Ivor Novello (1893-1951)

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01Keep The Home Fires Burning20161226

Ivor Novello becomes a household name during the Great War with Keep the Home Fires Burning. Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

David Ivor Davies, who later changed his name to Ivor Novello, was born in Cardiff in 1893. His mother Clara Novello Davies was a singer and music teacher, who had once performed for Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle. Mam soon recognised her son's talents, and so sent young Ivor off to school in Gloucester, and then to Oxford where he was awarded a choral scholarship. Once Novello's voice broke, he left Oxford and soon found himself living in London with his mother, where he taught music and regularly visited the theatre. He started composing songs at this time, and it was in 1914 that he penned his first big hit, the patriotic Keep the Home Fires Burning, which made him a household name during World War One.

Glamorous Night - Overture

New World Show Orchestra

Kenneth Alwyn, conductor

The Dancing Years - Waltz Of My Heart

Christopher Northam, piano

Careless Rapture - The Manchuko

John Stoddart, tenor (Captain Mellish)

Linden Singers

Spring of the Year

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

Gordon Langford, piano

Up There

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Keep the Home Fires Burning

John McCormack, tenor

The Victor Studio Orchestra

Josef A. Pasternak, conductor

Megan

Jerome Kern and Ivor Novello, arr. Henri Jaxon

Theodore and Co - orchestral medley

BBC Concert Orchestra

Keith Lockhart, principle conductor

Theodore and Co - What a Duke should be

Jeremy Northam, voice

Theodore and Co - Any Old Where

Producer Luke Whitlock.

01Keep The Home Fires Burning20161226

Ivor Novello becomes a household name during the Great War with Keep the Home Fires Burning. Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

David Ivor Davies, who later changed his name to Ivor Novello, was born in Cardiff in 1893. His mother Clara Novello Davies was a singer and music teacher, who had once performed for Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle. Mam soon recognised her son's talents, and so sent young Ivor off to school in Gloucester, and then to Oxford where he was awarded a choral scholarship. Once Novello's voice broke, he left Oxford and soon found himself living in London with his mother, where he taught music and regularly visited the theatre. He started composing songs at this time, and it was in 1914 that he penned his first big hit, the patriotic Keep the Home Fires Burning, which made him a household name during World War One.

Glamorous Night - Overture

New World Show Orchestra

Kenneth Alwyn, conductor

The Dancing Years - Waltz Of My Heart

Christopher Northam, piano

Careless Rapture - The Manchuko

John Stoddart, tenor (Captain Mellish)

Linden Singers

Spring of the Year

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

Gordon Langford, piano

Up There

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Keep the Home Fires Burning

John McCormack, tenor

The Victor Studio Orchestra

Josef A. Pasternak, conductor

Megan

Jerome Kern and Ivor Novello, arr. Henri Jaxon

Theodore and Co - orchestral medley

BBC Concert Orchestra

Keith Lockhart, principle conductor

Theodore and Co - What a Duke should be

Jeremy Northam, voice

Theodore and Co - Any Old Where

Producer Luke Whitlock.

02The Next Valentino20161227

Ivor Novello becomes a star of stage and screen on both sides of the Atlantic. Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

During World War One Ivor Novello became a Flight Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Air Service but, having crashed two planes, soon found himself transferred to a safer desk job in London where he could enjoy the thriving world of wartime West End Theatre. In between his war work, Novello was now composing for the stage including shows such as Arlette, Our Nell and The Golden Moth. It was during this time that he met Edward Marsh, a senior figure in the Civil Service who introduced Novello to Winston Churchill and also the actor Robert Andrews. Bobbie became Novello's partner for the rest of his life, and supported and encouraged him in his emerging career as an actor and writer for stage and screen. Soon Novello found himself working with the likes of Alfred Hitchcock, and with his highly appealing good looks, he became something of a matinee-idol.

Keep the Home Fires Burning

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

Gordon Langford, piano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Guy le Feuvre and Ivor Novello

Arlette - orchestral medley

BBC Concert Orchestra

Keith Lockhart, principle conductor

The Dancing Years - My Dearest Dear

Mary Ellis, soprano

Ivor Novello, piano

The Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Arlette - It's Just A Memory

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

First Up

The Golden Moth - Nuts in May

Lorna Dallas, soprano

Studio Ensemble

Bless You - And Her Mother Came To

Jeremy Northam, voice

Christopher Northam, piano

Our Nell - The Land of Might Have Been

Studio Orchestra

Careless Rapture - Love Made the Song I Sing to You

John Stoddart, tenor (Captain Mellish)

Patricia Bartlett, soprano (Mrs Winton)

Linden Singers

New World Show Orchestra

Kenneth Alwyn, conductor

Careless Rapture - Music in May

Patricia Bartlett, soprano (Penelope Lee)

Careless Rapture - The Bridge of Lovers

Patricia Johnson, mezzo-soprano (Madame Simonetti)

Producer Luke Whitlock.

Ivor Novello becomes a star of stage and screen on both sides of the Atlantic. Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

During World War One Ivor Novello became a Flight Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Air Service but, having crashed two planes, soon found himself transferred to a safer desk job in London where he could enjoy the thriving world of wartime West End Theatre. In between his war work, Novello was now composing for the stage including shows such as Arlette, Our Nell and The Golden Moth. It was during this time that he met Edward Marsh, a senior figure in the Civil Service who introduced Novello to Winston Churchill and also the actor Robert Andrews. Bobbie became Novello's partner for the rest of his life, and supported and encouraged him in his emerging career as an actor and writer for stage and screen. Soon Novello found himself working with the likes of Alfred Hitchcock, and with his highly appealing good looks, he became something of a matinee-idol.

Keep the Home Fires Burning

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

Gordon Langford, piano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Guy le Feuvre and Ivor Novello

Arlette - orchestral medley

BBC Concert Orchestra

Keith Lockhart, principle conductor

The Dancing Years - My Dearest Dear

Mary Ellis, soprano

Ivor Novello, piano

The Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Arlette - It's Just A Memory

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

First Up

The Golden Moth - Nuts in May

Lorna Dallas, soprano

Studio Ensemble

Bless You - And Her Mother Came To

Jeremy Northam, voice

Christopher Northam, piano

Our Nell - The Land of Might Have Been

Studio Orchestra

Careless Rapture - Love Made the Song I Sing to You

John Stoddart, tenor (Captain Mellish)

Patricia Bartlett, soprano (Mrs Winton)

Linden Singers

New World Show Orchestra

Kenneth Alwyn, conductor

Careless Rapture - Music in May

Patricia Bartlett, soprano (Penelope Lee)

Careless Rapture - The Bridge of Lovers

Patricia Johnson, mezzo-soprano (Madame Simonetti)

Producer Luke Whitlock.

03Glamorous Night20161228

03Glamorous Night20161228

Ivor Novello's first hit musical Glamorous Night saves the Drury Lane Theatre. Presented by Donald Macleod.

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

The Truth Game was the first play Ivor Novello wrote himself. He soon followed this up with Symphony in Two Flats in 1929. Both plays did very well in the UK, so Novello took them to Broadway where The Truth Game in particular was a success. Whilst in America he was offered an opportunity to work as a screenwriter in Hollywood, where he socialised with the likes of Douglas Fairbanks Jnr, Joan Crawford and Greta Garbo. He also worked on the first Tarzan film and penned the immortal lines "Me Tarzan, You Jane". Novello wasn't happy in Hollywood and soon returned to the UK, where he continued to develop his career on many fronts. In 1935 came the opportunity to write his first musical, Glamorous Night. The Drury Lane Theatre was looking for a show to save it from financial ruin and Novello obliged. Glamorous Night became a huge hit - a visual and audio extravaganza with a cast of 120 and, in one act, the spectacle of the sinking of a full-scale ocean liner.

Tabs - Something Doing Over the Way

Joan Sterndale Bennett, voice

Robert Docker, piano

Ivor Novello and Philip Braham, arr. Leonard Hornsey

A to Z, orchestral medley

BBC Concert Orchestra

Keith Lockhart, conductor

The House That Jack Built - The Thought Never Entered My Head

Winnie Melville, soprano

Derek Oldham, tenor

New Mayfair Orchestra

Ray Noble, conductor

Give Me Back My Heart

Peggy Wood, voice

Glamorous Night - Her Majesty Militza

BBC Concert Orchestra Chorus

Marcus Dods, conductor

Glamorous Night - When the Gypsy Played

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Glamorous Night - Glamorous Night

Glamorous Night - The Girl I Knew

Elizabeth Welch, voice

Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

03Glamorous Night20161228

Ivor Novello's first hit musical Glamorous Night saves the Drury Lane Theatre. Presented by Donald Macleod.

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

The Truth Game was the first play Ivor Novello wrote himself. He soon followed this up with Symphony in Two Flats in 1929. Both plays did very well in the UK, so Novello took them to Broadway where The Truth Game in particular was a success. Whilst in America he was offered an opportunity to work as a screenwriter in Hollywood, where he socialised with the likes of Douglas Fairbanks Jnr, Joan Crawford and Greta Garbo. He also worked on the first Tarzan film and penned the immortal lines "Me Tarzan, You Jane". Novello wasn't happy in Hollywood and soon returned to the UK, where he continued to develop his career on many fronts. In 1935 came the opportunity to write his first musical, Glamorous Night. The Drury Lane Theatre was looking for a show to save it from financial ruin and Novello obliged. Glamorous Night became a huge hit - a visual and audio extravaganza with a cast of 120 and, in one act, the spectacle of the sinking of a full-scale ocean liner.

Tabs - Something Doing Over the Way

Joan Sterndale Bennett, voice

Robert Docker, piano

Ivor Novello and Philip Braham, arr. Leonard Hornsey

A to Z, orchestral medley

BBC Concert Orchestra

Keith Lockhart, conductor

The House That Jack Built - The Thought Never Entered My Head

Winnie Melville, soprano

Derek Oldham, tenor

New Mayfair Orchestra

Ray Noble, conductor

Give Me Back My Heart

Peggy Wood, voice

Glamorous Night - Her Majesty Militza

BBC Concert Orchestra Chorus

Marcus Dods, conductor

Glamorous Night - When the Gypsy Played

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Glamorous Night - Glamorous Night

Glamorous Night - The Girl I Knew

Elizabeth Welch, voice

Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

03Glamorous Night20161228

Ivor Novello's first hit musical Glamorous Night saves the Drury Lane Theatre. Presented by Donald Macleod.

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

The Truth Game was the first play Ivor Novello wrote himself. He soon followed this up with Symphony in Two Flats in 1929. Both plays did very well in the UK, so Novello took them to Broadway where The Truth Game in particular was a success. Whilst in America he was offered an opportunity to work as a screenwriter in Hollywood, where he socialised with the likes of Douglas Fairbanks Jnr, Joan Crawford and Greta Garbo. He also worked on the first Tarzan film and penned the immortal lines "Me Tarzan, You Jane". Novello wasn't happy in Hollywood and soon returned to the UK, where he continued to develop his career on many fronts. In 1935 came the opportunity to write his first musical, Glamorous Night. The Drury Lane Theatre was looking for a show to save it from financial ruin and Novello obliged. Glamorous Night became a huge hit - a visual and audio extravaganza with a cast of 120 and, in one act, the spectacle of the sinking of a full-scale ocean liner.

Tabs - Something Doing Over the Way

Joan Sterndale Bennett, voice

Robert Docker, piano

Ivor Novello and Philip Braham, arr. Leonard Hornsey

A to Z, orchestral medley

BBC Concert Orchestra

Keith Lockhart, conductor

The House That Jack Built - The Thought Never Entered My Head

Winnie Melville, soprano

Derek Oldham, tenor

New Mayfair Orchestra

Ray Noble, conductor

Give Me Back My Heart

Peggy Wood, voice

New Mayfair Orchestra

Ray Noble, conductor

Glamorous Night - Her Majesty Militza

BBC Concert Orchestra Chorus

BBC Concert Orchestra

Marcus Dods, conductor

Glamorous Night - When the Gypsy Played

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Glamorous Night - Glamorous Night

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Glamorous Night - The Girl I Knew

Elizabeth Welch, voice

Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

04Singing for World Peace20161229

04Singing for World Peace20161229

Ivor Novello's Mam plans to visit and sing for Hitler.

Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

With the success of Novello's first musical, Glamorous Night, there followed in quick succession further sell-out musicals including Careless Rapture, Crest of the Wave and, in 1939, The Dancing Years. They were all huge successes. The Dancing Years relied less on spectacle and more on solid plot, representing Novello's horror at the treatment of Jewish composers in Austria and Germany. The Lord Chamberlain's Office required Novello to change certain elements of the show, in particular all references to the Nazis. It was during this build-up to the Second World War that Novello's mother, "Mam", decided to form her Welsh Singing Grandmothers Choir and head to Germany. The plan was to sing to Hitler in Berlin for World Peace. They made it as far as Amsterdam, and were then accompanied home again.

Careless Rapture - Overture

New World Show Orchestra

Kenneth Alwyn, conductor

Careless Rapture - Why Is There Ever Goodbye?

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Crest of the Wave - Why Isn't It You?

Jeremy Northam, voice

Christopher Northam, piano

Crest of the Wave - Haven of Your Heart

Olive Gilbert, contralto

Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Crest of the Wave - Rose of England

Ivor Emmanuel, baritone

Rita Williams Singers

The Michael Collins Orchestra

Michael Collins, conductor

We'll Remember

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Clear the Road to Glory

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

The Dancing Years - Primrose

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

The Dancing Years - I Can Give You The Starlight

Vanessa Lee, soprano

Michael Collins Orchestra

Michael Collins, conductor

Arc de Triomphe - Easy to Live With

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Arc de Triomphe - Dark Music

Elizabeth Welch, vocalist

Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Arc de Triomphe - orchestral medley

Phoenix Theatre Orchestra

Hary Acres, conductor

Arc de Triomphe - Josephine

Lorna Dallas, soprano

Studio Ensemble

Producer Luke Whitlock.

04Singing For World Peace20161229

Ivor Novello's Mam plans to visit and sing for Hitler.

Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

With the success of Novello's first musical, Glamorous Night, there followed in quick succession further sell-out musicals including Careless Rapture, Crest of the Wave and, in 1939, The Dancing Years. They were all huge successes. The Dancing Years relied less on spectacle and more on solid plot, representing Novello's horror at the treatment of Jewish composers in Austria and Germany. The Lord Chamberlain's Office required Novello to change certain elements of the show, in particular all references to the Nazis. It was during this build-up to the Second World War that Novello's mother, "Mam", decided to form her Welsh Singing Grandmothers Choir and head to Germany. The plan was to sing to Hitler in Berlin for World Peace. They made it as far as Amsterdam, and were then accompanied home again.

Careless Rapture - Overture

New World Show Orchestra

Kenneth Alwyn, conductor

Careless Rapture - Why Is There Ever Goodbye?

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Crest of the Wave - Why Isn't It You?

Jeremy Northam, voice

Christopher Northam, piano

Crest of the Wave - Haven of Your Heart

Olive Gilbert, contralto

Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Crest of the Wave - Rose of England

Ivor Emmanuel, baritone

Rita Williams Singers

The Michael Collins Orchestra

Michael Collins, conductor

We'll Remember

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Clear the Road to Glory

The Dancing Years - Primrose

The Dancing Years - I Can Give You The Starlight

Vanessa Lee, soprano

Michael Collins Orchestra

Arc de Triomphe - Easy to Live With

Arc de Triomphe - Dark Music

Elizabeth Welch, vocalist

Arc de Triomphe - orchestral medley

Phoenix Theatre Orchestra

Hary Acres, conductor

Arc de Triomphe - Josephine

Lorna Dallas, soprano

Studio Ensemble

Producer Luke Whitlock.

04Singing For World Peace20161229

Ivor Novello's Mam plans to visit and sing for Hitler.

Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

With the success of Novello's first musical, Glamorous Night, there followed in quick succession further sell-out musicals including Careless Rapture, Crest of the Wave and, in 1939, The Dancing Years. They were all huge successes. The Dancing Years relied less on spectacle and more on solid plot, representing Novello's horror at the treatment of Jewish composers in Austria and Germany. The Lord Chamberlain's Office required Novello to change certain elements of the show, in particular all references to the Nazis. It was during this build-up to the Second World War that Novello's mother, "Mam", decided to form her Welsh Singing Grandmothers Choir and head to Germany. The plan was to sing to Hitler in Berlin for World Peace. They made it as far as Amsterdam, and were then accompanied home again.

Careless Rapture - Overture

New World Show Orchestra

Kenneth Alwyn, conductor

Careless Rapture - Why Is There Ever Goodbye?

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Crest of the Wave - Why Isn't It You?

Jeremy Northam, voice

Christopher Northam, piano

Crest of the Wave - Haven of Your Heart

Olive Gilbert, contralto

Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Crest of the Wave - Rose of England

Ivor Emmanuel, baritone

Rita Williams Singers

The Michael Collins Orchestra

Michael Collins, conductor

We'll Remember

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Clear the Road to Glory

The Dancing Years - Primrose

The Dancing Years - I Can Give You The Starlight

Vanessa Lee, soprano

Michael Collins Orchestra

Arc de Triomphe - Easy to Live With

Arc de Triomphe - Dark Music

Elizabeth Welch, vocalist

Arc de Triomphe - orchestral medley

Phoenix Theatre Orchestra

Hary Acres, conductor

Arc de Triomphe - Josephine

Lorna Dallas, soprano

Studio Ensemble

Producer Luke Whitlock.

05Novello Does Time20161230

05Novello Does Time20161230

Ivor Novello falls foul of the law and is sent to prison.

Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

During the Second World War Ivor Novello met Grace Walton. She came up with a plan to assist Novello to continue using his car, despite petrol rationing. Unfortunately Novello was duped by an enamoured fan and ended up in Bow Street Magistrates Court, where he was eventually sentenced to four weeks in Wormwood Scrubs. Churchill was furious and offered to get the sentence suspended, but Novello refused and served his time. This stint in prison affected Novello's health and he never got over it. There was a great deal of sympathy for Novello, and once he returned to the London stage he received much applause. Towards the end of the war Novello composed his musical show, Perchance to Dream, which included his second-most famous song, We'll Gather Lilacs in the Spring. Although Novello went on to compose further musicals, King's Rhapsody and Gay's the Word, his health never fully recovered from his prison ordeal, and he died in 1951.

The Dancing Years - Overture

Cyril Ornadel and his Orchestra

Perchance to Dream - A Woman's Heart

Muriel Barron, soprano

Ivor Novello, piano

Perchance to Dream - Love Is My Reason

Julie Bryan, soprano

Ivor Emmanuel, baritone

Rita Williams Singers

Michael Collins Orchestra

Michael Collins, conductor

Perchance to Dream - We'll Gather Lilacs in the Spring

Maryetta Midgley, soprano

Vernon Midgley, tenor

Robert Docker, piano

Festival Concert Orchestra

Harry Rabinowitz, conductor

King's Rhapsody - Someday My Heart Will Awake

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

King's Rhapsody - Fly Home, Little Heart

Gay's the Word - A Matter of Minutes

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Gay's the Word - On Such a Night as This

Gay's the Word - Finder Please Return

The Dancing Years - The Wings of Sleep

Mary Ellis, soprano

Olive Gilbert, alto

The Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Pray for Me

Lily of the Valley - Look in My Heart

Producer Luke Whitlock.

05Novello Does Time20161230

Ivor Novello falls foul of the law and is sent to prison.

Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

During the Second World War Ivor Novello met Grace Walton. She came up with a plan to assist Novello to continue using his car, despite petrol rationing. Unfortunately Novello was duped by an enamoured fan and ended up in Bow Street Magistrates Court, where he was eventually sentenced to four weeks in Wormwood Scrubs. Churchill was furious and offered to get the sentence suspended, but Novello refused and served his time. This stint in prison affected Novello's health and he never got over it. There was a great deal of sympathy for Novello, and once he returned to the London stage he received much applause. Towards the end of the war Novello composed his musical show, Perchance to Dream, which included his second-most famous song, We'll Gather Lilacs in the Spring. Although Novello went on to compose further musicals, King's Rhapsody and Gay's the Word, his health never fully recovered from his prison ordeal, and he died in 1951.

The Dancing Years - Overture

Cyril Ornadel and his Orchestra

Perchance to Dream - A Woman's Heart

Muriel Barron, soprano

Ivor Novello, piano

Perchance to Dream - Love Is My Reason

Julie Bryan, soprano

Ivor Emmanuel, baritone

Rita Williams Singers

Michael Collins Orchestra

Michael Collins, conductor

Perchance to Dream - We'll Gather Lilacs in the Spring

Maryetta Midgley, soprano

Vernon Midgley, tenor

Robert Docker, piano

Festival Concert Orchestra

Harry Rabinowitz, conductor

King's Rhapsody - Someday My Heart Will Awake

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

King's Rhapsody - Fly Home, Little Heart

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Gay's the Word - A Matter of Minutes

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Gay's the Word - On Such a Night as This

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Gay's the Word - Finder Please Return

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

The Dancing Years - The Wings of Sleep

Mary Ellis, soprano

Olive Gilbert, alto

Ivor Novello, piano

The Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Pray for Me

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Lily of the Valley - Look in My Heart

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

05Novello Does Time20161230

Ivor Novello falls foul of the law and is sent to prison.

Presented by Donald Macleod

Ivor Novello's Drury Lane musicals were box-office sensations, and more popular than the likes of Oklahoma or Brigadoon. At the height of his career Novello not only had plays and musicals running in London, but also four other productions of his spectacular musicals touring the country, to say nothing of amateur productions as well. Part of the attraction was Novello himself. He was a huge celebrity on both sides of the Atlantic. Novello was an actor and playwright for both stage and screen, credited with coining the phrase Me Tarzan, You Jane, and with his matinee-idol looks he was hailed as the next Valentino. His charisma and infectious personality charmed many, so that when he died, thousands turned out to line the streets to see the hearse pass on its way. This week, a first for Composer of the Week in its over seventy-year history, Donald Macleod luxuriates in the theatrical and charismatic world of Ivor Novello, with many works specially recorded for the series. He's joined by one of Novello's biographers, David Slattery-Christy, and also explores what was once Novello's flat with Billy Differ. Donald also goes behind the scenes in Novello's London theatre-world accompanied by Rosy Runciman, with a trip to the Prince of Wales and Novello Theatres.

During the Second World War Ivor Novello met Grace Walton. She came up with a plan to assist Novello to continue using his car, despite petrol rationing. Unfortunately Novello was duped by an enamoured fan and ended up in Bow Street Magistrates Court, where he was eventually sentenced to four weeks in Wormwood Scrubs. Churchill was furious and offered to get the sentence suspended, but Novello refused and served his time. This stint in prison affected Novello's health and he never got over it. There was a great deal of sympathy for Novello, and once he returned to the London stage he received much applause. Towards the end of the war Novello composed his musical show, Perchance to Dream, which included his second-most famous song, We'll Gather Lilacs in the Spring. Although Novello went on to compose further musicals, King's Rhapsody and Gay's the Word, his health never fully recovered from his prison ordeal, and he died in 1951.

The Dancing Years - Overture

Cyril Ornadel and his Orchestra

Perchance to Dream - A Woman's Heart

Muriel Barron, soprano

Ivor Novello, piano

Perchance to Dream - Love Is My Reason

Julie Bryan, soprano

Ivor Emmanuel, baritone

Rita Williams Singers

Michael Collins Orchestra

Michael Collins, conductor

Perchance to Dream - We'll Gather Lilacs in the Spring

Maryetta Midgley, soprano

Vernon Midgley, tenor

Robert Docker, piano

Festival Concert Orchestra

Harry Rabinowitz, conductor

King's Rhapsody - Someday My Heart Will Awake

Marilyn Hill Smith, soprano

The Chandos Concert Orchestra

Stuart Barry, conductor

King's Rhapsody - Fly Home, Little Heart

Gay's the Word - A Matter of Minutes

Kitty Whately, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano

Gay's the Word - On Such a Night as This

Gay's the Word - Finder Please Return

The Dancing Years - The Wings of Sleep

Mary Ellis, soprano

Olive Gilbert, alto

The Drury Lane Theatre Orchestra

Charles Prentice, conductor

Pray for Me

Lily of the Valley - Look in My Heart

Producer Luke Whitlock.