Jeremy Vine - Songs My Son Loved

Episodes

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0201Private James Prosser20170612

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

0201Private James Prosser20170612

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private James Prosser grew up in and around leafy Cwmbran in South Wales. He joined the army aged 20, and was deployed to Afghanistan serving with the 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh. On 27 September 2009, aged 21, he was killed while driving his Warrior vehicle in the Musa Qaleh district of Helmand Province. James was described by his Platoon Commander, Lieutenant Tom Richards, as a 'model infantry soldier'.

Partially recorded on location at Cwmbran Boating Lake, James' mother Sarah Adams describes a boy who loved Batman, and who surprised his friends and family when he decided against a career as a graphic designer and went into the army. Sarah recalls how she was informed of James' death, not remembering the words that were spoken, but the sound of her younger son crying. She keeps James' razor in his room where he left it, with a single tiny hair remaining on its blades, unable to part with it.

Featuring the music of Bon Jovi, Eminem and Nelly, Sarah reflects on her memories of her son and his unexpected choice of music for his funeral.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

0201Private James Prosser20170612

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private James Prosser grew up in and around leafy Cwmbran in South Wales. He joined the army aged 20, and was deployed to Afghanistan serving with the 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh. On 27 September 2009, aged 21, he was killed while driving his Warrior vehicle in the Musa Qaleh district of Helmand Province. James was described by his Platoon Commander, Lieutenant Tom Richards, as a 'model infantry soldier'.

Partially recorded on location at Cwmbran Boating Lake, James' mother Sarah Adams describes a boy who loved Batman, and who surprised his friends and family when he decided against a career as a graphic designer and went into the army. Sarah recalls how she was informed of James' death, not remembering the words that were spoken, but the sound of her younger son crying. She keeps James' razor in his room where he left it, with a single tiny hair remaining on its blades, unable to part with it.

Featuring the music of Bon Jovi, Eminem and Nelly, Sarah reflects on her memories of her son and his unexpected choice of music for his funeral.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private James Prosser grew up in and around leafy Cwmbran in South Wales. He joined the army aged 20, and was deployed to Afghanistan serving with the 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh. On 27 September 2009, aged 21, he was killed while driving his Warrior vehicle in the Musa Qaleh district of Helmand Province. James was described by his Platoon Commander, Lieutenant Tom Richards, as a 'model infantry soldier'.

Partially recorded on location at Cwmbran Boating Lake, James' mother Sarah Adams describes a boy who loved Batman, and who surprised his friends and family when he decided against a career as a graphic designer and went into the army. Sarah recalls how she was informed of James' death, not remembering the words that were spoken, but the sound of her younger son crying. She keeps James' razor in his room where he left it, with a single tiny hair remaining on its blades, unable to part with it.

Featuring the music of Bon Jovi, Eminem and Nelly, Sarah reflects on her memories of her son and his unexpected choice of music for his funeral.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

0202Private Michael Tench20170613
0202Private Michael Tench20170613

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Michael Tench was described by his superiors as "an outstanding soldier", and was one of the youngest soldiers to die in Iraq when his Warrior patrol vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb on January 21st 2007. He was serving with 2nd Battalion, The Light Infantry, on the outskirts of Basra City.

His mother Janice Procter describes how Tenchy, as he was affectionately known, was an 'army barmy' boy. But his death has left her enraged by the political nature of the war he was killed in. Featuring the music of John Denver, UB40 and Westlife, Janice remembers being Michael's kick-boxing sparring partner, and describes their close relationship: "Where Michael was I was, and where I was Michael was."

Janice takes Jeremy to visit the memorial wall in Mowbray Park, Sunderland, which was built to remember the fallen soldiers of the north east of England. Janice worked with the Brothers In Arms appeal to raise funds to build the wall, and Michael's name is one of the last names to be engraved on it.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

0202Private Michael Tench20170613

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Michael Tench was described by his superiors as "an outstanding soldier", and was one of the youngest soldiers to die in Iraq when his Warrior patrol vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb on January 21st 2007. He was serving with 2nd Battalion, The Light Infantry, on the outskirts of Basra City.

His mother Janice Procter describes how Tenchy, as he was affectionately known, was an 'army barmy' boy. But his death has left her enraged by the political nature of the war he was killed in. Featuring the music of John Denver, UB40 and Westlife, Janice remembers being Michael's kick-boxing sparring partner, and describes their close relationship: "Where Michael was I was, and where I was Michael was."

Janice takes Jeremy to visit the memorial wall in Mowbray Park, Sunderland, which was built to remember the fallen soldiers of the north east of England. Janice worked with the Brothers In Arms appeal to raise funds to build the wall, and Michael's name is one of the last names to be engraved on it.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Michael Tench was described by his superiors as "an outstanding soldier", and was one of the youngest soldiers to die in Iraq when his Warrior patrol vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb on January 21st 2007. He was serving with 2nd Battalion, The Light Infantry, on the outskirts of Basra City.

His mother Janice Procter describes how Tenchy, as he was affectionately known, was an 'army barmy' boy. But his death has left her enraged by the political nature of the war he was killed in. Featuring the music of John Denver, UB40 and Westlife, Janice remembers being Michael's kick-boxing sparring partner, and describes their close relationship: "Where Michael was I was, and where I was Michael was."

Janice takes Jeremy to visit the memorial wall in Mowbray Park, Sunderland, which was built to remember the fallen soldiers of the north east of England. Janice worked with the Brothers In Arms appeal to raise funds to build the wall, and Michael's name is one of the last names to be engraved on it.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

0203Private Chris Gray20170614
0203Private Chris Gray20170614

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Chris Gray was born in Leicester, but died in Afghanistan on 13 April 2007, aged 19. He was serving with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, when he was shot by a Taliban fighter just three weeks into his first tour of duty, and just eight months after he joined the Army.

His mother Helen Gray recalls how Chris was always a keen online gamer. She would watch him playing army games on his X-Box, and remind him that in real-life, there was no second chance when shots are fired. Featuring an illicit visit to Ratby Sports Club, Helen reflects on Chris' life with the music of Feeder, Snow Patrol and the Halo soundtrack.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

0203Private Chris Gray20170614

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Chris Gray was born in Leicester, but died in Afghanistan on 13 April 2007, aged 19. He was serving with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, when he was shot by a Taliban fighter just three weeks into his first tour of duty, and just eight months after he joined the Army.

His mother Helen Gray recalls how Chris was always a keen online gamer. She would watch him playing army games on his X-Box, and remind him that in real-life, there was no second chance when shots are fired. Featuring an illicit visit to Ratby Sports Club, Helen reflects on Chris' life with the music of Feeder, Snow Patrol and the Halo soundtrack.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Chris Gray was born in Leicester, but died in Afghanistan on 13 April 2007, aged 19. He was serving with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, when he was shot by a Taliban fighter just three weeks into his first tour of duty, and just eight months after he joined the Army.

His mother Helen Gray recalls how Chris was always a keen online gamer. She would watch him playing army games on his X-Box, and remind him that in real-life, there was no second chance when shots are fired. Featuring an illicit visit to Ratby Sports Club, Helen reflects on Chris' life with the music of Feeder, Snow Patrol and the Halo soundtrack.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

0204Private Leon Spicer20170615
0204Private Leon Spicer20170615

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Leon Spicer overcame a serious leg injury that could have ruined his career, before heading out to Al Amarah in Iraq, serving with 1st Battalion The Staffordshire Regiment. He was killed, alongside two colleagues, when the Land Rover they were travelling in was hit by a roadside bomb.

His mother Bridie remembers a boy who was an enthusiastic altar server at his local church, and how he went on to earn the nickname 'the Birdman of Tamworth'. She fondly remembers the times they spent talking in the early hours, when Leon would return from a night out and insist she have cup of tea with him.

The programme features a version of 'Homes of Donegal' by Daniel O'Donnell, which was especially recorded for Bridie. It also includes music from the Scissor Sisters, Elvis, and the Stone Roses.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

0204Private Leon Spicer20170615

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Leon Spicer overcame a serious leg injury that could have ruined his career, before heading out to Al Amarah in Iraq, serving with 1st Battalion The Staffordshire Regiment. He was killed, alongside two colleagues, when the Land Rover they were travelling in was hit by a roadside bomb.

His mother Bridie remembers a boy who was an enthusiastic altar server at his local church, and how he went on to earn the nickname 'the Birdman of Tamworth'. She fondly remembers the times they spent talking in the early hours, when Leon would return from a night out and insist she have cup of tea with him.

The programme features a version of 'Homes of Donegal' by Daniel O'Donnell, which was especially recorded for Bridie. It also includes music from the Scissor Sisters, Elvis, and the Stone Roses.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.

Jeremy Vine meets the mother of a fallen soldier who remembers her son through music.

As part of BBC Music Day, Jeremy Vine talks to the mothers of four soldiers who died in conflict and asks them to share their memories through the music their sons loved to listen to.

Private Leon Spicer overcame a serious leg injury that could have ruined his career, before heading out to Al Amarah in Iraq, serving with 1st Battalion The Staffordshire Regiment. He was killed, alongside two colleagues, when the Land Rover they were travelling in was hit by a roadside bomb.

His mother Bridie remembers a boy who was an enthusiastic altar server at his local church, and how he went on to earn the nickname 'the Birdman of Tamworth'. She fondly remembers the times they spent talking in the early hours, when Leon would return from a night out and insist she have cup of tea with him.

The programme features a version of 'Homes of Donegal' by Daniel O'Donnell, which was especially recorded for Bridie. It also includes music from the Scissor Sisters, Elvis, and the Stone Roses.

Produced by Eleanor Kifvel.