaudhuri from King's College London explains. Also the latest evidence on the optimum intervals between blood donations and in the latest look at health and the internet Dr Margaret McCartney and Carl Heneghan unpick the pros and cons of patient groups and online forums

Anti-inflammatories & ovulation; probiotics and Parkinson's; giving blood; patient forums

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Aspirin, Stroke, Best Interests, Lasting Power Of Attorney, Bawa Garba2018073120180801 (R4)If you are taking low dose aspirin - typically 75 mg day - to protect against heart attack or stroke and you haven't been weighed then there is a good chance you are on the wrong dose. And from prevention to treatment; a new way of managing the most common form of stroke by grabbing the blockage in the brain and pulling it out. Charlotte Smith tells her story of a remarkable recovery from the procedure whilst she was pregnant with her second child. Plus a continuation of our guide to the help available when people lose the capacity to make decisions about their care. This week Mark Porter explains Best Interest Decisions and Lasting Power of Attorney. And GP Dr Margaret McCartney reflects on the Hadiza Bawa Garba case.

A baby aspirin for heart attack or stroke, best interests and lasting powers of attorney.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Asthma, Visual Snow, Confounding Factors20160315Why is asthma overdiagnosed and undertreated? Plus visual snow and confounding factors.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Bats And Rabies; Hip Dysplasia In Babies; Online Health Tips; Clinical Law2019073020190731 (R4)What is the risk of catching rabies from bats in the UK? We answer this question prompted by a case at Mark Porter's surgery last week when a bat flew straight into a person in broad daylight. Hip dysplasia in babies is a condition where the ball and socket of the joint don't form properly in early life. Every baby is examined as part of the National Screening Programme but new research suggests hundreds are being missed. Plus tips from Margaret McCartney and Carl Heneghan on finding reliable health information online. And what is clinical law?

Bats and the risk of rabies; hip dysplasia in babies; online health tips; clinical law.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Bedside Covid Test; Longterm Covid Recovery2020080420200805 (R4)Dr Mark Porter on a new bedside test that differentiates between Covid-19 and other infectious diseases including flu in under an hour. Mark meets Dr Tristan Clark who has already been using the test as part of a trial. And the world's largest study into 'Long Covid' recruiting 10.000 people from 50 different hospitals across the UK who've been hospitalised for Covid to assess their long term recovery. Lead author Professor Chris Brightling discusses the long term symptoms seen in many people recovering from the virus and how research can answer difficult questions such as how long will these continue and what's the best way to help people. And Mark hears from Roz, still recovering from Covid after being admitted to intensive care on May 26th and from physiotherapists Matt and Gemma about how early and long term rehab can help. Plus Professor Sally Singh on the new NHS online rehab service 'Your Covid Recovery'.

Dr Mark Porter on a bedside test for Covid-19 and long term recovery from the virus.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Big Baby Birth Trial, Uveitis, Telephone Triage, Burns2017100320171004 (R4)The Bristol team behind a pioneering way to protect the vision of children with arthritis.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Biosimilars, Insomnia, Abortion At Home2018071020180711 (R4)Copycat biologic drugs, to treat conditions from arthritis and psoriasis to breast cancer and lymphoma, could save hundreds of millions of pounds off the NHS drugs bill. Called biosimilars, these close copies give the same clinical benefit at a fraction of the cost. Up to now the problem has been take-up, but a new initiative led by the specialist UK cancer centre, London's Royal Marsden, run across the NHS Cancer Vanguard, has demonstrated that patients can be switched effectively onto the cheaper drugs. Chief pharmacist at the Royal Marsden, Dr Jatinder Harchowal, who led the national staff education programme, tells Mark that getting clinicians and patients on board was key to achieving an 80% take up for the blood cancer biosimilar, rituximab. This month a biosimilar copy of the breast and stomach cancer drug, Herceptin (generic name trastuzumab) is being introduced to patients too.

Imogen had sleep problems for almost 30 years and she admits that at times, her insomnia left her in a desperate state. For years she took sleeping tablets but she ended up increasing the dosage, to no effect. Eventually she found help at Queen Victoria Hospital's Sleep Disorder Clinic in East Grinstead. Mark visits the clinic and finds out from its Clinical Director Dr Peter Venn that sleeping tablets aren't the answer to insomnia and cognitive behaviour therapy, which Imogen used, is the best treatment.

Scotland has led the UK nations in allowing early medical abortion at home. Wales in the past 10 days has followed their lead. So where does this leave England? Dr Margaret McCartney reports from Glasgow about the choice now available for Scottish women who opt for a medical termination. Since last autumn the second pill that induces the breakdown of the womb lining can be taken at home, a practice that already happens in Scandinavia and parts of the USA. Dr Audrey Brown, a consultant in sexual and reproductive healthcare, tells Margaret that the impetus for the change in practice in Scotland came directly from women who didn't want to make the second clinic visit for the second set of drugs and risk cramping and bleeding on the way home. A woman who has opted for early medical abortion at home in Scotland shares her experience with Inside Health.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Bad sleep breeds bad sleep. Dr Mark Porter reports on what works for insomnia.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Bisphosphonates, Ibs And Diet, Crp Test For Infection, Randomisation2017031420170315 (R4)Bisphosphonates, IBS and diet, CRP test for infection, and randomisation.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Blood Clots, Iron Supplements, Doctor's Bag2018013020180131 (R4)Over half of all blood clots are acquired during hospitalisation, particularly for surgery, so prevention is key. Deep vein thromboses - DVTs - typically occur in the veins of the leg and central to prevention is the need to assess individual risk, while taking steps like special stockings, leg massagers and anticoagulant "blood thinning" drugs to mitigate them. But there are concerns in some quarters - particularly among orthopaedic surgeons - that the drive to protect patients against clots has exposed them to risks of bleeding and that the pendulum has swung too far the other way. Three leading specialists discuss the issues. And iron deficiency, a very common problem, but what is the best way to treat it? New research from Switzerland unexpectedly suggests that giving less iron, less frequently, leads to more absorption. Plus, what's in a doctor's bag?

Blood clots acquired in hospital. Taking iron supplements. Plus what is in a doctor's bag?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Blood Pressure Pills And Cancer, Aortic Aneurysm Repair, Sinks And Hospital Infection2018103020181031 (R4)Clarity behind recent headlines linking cancer to pills for high blood pressure; Margaret McCartney unpicks the numbers. And the aorta is the largest artery in the body so should it burst due to an abdominal aortic aneurysm, results can be catastrophic. Now Surgeons are concerned that restricting the use of the latest keyhole techniques to repair aneurysms would be a backward step and harm patients. Plus how sinks could be causing hospital infections.

Blood pressure pills and cancer, aortic aneurysm repair, sinks and hospital infection

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Blood Pressure, Palm Oil2016020220160203 (R4)How low should you go when treating blood pressure? And why is palm oil in so many foods?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Braintraining And Dementia; Cluster Headaches; Cancer Rehab; #hellomynameis2016072620160727 (R4)Dr Mark Porter investigates whether brain training can cut cases of dementia by a third.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Breast Cancer, Alcoholism, Crps, Generics2016092720160928 (R4)Breast cancer and bisphosphonates, alcoholism and Baclofen, CRPS, generics.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Breast Density; Health Education; Switching Outcomes2017080820170809 (R4)Breast density; health education; switching outcomes in clinical trials.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Cardiac Rehab, Withdrawing From Antidepressants, Middle Ear Implant2018031320180314 (R4)There are many myths about recovery from a heart attack. The most dangerous is that exercise is too risky. The truth is that for most people, they should be doing much more exercise, not less. Patrick Doherty, Professor of Cardiovascular Health at York University and lead author for the National Audit of Cardiac Rehab tells Dr Mark Porter that 70,000 people who should be accessing life saving cardiac rehabilitation therapy are missing out. The answer? Don't blame the patients but improve the design of rehab packages, he says. Inside Health visits a rehab session at Charing Cross Hospital in London and hears from cardiac patients about the impact of supported exercise programmes on their health.

A group of psychiatrists, psychologists and patients have complained to the Royal College of Psychiatrists about the withdrawal effects of antidepressants. They say claims that side effects are resolved, for the majority of patients, within a few weeks of stopping treatment are false and in fact, many people suffer unpleasant, frightening symptoms for much longer. Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney looks at the evidence.

We're all familiar with hearing aids, amplifiers which boost volume in a failing ear. And you might have heard of cochlear implants which, in people too deaf for aids, can be used to send signals directly to the inner part of the ear, and on to the brain. But in the future we're likely to hear more about middle ear implants, devices implanted because the outer ear hasn't developed properly. ENT surgeons at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital in London, Professor Dan Jiang and Harry Powell, have performed a middle ear implant on the UK's youngest ever patient, Charlotte Wright was just three years old when she had this pioneering treatment.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Dr Mark Porter busts some of the myths surrounding recovery from a heart attack.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Care.data, Asthma, Acne Rosacea, Pacemakers2016071220160713 (R4)Dr Mark Porter looks at care.data, asthma, acne rosacea and pacemakers.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Cbd Oil, Dental Phobia, Gout2019031220190313 (R4)Cannabidiol or CBD oil has had a recent surge in popularity but is there any evidence for it having any health benefits? Dr Margaret McCartney reviews the research. Mark visits the Dental psychology service at Guy's Hospital in London and talks to Tim Newton about dental phobia, the treatment available and how successful it is at treating a phobia which affects 1 in 10 people in the UK. Also what causes gout and why has advice changed on the best way to treat it? Mark talks to rheumatologist, Dr Tim Tait at United Lincolnshire hospitals.

Dr Mark Porter investigates CBD oil, visits a dental phobia clinic and talks gout.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Charles Bonnet Syndrome, Co-proxamol, Meningitis B Vaccine, Smart Tablets2016022320160224 (R4)Patient power and the parental clamour for more children to get the meningitis B vaccine.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Chicken Pox In Pregnancy, Club Foot, Test For Conn's Syndrome, Teeth Brushing2016020920160210 (R4)Dr Mark Porter talks about chicken pox in pregnancy.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Cholesterol-lowering Drug, Defibrillators, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder And Heart Disease, Lack Of Drugs In Pregnancy2017032120170322 (R4)Cholesterol-lowering drug; defibrillators; PTSD and heart disease; lack of pregnancy drugs

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Cigarette Filters; Sepsis2020022520200226 (R4)Chris van Tulleken examines cigarette filters - the tobacco industry's hidden marketing tool. He talks to historian Robert Proctor, author of The Golden Holocaust and May van Schalkwyk explains why she wrote her paper 'No More Butts'. Plus Margaret McCartney discusses whether the media portrays a balanced view of Sepsis.

Chris van Tulleken examines cigarette filters and how the media report sepsis.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Chris van Tulleken demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Conflict Of Interest, Living With A Stoma, Diet Books2019012220190123 (R4)Concerns about conflict of Interest and reputational damage. Should policy making organisations in the public health arena form partnerships with charities funded by industry? And living with a Stoma. Mark goes to Addenbrookes hospital in Cambridge to meet Michael, who explains what life is like after having his large colon removed. 1 in 500 people in the UK - children and adults - live with some form of bowel stoma, where part of their gut has been brought out through their abdominal wall to empty into a bag. But how does it all work, and what it’s like living with one? Plus Margaret McCartney on diet books and why they are rarely discussed on Inside Health.

Should policy-making organisations in public health partner charities funded by industry?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter goes on a weekly quest to demystify the health issues that perplex us.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Coronavirus Special2020031020200311 (R4)Inside Health gets exclusive access into Ysbyty Gwynedd, the Bangor emergency department, to see how they are preparing staff to deal with coronavirus patients arriving at the front door. Although advice is for patients to stay at home and call 111, some will be sick enough to need hospital admission. For that outcome, staff need to be properly fitted for face masks and trained in putting on personal protection equipment or PPE. Saleyha works in the department and Inside Health follows her getting kitted out with the help of Tim Hamilton Jones, an ED staff nurse tasked with the job of getting everyone ‘fit tested’.

GP Dr Margaret McCartney talks about the evidence on face masks and the different types that are out there and gives the latest information on the incubation period for COVID19.

It’s estimated that 80% of cases will be able to recover at home but 20% may need hospital care. Reports coming from Italy describe the demand on intensive care beds for patients with coronavirus because of the disease’s potential impact on the lungs. Dr Alison Pittard, Dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care and herself a practising ITU consultant in Leeds tells Inside Health about plans for increasing critical care bed capacity, in the NHS. The service is however already stretched before the disease has even taken hold here.

As the government works out a plan of action to support the NHS to cope at this time, Inside Health talks to the British Red Cross, already working in hospitals across Wales, about supporting staff during the normal pressures, even before coronavirus struck. We hear from support workers within the Emergency Department and get an insight into what they do.

Producer, Erika Wright

Saleyha Ahsan reports from her own emergency department about preparations for Coronavirus

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Inside Health demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Coronavirus Transmission; Breakfast; Women And Heart Attacks; Personal Digital Assistants2020021120200212 (R4)Farrah Jarral on coronavirus transmission and the difference between a cough and a sneeze. Why is health research and media coverage about breakfast often contradictory? Farrah meets senior lecturer Javier Gonzalez and Professor James Betts from the Department for Health at the University of Bath. And Margaret McCartney discusses the complex issue of inequalities between men and women when diagnosing heart attacks. Plus Farrah talks to Dr Ruth Chambers, clinical lead for a project in Stoke on Trent that assesses the benefits of personal digital assistants in the home.

Coronavirus; Breakfast; Women and Heart Attacks; Personal digital assistants.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Farrah Jarral demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Coronavirus; Probiotics And Babies' Gut Health; Pill Organisers; Haemophilia Therapy2020012820200129 (R4)James Gallagher, BBC health and science correspondent, and Dr Margaret McCartney talk about the new coronavirus and how GPs have been advised to manage a patient at risk. He meets listeners Rich and Lucy who have asked about probiotics and gut health in early life after one of their twins had a vaginal delivery while the other a C-section. They want to know whether the different types of birth might impact on the good bacteria passed from mother to child. What is the evidence for the potential impact on long term health and can probiotics help? Dr Trevor Lawley at the Sanger Centre and Dr Lindsay Hall of the Quadram Institute provide the answers. Debi Bhattacharya of the University of East Anglia and James discuss pill organisers and whether arranging medicines into one single packet is always a good idea. And Prof John Pasi explains the results of trials on a 'Holy Grail' treatment for Haemophilia A and Shaun, who took part in the trial at Guy's and St Thomas in London, reveals how it has changed his life.

Coronavirus; Probiotics and gut health in early life; Pill Organisers; Haemophilia therapy

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

James Gallagher, BBC health and science correspondent, and Dr Margaret McCartney talk about the new coronavirus and how GPs have been advised to manage a patient at risk. He meets listeners Rich and Lucy who have asked about probiotics and gut health in early life after one of their twins had a vaginal delivery while the other a C-section. They want to know whether the different types of birth might impact on the good bacteria passed from mother to child. What is the evidence for the potential impact on long term health and can probiotics help? Dr Trevor Lawley at the Sanger Centre and Dr Lindsay Hall of the Quadram Institute provide the answers. Debi Bhattacharya of the University of East Anglia and James discuss pill organisers and whether arranging medicines into one single packet is always a good idea. And Prof John Pasi at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry explains the results of trials on a life changing treatment for Haemophilia A.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Covid-19 And Ethnicity In Medicine; Medical Devices Safety Review2020071420200715 (R4)One of the most striking features of the coronavirus pandemic is the disproportionate toll it’s taken on some groups in society. Research by the Office for National Statistics shows black people are nearly twice as likely to have died from coronavirus than white people. And you see a similar pattern of elevated risk in other ethnicities too. Why is this? And to what extent is Covid 19 shedding light on approaches being taken in medicine more generally when assessing and treating people from Black, Asian and Minority ethnic groups?

We hear from GP Dr Navjoyt Ladher who’s been navigating the language of race for the British Medical Journal; Dr Rohin Francis, cardiologist and host of the Medlife Crisis podcast, and Prof Kamlish Khunti who’s establishing a detailed Covid risk score to establish exactly who’s at most risk of infection.

A major review has found women’s lives have been ruined and babies have been harmed in the womb and yet concerns were dismissed for years as simply “women’s problems”. Those are the findings of the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review. It looked at the hormonal pregnancy test Primodos, the epilepsy drug sodium valproate and vaginal mesh implants which are used to treat prolapse and incontinence. Inside Health’s resident GP Margaret McCartney. discusses what needs to change.

Presenter: James Gallagher
Producer: Adrian Washbourne

Covid-19 and ethnicity in medicine and medical devices safety review.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Covid-19 And The Impact On Uk Cancer Services2020070720200708 (R4)Coronavirus has turned the NHS upside down and inside out and by re-organising to treat people with the virus, other potentially fatal diseases like cancer have taken a backseat. At University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, which Inside Health visited weekly as the pandemic unfolded, cancer diagnoses fell by half in March and April and of the 50% who were asked to come in for follow up, only 25% actually did. The virus was more frightening than a potential cancer diagnosis. Divisional Director for Medicine at Southampton, Dr Trevor Smith, tells James Gallagher, the BBC's health and science correspondent. that patients are coming back, but it will take a long time to tackle the backlog.

For those with cancer caught up in the pandemic, they have experienced disruption, cancellations, altered treatments and they have had to cope with consultations and even surgery by themselves, without loved ones to support them. Charly from Wiltshire was diagnosed with breast cancer in February and her treatment was changed as lockdown happened. Instead of chemotherapy then surgery, she had surgery first. And a mastectomy instead of a lumpectomy. But despite the disruption to her care, she still considers herself one of the lucky ones because she did get treatment.

Others weren't so lucky and across the country, lives have been lost. The focus now is on Covid-proofing cancer care and tackling the backlog in screening, diagnosis and treatment. And it's an enormous backlog.

Professor Charlie Swanton, chief clinician of Cancer Research UK tells James Gallagher, the BBC's health and science correspondent, that 2.7 million people have missed out on cervical, breast and colorectal screening and 300,000 fewer people than normal have been referred under the urgent 2 week cancer pathway. The creation of Covid-free cancer hubs, he says, safe zones for cancer treatment, are vital, but it will still take a long time to recover and of course there's the spectre of a second wave of coronavirus which would disrupt services all over again.

Confidence building includes rapid Covid-19 testing for staff and Dr Trevor Smith from Southampton tells James about the saliva test pilot for key workers in the city. The new test just involves putting saliva in a sample pot, much easier than the normal "have you got it" swab test which involves wiping the back of the throat and deep inside the nose. Dr Navjoyt Ladher, GP and Head of Education at the British Medical Journal gives a simple guide to the "have you got it" tests: PCR, antigen and perhaps if the trial is a success, the new saliva test as well as the "have you had it tests"; the antibody tests.

And finally in the week that in England at least, guidance for those who are "clinically vulnerable" and shielding on the advice of the government changes, Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney reviews the new advice for those in all four nations of the UK.

Producer: Fiona Hill

James Gallagher investigates the impact on cancer care of the pandemic

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Covid-19 Intensive Care Beds; Ibuprofen; Laser And Glaucoma; Faecal Incontinence2020031720200318 (R4)The UK has one of the lowest numbers of critical care beds in Europe but as the coronavirus threatens to engulf us, drastic measures are being taken to increase capacity. Dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine, Dr Alison Pittard, tells Saleyha that the NHS has been asked to plan for doubling, trebling and then quadrupling the number of critical care beds. So far, health authorities in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales have identified how they can increase the number of beds from just under 5,000 to around 10,000 but as Nicki Credland, Chair of the British Association of Critical Care Nurses says, increased beds mean more specialist intensive care nurses in numbers that can't be invented overnight. Additional non-specialist staff are being earmarked to help fully qualified intensive care nurses in the current virus crisis.

Dr Margaret McCartney addresses the confusion around two medications: ibuprofen for viral symptoms and the potential risks to Covid-19 patients who are using ACE inhibitors for their high blood pressure or heart failure.

Meanwhile away from coronavirus, Saleyha reports on new advances for the treatment of glaucoma, a condition which involves increased pressure to the eye and damage to the optic nerve. It's usually treated using eye drops, but laser treatment could be coming to a hospital near you. Saleyha watches as Gus Gazzard, Professor of Ophthalmology at University College London, uses a laser to treat the high pressure in Veenay Shah's right eye. Evidence from the LiGHT trial, which showed the laser works for newly diagnosed glaucoma patients, is likely to lead to new NICE guidelines which could give patients the choice: eye drops or laser.

Faecal incontinence is one of the most debilitating conditions and patients can go for years without even seeking help. But at Sandwell General Hospital in West Bromwich, a revolutionary non-surgical approach is transforming lives. Called the FINCH service, Lead Nurse Kelly Stackhouse, colorectal consultant Rajeev Peravali and patients 21-year-old Lara and 74-year-old John, tell Saleyha how the new approach works.

Producer: Fiona Hill

Dr Saleyha Ahsan investigates the struggle to increase capacity in intensive care.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Faecal incontinence is one of the most debilitating conditions and patients can go for years without even seeking help. But at Sandwell General Hospital in West Bromwich, a revolutionary non-surgical approach is transforming lives. Called the FINCH service, Lead Nurse Kelly Stackhouse, colorectal consultant Rajeev Peravali and patients 21 year old Lara and 74 year old John, tell Saleyha how the new approach works.

Inside Health demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Covid-19 Ppe; Secondary Pneumonia; Viral Load; Trauma Care In Fort William2020032420200325 (R4)Margaret McCartney on COVID-19 and how the military has been deployed to get protective equipment supplies to critical care staff. Dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine, Dr Alison Pittard tells of the difficult ethical decisions staff are facing. And Professor Carl Heneghan - suffering from COVID-19 symptoms himself - explains the importance of fast action when treating secondary pneumonia in the elderly; while Deirdre Hollingsworth explains the term "Viral Load". Plus Margaret McCartney visits the famous Belford Hospital in Fort William - specialising in hostile environment trauma - and hears a story of intense mountain rescue.

Margaret McCartney on COVID-19; Pneumonia; Viral Load; Trauma Care in Fort William.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Margaret McCartney demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Covid-19 Test And Trace; Non-drug Trials In A Pandemic2020101320201014 (R4)Margaret McCartney on National Test and Trace and why households are receiving multiple calls. Beth tells of being contacted many times when her child tested positive and began to think all the family had been separately in contact with different cases, until the penny dropped that the calls were all about the same contact - her daughter. Professor Kate Ardern, director of Public Health in Wigan explains why these calls from the national system aren't joined up. And is there time in a pandemic to do trials for non-drug interventions like pub curfews or social distancing? Professor Paul Glaziou explains that there are currently just 8 such trials globally, while Professor Martin McKee highlights the problems involved. And Margaret hears from Professor Atle Fretheim who is trying to set up a trial in Norway into the impact of school closures on infection control.

Covid-19 Test and Trace; Non-drug trials in a pandemic

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Margaret McCartney on National Test and Trace and why households are receiving multiple calls. Beth tells of being contacted many times when her child tested positive and began to think all the family had been separately in contact with different cases, until the penny dropped that the calls were all about the same contact - her daughter. Professor Kate Ardern, director of Public Health in Wigan explains why these calls from the national system aren't joined up. And is there time in a pandemic to do trials for non-drug interventions like pub curfews or social distancing? Professor Paul Glaziou explains that there are currently just 8 such trials globally, while Professor Martin McKee highlights the problems involved. And Margaret hears from Professor Atle Fretheim who is trying to set up a trial in Norway into the impact of school closures on infection control.

Covid-19 Test and Trace; Non-drug trials in a pandemic

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Declining Male Fertility, Diagnosing Urinary Tract Infections In The Elderly, Guide To Health Websites2019071620190717 (R4)Decline in Male Fertility and evidence sperm counts have dropped dramatically over the last 40 years but despite this, research into the understanding of male fertility problems have fallen behind. Two leading specialists in the filed explain the issues. Plus diagnosing Urinary Tract Infections in the Elderly and risks of over treatment leading to antibiotic resistance. And tips from Margaret McCartney and Carl Heneghan on identifying health websites to trust.

Declining male fertility, diagnosing urinary tract infections, and health websites.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dementia Advice, Antidepressants, Transplant Organs, Vaginal Seeding2016030820160309 (R4)Antidepressants - how do you know when you are better and can stop taking them?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Deprescribing2019070220190703 (R4)In a new series of Inside Health Dr Mark Porter explores the growing initiative to 'deprescribe'. The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in prescriptions and over the counter medication use with one third of people aged over 75 taking at least six medicines. Evidence suggests a person taking ten or more medicines is 3 times more likely to be admitted to hospital. Yet this is not just an issue in the elderly. Inside Health visits a children's ward with a new drug optimising service leading the way in appropriate prescribing for kids. Mark Porter investigates why such a huge number of people are on multiple medications and discusses the barriers to change with tips from leading experts trying to achieve a new approach.

In a new series Dr Mark Porter explores the growing trend to 'deprescribe'.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

In a new series of Inside Health Dr Mark Porter explores the growing initiative to 'deprescribe'. The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in prescriptions and over the counter medication use with one third of people aged over 75 taking at least six medicines. Evidence suggests a person taking ten or more medicines is 3 times more likely to be admitted to hospital. Yet this is not just an issue in the elderly. Inside Health visits a children's ward with a new drug optimising service leading the way in appropriate prescribing for kids. Mark Porter investigates why such a huge number of people are on multiple medications and discusses the barriers to change with tips from leading experts trying to achieve a new approach.

In a new series Dr Mark Porter explores the growing trend to 'deprescribe'.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

In a new series of Inside Health Dr Mark Porter explores the growing drive to 'deprescribe'. The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in prescription and over the counter medication use with one third of people aged over 75 taking at least six medicines. Evidence suggests a person taking ten or more medicines is 300% more likely to be admitted to hospital. Yet this is not just an issue in the elderly. Inside Health visits a children's ward with a new drug optimising service leading the way in appropriate prescribing for kids. Mark Porter investigates why such a huge number of people are on multiple medications and discusses the barriers to change with tips from leading experts trying to achieve a new approach.

In a new series Dr Mark Porter explores the growing drive to 'deprescribe'.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Deprescribing Long-term Opioids, Diagnosing Concussion2019030520190306 (R4)Research suggests opioids don't work in long-term chronic pain but dispensing in the UK has risen four-fold since the nineties, and we consume more than any other country in Europe. There is a dearth of good evidence for how best to help people come off these drugs. Mark Porter meets the team trying to change that. And an objective pitch-side test that takes the guesswork out of diagnosing concussion.

Opioids for long-term pain and evidence for deprescribing them. Diagnosing concussion.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Diabetes Tech, Antidepressants, Stem Cell Therapy And Knees2018022720180228 (R4)First urine testing then finger pricking and now high-tech scanning. The monitoring of glucose levels is undergoing a revolution for patients with Type 1 Diabetes. Dr Margaret McCartney reports from Glasgow on the new sensing devices which allow for endless glucose scanning without the need for multiple finger prick blood tests. She talks to parents like Ben, who's paying for a continuous glucose monitor because the fingers of his young son George, were so sore from constant finger prick testing that he couldn't even play with his lego. And to 18 year old Matthew and his mum, Barbara, about the flash glucose monitor which they say has transformed the control and management of his diabetes. Dr Kenneth Robertson, who's led NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde's Children's Diabetes Service for the past 25 years tells Margaret that the new technology is a game changer for diabetes, but urges a cautious, evidence-based roll-out of the best devices.

Many patients, as Margaret hears, are paying for the devices out of their own pockets and the charity UK Diabetes is keeping tabs on which areas of the NHS are funding flash glucose monitors after they came on NHS license four months ago. Policy Manager Nikki Joule tells Mark that they'll lobby hard on behalf of patients denied access to this life-changing technology. Meanwhile Dr Partha Kar, Associate National Clinical Director for Diabetes at NHS England urges clinical commissioning groups to review national guidance and where patients are multiple testing or at risk of the life-threatening high sugar level condition, ketoacidosis, allow access.

Enthusiastic headlines following the recent Lancet study of antidepressants claimed the drugs work, that they're better than placebo and that more should be prescribed. Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney takes a closer look at the large meta-analysis of over 500 clinical trials.

Every year in the UK almost 200,000 hip and knees get replaced, mainly because of osteoarthritis. But if the damaged cartilage could be repaired in younger people, would this prevent arthritis and a replacement joint later in life? Researchers have been using stem cell therapy to re-line damaged joints but it's an expensive and complex process, which up to now has involved two stages, one to harvest the stem cells and another, weeks later, to put the tissue back into the injured joint. But now a team at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital at Stanmore has developed a one stop operation. Stem cells are harvested from the pelvis and then in the same operation, put back into injured knees to "seed" new cartilage. George Bentley, emeritus Professor of Orthopaedics, orthopaedic surgeon James Donaldson and patient, Nick Brown, talk to Inside Health about this pioneering new treatment.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Diabetes glucose monitors, antidepressants, stem cell therapy and knees.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Google; Sexual Orientation And The Nhs; Hypermobility; Surgery For Copd2017101720171018 (R4)Dr Google; GPs told to ask about your sexual orientation; hypermobility; surgery for COPD.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Drug Shortages, Eye Drops For Myopia, Is Muscle More Dense Than Fat? Sarcopenia2019011520190116 (R4)An unprecedented number of medicines are in short supply, according to NHS England. Doctors, pharmacists and patients all over the UK are finding common drugs like naproxen are more difficult to get hold of. Why is there such a problem with supply of medicines that are normally cheap and easy to get hold of? And why a 'severe shortage protocol' due in the next few weeks should give pharmacists more power help ease the situation. Mark talks to Ash Soni, president of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and pharmacist, Ben Merriman to find out more.
The number of children with short-sightedness, myopia has doubled in the last 50 years. Mark finds out why atropine eye drops, which are widely used in China and Singapore, are being trialled on children in the UK to help prevent the progression of myopia. Professor Augusto Azuara-Blanco from Queens University Belfast explains.
And is muscle more dense than fat? Jason Gill, professor of cardio metabolic health at the University of Glasgow discusses how even a small amount of fat loss can have hugely significant health benefits. Elaine Dennison, professor of Musculoskeletal Epidemiology at the University of Southampton explains why muscle is an under researched part of the body and how we lose muscle mass and strength in middle age and what we can do to prevent it.

Drug shortages, eye drops for myopia, is muscle more dense than fat? And sarcopenia

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter goes on a weekly quest to demystify the health issues that perplex us.

Dying At Home, Familial Hypercholesterolaemia Fh, Delirium2016101820161019 (R4)Dying at Home; Familial Hypercholesterolaemia FH; Delirium.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

E-cigarettes, Asherman's Syndrome, Rugby2016021620160217 (R4)The UK's first licensed e-cigarette, owned by a tobacco company, is classed as a medicine.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

E-cigs, Prehabilitation Before Surgery, Hospital Safety2019031920190320 (R4)Why vaping divides public health experts, prehabilitation before surgery, hospital safety

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Epipens And Autoinjectors; Meningitis B Bedside Test; Age Related Macular Degeneration2018102320181024 (R4)Adrenaline auto injectors are used to treat life-threatening allergies, anaphylaxis, but there are severe supply issues with the brand leader, epipen, particularly with junior epipen and many parents are reporting problems when their children's devices need replacing. It's an anxious time for those caring for severely allergic children and Dr Margaret McCartney reviews the reasons for the shortage and the latest advice for worried parents. At the same time, epipen has come under fire from a UK coroner, who concluded during an inquest into the death of 15 year old Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, that epipens aren't fit for purpose because they don't contain enough adrenaline or have a long enough needle to deliver it properly. Consultant paediatric allergist at St Mary's Hospital, London and a researcher in children's allergies at Imperial College, Dr Robert Boyle, tells Mark there is widespread belief that the companies behind adrenaline auto injectors need to innovate and better designs are needed.

Meningitis is every parent's nightmare. It can strike anyone at any age but around half of those with the most serious form, Meningitis B, are toddlers and young children. Two years ago, Ezra, who is now three and a half, contracted the disease. His parents, Cosmin and Serena from Carrick Fergus in Northern Ireland, tell Inside Health how this devastating illness spread so rapidly. Ezra's life was saved but septicaemia meant both of his legs, below the knee, were amputated, followed by the fingers on one of his hands. One of the paediatricians who looked after Ezra at the Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children was paediatrician Dr Thomas Waterfield. Inspired by Ezra, Tom worked with colleagues at Queen's University in Belfast to develop a rapid bedside test for Meningitis B. The LAMP test - Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification test - takes just an hour to identify the Meningococcal DNA and it doesn't need specialists to use it. The current lab test for the disease takes a minimum of 48 hours.

Age related macular degeneration, AMD, is the leading cause of blindness around the world, with at least half a million people living with this condition in the UK alone. Treatment has hugely improved in recent decades, with regular injections helping to prevent progressive loss of vision. But intensive monitoring is necessary with monthly trips to hospital for patients for vision tests. Researchers at the Centre for Public Health at Queen's University, Belfast, are trialling ways to avoid these regular hospital visits - saving patients the journey and saving the NHS money. The Monarch Study will assess different ways that patients can monitor their own vision at home, using paper tests or more sophisticated ipad-style eye tests. Mark meets Patricia, who has wet AMD in one eye and dry AMD in the other, who's agreed to be part of the trial and talks to research optometrist Lesley Doyle and Chief Investigator, Dr Ruth Hogg, about the study.

Producer: Fiona Hill

Epipens are in short supply and under fire for their design. Dr Mark Porter investigates.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Flu, Cow's Milk Allergy, Robotic Pharmacy2018010920180110 (R4)What goes into our flu vaccine always has an element of guesswork. Usually the experts get it right but sometimes nature has other ideas and a new strain emerges. Dr John McCauley, Director of the Worldwide Influenza Centre at the Francis Crick Institute in London tells Dr Mark Porter about Aussie flu and how different flu strains pose risks to different groups of people.

Cow's milk allergy is the most common food allergy among infants and it affects at least one in 50 babies, toddlers and pre-school children in the UK. It's an allergic reaction to the protein in cow's milk. There are two different types though and one type, called delayed cow's milk allergy, is often missed by health care professionals because it's easily confused with other common conditions. Lucy Wronka tells Inside Health her baby son George was ill for months with reflux, eczema and an upset stomach. It was only a chance meeting with a friend who recognised the symptoms that led to a diagnosis of delayed cow's milk allergy. Twenty four hours after diagnosis and treatment, Lucy says George was a different baby. Dr Adam Fox, paediatric allergist at the Evelina London Children's Hospital explains the difference between the two different types of cow's milk allergy and discusses new guidance for GPs and health visitors which are designed to improve diagnosis.

One of Europe's largest robotic pharmacies is housed in Glasgow and this super high-tech hub has replaced fourteen separate pharmacy stores. It handles almost a hundred thousand packs of medicines a week and Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney, herself a GP in the city, reports on how this automation has transformed pharmacy services in Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

Dr Mark Porter investigates the protection the latest vaccine gives us from Aussie flu.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Folic Acid In Flour, Southampton Fc And Hip And Groin Pain, Online Private Doctors2016012620160127 (R4)Folic acid in flour, Southampton FC and hip and groin pain, online private doctors.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

France Delists Alzheimer's Drugs, Quality Of Life After Hip Fracture, Prostate Cancer2018101620181017 (R4)France delists Alzheimer's drugs, a move that is a world first, after concluding that the dangers of side effects outweigh any benefits. Mark assesses the evidence and hears the arguments from France and the UK including from the head of drug evaluation at the French Health Authority which is behind the decision. Plus a more holistic approach to hip fracture and a visit to a busy clinic in Oxford where research measuring quality of life after surgery aims to improve outcomes that really matter to patients. And Margaret McCartney on prostate cancer and the Stephen Fry effect

France delists Alzheimer's drugs, quality of life after hip fracture and prostate cancer.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Genes And Confidentiality; Sore Throats And Cancer; Diet For Epilepsy; Shaving For Hospital Drips2019020520190206 (R4)Genetics and confidentiality; a fascinating legal case where a woman is suing the hospital trust that looked after her father with Huntington's disease for not warning that she too could be affected. And a well established use of very low carb diets that isn't so well known - to treat complex childhood epilepsy. Plus cancer of the voice box and persistent sore throat. And should hairy arms be shaved for a hospital drip? This question has prompted a transatlantic spat when Sir Andy Murray posted a photograph after his recent hip operation.

Genes and confidentiality; sore throats and cancer; diet for epilepsy; hair and drips.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter goes on a weekly quest to demystify the health issues that perplex us.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Hard Sell For Private Cataract Surgery; Language In Healthcare; Specialist Medical Travel Clinic2020030320200304 (R4)Inside Health hears from two patients, Surinder Biant and Sam Begum who went for a free eye check up with Optical Express. Both were surprised by a diagnosis of cataracts when previous eye tests hadn't uncovered these. Both felt that they were given a hard sell and felt pressurised to have cataract surgery and both had independent second opinions which brought the diagnosis and proposed treatment into question. And the President of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, Mike Burdon, explains what cataracts are and how doctor and patient can decide together when surgery is required.

GP and regular Inside Health contributor, Dr Margaret McCartney talks about the language we use in healthcare which blames both patients and doctors unfairly. Words and phrases like "compliance", "bed-blocker" and "unnecessary admissions" are singled out as particular culprits.

The travel clinic at The Hospital for Tropical Diseases in London aims to help people with complex medical conditions get to where they need or want to go for work, family or just some winter sun. We meet Elisabeth, who is partially sighted and wants to travel to East Africa with her grandson; Robert who has lymphoma but is far more concerned that he won't be able to fly to a country he loves, Japan, and to Robin, who wants to start a career in Uganda but is allergic to some of the components of essential vaccines. Dr Nicky Longley, consultant in infectious disease and travel medicine runs the clinic.

Producer: Fiona Hill

Chris van Tulleken investigates hard sell in the private cataract business

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Chris van Tulleken demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Health And Exercise Inside Health Special2016011220160113 (R4)The healing power of exercise: how being fit helps everything from stiff joints to cancer.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Health Checks, Fertility, Adjustment2016032920160330 (R4)The evidence for 'mid-life MOTs', female fertility and age and the meaning of 'adjustment'

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Heparin And Pigs; Anticoagulants; Ovarian Freezing And Cancer; Thumb Surgery2019100120191002 (R4)Mark Porter reports on shortages of Heparin, a drug to treat blood clots, due to swine fever in Chinese pigs! And staying with anticoagulants Margaret McCartney discusses concerns about taking these drugs along with common pain killers like ibuprofen. Why is this a risky combination? And Alice tells her story of opting for ovarian freezing, the latest technique to preserve fertility when undergoing cancer treatment. Plus a pioneering new type of surgery for arthritis of the thumb.

Heparin and Pigs; Anticoagulants; Ovarian Freezing and Cancer; Thumb surgery.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Mark Porter reports on shortages of Heparin, a drug to treat blood clots, due to swine fever in Chinese pigs! And staying with anticoagulants Margaret McCartney discusses concerns about taking these drugs along with common pain killers like ibuprofen. Why is this a risky combination? And Alice tells her story of opting for ovarian freezing, the latest technique to preserve fertility when undergoing cancer treatment. Plus a pioneering new type of surgery for arthritis of the thumb.

Hepatitis B Vaccine, Sheds, Obesity Paradox, Taking Part In Clinical Trials2017071820170719 (R4)Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

High Blood Pressure2019010820190109 (R4)Dr Mark Porter discusses High Blood Pressure , a silent threat that isn’t well managed, with only a third of those affected being diagnosed and treated as advised in the latest guidelines. Dr Margaret McCartney and Professor of Medicine, Bryan Williams help unpick areas of confusion including lifestyle and treatment with the latest thinking in the UK, on who should be offered what and when.

Dr Mark Porter discusses high blood pressure, a silent threat that isn't well managed.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter goes on a weekly quest to demystify the health issues that perplex us.

High Costs Of Cheap Medicines, Can A Simple Blood Test Help Identify Cancer, Undescended Testes, Aspirin2017070420170705 (R4)The price of everyday medicines is rising as some manufacturers are monopolies.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Home Fetal Heart Monitoring, Deconditioning In Hospital, Alcohol Harm Paradox, Pre-eclampsia Feedback2019022620190227 (R4)Regulation of Home Fetal Heart Monitors prompted by concerns that the burgeoning use of these devices could be harmful. Deconditioning - there is a popular adage that spending 10 days in hospital can age people 10 years, but is this backed by evidence and could it actually be worse? Mark Porter visits Warwick Hospital to meet the team working to combat deconditioning in the elderly. Plus the Alcohol Harm Paradox - why do less affluent drinkers tend to develop more problems than their better off peers even if they drink exactly the same amount.

Regulation of home fetal heart monitors, deconditioning in hospital, alcohol harm paradox.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Hospital Admissions And The 'weekend Effect', Peyronie's Disease2016011920160120 (R4)Do more people die in hospital at the weekend? Dr Mark Porter examines the evidence.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

How Bangor Hospital's Intensive Care Unit is Preparing for Winter20201027

Saleyha Ahsan reports from Ysbyty Gwynedd, her own hospital in Bangor, North Wales about how the Intensive Care Unit is preparing for winter. Saleyha meets Val and the Critical Care team who have looked after her since the pandemic began. Val was admitted to the unit in March and has become part of the intensive care family.

Producer, Erika Wright

Saleyha Ahsan on how Bangor Hospital's Intensive Care Unit is preparing for winter.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

How Bangor Hospital's Intensive Care Unit is Preparing for Winter2020102720201028 (R4)

Saleyha Ahsan reports from Ysbyty Gwynedd, her own hospital in Bangor, North Wales about how the Intensive Care Unit is preparing for winter. Saleyha meets Val and the Critical Care team who have looked after her since the pandemic began. Val was admitted to the unit in March and has become part of the intensive care family.

Producer, Erika Wright

Saleyha Ahsan on how Bangor Hospital's Intensive Care Unit is preparing for winter.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Medical Cannabis; Hidden Blood In The Urine; Ageing And Immunity2018022020180221 (R4)There are questions in Parliament following the story of 6 year old Alfie Dingley who was refused medical cannabis to help relieve his epileptic seizures. But what is the body of evidence for medical cannabis and does the reality live up to the hype? And age, immunity and the poor performance of this season's flu vaccine. Why do our defences decline as we get older and what can be done to improve vaccines that aim to protect the elderly against flu? Plus blood in your urine - pee the colour of Ribena is hopefully enough to drive anyone to their doctor - but what about tiny traces invisible to the naked eye frequently picked up by sensitive dipstick tests? If that has happened to you listen to our comprehensive guide.

The evidence for medical cannabis, hidden blood in the urine, ageing and immunity.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Medical Detection Dogs2018010220180103 (R4)Mark Porter investigates the evidence for whether dogs can accurately smell cancer.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Can dogs smell cancer? Ever since Hippocrates the odour of disease has been used to aid diagnosis but has this simple technique been forgotten? Dr Mark Porter investigates the evidence for whether canine super noses can be used to accurately detect cancer. There have been plenty of anecdotes reported but what about hard science? Studies since 2004 from the Medical Detection Dogs Centre in Milton Keynes have shown convincing results and they've now teamed up with MIT in the US, specialists in 'e-noses'. Could devices the size of a mobile phone be used to sniff for disease?

Meningitis Acwy Vaccine, Testosterone For Women, Allotments On Prescription, Heart Failure And Iron2016101120161012 (R4)There is confusion about how teens should be getting the new Meningitis ACWY vaccine.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Microprocessor Knees, The 'glasgow Effect', Mesothelioma2018012320180124 (R4)About six thousand people in the UK lose a leg every year from amputations due to vascular problems, trauma and disease. Others are born without limbs. Standard prosthetic knees often meant frequent falls and stumbles as well as the need to use two sticks. But microprocessor power is set to change all that. A new generation of intelligent joints is now available for the first time on the NHS in England - you can already get them in Scotland and Northern Ireland - and they adjust the knee stiffness to match the individual's weight, gait and activity and they even have anti-stumble software. Dr Mark Porter joins Dr Imad Sedki, consultant in rehabilitation medicine at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore at a retrofitting clinic, where patients like Naitik Patel are fitted with these new smart knees.

Almost a decade ago, researchers in Scotland coined the term "The Glasgow Effect" after they exposed the shocking fact that premature deaths were 30% higher in Scotland's biggest city compared with cities with similar histories like Liverpool and Manchester. Since then studies have highlighted a toxic combination of social, political and economic decisions which adversely affected the health of Glaswegians. Sir Harry Burns, the former Chief Medical Officer for Scotland, now Professor of Global Public Health at the University of Strathclyde, talks to Mark about why the phrase "The Glasgow Effect" has fallen out of favour and what he thinks should be done to address continuing health inequality.

Glasgow - in fact the UK as a whole - has one of the highest rates in the world of mesothelioma, a cancer which attacks the lining of the lung and which is directly linked to the breathing in of asbestos fibres. From her home city, Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney reports from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Glasgow, which is a specialist centre for patients with this cancer. She talks to Robert Henderson, who contracted mesothelioma fifty years after working as an apprentice electrician and to 68 year old Boyd McNicol, who worked as an art teacher in a school full of asbestos when he was in his 20s. Their doctor, Kevin Blyth, is a respiratory consultant who coordinates a mesothelioma service across Western Scotland. He tells Margaret that the 20, 30, 40 and even 50 year time lag between exposure to asbestos and a diagnosis of mesothelioma means that the cancer will still be claiming lives for many years to come and urgent new treatments are needed.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

A look at microprocessor knees, the 'Glasgow Effect' and mesothelioma.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Migraine, Iron Overload, Redefining Low-risk Cancers2019021220190213 (R4)A new handheld device for migraine is being pioneered at Guys and St Thomas's Hospital in London. Using single pulses of transcranial magnetic stimulation the device is helping prevent and treat migraines in people who haven't responded well to other treatments. Dr Anna Andreou, director of headache research, and nurse specialist, Bethany Hill talk Mark through how it works.

Some people, particular of North European and Irish ancestry have the faulty genes that mean they are unable to get rid of excess iron in the body. This can lead to symptoms ranging from tiredness, joint pain, and diabetes to skin discolouring and liver disease. New research has shown the condition is far more common than has been previously thought and is often missed as a diagnosis. Haematologist at Gartnavel Hospital in Glasgow, Ted Fitzsimons and epidemiologist, David Melzer of the University of Exeter, talk testing and treatment for iron overload, or haemochromatosis.

Cancer is an umbrella term which covers a spectrum of disease. Some cancers, like lung cancer grow and spread rapidly. But others like some forms of breast, thyroid and prostate cancer have a less than 5% chance of progressing over twenty years. So should we redefine low risk cancers? GP Margaret McCartney and consultant histopathologist, Murali Varma of University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff discuss this question.

New treatment for migraine, iron overload and should low-risk cancers be redefined?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Ministrokes, Midwife Study, Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome, Noise In Intensive Care2016100420161005 (R4)This edition looks at ministrokes, a midwife study, and cyclic vomiting syndrome.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Moving The Goalposts In Research, Involving Parents In The Care Of Premature Babies, Feedback2019032620190327 (R4)Fiddling figures in research, involving parents in the care of premature babies, feedback.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Multi-morbidity, One-shot Radiotherapy During Surgery For Early Stage Breast Cancer2016070520160706 (R4)David Haslam, chair of NICE, on managing the millions of people on 5 or more drugs a day.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Nhs Special: What Needs To Give?2017021420170215 (R4)Dr Mark Porter hosts a special debate on the current state of the NHS.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Nhs Under Pressure, Breast Cancer Prevention, Lactose Intolerance2017011720170118 (R4)Do funding requests hinder NHS operations? Plus breast cancer prevention.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Obesity And Cancer Campaign; Intelligent Liver Function Tests; Getting Reliable Information From Websites2019070920190710 (R4)The new Cancer Research UK campaign that compares obesity to smoking as a risk factor for cancer has come under criticism; Margaret McCartney debates the issues with Professor Linda Bauld. And how healthy is your liver? Do you know? Does your doctor know? Liver Function blood tests are notoriously difficult to interpret and early disease is often missed. Hence a new initiative - Intelligent liver function tests devised by a team from the University of Dundee. And a new mini series on which websites to trust and whether the health information you've found is reliable. Top tips on how to navigate the internet.

Obesity and Cancer campaign; intelligent liver function tests; which websites to trust.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Obesity And Smoking, Blood Pressure, Adhd2016091320160914 (R4)Obesity and smoking, should blood pressure targets get lower? And medicating ADHD.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Online Gp Consultations, Pre-eclampsia And Could Aspirin Treat Cancer?2019021920190220 (R4)Dr Mark Porter investigates the digitisation of the NHS: are online, asynchronous GP consultations the future? He visits a GP surgery in Tower Hamlets to find out how patients are getting in touch online, in their own time. Does it help improve access for patients and manage workload for busy GPs?

Manu Vatish, an obstetrician from the University of Oxford, explains that currently every pregnant woman will be tested for pre eclampsia and how a new test could help accurately identify the 4% of women who actually get the condition.

And could aspirin help in the treatment of cancer? Mark talks to Professor Peter Elwood from Cardiff University about his recent study into the evidence and to Professor Janusz Jankowski, a gastroenterologist at Morecambe Bay hospital to talk about the implications and risk and benefits.

Online GP consultations, a new test for pre-eclampsia and could aspirin treat cancer?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Opt-out Organ Donation; Your Body After Death; What Time Of Day To Take Blood Pressure Medication20170308Opt-out organ donation; your body after death; time of day to take blood pressure drugs.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Ovarian Cancer, Pbc, Treating Severe Head Injury2016030120160302 (R4)Talc use and ovarian cancer. PBC causes fatigue and itching but is often missed.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Over-the-counter Prescriptions, Virtual Reality In Rehabilitation, Sore Throats And Antibiotics2017020720170208 (R4)Over-the-counter prescriptions, virtual reality for rehab, sore throats and antibiotics.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Papilloedema; Cardiac Death In Sport; Diagnosing Early Miscarriage; Warfarin2016071920160720 (R4)Papilloedema, cardiac death in sport, diagnosing early miscarriage, Warfarin.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Paracetamol, Prostate And Hifu, Uncertainty - Oxygen And Heart Attacks2017011020170111 (R4)Evidence suggests paracetamol is not as effective as previously thought for chronic pain.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Placebo On Prescription: Hepatitis C Transplants, Genes And Back Pain2018100920181010 (R4)Until recently it was assumed that placebo pills would only produce a therapeutic benefit if patients didn't know that's what they had been given. But there are early suggestions that patients can still get symptom relief even when they're told that there is no active ingredient at all in the pills they've been given. So should placebo pills be openly prescribed to patients? Ted Kaptchuk, Professor of Medicine at Harvard University tells Mark he believes open-label placebo could, if evidence continues to accumulate, form part of the physician's therapeutic toolbox. But Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney urges caution. She says there is insufficient evidence about the long-term impact on symptoms.

Nearly 500 people died on the transplant waiting list last year and if you're one of the 7,000 waiting for a life-saving organ, how would you feel if the organ on offer came from a donor infected with hepatitis C? Such organs are about to be available on the NHS and this radical change has come about because of the revolution in treatment for this potentially-serious blood borne viral infection. Yes recipients of Hepatitis C positive organs will be infected by the virus after transplant, but a short course of treatment, direct acting antivirals, will then cure them. Consultant kidney and transplant specialist Dr Adnan Sharif from Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham explains why patients on the waiting list should have this option available to them and Professor James Neuberger from the UK government's advisory committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs, tells Mark why SaBTO have recommended this policy change and are now keen to see it implemented.

Back pain is common but most of us recover in a matter of weeks. For 10-20% of people though, the pain and discomfort doesn't go away and they suffer chronic pain throughout their lives. What many people don't know is the extent to which genes feature in back pain - it runs in families. Frances Williams is Professor of Genomic Epidemiology at Kings' College, London and a consultant rheumatologist at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Trust. She tells Mark about the genetic clues that emerged from the world's largest ever study of 500,000 individuals with chronic back pain across five countries.

Producer: Fiona Hill

Hepatitis C infected organs to be offered on the NHS transplant waiting list

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Ppis, Aspirin And Cancer, Radiotherapy And Smoking2017072520170726 (R4)Long term use of PPIs, aspirin and cancer prevention, radiotherapy and smoking.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Prescribing Cycling; Temperature Checks; False Positives; Choirs And Covid-192020072820200729 (R4)As the Government announces GPs should start to prescribe cycling Margaret McCartney examines the evidence for exercise referrals with Harry Rutter, Professor of Global Health at the University of Bath. Temperature checks are popping up in bars, restaurants and receptions but do they work or are they giving false reassurance? Plus while the pandemic progresses Professor Carl Heneghan explains another type of false result, that the chance of false positive tests go up. Navjoyt Ladher, Head of Education at the BMJ, talks us through two highly topical terms - specificity and sensitivity. Amateur choirs have been closed due to Covid-19. Margaret talks to Professor Jackie Cassell who is currently researching what aspect of choirs congregating is particularly dangerous and whether the singing is actually a red herring.

Producer: Erika Wright
Studio Manager: John Boland

Evidence for GPs prescribing cycling; temperature checks; false positives; choirs & Covid.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Prescription Charges; Acute Kidney Injury; Mmr Vaccine; Meningitis In Students2019092420190925 (R4)Why aren't prescription charges free across the whole of the UK? Acute Kidney Injury has shot up the NHS agenda in the last decade. Mark Porter visits Derby Royal Hospital to find out why kidney problems are so common and discovers what's been done to prevent damage to an organ many of us take for granted. Plus the World Health Organisation has removed the UK's measles free status because too few children are being immunised. Could making the vaccine mandatory be the answer? Margaret McCartney examines the evidence. And as the academic term gets underway Inside Health learns of a novel method to help with the prevention of meningitis amongst university students who are at risk of the disease.

Prescription Charges; Acute Kidney Injury; MMR vaccine; Meningitis in Students

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Why aren't prescription charges free across the whole of the UK? Acute Kidney Injury has shot up the NHS agenda in the last decade. Mark Porter visits Derby Royal Hospital to find out why kidney problems are so common and discovers what's been done to prevent damage to an organ many of us take for granted. Plus the World Health Organisation has removed the UK's measles free status because too few children are being immunised. Could making the vaccine mandatory be the answer? Margaret McCartney examines the evidence. And as the academic term gets underway Inside Health learns of a novel method to help with the prevention of meningitis amongst university students who are at risk of the disease.

Preventable Deaths, Poo Bank, Waterbirths2017012420170125 (R4)Preventable deaths in hospitals, Mark visits a stool bank, and evidence for water births.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Preventive Hiv Therapy, Sugar Tax, Bowel Cancer, Surgery2016032220160323 (R4)Dr Mark Porter explores preventive HIV therapy, the sugar tax, bowel cancer and surgery.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Prostate Cancer2017010320170104 (R4)Mark Porter reports on two landmark trials assessing when and how to treat prostate cancer

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Prostate Cancer2018030620180307 (R4)This week it has been hard to miss news on prostate cancer. The papers were full of a 'one stop shop' service for the diagnosis of the disease being rolled out in three hospitals in England. Plus celebrities have described their diagnosis and encouraged men to see their doctor for a PSA test. But just published today, the largest every study of prostate cancer over 10 years confirms that a single screening test of PSA does not save lives. With all these headlines this week is an ideal time to repeat Inside Health's prostate special. One in eight men in the UK will develop prostate cancer at some stage, but deciding who needs treatment - and when - is still far from clear. Mark Porter and Margaret McCartney report on two landmark trials that could provide some clarity, and hears from men and their doctors, faced with the dilemma of choosing the right course of action.

One in eight men will develop prostate cancer. Mark Porter and Margaret McCartney report.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Public Health In The Time Of Coronavirus2020072120200722 (R4)Public health doctors don't dash around hospitals wearing white coats brandishing stethoscopes. The work of this medical specialty is mainly outside of hospitals and it has a very long history. It has a local, national and global reach, an international skeleton charged with the care of populations. And in this pandemic, it is public health which is doing the heavy lifting.

In this special edition of Inside Health Dr Margaret McCartney investigates the serious questions being raised about the UK's public health response to trying to stop the spread of the virus, and how tension, over the performance of the government's Test and Trace programme, has spilled out into the open.

Margaret hears from Directors of Public Health who feel that their role and expertise in local communities working closely with local Public Health England teams has been overlooked. Instead a new national Test and Trace system has been set up using private companies outside the traditional public health infrastructure. The DPH for Wigan and lead director of public health for the Greater Manchester Combined Authority, Professor Kate Ardern, tells Margaret she believes government didn't understand the role and the experience of local public health teams and so instead of empowering them to oversee test, trace and isolate services, set up a new national system, from scratch, using private companies without public health experience. And the data needed locally to identify and deal with Covid cases, she tells Margaret, just hasn't come through. This is despite the fact that the law is clear; Covid is a notifiable disease and local directors of public health should receive the information.

Margaret explores the history of public health with Professor Martin Gorsky from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and hears from Professor of Global Health at Queen Mary, University of London, David McCoy, who believes the very structure of public health institutions after the 2012 Health and Social Care fragmented the service, leaving the country vulnerable (as he and 400 other experts warned at the time) to a pandemic.

Public Health England's Medical Director, Professor Yvonne Doyle, rejects suggestions that PHE is insufficiently independent from government and insists that both national and local public health teams have pulled together in these unprecedented times.

Producer: Fiona Hill

Dr Margaret McCartney looks at the vital role of public health in the pandemic.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Remote And Rural Healthcare2020012120200122 (R4)Nigel Edwards, Chief Executive of the health think tank the Nuffield Trust, joins Dr Margaret McCartney for this special programme about the challenges of remote and rural healthcare.
Margaret travels by boat from Mallaig to the Hebridean islands of Eigg, Muck, Rum and Canna off the north west coast of Scotland where, after 100 years the islanders lost their resident doctor. When it was clear there wouldn't be a replacement, the islanders and NHS Highland instead opted for a radical new healthcare model.
Taking inspiration from indigenous tribes in Alaska, the NUKA model has been adapted for the Small Isles and it is very different, with a high level of community engagement. The idea is that local people own their own healthcare rather than having healthcare delivered to them, as passive recipients.
Local people are trained up in first aid and become salaried Rural Health and Social Care Workers. They are the eyes and ears of healthcare professionals. Volunteers also act as First Responders coordinating helicopter and lifeboat rescues in emergencies.
Dr Margaret McCartney joins GP Dr Geoff Boyes on his weekly visit to Eigg and discovers how the community has adapted to this new way of delivering care. She hears from Gill McVicar, former NHS Highland Director of Transformation and Camille Dressler, chair of the Small Isles Community Council, about how the reorganisation was managed; from Julie McFadzean about the new health and rural health and social care worker role; from Sheena Kean, the Eigg healthcare practice manager who makes sure everything runs smoothly and to Eigg residents about how they think their new healthcare model is working.

Producer: Fiona Hill
Credit Photo of Margaret McCartney: Paul Clarke

Dr Margaret McCartney on the challenges of healthcare when help isn't on your doorstep.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Margaret McCartney reports on the challenges of healthcare in remote and rural areas

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus; Coronavirus Vaccine; Unnecessary Vaginal Examinations; Compassion Fatigue2020020420200205 (R4)It's not a household name but RSV or Respiratory Syncytial Virus is responsible for 30,000 children under five ending up in hospital every year in the UK. The virus can cause serious infections of the lungs and airways (like pneumonia and bronchiolitis). Hannah and Sean from Oxfordshire had baby girls, Millie and Freya, born prematurely in October last year. Just weeks later, the twins spent 12 days in intensive care and then 3 days in the high dependency unit at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford with bronchiolitis caused by RSV. Andrew Pollard, Professor of Paediatric Infection and Immunity at the University of Oxford tells James, the BBC's Science and Health Correspondent, about the dangers of RSV in lower income settings where the virus claims more babies' lives under 12 months old than any other disease apart from malaria. Hopes are that a vaccine for RSV to protect children during the vulnerable first years is imminent.

And as one of the world's leading experts on vaccinations (and chair of the UK's Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation) Professor Pollard tells James that he is confident that a vaccine for the coronavirus, which some experts have suggested could become a pandemic, could be developed by the end of this year.

Inside Health regular contributor Dr Margaret McCartney raises the issue of unnecessary vaginal examinations. A new American study in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that more than half of the bimanual pelvic examinations performed on girls and women aged 15 to 20 in the USA are potentially unnecessary and could cause harm. The fact this is still routine for many American women contradicts clear guidance which states there is no evidence for such internal examinations to be carried out in healthy girls and women who don't have symptoms. It doesn't happen in the NHS, Margaret reports, but they are carried out in the private sector under the banner of "well women checks".

Could you tell somebody that they were going to die? Could you comfort family members after their loved one has passed away? Crucially could you do this as part of your job, day in, day out, without it affecting you? James talks to nurses at the Royal Marsden Hospital in Surrey which has been raising "compassion fatigue" as an occupational hazard within the profession.

Producer: Fiona Hill

James Gallagher on the virus almost nobody's heard of, Respiratory Syncytial Virus or RSV.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

James Gallagher demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Rickets, Drug Addiction Recovery, Defibrillator Support2018020620180207 (R4)Rickets was eradicated from the UK after World War Two but "The English Disease", as rickets has long been known, is back. Two children have died of this completely preventable disease in the past two years. Dr Mark Porter talks to paediatrician Dr Benjamin Jacobs at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore about the importance of Vitamin D supplementation and calcium for proper bone growth. He meets Zana, whose toddler son was diagnosed with rickets six months ago and talks to Dr Priscilla Julies, paediatrician from the Royal Free Hospital in London about the forthcoming British Paediatric Surveillance Unit survey of the disease. Consultant Paediatric Endocrinologist Dr Wolfgang Hogler from Birmingham Children's Hospital tells Mark that the UK's record of vital Vitamin D supplementation is woeful compared to our European neighbours and warns that unless rickets is given a higher priority, more lives will be lost.

The number of drug related deaths has soared in recent years and this is against a background of growing concern about the misuse of prescription medicines - particularly morphine type painkillers - and the burgeoning popularity of novel psychoactive substances like spice and mamba. But this changing drugs scene has been accompanied by changing attitudes and approaches to what helps addicts recover. A new European survey - in England, Scotland, Belgium and the Netherlands - led by David Best, Professor of Criminology at Sheffield Hallam University aims to map what has helped people out of their drug addiction and he tells Mark this will better shape policy and services.

Advances in pacemaker technology mean that many people who are prone to life-threatening heart rhythm disturbances, will have, inside their chests, their own internal defibrillators, known as implantable cardioverter defibrillators, or ICDs. These tiny devices, not much bigger than a matchbox, sit in the upper chest and monitor the heart. When they detect a problem they automatically deliver a shock, direct to the organ. This is life-saving technology but arrhythmia specialist nurse, Sharlene Hogan from St Thomas' Hospital in London six years ago set up a support group for patients with ICDs, because she realised that there was enormous anxiety about when the device might fire. The group meets three to four times a year and Inside Health reports from their most recent get together.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

The growing problem of rickets, drug addiction recovery and defibrillator support.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Robo-docs, Using Ai To Diagnose; Pancreatic Cancer; Statins And Muscle Aches2017071120170712 (R4)Are we on the cusp of a new era where computers will be doing the diagnosing?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Running, Cycling And Knee Health, Adrenaline And Cardiac Arrest, Artificial Eyes2018072420180725 (R4)Does running damage your knees? And is cycling any better? Runner, cyclist, GP and Inside Health regular, Dr Margaret McCartney goes to the new Motion Analysis Lab at Glasgow's Jubilee Hospital and asks orthopaedic surgeon and competitive cyclist Jason Roberts about the latest evidence.

Around 30,000 people a year suffer cardiac arrest - their heart suddenly stops pumping blood around their body - and fewer than one in ten survive. Paramedics and ambulance crews will give CPR and use a defibrillator to try to restart the heart, and for the past 50 plus years, most patients will be given a shot of adrenaline too.
But a landmark new study funded by the government and run by Warwick Medical School reveals that giving adrenaline barely increases survival and almost doubles the risk of severe brain damage. Dr Margaret McCartney discusses likely changes to policy with Dr Mark Porter.

It's said that eyes are the windows to the soul - and certainly looking into other peoples' is the key part of human interaction. But what if one of yours isn't real? Sixty thousand people in the UK have an artificial eye and Europe's largest maxillo-facial laboratory at Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead offers a bespoke service where specialists make individual eyes from live sittings. Susan lost one eye as a child and she tells Mark that her latest prosthesis is her favourite. Why? Because it's almost half the weight of eyes she's had fitted before. Dr Emma Worrall, principal prosthetist, has invented a lighter sphere. In a lightbulb moment sitting in a café stirring a sugar cube into her coffee and watching it melt, Emma tells Mark that she realised she could build the plastic sphere around sugar, drill a tiny hole, then melt the sugar out of the middle! Twenty patients at the hospital are now benefiting from lighter eyes (which means less surgery). And there's another plus. The new eyes float in the swimming pool and the sea!

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Does running damage your knees and is cycling any better?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Scoliosis, Depression, Pets In Hospital, Eustachian Tubes2017092620170927 (R4)Scoliosis, depression in teenagers, pets in hospital, Eustachian tubes and blocked ears.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Singing For Breathlessness, Aneurysms, Sunscreens And Myasthenia Gravis2019080620190807 (R4)Dr Mark Porter finds out about 'singing for lung health', an evidence based therapy for helping people with breathlessness arising from conditions like Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. He hears from the choir based at Charing Cross Hospital in London and talks to respiratory physiologist, Adam Lound, to find out how the breathing and singing techniques being taught there, as well as the camaraderie, improve people's quality of life and confidence. Does exercise increase the risk of worsening an aortic aneurysm? Consultant vascular surgeon, Rachel Bell talks about the benefits of cardio vascular exercise for people with aneurysms. Dr Margaret McCartney reviews the evidence on sunscreens. Also in the programme, Saiju Jacob discusses myasthenia gravis, an auto-immune condition that causes muscle weakening. He explains what causes it and how it's treated.

Singing for breathlessness, Aneurysms and exercise, Sunscreens, Myasthenia gravis

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Smoking In Pregnancy; Lifestyle Targets; Thyroid Cancer; Flossing2017022820170301 (R4)Smoking in pregnancy; lifestyle targets; thyroid cancer; what's the evidence for flossing?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Social Prescribing, Topical Steroid Withdrawal, Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension2018080720180808 (R4)Every GP surgery should provide access to a dedicated social prescriber, according to the Royal College of GPs. Supporting peoples' non-medical needs - including housing, finance and social care - will, it is hoped, free up GP time for urgent medical care and at the same time, provide much-needed access to activities in the community. Arabella describes how social prescribing worked for her. A support worker helped her to join a choir, sort out finances and plan how to return to work after a period of serious illness. Dr Marie Polley, senior lecturer in health sciences at the University of Westminster and co-chair of the Social Prescribing Network (with Dr Michael Dixon) tells Dr Mark Porter that social prescribing will be embedded within medical and social care in the next decade as long as the voluntary sector is supported.

Steroid cream and ointments - like hydrocortisone, clobetasone and betamethasone - are used to treat a number of skin problems. But for some patients long-term topical steroid use can lead to painful, disfiguring and debilitating skin flare-ups. Some call this condition topical steroid addiction. But consultant dermatologist Dr Tony Bewley from Bart's Health in London tells Mark that health care professionals prefer the term topical steroid withdrawal syndrome. He sees the condition fairly often in his clinic and reassures sufferers that there is treatment available.

We're used to having our blood pressure checked using a cuff on our arms but we can also have high blood pressure in our lungs. Pulmonary hypertension tends to put our hearts under strain and causes breathlessness. It can be caused by a range of diseases but in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) the raised pressure is due to constriction of the blood vessels. This narrowing of the arteries makes it difficult for the heart to pump blood through the lungs, leading to breathlessness. Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney visits the Scottish national specialist centre for the disease at the Golden Jubilee Hospital in Glasgow's Clydebank. She talks to Lorraine who is living with the disease, to pulmonary vascular consultant Dr Colin Church and watches a team led by Dr Martin Johnson performing right heart catheterisation, the gold standard diagnostic test for the disease.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

Social Prescribing, Topical Steroid Withdrawal, Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Statins In The Media, Unusual Neurological Itch, The Hunger Hormone, Viagra2016080220160803 (R4)Has media coverage of statins caused people to come off the drugs?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Statins Over The Counter, Amyloidosis, Gene Silencing2019100820191009 (R4)There are plans to make high dose statins available over-the-counter without a prescription to improve uptake. Currently around two thirds of people likely to benefit most don't take them, but will these plans make a difference? Amyloidosis is a debilitating rare disease that is often missed: Pam tells her amazing story of recovery and Mark meets the specialists helping her. And news about new gene silencing treatments that could transform the outlook for people with other rare conditions too.

High-dose statins over the counter, amyloidosis, and gene silencing.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Sticky Blood : From Blood Clots To Covid-192020092220200923 (R4)Thromboses - blood clots that form in the circulation - are easily the biggest single killer of British men and women. They affects people of all ages, races and ethnicities. Most strokes and heart attacks are caused by thromboses forming in the arteries supplying the heart or brain. But clots in the veins can be just as lethal, particularly when part of the clot breaks off and travels around the circulation and lodges in the lungs. Recently, the appearance of abnormal micro-clots in the lungs of severely affected Covid patients has highlighted the huge impact even tiny clots can have on our long term health and mortality. What more should be done to protect people from this misunderstood condition?

James Gallagher unravels the risks and causes for blood clots, from deep vein thrombosis to clots in the lungs. As he hears from patients, the surprise of a DVT diagnosis and debilitation can be profound. Treating clots is a delicate process with a need to get the balance right between thinning the blood but preventing bleeding. James examines the effectiveness of the latest range of anticoagulants that have a more predictable blood thinning effect, without the need for regular checks to make sure the blood’s not too thick or too thin.

The psychological effects of being diagnosed with thrombosis is often under reported. but in up to half the cases, severe anxiety, depression and PTSD can arise. We hear of a major new study following the experiences of patients from their diagnosis to follow ups after treatment and how effectively they overcame the impact of knowing they carried a blood clot, on their mental health.

And we unravel the newly emerging relationship between Covid and clotting. It was back in April when the alarm was first sounded about abnormal blood clots in severe Covid19 cases. Research as it continues to unfold, is shedding new light on the causes of the problem - sticky blood, and in turn, offering up new ways to treat some of the major complications thrown up by the virus.

Presenter: James Gallagher
Producer Adrian Washbourne

Sticky Blood : From Blood Clots to Covid-19

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Stroke Man Recovers Speech, Apple Watch And Ecgs, Newborn Heel Prick Test2018092520180926 (R4)Four years ago, Peter, a retired engineer from Gloucestershire, suffered a small stroke and lost the ability to speak. He communicated by hand signals and writing notes to his wife, Carol. But this summer, as he tells Dr Mark Porter, he woke up one morning and, much to everybody's amazement, began to talk....and he hasn't stopped since. Later that same day, a second stroke was diagnosed but his newly-returned speech was unaffected. It's a remarkable story and Alex Leff, Professor of Cognitive Neurology at the Queen Square Institute of Neurology in London discusses Peter's experience but describes what usually happens when stroke patients experience aphasia.

We're all familiar with devices like FitBits and gym monitors that measure your pulse rate but the latest development in wearable tech is a watch that monitors your heart. The latest Apple watch will offer ECG-like capabilities which can spot potentially worrying disturbances in heart rhythm. But Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney has serious concerns about the use of such tech for screening in healthy populations.

If you're under 50 you've almost certainly had it. The heel prick test or NHS newborn blood spot screening programme is done during the first week of life and it's designed to detect nine different conditions before they can cause symptoms or irreversible damage in young children. Dr Elaine Murphy is a consultant in inherited metabolic diseases at the Charles Dent Metabolic Unit at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and she tells Mark about the history of the heel prick test and describes the original condition, phenylketonuria or PKU, that the 1969 test was designed to detect.

Producer: Fiona Hill

How one stroke robbed a man of speech and four years later another stroke brought it back

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Tamoxifen And Breast Cancer Prevention2018070320180704 (R4)Tamoxifen, the so called "statin of breast cancer prevention" is recommended for healthy women with a family history of the disease. So why are only 1 in 7 of those eligible taking it? And Mark Porter speaks to Professor Gareth Evans working with his team at the Wythenshawe Hospital in Manchester to reliably identify women at higher risk of breast cancer. They are testing for SNPS, spelling mistakes in the DNA that influence growth and survival of cancer cells and that give a more accurate assessment of a woman's risk.

Why are only 1 in 7 eligible women on Tamoxifen, the 'statin of breast cancer prevention'?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

The Future Heart2017120520171206 (R4)Could lab-grown cells be the future for patients with heart failure? Kevin Fong reports.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Touch In Health Care2020100620201007 (R4)The Radio 4 Touch Test included questions about touch in health care. Dr Natalie Bowling who's a psychologist from the University of Greenwich helped to create the test with colleagues at Goldsmith's University. Analysing the data revealed that a positive attitude towards touch in treatment settings increases as we get older. Surprisingly men reported being more likely to feel comfortable with touch in treatment settings - despite women preferring tactile treatments more than men.

GPs Margaret McCartney and Ann Robinson agree on the importance of touch in their consulting rooms - both to help tell the difference between constipation and a ruptured appendix - and to place a comforting hand on the shoulder of a distressed patient.

Chemotherapy cannot cure 82 year old Anne Townsend who was given a diagnosis of ovarian cancer a year ago - but it's hoped it will help to relieve her symptoms. One side effect has been a loss of her sense of touch - devastating because she loves to sew quilts. She found that reflexology sessions helped - though they stopped because of lockdown and she now uses acupressure techniques which she was taught online by therapists at St Christopher's hospice.

Deborah Bowman, Professor of Bioethics at St George's University, also felt calmer and better-prepared for medical procedures when she was having cancer treatment. She explains how she trains medical students to approach their patients in a sensitive way and use touch with care.

What role does touch play in health care?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

A weekly quest to demystify health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Umbilical Cord Clamping, Natural Cycles, Pedometers2018100220181003 (R4)When is the best time to clamp a baby's umbilical cord? It is a controversial question that has perplexed maternity units for years but new evidence from Nottingham has changed practice at the hospital's busy labour ward. Mark Porter pays them a visit. Natural Cycles is a much promoted contraception app advertised as an alternative to more conventional methods. But the Advertising Standards Authority has ruled that claims of it being 'highly accurate' were misleading so Margaret McCartney expresses her concerns that the app doesn't live up to the hype. And once the initial enthusiasm of having a pedometer wears off do they keep people walking in the long term?

Umbilical cord clamping, Natural Cycles and do pedometers help long term?

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Unproven Ivf Add-ons; Running Injuries; Dna Analysis On The Nhs2019012920190130 (R4)Warnings that expensive, unproven 'add-ons' are being offered by IVF clinics ; Keen jogger Margaret McCartney asks whether rest helps running problems such as stitch, shin splints and plantar fasciitis. Plus DNA testing on the NHS to anyone prepared to pay for it with the results contributing to research. But what exactly is the aim of such testing and are there hidden implications?

Unproven IVF add-ons; does rest help running injuries? DNA analysis on the NHS

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter goes on a weekly quest to demystify the health issues that perplex us.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Vaginal Mesh; Alcohol And The Heart2017101020171011 (R4)Complications of vaginal mesh implants, plus alcohol and the heart.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Vitamin D, Air Ambulance Blood Trial, Phantom Limb Pain, Sitting-rising Test2017022120170222 (R4)Topics include Vitamin D, an air ambulance blood trial and phantom limb pain.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Weaning Babies, Seeing The Same Doctor Saves Lives, Nhs Research, Mental Capacity2018071720180718 (R4)The relationship between when babies are weaned and the amount of time they sleep has hit the headlines after a new study has been published. Now UNICEF has got involved. Margaret McCartney reviews the evidence. Also proof that seeing the same GP saves lives. Mark Porter meets the man behind new research on mortality and continuity of care, Sir Denis Pereira Gray, who also works in the same GP surgery as his father and grandfather did. And a guide to Mental Capacity, an issue that touches many people but is increasingly pressing as more families manage elderly relatives living with dementia. Plus research and the NHS charter.

The relationship between when babies are weaned and the time they sleep has been published

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Welsh Patient Power, Liquid Biopsies, Food Allergies, Dosing Errors20160920A new way of tracking cancer is exciting oncologists worldwide.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

When To Take Blood Pressure Pills; Adhd; Recurrent Fevers; Head Lice2019102920191030 (R4)When is the best time of day to take blood pressure pills? A new study from Spain has hit the headlines, with dramatic results that could change practice but are the findings too good to be true? And why is getting help for ADHD or other behavioural conditions such a struggle for parents, schools and doctors? Plus recurrent fevers - a rare genetic condition that feels like flu every day. And evidence for the best way to get rid of headlice!

The best time of day to take blood pressure pills; ADHD; Recurrent fevers; Head lice

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Why Hernias, Hands And Varicose Veins Might Not Be Treated On The Nhs2017013120170201 (R4)Hernias, hands and varicose veins might not be treated on the NHS in the future.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Zantac Alert, Newborn Brain Injury, Otc Guide, Surgery For Reflux2019101520191016 (R4)Zantac alert over concerns that the branded reflux treatment is contaminated with a carcinogenic impurity, so what are the risks? And a new device helping to identify Newborn brain injury earlier. An Inside Health Guide to Over the Counter choices and evidence for those that work best - this week Warts and Veruccas; Plus surgery for reflux as an alternative to pills.

Zantac alert, newborn brain injury, Guide to Over the Counter choices, surgery for reflux.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice

Dr Mark Porter demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.

Zika In Uk, Hip Arthroscopy, Limits Of Cancer Treatment2016080920160810 (R4)Dr Mark Porter finds out how hip arthroscopy is increasingly being used.

Series that demystifies health issues, bringing clarity to conflicting advice.