Islam Kundalini [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Heart And Soul20131019

Why is yoga so popular in Iran?

01Heart And Soul2013101920131020 (WS)
20131021 (WS)
20131022 (WS)

Why is yoga so popular in Iran?

01Heart And Soul2013101920131020 (WS)

Why is yoga so popular in Iran?

01Heart And Soul2013101920131021 (WS)

Why is yoga so popular in Iran?

01Heart And Soul2013101920131022 (WS)

Why is yoga so popular in Iran?

02Heart And Soul20131026

Iranian writer Azadeh Moaveni looks at the yoga boom in Iran; why has yoga been embrace.

02Heart And Soul2013102620131027 (WS)
20131028 (WS)

Iranian writer Azadeh Moaveni looks at the yoga boom in Iran; why has yoga been embrace...

02Heart And Soul2013102620131027 (WS)

Iranian writer Azadeh Moaveni looks at the yoga boom in Iran; why has yoga been embrace...

02Heart And Soul2013102620131028 (WS)

Iranian writer Azadeh Moaveni looks at the yoga boom in Iran; why has yoga been embrace...

02Part Two - Heart and Soul2013102620131027 (WS)

Why has yoga been fully embraced in some Muslim countries but not in others?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

In 2008, the Malaysian government issued a fatwa banning some features of yoga practice, including the chanting of mantras, claiming that they were incompatible with Islam. The move drew criticisms from Muslim and non-Muslim practitioners who have felt real physical and mental benefits from yoga.

Elsewhere Muslims - particularly those of the Middle East - have been practicing yoga widely since the mid 1990s, and the movement is growing. In Iran, where clerics have inveighed against many other trends, yoga is popular enough to warrant its own magazines and TV shows.

In this programme Azadeh asks, why has yoga been fully embraced in some Muslim countries but not in others? How do followers of yoga in the Muslim world view the relationship between their faith and their practice? What are the true spiritual origins of yoga and can the practice be adapted to suit different faiths and perspectives?

She speaks to the Malaysian activist Marina Mahathir, about the 2008 fatwa against yoga in her country. And she talks to a Muslim yoga teacher in the United States whose recent blog detailing her anxieties about the relationship between yoga and Islam provoked worldwide attention.

Produced by Sarah Cuddon, Falling Tree Productions

02Part Two - Heart and Soul2013102620131028 (WS)

Why has yoga been fully embraced in some Muslim countries but not in others?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

In 2008, the Malaysian government issued a fatwa banning some features of yoga practice, including the chanting of mantras, claiming that they were incompatible with Islam. The move drew criticisms from Muslim and non-Muslim practitioners who have felt real physical and mental benefits from yoga.

Elsewhere Muslims - particularly those of the Middle East - have been practicing yoga widely since the mid 1990s, and the movement is growing. In Iran, where clerics have inveighed against many other trends, yoga is popular enough to warrant its own magazines and TV shows.

In this programme Azadeh asks, why has yoga been fully embraced in some Muslim countries but not in others? How do followers of yoga in the Muslim world view the relationship between their faith and their practice? What are the true spiritual origins of yoga and can the practice be adapted to suit different faiths and perspectives?

She speaks to the Malaysian activist Marina Mahathir, about the 2008 fatwa against yoga in her country. And she talks to a Muslim yoga teacher in the United States whose recent blog detailing her anxieties about the relationship between yoga and Islam provoked worldwide attention.

Produced by Sarah Cuddon, Falling Tree Productions

02Part Two - Heart and Soul20131026

Why has yoga been fully embraced in some Muslim countries but not in others?

Personal approaches to spirituality from around the world.

In 2008, the Malaysian government issued a fatwa banning some features of yoga practice, including the chanting of mantras, claiming that they were incompatible with Islam. The move drew criticisms from Muslim and non-Muslim practitioners who have felt real physical and mental benefits from yoga.

Elsewhere Muslims - particularly those of the Middle East - have been practicing yoga widely since the mid 1990s, and the movement is growing. In Iran, where clerics have inveighed against many other trends, yoga is popular enough to warrant its own magazines and TV shows.

In this programme Azadeh asks, why has yoga been fully embraced in some Muslim countries but not in others? How do followers of yoga in the Muslim world view the relationship between their faith and their practice? What are the true spiritual origins of yoga and can the practice be adapted to suit different faiths and perspectives?

She speaks to the Malaysian activist Marina Mahathir, about the 2008 fatwa against yoga in her country. And she talks to a Muslim yoga teacher in the United States whose recent blog detailing her anxieties about the relationship between yoga and Islam provoked worldwide attention.

Produced by Sarah Cuddon, Falling Tree Productions