Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) [composer Of The Week]

Episodes

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Devout Catholic20190410

Donald Macleod explores the importance of religion to Haydn, how it permeated his career and the choices he made throughout his life.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativity earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

Haydn was brought up in a Catholic family at a time when the values of the Enlightenment were held in high esteem in Europe. As a young choir boy, Haydn’s daily routine followed the pattern of the liturgical year, which was an influence he never forgot. His steadfast faith is evident in his compositions, copies of which travelled along the length of the Danube and beyond.

Stabat Mater: Sancta Mater
Patricia Rozario, soprano
Anthony Rolfe Johnson, tenor
The English Concert
Trevor Pinnock, musical director

Mass in F major ‘Missa brevis a due soprani’
Susan Gritton, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Arianna a Naxos cantata: Aria ‘Dove sei’
Carolyn Watkinson, mezzo-soprano
Glen Wilson, piano

String Quartet in B flat major Op 64 No 3
The Salomon Quartet
Simon Standage, violin
Micaela Comberti, violin
Trevor Jones, viola
Jennifer Ward Clarke, cello

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod explores the importance of religion in Haydn\u2019s life.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Distracted Times20190411

Donald Macleod considers the effect war and turmoil had on Haydn’s life and career, and how those infuences shaped his compositions.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativity earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

Austria was in an almost constant state of war during Haydn’s life. While he was protected from front line warfare, he was always engaged with the politics of his time. Haydn disliked Napoleon and was horrified at news of the French Revolution. Donald recounts a story about music transcending politics when an 'enemy' soldier visited Haydn at the end of his life and sang an aria from The Creation oratorio, bringing tears of joy to the old man’s eyes.

Mass in C major Missa in tempore belli ‘Paukenmesse’: Agnus Dei
Joanna Lunn, soprano
Sara Mingardo, alto
Topi Lehtipuu, tenor
Brindley Sherratt, bass
Monteverdi Choir
English Baroque Soloists
John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

Symphony No 100 in G major ‘Military’: movt. II Allegretto
New York Philharmonic
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

Piano Trio No 39 in G major ‘Gypsy Rondo’
Patrick Cohen, piano
Erich Höbarth, violin
Christophe Coin, cello

Mass in C major Missa in tempore belli ‘Paukenmesse’: Credo
Joanna Lunn, soprano
Sara Mingardo, alto
Topi Lehtipuu, tenor
Brindley Sherratt, bass
Monteverdi Choir
English Baroque Soloists
John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

Die Schöpfung, Part 2: Aria ‘Mit Würd’ und Hoheit angetan
Michael Schade, tenor
The English Baroque Soloists
John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

Mass in D minor Missa in angustiis ‘Nelson Mass’: Benedictus, Agnus Dei and Dona nobis pacem
Sylvia Stahlman, soprano
Helen Watts, alto
Wilfred Brown, tenor
Tom Krause, bass
Choir of King’s College, Cambridge
Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields
Sir David Willcocks, conductor

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod considers the effect war and turmoil had on Haydn\u2019s life and career.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Man of the People20190408

Donald Macleod focuses his attention on Joseph Haydn’s humanity; a man of exceptional character with a warm, generous personality, and a great sense of humour.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativty earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

A man with his roots firmly in the country, Haydn never allowed his fame to make him feel he was anything but ordinary. Despite working for the grandest noble family in Austria, and having his music performed all across Europe. Today, Donald looks at how Haydn’s fortune might have been very different, had he opted for a career in the Church.

Mass in B flat major ‘Harmoniemesse’: Kyrie and Gloria
Nancy Argenta, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Symphony No 94 in G major ‘Surprise’: movt II Andante
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Sir Georg Solti, conductor

Mass in B flat major ‘Theresienmesse’: Kyrie and Gloria
Janice Watson, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, contralto
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

String Quartet in B minor Op 64 No 2
The Salomon Quartet
Simon Standage, violin
Micaela Comberti, violin
Trevor Jones, viola
Jennifer Ward Clarke, cello

Mass in B flat major ‘Harmoniemesse’: Sanctus and Benedictus
Nancy Argenta, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod focuses his attention on Haydn\u2019s humanity.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Popular Composer20190412

Donald Macleod turns his attention to the high regard Haydn enjoyed from his friends, colleagues and audiences. Also, the extraordinary story of how Haydn lost his head.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativity earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

Today, Donald draws a picture of Haydn’s immense popularity, not just as a comoposer but as a man. The affection in which he was held only grew as he entered old age.

Mass in B flat major ‘Harmoniemesse’: Agnus Dei and Dona nobis pacem
Nancy Argenta, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Trumpet Concerto in E flat major: movt I Allegro
Wynton Marsalis, trumpet
English Chamber Orchestra
Raymond Leppard, conductor

Symphony No 104 in D major ‘London’: movt IV Finale: Spiritoso
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Sir Georg Solti, conductor

Die Schöpfung: Part 1 Nos 10-14
Ruth Ziesak, soprano
Herbert Lippert, tenor
René Pape, bass
Anton Scharinger, bass-baritone
Chicago Symphony Chorus
Margaret Hillis, chorus director
David Schrader, piano
John Sharp, cello
Joseph Guastafeste, double bass
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Sir Georg Solti, conductor

Mass in B flat major ‘Schöpfungsmesse’: Kyrie and Gloria
Susan Gritton, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod focuses on the respect and appreciation offered to Haydn by his audiences.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Struggling Musician20190409

Donald Macleod looks at the obstacles thrown into Haydn’s path throughout his career as he shuffled between one job and the next until his employment with the Esterházys began.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativity earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

Donald conjures up images of Haydn sofa-surfing in his younger days, running between jobs to earn enough money to feed himself and describes how his father saved him after a burglary left him with nothing, not even a spare shirt to wear to work. Haydn’s struggles weren’t just confined to his work but were also evident in his private life; in his choice of wife and an unrequited love.

Mass in B flat major ‘Harmoniemesse’: Credo
Nancy Argenta, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Organ Concerto in C major
Simon Preson, organ
Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields
Neville Mariner, conductor

Piano Trio No 17 in F major
Beaux Arts Trio
Menahem Pressler, piano
Isidore Cohen, violin
Bernard Greenhouse, cello

Mass in G major ‘Missa Sancti Nicolai’: Agnus Dei
Lorna Anderson, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod looks at the obstacles thrown into Haydn\u2019s path throughout his career.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201901Man Of The People20190408

Donald Macleod focuses his attention on Joseph Haydn’s humanity; a man of exceptional character with a warm, generous personality, and a great sense of humour.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativty earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

A man with his roots firmly in the country, Haydn never allowed his fame to make him feel he was anything but ordinary. Despite working for the grandest noble family in Austria, and having his music performed all across Europe. Today, Donald looks at how Haydn’s fortune might have been very different, had he opted for a career in the Church.

Mass in B flat major ‘Harmoniemesse’: Kyrie and Gloria
Nancy Argenta, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Symphony No 94 in G major ‘Surprise’: movt II Andante
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Sir Georg Solti, conductor

Mass in B flat major ‘Theresienmesse’: Kyrie and Gloria
Janice Watson, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, contralto
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

String Quartet in B minor Op 64 No 2
The Salomon Quartet
Simon Standage, violin
Micaela Comberti, violin
Trevor Jones, viola
Jennifer Ward Clarke, cello

Mass in B flat major ‘Harmoniemesse’: Sanctus and Benedictus
Nancy Argenta, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod focuses his attention on Haydn\u2019s humanity.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201902Struggling Musician20190409

Donald Macleod looks at the obstacles thrown into Haydn’s path throughout his career as he shuffled between one job and the next until his employment with the Esterházys began.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativity earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

Donald conjures up images of Haydn sofa-surfing in his younger days, running between jobs to earn enough money to feed himself and describes how his father saved him after a burglary left him with nothing, not even a spare shirt to wear to work. Haydn’s struggles weren’t just confined to his work but were also evident in his private life; in his choice of wife and an unrequited love.

Mass in B flat major ‘Harmoniemesse’: Credo
Nancy Argenta, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Organ Concerto in C major
Simon Preson, organ
Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields
Neville Mariner, conductor

Piano Trio No 17 in F major
Beaux Arts Trio
Menahem Pressler, piano
Isidore Cohen, violin
Bernard Greenhouse, cello

Mass in G major ‘Missa Sancti Nicolai’: Agnus Dei
Lorna Anderson, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod looks at the obstacles thrown into Haydn\u2019s path throughout his career.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201903Devout Catholic20190410

Donald Macleod explores the importance of religion to Haydn, how it permeated his career and the choices he made throughout his life.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativity earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

Haydn was brought up in a Catholic family at a time when the values of the Enlightenment were held in high esteem in Europe. As a young choir boy, Haydn’s daily routine followed the pattern of the liturgical year, which was an influence he never forgot. His steadfast faith is evident in his compositions, copies of which travelled along the length of the Danube and beyond.

Stabat Mater: Sancta Mater
Patricia Rozario, soprano
Anthony Rolfe Johnson, tenor
The English Concert
Trevor Pinnock, musical director

Mass in F major ‘Missa brevis a due soprani’
Susan Gritton, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Arianna a Naxos cantata: Aria ‘Dove sei’
Carolyn Watkinson, mezzo-soprano
Glen Wilson, piano

String Quartet in B flat major Op 64 No 3
The Salomon Quartet
Simon Standage, violin
Micaela Comberti, violin
Trevor Jones, viola
Jennifer Ward Clarke, cello

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod explores the importance of religion in Haydn\u2019s life.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201904Distracted Times20190411

Donald Macleod considers the effect war and turmoil had on Haydn’s life and career, and how those infuences shaped his compositions.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativity earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

Austria was in an almost constant state of war during Haydn’s life. While he was protected from front line warfare, he was always engaged with the politics of his time. Haydn disliked Napoleon and was horrified at news of the French Revolution. Donald recounts a story about music transcending politics when an 'enemy' soldier visited Haydn at the end of his life and sang an aria from The Creation oratorio, bringing tears of joy to the old man’s eyes.

Mass in C major Missa in tempore belli ‘Paukenmesse’: Agnus Dei
Joanna Lunn, soprano
Sara Mingardo, alto
Topi Lehtipuu, tenor
Brindley Sherratt, bass
Monteverdi Choir
English Baroque Soloists
John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

Symphony No 100 in G major ‘Military’: movt. II Allegretto
New York Philharmonic
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

Piano Trio No 39 in G major ‘Gypsy Rondo’
Patrick Cohen, piano
Erich Höbarth, violin
Christophe Coin, cello

Mass in C major Missa in tempore belli ‘Paukenmesse’: Credo
Joanna Lunn, soprano
Sara Mingardo, alto
Topi Lehtipuu, tenor
Brindley Sherratt, bass
Monteverdi Choir
English Baroque Soloists
John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

Die Schöpfung, Part 2: Aria ‘Mit Würd’ und Hoheit angetan
Michael Schade, tenor
The English Baroque Soloists
John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

Mass in D minor Missa in angustiis ‘Nelson Mass’: Benedictus, Agnus Dei and Dona nobis pacem
Sylvia Stahlman, soprano
Helen Watts, alto
Wilfred Brown, tenor
Tom Krause, bass
Choir of King’s College, Cambridge
Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields
Sir David Willcocks, conductor

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod considers the effect war and turmoil had on Haydn\u2019s life and career.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201905Popular Composer20190412

Donald Macleod turns his attention to the high regard Haydn enjoyed from his friends, colleagues and audiences. Also, the extraordinary story of how Haydn lost his head.

Joseph Haydn’s prodigious creativity earned him the titles Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. However, he was also occupied with sacred music throughout his career. This week, as Donald Macleod follows Haydn’s journey from humble choirboy to Europe’s most celebrated composer, he shines the spotlight on music from Haydn’s many settings of the Mass. It's music that is as chock-full of invention and character as any of the instrumental forms he made his own.

Today, Donald draws a picture of Haydn’s immense popularity, not just as a comoposer but as a man. The affection in which he was held only grew as he entered old age.

Mass in B flat major ‘Harmoniemesse’: Agnus Dei and Dona nobis pacem
Nancy Argenta, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Trumpet Concerto in E flat major: movt I Allegro
Wynton Marsalis, trumpet
English Chamber Orchestra
Raymond Leppard, conductor

Symphony No 104 in D major ‘London’: movt IV Finale: Spiritoso
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Sir Georg Solti, conductor

Die Schöpfung: Part 1 Nos 10-14
Ruth Ziesak, soprano
Herbert Lippert, tenor
René Pape, bass
Anton Scharinger, bass-baritone
Chicago Symphony Chorus
Margaret Hillis, chorus director
David Schrader, piano
John Sharp, cello
Joseph Guastafeste, double bass
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Sir Georg Solti, conductor

Mass in B flat major ‘Schöpfungsmesse’: Kyrie and Gloria
Susan Gritton, soprano
Pamela Helen Stephen, mezzo-soprano
Mark Padmore, tenor
Stephen Varcoe, baritone
Collegium Musicum 90
Richard Hickox, conductor

Producer: Eleri Llian Rees for BBC Cymru Wales

Donald Macleod focuses on the respect and appreciation offered to Haydn by his audiences.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.