Kids Are Alright, The [The Compass] [World Service]

Episodes

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012019112720191201 (WS)

Kids today: the lament of adults for generations. But throughout history, changes in society have been powered by youthful outrage and determination. Today’s teenagers face a new landscape of dangers, stretching into the 2050s and beyond. This is their inheritance, and they have a clear incentive to improve it.

In this three part series, The Kids Are Alright, Sandra Kanthal meets inspiring teenagers around the world working to make a difference in their communities and beyond.

This series will introduce you to, among others, youth reporters in South Africa trying to confront the rising tide of violence engulfing their neighbourhood; a Canadian teenager who has persuaded her government to spend millions to clean up a heavily polluted local river; and in Sweden, a young Syrian refugee working to improving the lives of hundreds of school age children in the camp in Lebanon where he lived for years.

Teenagers are often dismissed as too young to have an opinion and too inexperienced to make a difference. But these young adults are passionate, articulate and determined. Their experiences may provide inspiration to others who are fighting to make their world a better place.

Teenagers inspired to try and make a difference in the world around them.

The Compass - exploring our world.

Kids today: the lament of adults for generations. But throughout history, changes in society have been powered by youthful outrage and determination. Today’s teenagers face a new landscape of dangers, stretching into the 2050s and beyond. This is their inheritance, and they have a clear incentive to improve it.

In this three part series, The Kids Are Alright, Sandra Kanthal meets inspiring teenagers around the world working to make a difference in their communities and beyond.

This series will introduce you to, among others, youth reporters in South Africa trying to confront the rising tide of violence engulfing their neighbourhood; a Canadian teenager who has persuaded her government to spend millions to clean up a heavily polluted local river; and in Sweden, a young Syrian refugee working to improving the lives of hundreds of school age children in the camp in Lebanon where he lived for years.

Teenagers are often dismissed as too young to have an opinion and too inexperienced to make a difference. But these young adults are passionate, articulate and determined. Their experiences may provide inspiration to others who are fighting to make their world a better place.

Teenagers inspired to try and make a difference in the world around them.

The Compass - exploring our world.

01The Kids are Alright: Environment20191127

Stella Bowles is a teenage environmental campaigner; one you probably haven’t heard about - yet. But she has sparked real change in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Her school science project, and a great deal of persistence, led to a 15 million Canadian dollar project to clean up pollution in her local river. Now she is trying to show other teenagers around the world how they too can be guardians of their local waterways.

Teenagers are often dismissed as too young to have an opinion and too inexperienced to make a difference. But throughout history, changes in society have been powered by youthful outrage and determination. Today’s young adults face a new array of dangers which will stretch out over decades. This is their inheritance, and they have a clear incentive to improve it.

This is the first of a three-part series, in which Sandra Kanthal talks to teenagers around the world who are determined to be a voice for change. They are passionate, articulate and determined. Their experiences may provide inspiration to others who are fighting to make their world a better place.

How Stella Bowles' school project and persistence led to a clean-up of her local river

The Compass - exploring our world.

01The Kids are Alright: Environment2019112720191201 (WS)

Stella Bowles is a teenage environmental campaigner; one you probably haven’t heard about - yet. But she has sparked real change in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Her school science project, and a great deal of persistence, led to a 15 million Canadian dollar project to clean up pollution in her local river. Now she is trying to show other teenagers around the world how they too can be guardians of their local waterways.

Teenagers are often dismissed as too young to have an opinion and too inexperienced to make a difference. But throughout history, changes in society have been powered by youthful outrage and determination. Today’s young adults face a new array of dangers which will stretch out over decades. This is their inheritance, and they have a clear incentive to improve it.

This is the first of a three-part series, in which Sandra Kanthal talks to teenagers around the world who are determined to be a voice for change. They are passionate, articulate and determined. Their experiences may provide inspiration to others who are fighting to make their world a better place.

How Stella Bowles' school project and persistence led to a clean-up of her local river

The Compass - exploring our world.

02The Kids are Alright: Opportunity20191204

Mohamad Aljounde is an 18-year-old student in Sweden. He is a keen photographer, amateur film-maker, a Syrian refugee and winner of the 2017 International Children’s Peace Prize. When the war in Syria broke out, he and his family fled to Lebanon where they lived for years. Due to a shortage of money, and a lack of school places, Mohamad’s education came to a halt. So, when he couldn’t go to school, he did a remarkable thing - he helped build one, and that school is thriving, providing an education to other Syrian refugees.

On the other side of the world, 15-year-old Taarini Kaur Dang is building a million dollar investment fund in Silicon Valley to try and maximise the social impact one entrepreneurial teenager can achieve.

What both these young adults have in common is a determination to grasp opportunities in the best and worst of circumstances.

The 18-year-old student who built a school and a 15-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur

The Compass - exploring our world.

02The Kids are Alright: Opportunity2019120420191208 (WS)

Mohamad Aljounde is an 18-year-old student in Sweden. He is a keen photographer, amateur film-maker, a Syrian refugee and winner of the 2017 International Children’s Peace Prize. When the war in Syria broke out, he and his family fled to Lebanon where they lived for years. Due to a shortage of money, and a lack of school places, Mohamad’s education came to a halt. So, when he couldn’t go to school, he did a remarkable thing - he helped build one, and that school is thriving, providing an education to other Syrian refugees.

On the other side of the world, 15-year-old Taarini Kaur Dang is building a million dollar investment fund in Silicon Valley to try and maximise the social impact one entrepreneurial teenager can achieve.

What both these young adults have in common is a determination to grasp opportunities in the best and worst of circumstances.

The 18-year-old student who built a school and a 15-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur

The Compass - exploring our world.

03The Kids are Alright: Tackling violence20191211

In the South African town of Atlantis, a group of teenage reporters are speaking out against the rising levels of violence ripping at the fabric of their lives.
Once a week, Temica Bonn, Logan Hansen and Meagan Lubbe broadcast a live show from Radio Atlantis inspiring conversations and educating the community on how gun crime is threatening the way they live. The team have been focusing on this topic for two years in the hope of steering young people away from a path which leads to guns and gangs.

In London, it is knife crime which is scaring the neighbourhood where Shanea Oldham lives. After two violent events which changed the course of her life, she is starting a social enterprise to help young people in her community who are struggling to cope with the challenges that surround them.

Sandra Kanthal meets some very brave and determined teenagers to hear how they are using their voices to fight for change on the streets where they live.

(Photo: Temica Bonn, Logan Hansen, Meagan Lubbe, Monique Hansen. Credit: Sandra Kanthal)

Teenagers inspired to try and make a difference in the world around them.

The Compass - exploring our world.

03The Kids are Alright: Tackling violence2019121120191215 (WS)

In the South African town of Atlantis, a group of teenage reporters are speaking out against the rising levels of violence ripping at the fabric of their lives.
Once a week, Temica Bonn, Logan Hansen and Meagan Lubbe broadcast a live show from Radio Atlantis inspiring conversations and educating the community on how gun crime is threatening the way they live. The team have been focusing on this topic for two years in the hope of steering young people away from a path which leads to guns and gangs.

In London, it is knife crime which is scaring the neighbourhood where Shanea Oldham lives. After two violent events which changed the course of her life, she is starting a social enterprise to help young people in her community who are struggling to cope with the challenges that surround them.

Sandra Kanthal meets some very brave and determined teenagers to hear how they are using their voices to fight for change on the streets where they live.

(Photo: Temica Bonn, Logan Hansen, Meagan Lubbe, Monique Hansen. Credit: Sandra Kanthal)

Teenagers inspired to try and make a difference in the world around them.

The Compass - exploring our world.

03The Kids are Alright: Tackling violence2019121120191215 (WS)

In the South African town of Atlantis, a group of teenage reporters are speaking out against the rising levels of violence ripping at the fabric of their lives.
Once a week, Temica Bonn, Logan Hansen and Meagan Lubbe broadcast a live show from Radio Atlantis inspiring conversations and educating the community on how gun crime is threatening the way they live. The team have been focusing on this topic for two years in the hope of steering young people away from a path which leads to guns and gangs.

In London, it is knife crime which is scaring the neighbourhood where Shanea Oldham lives. After two violent events which changed the course of her life, she is starting a social enterprise to help young people in her community who are struggling to cope with the challenges that surround them.

Sandra Kanthal meets some very brave and determined teenagers to hear how they are using their voices to fight for change on the streets where they live.

(Photo: Temica Bonn, Logan Hansen, Meagan Lubbe, Monique Hansen. Credit: Sandra Kanthal)

Teenagers inspired to try and make a difference in the world around them.

With ideas too big for a single episode, The Compass presents mini-series about society