Killing Insects - The Rights And Wrongs [discovery] [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Killing Insects for Conservation2018061120180612 (WS)

Killing insects in the name of research upsets some people. How do scientists justify it?

Explorations in the world of science.

Prof Adam Hart stirred a hornet’s nest of controversy by asking the public to kill wasps for science. He explores why scientists kill insects to save them from extinction.

The work of the entolomologist often involves the killing of insects in large numbers. This happens in the search for new species in the exploration of the planet’s biodiversity and in ecological research to monitor the health of wild insect populations and the impact that we are having on the environment. But the methods of insects scientists have come under criticism.

Last year presenter and entomologist Adam Hart was involved in a citizen science project aimed at surveying the abundance of various species of British wasp around the country. The survey entailed members of the public setting up lethal wasp traps in their gardens and sending the dead insects to the lab running the survey. Many people took part but the study also generated negative newspaper coverage and stinging criticism on social media. How can you save insects by killing them?

Next week, do insects experience pain and suffering?

Picture: Broad-Bellied Chaser, Credit: BBC/Andrew Luck-Baker

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

01Killing Insects for Conservation2018061120180617 (WS)

Killing insects in the name of research upsets some people. How do scientists justify it?

Explorations in the world of science.

Prof Adam Hart stirred a hornet’s nest of controversy by asking the public to kill wasps for science. He explores why scientists kill insects to save them from extinction.

The work of the entolomologist often involves the killing of insects in large numbers. This happens in the search for new species in the exploration of the planet’s biodiversity and in ecological research to monitor the health of wild insect populations and the impact that we are having on the environment. But the methods of insects scientists have come under criticism.

Last year presenter and entomologist Adam Hart was involved in a citizen science project aimed at surveying the abundance of various species of British wasp around the country. The survey entailed members of the public setting up lethal wasp traps in their gardens and sending the dead insects to the lab running the survey. Many people took part but the study also generated negative newspaper coverage and stinging criticism on social media. How can you save insects by killing them?

Next week, do insects experience pain and suffering?

Picture: Broad-Bellied Chaser, Credit: BBC/Andrew Luck-Baker

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

01Killing Insects for Conservation20180611

Killing insects in the name of research upsets some people. How do scientists justify it?

Explorations in the world of science.

Prof Adam Hart stirred a hornet’s nest of controversy by asking the public to kill wasps for science. He explores why scientists kill insects to save them from extinction.

The work of the entolomologist often involves the killing of insects in large numbers. This happens in the search for new species in the exploration of the planet’s biodiversity and in ecological research to monitor the health of wild insect populations and the impact that we are having on the environment. But the methods of insects scientists have come under criticism.

Last year presenter and entomologist Adam Hart was involved in a citizen science project aimed at surveying the abundance of various species of British wasp around the country. The survey entailed members of the public setting up lethal wasp traps in their gardens and sending the dead insects to the lab running the survey. Many people took part but the study also generated negative newspaper coverage and stinging criticism on social media. How can you save insects by killing them?

Next week, do insects experience pain and suffering?

Picture: Broad-Bellied Chaser, Credit: BBC/Andrew Luck-Baker

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

02Do Insects Feel Pain?2018061820180619 (WS)

Do insects experience pain and suffering?

Explorations in the world of science.

Insects such as fruit flies provide important insights into human biology and medicine. But should we worry whether insects experience pain and suffering in scientists’ hands?

Entomologist Adam Hart visits the Fly Facility at the University of Manchester where researcher Andreas Prokop describes the many insights that experiments on the fruit fly Drosophila have provided on aspects of human biology and health. Globally billions of these little flies have died in the pursuit of this knowledge.

Should we give a second thought about the deaths of these creatures? Do insects have the capacity for pain and the experience of suffering? It depends which scientist you ask. Lars Chittka of Queen Mary University of London says his work on bumble bees suggests that we can’t assume they do not. Shelley Adamo of Dalhousie University in Canada is not convinced by existing arguments for insect consciousness.

Photo: Robber Fly Asilidae Diptera Insect, Credit: Nechaev-kon/Getty Images

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

02Do Insects Feel Pain?20180618

Do insects experience pain and suffering?

Explorations in the world of science.

Insects such as fruit flies provide important insights into human biology and medicine. But should we worry whether insects experience pain and suffering in scientists’ hands?

Entomologist Adam Hart visits the Fly Facility at the University of Manchester where researcher Andreas Prokop describes the many insights that experiments on the fruit fly Drosophila have provided on aspects of human biology and health. Globally billions of these little flies have died in the pursuit of this knowledge.

Should we give a second thought about the deaths of these creatures? Do insects have the capacity for pain and the experience of suffering? It depends which scientist you ask. Lars Chittka of Queen Mary University of London says his work on bumble bees suggests that we can’t assume they do not. Shelley Adamo of Dalhousie University in Canada is not convinced by existing arguments for insect consciousness.

Photo: Robber Fly Asilidae Diptera Insect, Credit: Nechaev-kon/Getty Images

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

02Do Insects Feel Pain?2018061820180624 (WS)

Do insects experience pain and suffering?

Explorations in the world of science.

Insects such as fruit flies provide important insights into human biology and medicine. But should we worry whether insects experience pain and suffering in scientists’ hands?

Entomologist Adam Hart visits the Fly Facility at the University of Manchester where researcher Andreas Prokop describes the many insights that experiments on the fruit fly Drosophila have provided on aspects of human biology and health. Globally billions of these little flies have died in the pursuit of this knowledge.

Should we give a second thought about the deaths of these creatures? Do insects have the capacity for pain and the experience of suffering? It depends which scientist you ask. Lars Chittka of Queen Mary University of London says his work on bumble bees suggests that we can’t assume they do not. Shelley Adamo of Dalhousie University in Canada is not convinced by existing arguments for insect consciousness.

Photo: Robber Fly Asilidae Diptera Insect, Credit: Nechaev-kon/Getty Images

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker