Lady Curzon And A Pineapple

As well as being a tasty treat, the pineapple is also a thing of symbolic significance in architecture.

In this celebration of the spiky-headed fruit, Ian Peacock meets a young pineapple grower and a man who likes to roast pineapples on a spit.

He also travels to Falkirk, to see Scotland's great Pineapple Folly.

With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

Episodes

First
Broadcast
RepeatedComments

20101001 (BBC7)

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'. With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

20120101 (BBC7)

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'. With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'.

20120102 (BBC7)

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'. With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'.

20080725 BT=1345 (BBC7)
20080725 (BBC7)
20121209 (BBC7)
20121210 (BBC7)

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of The King of Fruits. With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'.

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'. With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

2005041920051226
20071228 (BBC7)
20080725 (BBC7)
20090605 (BBC7)
20090606 (BBC7)
20100312 BT=1445 (BBC7)
20100312 (BBC7)
20101001 (BBC7)
20120101 (BBC7)
20120102 (BBC7)
20121209 (BBC7)
20121210 (BBC7)
20140126 (BBC7)
20151012 (BBC7)
20151013 (BBC7)
20161211 (BBC7)
20161212 (BBC7)
20181229 (BBC7)
20181230 (BBC7)
20071228 (R4)

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'.

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'. With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

With comment from Lucinda Lambton.>

With comment from Lucinda Lambton.Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'. With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of "The King of Fruits". With comment from Lucinda Lambton.
The "most wanted" additions to any early 20th-century dinner party were said to have been Lady Curzon and a Pineapple. The former for her wit and charms, the latter for its taste, of course, but also for its status as a symbol of wealth and exoticism. Pineapples are believed to have been discovered by Columbus in 1493, and by the 18th century they were so sought-after that many wealthy landowners were attempting to grow them here in Britain. Some were successfully grown as far north as Falkirk in Central Scotland.
Tomorrow morning here on BBC Radio4, Ian Peacock will be exploring the history of this extraordinary fruit, meeting a young pineapple enthusiast who grew one in his grandad's greenhouse, hearing from Lucinda Lambton about pineapple representation in architecture here and abroad, and tasting a pineapple cooked to an ancient recipe on a spit over an open fire. Join Ian Peacock for "Lady Curzon and a Pineapple" tomorrow morning at half past nine here on BBC Radio 4.

As well as being a tasty treat, the pineapple is also a thing of symbolic significance in architecture. In this celebration of the spiky-headed fruit, Ian Peacock meets a young pineapple grower and a man who likes to roast pineapples on a spit. He also travels to Falkirk, to see Scotland's great Pineapple Folly.

20051226

As well as being a tasty treat, the pineapple is also a thing of symbolic significance in architecture. In this celebration of the spiky-headed fruit, Ian Peacock meets a young pineapple grower and a man who likes to roast pineapples on a spit. He also travels to Falkirk, to see Scotland's great Pineapple Folly.

Followed by News.

2007122820090606 BT=0415 (BBC7)
20090606 (BBC7)
20101001 (BBC7)
20140126 (BBC7)
20151012 (BBC7)
20151013 (BBC7)
20161211 (BBC7)
20161212 (BBC7)

As well as being a tasty treat, the pineapple also carries symbolic significance in architecture. In this celebration of the fruit, Ian Peacock meets a young pineapple grower and a man who likes to roast pineapples on a spit. He also travels to Falkirk to see Scotland's great Pineapple Folly.

As well as being a tasty treat, the pineapple is also a thing of symbolic significance in architecture. In this celebration of the spiky-headed fruit, Ian Peacock meets a young pineapple grower and a man who likes to roast pineapples on a spit. He also travels to Falkirk, to see Scotland's great Pineapple Folly.

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'. With comment from Lucinda Lambton.

Ian Peacock picks up his spoon and delves into the history of 'The King of Fruits'.