Episodes

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20020405Marcel Berlins explores the legal issues of the day.

As the House of Lords prepares to review religious offences, this edition asks whether a law of blasphemy is still necessary.

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20030131Marcel Berlins and guests debate David Blunkett's proposed legislation which would allow juries to be told about a defendant's previous convictions.
20030214With Marcel Berlins.

As the prospect of human cloning draws closer, science is racing ahead of current law.

What legal gaps have opened up and how important is it to fill them?

20030221Marcel Berlins explores the legal issues of the day.

The US fast food industry is facing multiple lawsuits from people alleging that it is responsible for making them fat.

20030314Convicted criminals have won compensation in courts for injustices they have suffered.

Marcel Berlins asks if the law is becoming too concerned with offenders rather than victims.

20030328Marcel Berlins explores the legal issues of the day.

Is our criminal justice system concentrating too much on the victim, and is this leading to miscarriages of justice?

20030530The legal series returns in which Marcel Berlins tackles the big legal issues and the everyday ones without long words, small print or expensive fees.
20030606Marcel Berlins takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.
20030613The cases, the courts and the lawyers: Marcel Berlins' weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.
20030627Another edition of the legal series in which Marcel Berlins tackles the big legal issues and the everyday ones, without the small print or expensive fees.
20030725The cases, the courts and the lawyers.

Marcel Berlins' weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

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20031024Another edition of the legal series in which Marcel Berlins unpicks the complexities of the law and examines its impact.
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20031114Is treatment better than punishment? In this special edition, Marcel Berlins visits Liverpool to examine the ideas behind Britain's first Community Justice Centre.
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20031128The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.
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20050610Presenter Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.
20050617Presenter Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.
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20050701Radio 4's agenda-setting cross examination of the law and legal system. Presenter Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.
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20060131Barrister Clive Coleman cuts through the legal jargon to explain what's really happening with the law - and how it affects our everyday lives.
20060207Barrister Clive Coleman cuts through the legal jargon to explain what's really happening with the law - and how it affects our everyday lives.

Barrister Clive Coleman cuts through the legal jargon to explain what's really happening with the law - and how it affects our everyday lives.

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20060228Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.
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20060620Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.
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20060704Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.
20060711Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

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20061003Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

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20061128Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.
20070130As Tony Blair prepares to leave office, David Blunkett, Dominic Grieve, Lord Goodhart and Baroness Kennedy join presenter Clive Coleman to assess the Prime Minister's legal legacy. He's brought us ASBOs, the Human Rights Act and more than 1,000 new criminal offences. Has any of it made a difference?

As Tony Blair prepares to leave office, David Blunkett, Dominic Grieve, Lord Goodhart and Baroness Kennedy join presenter Clive Coleman to assess the Prime Minister's legal legacy.

20070227Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

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20070327Clive Coleman presents a special programme recorded in front of an audience at Queen Mary, University of London. He is joined by Andrew Gowers, former editor of the Financial Times and the author of the government's review of intellectual property law, to discuss theft of music, pictures and ideas, one of the fastest growing areas of crime and legal disputes.

Clive Coleman presents a special programme recorded in front of an audience at Queen Mary, University of London.

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20071106Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20071113Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.
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20080129Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

Clive Coleman takes a look at the legal issues in the news.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

20080226As celebrities trade more on their private lives and fears grow about the security of personal data, Clive Coleman asks where the law on privacy is heading.

As celebrities trade more on their private lives and fears grow about the security of personal data, Clive Coleman asks where the law on privacy is heading.

20080304Clive Coleman looks at the legal issues in the news. As courts take more notice of pre-nuptial agreements, he asks if they are now essential for everyone, however wealthy.
20080311Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news. He examines the process of judicial review, how it works and how it will change our lives in the future.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20080318Clive Coleman looks at the legal issues in the news.

He asks how the prosecution of sexual offences can be made more effective and what changes to the law are needed.

Clive Coleman looks at the legal issues in the news. He asks how the prosecution of sexual offences can be made more effective and what changes to the law are needed.

20080325He explores the law on defamation.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news. He explores the law on defamation.

20080527Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news. He asks if forensic scientific evidence is given too much weight in prosecuting crime.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20080603Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

He asks why universities and students are using the law on everything from attendance at lectures to what clothes are worn to seminars.

20080610Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

The legal process depends upon accurate recollection of events, but just how reliable are our memories? Clive asks whether we need to reform the law to allow for human fallibility.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20080617Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news. He asks what the police and prosecutors can do to get frightened witnesses to give evidence in court.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20080624Points of law in criminal cases are often decided in the absence of jurors.

Clive explores what goes on before a trial and what prosecution and defence reveal to one another.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

Points of law in criminal cases are often decided in the absence of jurors. Clive explores what goes on before a trial and what prosecution and defence reveal to one another.

20080701Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news and tackles the issue of who should be allowed to plead insanity. As more mentally ill people enter the justice system, Clive asks if the law is as up-to-date and fair as it should be.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news and tackles the issue of who should be allowed to plead insanity.

20080708Our senior judges may be independent, but are they sufficiently in touch with public opinion? How are they perceived by the public and what changes may be necessary?

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues. Our senior judges may be independent, but are they sufficiently in touch with public opinion? How are they perceived by the public and what changes may be necessary?

20080715In an exclusive interview, he talks to Lord Bingham, former Lord Chief Justice and Master of the Rolls, the judge who has perhaps done more than any other person in the past 15 years to shape British law.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

20080722Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

He looks at the function of county courts, who deal with much of the sharp end of human life, from mortgage repossessions to domestic violence.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

20080729Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

He asks if there can be a right to food and how might such a right be enforced.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues. He asks if there can be a right to food and how might such a right be enforced.

20080923Reporter Mukul Devichand investigates the plausibility of the claim that the medieval Islamic world influenced the 13th-century foundations of English common law.
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20081007Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

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Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

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20090120Clive Coleman discusses the idea that human rights might extend beyond humans, asking whether rights exist for animals, the environment and even robots.

He is joined by the writer Kenan Malik, philosopher Jo Woolf and lawyer Christopher Stone, who discuss propositions put forward by philosopher Peter Singer and environmental lawyer Cormac Cullinan.

Clive Coleman discusses the idea that human rights might extend beyond humans.

Clive Coleman discusses the idea that human rights might extend beyond humans, asking whether rights exist for animals, the environment and even robots. He is joined by the writer Kenan Malik, philosopher Jo Woolf and lawyer Christopher Stone, who discuss propositions put forward by philosopher Peter Singer and environmental lawyer Cormac Cullinan.

Clive Coleman discusses the idea that human rights might extend beyond humans.

20090127Clive Coleman investigates the future of the legal profession, faced with the twin threats of new technology and the credit crunch.

Will the familiar figure of the high street solicitor disappear, to be replaced by clever software that can draft complex documents, and by offshore lawyers working in India?

Clive Coleman investigates the future of the legal profession.

Clive Coleman investigates the future of the legal profession, faced with the twin threats of new technology and the credit crunch. Will the familiar figure of the high street solicitor disappear, to be replaced by clever software that can draft complex documents, and by offshore lawyers working in India?

Clive Coleman investigates the future of the legal profession.

20090203Lucy Ash reports on how the US is trying to cut re-offending and meets the killers and gang bosses who are now learning business skills from top CEOs.

She also asks whether communing with nature can soften the hard hearts of the toughest convicts.

Lucy Ash reports on how the US is trying to cut reoffending.

20090210Clive Coleman reports on legal issues behind the headlines.
20090217After winning his case against the News of the World, FIA president Max Mosley says he wants the law changed so that journalists who breach privacy could face jail.

He tells Clive Coleman how he is pursuing cases through the courts across Europe and about the idea of a fighting fund to help individuals do battle with the newspapers.

Private Eye editor Ian Hislop responds.

Clive Coleman talks to FIA president Max Mosley about privacy laws.

After winning his case against the News of the World, FIA president Max Mosley says he wants the law changed so that journalists who breach privacy could face jail. He tells Clive Coleman how he is pursuing cases through the courts across Europe and about the idea of a fighting fund to help individuals do battle with the newspapers. Private Eye editor Ian Hislop responds.

Clive Coleman talks to FIA president Max Mosley about privacy laws.

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20090303Judges now have the power to hand out community service punishments to parents who sabotage contact between their ex-partners and their children.

Will the courts be willing to impose penalties on obstructive parents?

Also a report on how children going through care proceedings are being affected by the shortage of guardians, the professionals responsible for advising the judge on what is in the best interests of the child.

Focusing on some of the ways in which the law affects children.

Judges now have the power to hand out community service punishments to parents who sabotage contact between their ex-partners and their children. Will the courts be willing to impose penalties on obstructive parents?

20090310Reporting on the problems faced by governments prosecuting pirates captured at sea.

The world's navies have joined forces to fight piracy off the coast of Somalia but cannot agree what to do with the pirates they catch.

Reporting on the problems faced by governments prosecuting sea pirates.

Reporting on the problems faced by governments prosecuting pirates captured at sea. The world's navies have joined forces to fight piracy off the coast of Somalia but cannot agree what to do with the pirates they catch.

Reporting on the problems faced by governments prosecuting sea pirates.

20090317Clive Coleman explores the acute knife crime problems on the streets and how both young people and the police want to tackle them.

Synopsis

Clive Coleman explores the acute knife crime problems on the streets and how both young people and the police want to tackle them.

Clive Coleman explores the acute knife crime problems on the streets.

20090324Would it be a good idea if there was a halfway house between marriage and living together? In France couples can sign Civil Solidarity Pacts, while in Scotland cohabitants can have a claim on each other if they split up.

Clive Coleman asks which example England and Wales should follow.

Synopsis

Would it be a good idea if there was a halfway house between marriage and living together? In France couples can sign Civil Solidarity Pacts, while in Scotland cohabitants can have a claim on each other if they split up. Clive Coleman asks which example England and Wales should follow.

Options for adopting a halfway house between marriage and living together.

20090331Clive Coleman asks why the government wants radical changes to the law on murder and on inquests in cases where the state is involved.

Clive Coleman asks why the government wants radical changes to the law on murder and on inquests in cases where the state is involved.

Clive Coleman asks why the government wants radical changes to the law on murder.

Synopsis

2009061620090618Clive Coleman explores the age of criminal responsibility.

In most European countries this ranges from 12 to 18 years old, but in England, Wales and Northern Ireland 10-year-old children can be prosecuted.

Clive asks if criminalising young people at such an early age is the best response to child crime.

Clive Coleman explores the age of criminal responsibility. In most European countries this ranges from 12 to 18 years old, but in England, Wales and Northern Ireland 10-year-old children can be prosecuted. Clive asks if criminalising young people at such an early age is the best response to child crime.

Clive Coleman explores the age of criminal responsibility.

2009062320090625Clive Coleman examines the law governing what happens to your body when you are dead.

With a report due on the findings of an inquiry into the nuclear industry's use of organs from dead workers for medical research, Clive Coleman examines the law governing what happens to your body when you are dead and what it means for people who want to give away - or even sell - bits of themselves.

Who owns your body - you or the state?

With a report due on the findings of an inquiry into the nuclear industry's use of organs from dead workers for medical research, Clive Coleman examines the law governing what happens to your body when you are dead and what it means for people who want to give away - or even sell - bits of themselves. Who owns your body - you or the state?

Clive Coleman examines the law governing what happens to your body when you are dead.

2009063020090702Clive Coleman reports on legal issues behind the headlines.
2009070720090709Examining compensation for victims of child abuse by religious institutions in Ireland.

As more evidence emerges of child abuse by religious institutions in Ireland, Clive Coleman examines a scheme set up to provide justice and compensation for victims.

What lessons does it offer in dealing with institutional abuse - and why does it insist on protecting the identity of alleged abusers?

As more evidence emerges of child abuse by religious institutions in Ireland, Clive Coleman examines a scheme set up to provide justice and compensation for victims. What lessons does it offer in dealing with institutional abuse - and why does it insist on protecting the identity of alleged abusers?

Examining compensation for victims of child abuse by religious institutions in Ireland.

2009102020091022Clive Coleman asks if the Freedom of Information Act has created a more open society and changed the culture of government.

Clive Coleman asks if the Freedom of Information Act has created a more open society.

2009102720091029Clive Coleman talks to the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge, about the key issues currently facing the criminal justice system.

Clive Coleman talks to the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge.

2009110320091105Clive Coleman interviews Ken MacDonald, the former Director of Public Prosecutions, about his five years in the position from 2003 to 2008.

Clive Coleman interviews Ken MacDonald, the former Director of Public Prosecutions.

Clive Coleman interviews Ken MacDonald, the former Director of Public Prosecutions, about his five years in the position from 2003 to 2008.

Clive Coleman interviews Ken MacDonald, the former Director of Public Prosecutions.

2009111020091112The programme visits the mental health court pilot in Brighton and takes a wider look at Mental Health Treatment orders and the problems faced by defendants with mental health problems in the criminal justice system.

The programme visits the mental health court pilot in Brighton.

The programme visits the mental health court pilot in Brighton.

2010022320100225Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories of the day and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories of the day.

2010030220100304Clive Coleman and a panel of politicians examine some of the key policies on justice.

Interviewees:

Charles Falconer QC, the former Lord Chancellor

Edward Garnier QC, the Shadow Attorney General

David Howarth, Liberal Democrat Shadow Justice Secretary.

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Clive Coleman and a panel of politicians examine some of the key policies on justice.

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2010030920100311Outdated, inadequate and piecemeal are just some of the criticisms levelled at the UK's current anti-bribery legislation.

Clive Coleman and guests weigh up whether or not the Bribery Bill and proposed reforms are robust enough to achieve their aims.

Penalties, plea bargains and the enforcement role of the Serious Fraud Office are examined in the light of recent cases, such as the BAE Systems settlement.

Interviewees include former Attorney General Lord Goldsmith and Monty Raphael, special counsel at Peters and Peters law firm.

Outdated, inadequate and piecemeal are just some of the criticisms levelled at the UK's current anti-bribery legislation. Clive Coleman and guests weigh up whether or not the Bribery Bill and proposed reforms are robust enough to achieve their aims. Penalties, plea bargains and the enforcement role of the Serious Fraud Office are examined in the light of recent cases, such as the BAE Systems settlement.

Clive Coleman and guests explore the proposed reforms of the UK's bribery laws.

2010031620100318The International Criminal Court has been criticised for lacking teeth, dealing with too few cases and concentrating too much on Africa.

Clive Coleman speaks to the Court's president and others to consider those claims.

The government has finally reacted to widespread criticism of the Dangerous Dogs Act with a consultation.

But how do you balance the rights of animals with the safety of humans?

Plus the surprisingly intense relationship between poetry and the law.

Interviewees include President Sang-Hyun Song, Philippe Sands and Tod Lindberg.

Clive Coleman looks at the International Criminal Court and the Dangerous Dogs Act.

The International Criminal Court has been criticised for lacking teeth, dealing with too few cases and concentrating too much on Africa. Clive Coleman speaks to the Court's president and others to consider those claims.

The government has finally reacted to widespread criticism of the Dangerous Dogs Act with a consultation. But how do you balance the rights of animals with the safety of humans?

Clive Coleman looks at the International Criminal Court and the Dangerous Dogs Act.

201006081/4.

Top legal journalist Joshua Rozenberg returns to present the first in a new series of the legal affairs magazine.

More than two decades after he first presented Law in Action", Joshua Rozenberg, the doyen of legal reporters, returns to the programme to investigate the issues which influence and determine our law.

Later in this series, he reveals what the new UK government's approach to the law is likely to be, its priorities and how its policies will change our system of justice.

In this opening programme, he examines an issue that looks set to prompt widespread debate among the public as well as among those working in the criminal justice system.

Increasingly the police are using digital cameras and intelligence tactics to create image libraries of campaigners and protesters.

These are designed, senior officers say, to help the police prevent criminal acts from being committed.

But critics see the creation and development of the photographic databases as potentially sinister, claiming that ever larger numbers of images are being added.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how the police, the courts and those responsible for protecting personal data strike a balance between the need to safeguard civil liberties and the police's responsibility to prevent crime.

Are there enough safeguards to protect the public from being unfairly linked with criminals? Is maintaining public order being used as an excuse to engineer a surveillance society? Or are the authorities simply taking the minimum steps to ensure a determined and well-organised minority of protesters bent on disruption do not wreck the lives of the law-abiding majority?

Producer: Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg asks if the police's use of cameras endangers civil liberties.

1/4. Top legal journalist Joshua Rozenberg returns to present the first in a new series of the legal affairs magazine.

More than two decades after he first presented "Law in Action", Joshua Rozenberg, the doyen of legal reporters, returns to the programme to investigate the issues which influence and determine our law. Later in this series, he reveals what the new UK government's approach to the law is likely to be, its priorities and how its policies will change our system of justice. In this opening programme, he examines an issue that looks set to prompt widespread debate among the public as well as among those working in the criminal justice system. Increasingly the police are using digital cameras and intelligence tactics to create image libraries of campaigners and protesters. These are designed, senior officers say, to help the police prevent criminal acts from being committed. But critics see the creation and development of the photographic databases as potentially sinister, claiming that ever larger numbers of images are being added.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how the police, the courts and those responsible for protecting personal data strike a balance between the need to safeguard civil liberties and the police's responsibility to prevent crime. Are there enough safeguards to protect the public from being unfairly linked with criminals? Is maintaining public order being used as an excuse to engineer a surveillance society? Or are the authorities simply taking the minimum steps to ensure a determined and well-organised minority of protesters bent on disruption do not wreck the lives of the law-abiding majority?

Joshua Rozenberg asks if the police's use of cameras endangers civil liberties.

More than two decades after he first presented Law in Action"", Joshua Rozenberg, the doyen of legal reporters, returns to the programme to investigate the issues which influence and determine our law.

Joshua Rozenberg asks if the police's use of cameras endangers civil liberties."

20100615Joshua Rozenberg presents the legal affairs magazine.
20100622At the half way stage of the World Cup, police forces across the UK are paying unsolicited visits to men with a record of domestic violence.

It's a strategy recommended by the Association of Chief Police Officers.

According to ACPO, research shows that domestic violence peaks during big sporting events like the World Cup.

Many police forces have therefore concluded that it makes sense to let potential perpetrators know they are being watched.

Joshua Rozenberg visits Nottinghamshire to see how such a strategy works in practice and investigates whether it is the best way to protect potential victims.

Joshua Rozenburg investigates an alleged link between the World Cup and domestic violence.

At the half way stage of the World Cup, police forces across the UK are paying unsolicited visits to men with a record of domestic violence. It's a strategy recommended by the Association of Chief Police Officers. According to ACPO, research shows that domestic violence peaks during big sporting events like the World Cup. Many police forces have therefore concluded that it makes sense to let potential perpetrators know they are being watched. Joshua Rozenberg visits Nottinghamshire to see how such a strategy works in practice and investigates whether it is the best way to protect potential victims.

20100629Joshua Rozenberg investigates the legal issues in the news and explains the law without long words, small print or expensive fees.
20101102

The case of Baha Mousa, an Iraqi hotel worker who died in the custody of British troops in 2003, exposed not just abusive behaviour by some British soldiers but a failure of the military justice system to adequately investigate and punish those responsible.

Joshua Rozenberg asks whether recent reforms to the military justice system are sufficient to restore confidence in the way the armed forces deal with crimes committed by their own troops.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the issue of military justice.

Joshua Rozenberg asks whether recent reforms to the military justice system are sufficient to restore confidence in the way the armed forces deal with crimes committed by their own troops.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the issue of military justice.

20101109

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal isses behind the headlines.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal isses behind the headlines.

20110308

The result of the referendum in Wales on greater law making powers for the Welsh Assembly could widen the gap between the law in England and that in Wales.

There are already many differences in areas such as planning and health, creating pitfalls for lawyers giving advice on both sides of the border.

In this edition Joshua Rozenberg looks at where devolution is going and the problems and opportunities that a divergence in the law could create.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at whether Wales is on the road to becoming a fourth jurisdiction.

The result of the referendum in Wales on greater law making powers for the Welsh Assembly could widen the gap between the law in England and that in Wales. There are already many differences in areas such as planning and health, creating pitfalls for lawyers giving advice on both sides of the border. In this edition Joshua Rozenberg looks at where devolution is going and the problems and opportunities that a divergence in the law could create.

2011031520110317

Joshua Rozenberg considers the UK's relationship with the European Court of Human Rights.

th political pressure mounting for changes to the UK's relationship with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, Joshua Rozenberg explores what scope there may be for reforms and how far, if at all, they would alter the Court's decisions.

And following recent concern about how the media in Britain reports on witnesses and suspects in high profile criminal investigations, he talks to the Attorney General, the Rt.

Hon.

Dominic Grieve, Q.C., M.P., about the law on contempt of court.

The law in this area was last amended by Parliament in the early 1980s, before the Internet and social networking.

How should we now strike a proper balance between public information on the one hand and reporting which may be prejudicial to future prosecutions on the other?

Producer: Simon Coates.

th political pressure mounting for changes to the UK's relationship with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, Joshua Rozenberg explores what scope there may be for reforms and how far, if at all, they would alter the Court's decisions. And following recent concern about how the media in Britain reports on witnesses and suspects in high profile criminal investigations, he talks to the Attorney General, the Rt. Hon. Dominic Grieve, Q.C., M.P., about the law on contempt of court. The law in this area was last amended by Parliament in the early 1980s, before the Internet and social networking. How should we now strike a proper balance between public information on the one hand and reporting which may be prejudicial to future prosecutions on the other?

2011101820111020The riots which hit England in August of this year presented the legal system with significant challenges.

In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg explores how the state responded to this very unusual situation.

The programme examines the sentences given to those arrested during the riots, and the reasons behind them, and also asks why many people were refused bail.

It looks at the speed at which cases were processed and asks how fast is too fast?

Producer Michael Wendling

Researcher Lucy Proctor.

Joshua Rozenberg explores contentious legal issues which arose from the August riots.

The riots which hit England in August of this year presented the legal system with significant challenges. In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg explores how the state responded to this very unusual situation. The programme examines the sentences given to those arrested during the riots, and the reasons behind them, and also asks why many people were refused bail. It looks at the speed at which cases were processed and asks how fast is too fast?

2011102520111027As the Leveson Inquiry into the culture, practices and ethics of the press takes evidence, Joshua Rozenberg looks at the expanding role of public inquiries and independent reviews, their practices and procedures and how accountable they are.

In his inquiry, Lord Justice Leveson is seeking an inclusive approach, holding open seminars and teach-in sessions and creating a role for "core participants" who have demonstrated a special interest in the Inquiry's work.

The panel of experts working with the judge has been chosen, it is claimed, for its independence.

But just how transparent will the Inquiry be? Joshua Rozenberg talks to those involved in previous high-profile public inquiries to discover what effect they have had on our law and public policy, whether they represented value for money for the taxpayer and whose interests they really served.

Producer: Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how accountable such reviews as the Leveson Inquiry will be.

In his inquiry, Lord Justice Leveson is seeking an inclusive approach, holding open seminars and teach-in sessions and creating a role for "core participants" who have demonstrated a special interest in the Inquiry's work. The panel of experts working with the judge has been chosen, it is claimed, for its independence. But just how transparent will the Inquiry be? Joshua Rozenberg talks to those involved in previous high-profile public inquiries to discover what effect they have had on our law and public policy, whether they represented value for money for the taxpayer and whose interests they really served.

2012102320121025In his first broadcast interview, the brand new chief coroner talks to Joshua Rozenberg.

Earlier this year, in a complete reversal of government policy, ministers decided after all to establish the new post of Chief Coroner. His Honour Judge Peter Thornton formally took up his role in September. The post is a highly visible one in an area of the law that has captured enormous public attention in recent years.

The inquest into the 7/7 bombings; the inquest into the death of the newspaper seller, Ian Tomlinson; Hillsborough; deaths in police custody; and deaths on military service abroad - all these have put the spotlight on the inquest system and the role of coroners in unprecedented ways.

In his first broadcast interview since taking up the newly-created post of Chief Coroner, Judge Thornton talks to "Law in Action" presenter, Joshua Rozenberg, about what the public can expect from him and how inquest procedures will be improved.

The programme will also explore the coalition's highly controversial plans for new sentencing rules. First, the proposed new "2-strikes-and-you're-out" rubric for serious violent and sexual criminals. How many offenders will actually be affected by this? And will it mean that such offenders really do serve "life sentences"?

At the other end of the scale, the government also plans a change. This is to give victims the power to choose the form which an out-of-court community sentence will take. Joshua Rozenberg asks if it is a good idea to involve victims in the sentencing process in this way. And, if it is, where might we go next in giving victims sentencing powers?

Producer Simon Coates.

Earlier this year, in a complete reversal of government policy, ministers decided after all to establish the new post of Chief Coroner. His Honour Judge Peter Thornton formally took up his role in September. The post is a highly visible one in an area of the law that has captured enormous public attention in recent years.

In his first broadcast interview since taking up the newly-created post of Chief Coroner, Judge Thornton talks to ""Law in Action"" presenter, Joshua Rozenberg, about what the public can expect from him and how inquest procedures will be improved.

The programme will also explore the coalition's highly controversial plans for new sentencing rules. First, the proposed new ""2-strikes-and-you're-out"" rubric for serious violent and sexual criminals. How many offenders will actually be affected by this? And will it mean that such offenders really do serve ""life sentences""?

In his first broadcast interview since taking up the newly-created post of Chief Coroner, Judge Thornton talks to "Law in Action" presenter, Joshua Rozenberg, about what the public can expect from him and how inquest procedures will be improved.

The programme will also explore the coalition's highly controversial plans for new sentencing rules. First, the proposed new "2-strikes-and-you're-out" rubric for serious violent and sexual criminals. How many offenders will actually be affected by this? And will it mean that such offenders really do serve "life sentences"?

2013031220130314
2013060420130606Legal magazine programme.
2013061120130613Legal magazine programme with Joshua Rozenberg.

Legal magazine programme with Joshua Rozenberg

2013061820130620
2014031820140320Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg

2014061020140612Joshua Rozenberg presents the topical legal magazine programme.

Joshua Rozenberg presents the magazine programme which explores how the law affects us all.

Producer: Richard Fenton Smith.

2014110420141106 (R4)Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

2015021720150219 (R4)Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

2015022420150226 (R4)Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

2015060220150604 (R4)Law in Action - BBC Radio 4's legal magazine programme - returns for a new series.

In this first edition Joshua Rozenberg examines the new Conservative government's plans for the law, including the future of the Human Rights Act.

Editor: Richard Knight.

Joshua Rozenberg examines the new Conservative government's plans for the law.

Law in Action - BBC Radio 4's legal magazine programme - returns for a new series.

Joshua Rozenberg examines the new Conservative government's plans for the law.

2015060920150611 (R4)Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

02/03/201020100304Clive Coleman and a panel of politicians examine some of the key policies on justice.
02/11/201020101104Joshua Rozenberg looks at the issue of military justice.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the issue of military justice.

03/11/200920091105 Clive Coleman interviews Ken MacDonald, the former Director of Public Prosecutions.
07/07/200920090709Examining compensation for victims of child abuse by religious institutions in Ireland.

Examining compensation for victims of child abuse by religious institutions in Ireland.

08/03/201120110310The result of the referendum in Wales on greater law making powers for the Welsh Assembly could widen the gap between the law in England and that in Wales.

There are already many differences in areas such as planning and health, creating pitfalls for lawyers giving advice on both sides of the border.

In this edition Joshua Rozenberg looks at where devolution is going and the problems and opportunities that a divergence in the law could create.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at whether Wales is on the road to becoming a fourth jurisdiction.

The result of the referendum in Wales on greater law making powers for the Welsh Assembly could widen the gap between the law in England and that in Wales. There are already many differences in areas such as planning and health, creating pitfalls for lawyers giving advice on both sides of the border. In this edition Joshua Rozenberg looks at where devolution is going and the problems and opportunities that a divergence in the law could create.

08/06/201020100610Joshua Rozenberg asks if the police's use of cameras endangers civil liberties.

Joshua Rozenberg asks if the police's use of cameras endangers civil liberties.

09/03/201020100311Clive Coleman and guests explore the proposed reforms of the UK's bribery laws.
09/11/201020101111Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal isses behind the headlines.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal isses behind the headlines.

10/11/200920091112The programme visits the mental health court pilot in Brighton.

The programme visits the mental health court pilot in Brighton.

15/03/201120110317Joshua Rozenberg considers the UK's relationship with the European Court of Human Rights.

15/06/201020100617Joshua Rozenberg presents the legal affairs magazine.

Joshua Rozenberg presents the legal affairs magazine.

16/03/201020100318Clive Coleman looks at the International Criminal Court and the Dangerous Dogs Act.
16/06/200920090618Clive Coleman explores the age of criminal responsibility.

Clive Coleman explores the age of criminal responsibility.

18/10/201120111020Joshua Rozenberg explores contentious legal issues which arose from the August riots.
2/4. The Coalition's Sentencing Reform Plans20110614The plans of Kenneth Clarke, the Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, for changes to sentencing in England and Wales have already proved highly controversial. But how are they likely to work in practice and what are their effects going to be?

Joshua Rozenberg explores what the thinking behind the reforms is and how the Justice Secretary's plans for higher discounts on sentences for "early pleas" of guilty by offenders came unstuck. He also talks to a leading criminologist about a radical new approach towards the early identification of potentially serious criminals. He discovers how reliable the evidence for this strategy is and what benefits it might offer the police, the courts - and politicians seeking to achieve a smaller prison population.

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg explores the thinking behind the Justice Secretary's sentencing reforms.

2/4. The Coalition's Sentencing Reform Plans20110616Joshua Rozenberg explores the thinking behind the Justice Secretary's sentencing reforms.
20/10/200920091022Clive Coleman asks if the Freedom of Information Act has created a more open society.

Clive Coleman asks if the Freedom of Information Act has created a more open society.

22/02/201120110224Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal issues behind the Wikileaks story.

22/06/201020100624Joshua Rozenburg investigates an alleged link between the World Cup and domestic violence.
23/02/201020100225Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories of the day.
23/06/200920090625Clive Coleman examines the law governing what happens to your body when you are dead.

Clive Coleman examines the law governing what happens to your body when you are dead.

25/10/201120111027Joshua Rozenberg investigates how accountable such reviews as the Leveson Inquiry will be.
27/10/200920091029 Clive Coleman talks to the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge.
29/06/201020100701
30/06/200920090702Clive Coleman reports on legal issues behind the headlines.

Clive Coleman reports on legal issues behind the headlines.

A Threat To Justice?2015111020151112 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg finds out why criminal courts charges have proved controversial.

Senior judges, magistrates and politicians have criticised the criminal courts charge since it was introduced in England and Wales in April. Many say it is a threat to justice. In this week's edition of Law in Action, a serving magistrate tells Joshua Rozenberg how the charge has prompted him to think about giving up his role. Also in the programme: Britain's intelligence services commissioner, Sir Mark Waller, discusses the new Investigatory Powers Bill. And would the UK be able to scrap EU laws in the event of a "Brexit"? Sylvia de Mars of Newcastle University explains.

Producers: Keith Moore and Tim Mansel.

Senior judges, magistrates and politicians have criticised the criminal courts charge since it was introduced in England and Wales in April. Many say it is a threat to justice. In this week's edition of Law in Action, a serving magistrate tells Joshua Rozenberg how the charge has prompted him to think about giving up his role. Also in the programme: Britain's intelligence services commissioner, Sir Mark Waller, discusses the new Investigatory Powers Bill. And would the UK be able to scrap EU laws in the event of a ""Brexit""? Sylvia de Mars of Newcastle University explains.

Abusive Parents2019111220191114 (R4)Should parents with a history of domestic abuse be allowed to see their children?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Should parents with a history of domestic abuse be allowed to see their children? How can the family courts protect children from further abuse? Joshua Rozenberg asks where the law should draw the line. And he discovers some of the innovative programmes being run in Altcourse Prison near Liverpool - including keeping birds of prey.
Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

Acid Attacks And The Law2017110720171109 (R4)Proposals for new acid and corrosive offences.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

An Enterprising Court2020031020200312 (R4)Tucked away in the City of London is one of the UK’s most successful invisible exports. But is the Commercial Court threatened by international developments? Joshua Rozenberg investigates.

Italy has extended its emergency coronavirus measures and Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte has ordered people to stay at home. Lawyer Mariella Melandri tells Law In Action how this is affecting her legal practice and clients.

The government is planning emergency legislation allowing people who are forced to self-isolate to appear in court by video link or telephone. Is this an adequate substitute for a face-to-face hearing? Joshua speaks to immigration barrister Colin Yeo.

Also, is India’s Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) unconstitutional? Dr Rahul Rao, Senior Lecturer in Politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University, explains why this controversial law is being challenged in the Indian Supreme Court.

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Di Richardson

A look inside the commercial court, one of the UK's most successful invisible exports.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

A look inside the commercial court, one of the UK's most successful invisible exports.

Artificial Intelligence And The Law2016060720160609 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg explores how artificial intelligence might change the legal profession.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Artificial Intelligence has made great advances in recent years, with computer scientists developing cars without drivers, planes without pilots and mobile phones which can double up as a personal assistant. The legal profession is proving to be rich territory in the AI field too.

Joshua Rozenberg meets computer scientists at the University of Liverpool, who are using 'computational argumentation' to digitally decide the results of legal cases, proving that AI can be just as discerning as a court judge. He also meets the founder of a law firm already making the most of existing AI technology to benefit customers and build business.

But just how far is the legal profession - and the general public - willing to trust the judgement of an AI algorithm? The IT Adviser to the Lord Chief Justice, Professor Richard Susskind, explains where AI might fit into the legal sphere in years to come.

Also: The First 100 Years is a new digital history project, charting the pioneering role women have played in the legal profession. Law in Action speaks to the project's founder Dana Denis-Smith and Baroness Elizabeth Butler-Sloss.

Producers: Richard Fenton-Smith & Ben Crighton.

Producers: Richard Fenton-Smith and Ben Crighton.

Producers: Richard Fenton-Smith and Ben Crighton.

Brexit And The Eu Judiciary2019060420190606 (R4)What will happen to the European Union judiciary after Brexit? Eleanor Sharpston QC is a British member of the EU Court of Justice in Luxembourg. She argues it’s in the interests of both the UK and the EU for British judges to remain at the EU Court after Brexit - at least during a transitional period - because the UK will still be affected by its rulings.

Also this week: transparency in the courts. When judges make decisions on sensitive personal and family issues, should their courts be open to all? Or does reporting put justice at risk? Joshua Rozenberg shines a light on this darker corner of the law.

Producer: Neil Koenig

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Producer: Neil Koenig

Brexit In The High Court2016110820161110 (R4)What are the legal ramifications of the High Court ruling on the Brexit legal challenge?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Joshua Rozenberg examines the ruling on the Brexit legal challenge at the High Court

Producer: Matt Bardo.

Joshua Rozenberg examines the ruling on the Brexit legal challenge at the High Court.

The High Court has decided that Prime Minister Theresa May cannot trigger Brexit without an Act of Parliament - but what are the legal ramifications of this ruling?

This week, Joshua Rozenberg explores this latest chapter in Britain's exit from the EU - the fallout from which has seen highly personal attacks on England's most senior judges, as the ideological divisions seen in the run up to the referendum vote were exposed once more.

Following our previous edition of Law in Action, which aired straight after the referendum vote, the programme has gone back to the same leading legal minds to seek some clarity amid the conflicting and confusing media coverage.

Has the high court's decision really stalled Brexit as leave voters fear - and some remainers hope? Just how will the so-called 'Great Repeal Bill' work in practice? And will the UK still have to comply with EU laws if it wants to continue to trade with the continent?

CONTRIBUTORS

Prof Catherine Barnard, Professor of European Law at the University of Cambridge

Prof Mark Elliott, Professor of Public Law at University of Cambridge

Producers: Matt Bardo & Richard Fenton-Smith.

Producers: Matt Bardo and Richard Fenton-Smith.

Producers: Matt Bardo and Richard Fenton-Smith.

Brexit: The Legal Minefield20160628Will the UK referendum result lead to real legal independence?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Brexit: the Legal Minefield

How will the UK achieve its new status? Will the referendum result lead to real legal independence? Joshua Rozenberg and a panel of guests discuss the legal journey Britain must now take. They examine practical questions like workers' rights, the free movement of people and goods, as well as the constitution and human rights.

Producer Simon Coates

Editor Penny Murphy.

Bringing Bankers To Book2014030420140306Locking up bankers, lawyer-free litigants, and can you arrest Tony Blair?

Why have no senior bankers been prosecuted for their role in the financial crisis? And should companies be able to avoid criminal prosecution by making a deal with a judge about how they work in future? The man who runs the Serious Fraud Office will be in the Law In Action studio to answers those questions and more as the programme returns for a new series.

Also on the programme, presenter Joshua Rozenberg hears claims of a murder attempt and lives in turmoil as he speaks to people who turn up at the High Court without legal representation.

And could Tony Blair be subject to a citizen's arrest?

Britain And Human Rights Law2011110820111110With political pressure mounting for far-reaching reform to the Human Rights Act, Joshua Rozenberg explores how this might be done.

More than ten years after the incorporation into UK law of the European Convention on Human Rights, how far has the Convention re-shaped our law? How far do the provisions of the Human Rights Act affect the day-to-day decisions of our courts? And if Parliament were to amend the law, what could - and should - be changed and why?

Joshua Rozenberg explores the legal issues underlying this controversial legal and political debate.

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how reforming the Human Rights Act would affect UK law.

With political pressure mounting for far-reaching reform to the Human Rights Act, Joshua Rozenberg explores how this might be done. More than ten years after the incorporation into UK law of the European Convention on Human Rights, how far has the Convention re-shaped our law? How far do the provisions of the Human Rights Act affect the day-to-day decisions of our courts? And if Parliament were to amend the law, what could - and should - be changed and why?

Britain And Human Rights Law20111110Joshua Rozenberg investigates how reforming the Human Rights Act would affect UK law.
Can I Stay, Please?2019031920190321 (R4)Behind the scenes at an immigration tribunal.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Can The Law Rein In Amazon?2018110620181108 (R4)There is a possibility of a new legal challenge to the tech giants. Early last year, an unknown American law student published a scholarly article in a distinguished journal. Lina Khan argued that competition law – known in the United States as anti-trust law – could be used to rein in the activities of huge enterprises like Amazon. Other lawyers disagree with her reasoning - but the Federal Trade Commission is assessing the arguments. Joshua Rozenberg sounds out opinions in the United States. Also this week: should offences committed in childhood mean a criminal record for life?
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

Are the tech giants anti-competitive? And should having a past block a child's future?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

There is a possibility of a new legal challenge to the tech giants. Early last year, an unknown American law student published a scholarly article in a distinguished journal. Lina Khan argued that competition law – known in the United States as anti-trust law – could be used to rein in the activities of huge enterprises like Amazon. Other lawyers disagree with her reasoning - but the Federal Trade Commission is assessing the arguments. Joshua Rozenberg sounds out opinions in the United States. Also this week: should offences committed in childhood mean a criminal record for life?
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

Legal magazine programme.

There is a possibility of a new legal challenge to the tech giants. Early last year, an unknown American law student published a scholarly article in a distinguished journal. Lina Khan argued that competition law – known in the United States as anti-trust law – could be used to rein in the activities of huge enterprises like Amazon. Other lawyers disagree with her reasoning - but the Federal Trade Commission is assessing the arguments. Joshua Rozenberg sounds out opinions in the United States. Also this week: should offences committed in childhood mean a criminal record for life?
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

Can The Pm Go To War?2014102120141023 (R4)With British military aircraft now deployed against the forces of Islamic State in Iraq, Law in Action asks whether the Prime Minister needs to seek consent from Parliament before committing the British military to action overseas.

Joshua Rozenberg hears from Sir Malcolm Rifkind, chair of the House of Commons Intelligence and Security Committee, and Gavin Phillipson of Durham University.

Did the vote in the House of Commons in 2013 rejecting military action against president Assad of Syria create a convention that should now be followed in all cases?

Also: the minister of justice and Lord Chancellor, Chris Grayling, gave evidence this week to the House of Lords Constitution Committee. He was asked whether the Lord Chancellor should be a lawyer. Mr Grayling, who is not a lawyer, did not think so. But what do others think? And does it matter?

And TV justice: we hear from the criminal barrister Robert Rinder who, as ""Judge Rinder"", is attracting large audiences to his ITV show, in which he adjudicates on real disputes.

Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg

Producers: Keith Moore and Tim Mansel

Editor: Richard Knight.

Does the PM have to ask Parliament before committing Britain to military action overseas?

And TV justice: we hear from the criminal barrister Robert Rinder who, as "Judge Rinder", is attracting large audiences to his ITV show, in which he adjudicates on real disputes.

Chemical Weapons And The Law2013102220131024Joshua Rozenberg reveals how laws relating to chemical weapons stretch back 2,000 years.

In this week's programme Law in Action charts the history of laws forbidding the use of chemical weapons, and reveals how they first emerged in India over 2000 years ago. Today, with Syria now signing up to the chemical weapons convention, could we be on the brink of abolishing chemical weapons for good?

Joshua Rozenberg interviews Karim Hammoud from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which is responsble for enforcing the treaty, and asks why we need special laws for chemical weapons - what distinguishes them other deadly weapons?

Also: The programme reflects on the first public lecture given by the new Lord Chief Justice, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, presented at Gray's Inn in London. Titled 'Justice in One Place or Several?', Lord Thomas reveals his proposal to enhance the role of courts outside of London.

Joshua also debates the merits of allowing TV cameras into the Court of Appeal with Baroness Helena Kennedy QC - will it help open up an understanding of the law to the public?

Contributors:

Jean Pascal Zanders, chemical weapons expert and consultant, founder of the-trench.org

Karim Hammoud, Senior Legal Officer, Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

Baroness Helena Kennedy QC.

British veterans of World War I, archive courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London.

Producer: Mike Wendling

Series Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith

Editor: Richard Knight.

Children Giving Evidence20070213A look at how the law on children's evidence has changed since the Cleveland scandal.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Clive Coleman looks at how the law on children's evidence has changed in the 20 years since the Cleveland scandal.

Clive Coleman looks at how the law on children's evidence has changed in the 20 years since the Cleveland scandal.

Coercive And Controlling Behaviour2016061420160616 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg examines the new laws on coercive and controlling behaviour.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Legal magazine programme.

Community Criminal Courts20070220Clive Coleman visits new style community criminal courts in Liverpool and Salford.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Clive Coleman visits new community criminal courts in Liverpool and Salford and asks Lord Falconer about his plan to extend the model to other parts of England and Wales.

Clive Coleman visits new community criminal courts in Liverpool and Salford and asks Lord Falconer about his plan to extend the model to other parts of England and Wales.

Courts On Trial2015062320150625 (R4)

The "creaking and outdated" justice system in England and Wales is failing society's poorest, Michael Gove argued this week.

In his first speech since becoming Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, he said that the best legal provision is the preserve of the wealthy, while victims of crime are "badly" let down. Mr Gove also said that the case for change had been "made most powerfully and clearly by the judiciary themselves".

In this special edition of Law in Action, the Lord Chief Justice gives his reaction to Michael Gove's speech.

And we hear from a panel of experts who have intimate knowledge of the justice system on what can be done to make our courts function better and more efficiently: Sir Keir Starmer, the former Director of Public Prosecutions and now a Labour MP; Sir Stanley Burnton, former Lord Justice of Appeal and author of the report 'Delivering Justice in an Age of Austerity; and Dame Hazel Genn, Co-Director of the UCL Judicial Institute.

Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg

Producer: Hannah Barnes

Editor: Richard Knight.

The ""creaking and outdated"" justice system in England and Wales is failing society's poorest, Michael Gove argued this week.

In his first speech since becoming Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, he said that the best legal provision is the preserve of the wealthy, while victims of crime are ""badly"" let down. Mr Gove also said that the case for change had been ""made most powerfully and clearly by the judiciary themselves"".

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

The ""creaking and outdated"" justice system in England and Wales is failing society's poorest, Michael Gove argued this week.

In his first speech since becoming Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, he said that the best legal provision is the preserve of the wealthy, while victims of crime are ""badly"" let down. Mr Gove also said that the case for change had been ""made most powerfully and clearly by the judiciary themselves"".

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg

Crime Stats And False Confessions2011110120111103In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg reveals new statistics on the use of so-called 'taken into consideration' offences.

After their arrest, some suspects confess to additional crimes to wipe the slate clean.

But with no prosecution or trial, can these admissions of guilt really count as solved crimes?

Law in Action also looks into the issue of false confessions and asks why people admit to a crime they didn't commit.

Some suspects may find themselves convicted of a crime even when they retract their initial statements.

Research from the US indicates that one in five death row inmates exonerated by DNA evidence falsely confessed to murder.

Closer to home, a study shows that false confessions can set off a chain of events that can skew the justice system against an innocent suspect.

The programme also examines proposed anti-sectarianism football legislation in Scotland.

The law is designed to crack down on the kinds of ugly violence that plagued Rangers and Celtic matches last season.

But the one thing that seems to unite the supporters of the two clubs is their opposition to the bill, and few others in Scotland see the need for new legislation to tackle sectarian violence.

In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg explores the roots of Scottish sectarianism and finds out how the law deals with it.

Producer: Mike Wendling

Researcher: Lucy Proctor.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates crime statistics and looks into sectarianism in Scotland.

In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg reveals new statistics on the use of so-called 'taken into consideration' offences. After their arrest, some suspects confess to additional crimes to wipe the slate clean. But with no prosecution or trial, can these admissions of guilt really count as solved crimes?

Law in Action also looks into the issue of false confessions and asks why people admit to a crime they didn't commit. Some suspects may find themselves convicted of a crime even when they retract their initial statements. Research from the US indicates that one in five death row inmates exonerated by DNA evidence falsely confessed to murder. Closer to home, a study shows that false confessions can set off a chain of events that can skew the justice system against an innocent suspect.

The programme also examines proposed anti-sectarianism football legislation in Scotland. The law is designed to crack down on the kinds of ugly violence that plagued Rangers and Celtic matches last season. But the one thing that seems to unite the supporters of the two clubs is their opposition to the bill, and few others in Scotland see the need for new legislation to tackle sectarian violence. In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg explores the roots of Scottish sectarianism and finds out how the law deals with it.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates crime statistics and looks into sectarianism in Scotland.

Crime Stats And False Confessions20111103Joshua Rozenberg investigates crime statistics and looks into sectarianism in Scotland.
Crimes Against Humanity2016053120160602 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg examines the definition and prosecution of crimes against humanity.

Deferred Prosecution Agreements: Pragmatic But Unprincipled?2020052620200528 (R4)Why is large-scale fraud so hard to prosecute? Joshua Rozenberg investigates.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Earlier this year, Airbus was ordered to pay nearly €1bn by a criminal court in London. The penalty, for failure to prevent bribery, was more than twice the fines paid by defendants in England and Wales for the whole of 2018. In addition, the global aerospace company was required to pay fines totalling €2.6bn in France and the United States. But Airbus has not been convicted of any crimes and nobody has gone to prison. Joshua Rozenberg Investigates deferred prosecution agreements.

Contributors:
Tim Bowden, partner, Dechert
Alex Brummer, City editor of the Daily Mail
Toby Duthie, co-founder, Forensic Risk Alliance
Duncan Hames, director of policy, Transparency International
Laura Haywood, case controller, Serious Fraud Office
Eric Russo, prosecutor, Parquet National Financier
Janette Rutterford, emeritus professor of finance and financial history, Open University Business School

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

Diy Law2012103020121101Joshua Rozenberg asks what it is like to represent yourself in court.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at DIY law - what it is like to represent yourself as a litigant in person and whether the CPS should be allowed to shut down private prosecutions. Producer Wesley Stephenson.

Joshua Rozenberg asks what it is like to represent yourself in court.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at DIY law - what it is like to represent yourself as a litigant in person and whether the CPS should be allowed to shut down private prosecutions. Producer Wesley Stephenson.

Driverless Cars And The Law2018031320180315 (R4)The government wants fully self-driving cars on UK roads by 2021 but which will be ready first - the technology or the law? Who is responsible in an accident - the owner or the manufacturer?

Joshua Rozenberg meets the team planning a 200 mile driverless journey across the UK and speaks to barrister Lucy McCormick, co-author of Law and Driverless Cars, who explains how the legal landscape is evolving.

Also: this week, the High Court is considering a challenge by two victims of the black-cab rapist, John Worboys. Among the points being considered is a challenge to a Parole Board rule, made by ministers, that says its proceedings must not be made public. Former DPP and chairman of the Parole Board Sir David Calvert-Smith discusses the desirability of a more transparent system.

Plus: a new data protection law will soon come into effect. It's called the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, and it's designed to make sure that organisations take more care of how they store and use our personal information.

Philip Giles of Giles Wilson Solicitors and Chair of the Law Society's Small Firms Division explains what this means for businesses and the way they handle data, and Deputy Information Commissioner James Dipple-Johnstone reveals the sizeable penalties for failure to comply with the new law.

If a driverless car has a crash, who is responsible - the owner or the manufacturer?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Philip Giles of Giles Wilson Solicitors and Chair of the Law Society's Small Firms Division explains what this means for businesses and the way they handle data, and Deputy Information Commissioner James Dipple-Johnstone reveals the sizeable penalties for failure to comply with the new law.

Philip Giles of Giles Wilson Solicitors and Chair of the Law Society's Small Firms Division explains what this means for businesses and the way they handle data, and Deputy Information Commissioner James Dipple-Johnstone reveals the sizeable penalties for failure to comply with the new law.

Drones And The Law2016030820160310 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg presents a look at how effective the law is at dealing with drones.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Joshua Rozenberg presents a look at how effective the law is at dealing with drones.

Britain's best-known legal journalist and broadcaster, Joshua Rozenberg, with the first of a new series of Law in Action, the UK's specialist legal affairs programme, featuring reports and discussion.

This week, after concerns voiced by pilots about drones potentially crashing into planes, how effective is the law at dealing with this new technology?

We hear from two senior Judges about the digital revolution taking place in our court rooms. But is the new system working or will it be another costly public sector digital disaster?

And ahead of the first substantive hearing of Dame Lowell Goddard's Inquiry into child abuse Sir Ian Kennedy, who oversaw the inquiry into the scandal at Bristol Royal infirmary, offers her some advice on how to run a major public inquiry.

Producer: Jim Frank.

Drones, Street Art And More Immigration Law2013022620130228BBC Radio 4's long-running legal magazine programme, with Joshua Rozenberg. Joining us this week is Ben Emmerson QC, the UN's Special Rapporteur on Counter Terrorism. As "drones" - or unmanned aerial vehicles - are increasingly used by the United States to kill suspected terrorists in other nations, we look at the legal case for and against their use. And we ask: if they can legally be deployed in civilian areas in Yemen or Pakistan, could they also be used against targets in Britain? Plus: we look at the controversial European court rulings that stop illegal immigrants being deported if they are caring for children who are British citizens.

BBC Radio 4's long-running legal magazine programme, with Joshua Rozenberg. Joining us this week is Ben Emmerson QC, the UN's Special Rapporteur on Counter Terrorism. As ""drones"" - or unmanned aerial vehicles - are increasingly used by the United States to kill suspected terrorists in other nations, we look at the legal case for and against their use. And we ask: if they can legally be deployed in civilian areas in Yemen or Pakistan, could they also be used against targets in Britain? Plus: we look at the controversial European court rulings that stop illegal immigrants being deported if they are caring for children who are British citizens.

BBC Radio 4's long-running legal magazine programme, with Joshua Rozenberg. Joining us this week is Ben Emmerson QC, the UN's Special Rapporteur on Counter Terrorism. As ""drones"" - or unmanned aerial vehicles - are increasingly used by the United States to kill suspected terrorists in other nations, we look at the legal case for and against their use. And we ask: if they can legally be deployed in civilian areas in Yemen or Pakistan, could they also be used against targets in Britain? Plus: we look at the controversial European court rulings that stop illegal immigrants being deported if they are caring for children who are British citizens.

Drug And Alcohol Misusing Families2012031320120315For the last four years, London's family drug and alcohol court has been trying to get drug and alcohol misusing families back on track. It has done so by following a different approach from the traditional, more punitive measures adopted by the mainstream courts. Joshua Rozenberg visits the court to find out how effective its pioneering work has been and what those who use it think of it. He speaks to those involved in the day-to-day work of the court - including the district judge, the principals of the main charity involved in its creation, legal representatives and others with expert knowledge of the problems which the court's family users must tackle to put their lives back in order - and talks to observers of the court who have reservations about its approach. Law in Action discovers how far this innovative - but expensive - legal model is one which can realistically be emulated elsewhere in the UK when public funds are under such pressure.

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg visits London's family drug and alcohol court and asks how well it works.

For the last four years, London's family drug and alcohol court has been trying to get drug and alcohol misusing families back on track. It has done so by following a different approach from the traditional, more punitive measures adopted by the mainstream courts. Joshua Rozenberg visits the court to find out how effective its pioneering work has been and what those who use it think of it. He speaks to those involved in the day-to-day work of the court - including the district judge, the principals of the main charity involved in its creation, legal representatives and others with expert knowledge of the problems which the court's family users must tackle to put their lives back in order - and talks to observers of the court who have reservations about its approach. Law in Action discovers how far this innovative - but expensive - legal model is one which can realistically be emulated elsewhere in the UK when public funds are under such pressure.

Joshua Rozenberg visits London's family drug and alcohol court and asks how well it works.

Drug And Alcohol Misusing Families20120315Joshua Rozenberg visits London's family drug and alcohol court and asks how well it works.
Elizabeth Truss Interview2017030720170309 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg interviews Elizabeth Truss.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

On this week's programme, Joshua Rozenberg interviews the Lord Chancellor and Minister for Justice for England and Wales, Elizabeth Truss

She discusses the current crisis in prisons, the role of the judiciary and the law relating to domestic violence

Produced by Jim Frank.

Facial Recognition Technology2018062620180628 (R4)Some police forces are using automated facial recognition technology to pick suspects out of a crowd. But is face mapping a valuable tool in the fight against serious crime or a new threat to our civil liberties? And does it work? Joshua Rozenberg investigates.

Also in this week's programme...

Do body-worn video cameras help police to deal more effectively with domestic violence incidents - or do they make matters worse?

And the mysterious case of the "pernicious weed"...who should pay when the wrong kind of vegetation - such as Japanese knotweed - is found on railway lines?

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Is face mapping a valuable tool in the fight against crime or a threat to civil liberties?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Producer: Neil Koenig
Reseracher: Diane Richardson.

Producer: Neil Koenig
Reseracher: Diane Richardson.

Failing To Make Crime Pay2014060320140605Why have government agencies consistently failed to recover the proceeds of crime?

The Public Accounts Committee has published a scathing report criticising the collective efforts of the CPS, National Crime Agency and the courts service to reclaim the proceeds of crime. The accounts committee chairperson, Margaret Hodge, summarised the collective performance as 'rubbish' and said the report is one of the worst she has ever seen, revealing that only 26 pence in every £100 generated by criminal activity is recovered. Joshua Rozenberg asks why have government agencies consistently struggled to claw back illegally-earned assets over the past decade?

Also: It was recently revealed that legendary rockers Led Zeppelin are facing a legal challenge over the writing credits to their classic hit Stairway to Heaven - but how can such a claim be proven in a court of law? Law in Action meets Peter Oxendale - one of the world's leading musicologists - who explains how courts determine whether an artist has 'stolen' a song, or whether the similarities are simply a coincidence.

Finally, the European Union Court of Justice recently ruled Google must amend some search results at the request of ordinary people in a test of the so-called 'right to be forgotten'. Joshua Rozenberg speaks to EU and internet law expert Orla Lynskey about the ruling and whether Google has any avenue to appeal.

CONTRIBUTORS

Peter Oxendale, musicologist

Assistant Professor Orla Lynskey, The London School of Economics and Political Science

Producer: Keith Moore

Series Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith

Editor: Richard Knight.

Failings In Evidence Disclosure2018022720180301 (R4)The number of prosecutions in England and Wales that collapsed because of a failure by police or prosecutors to disclose evidence increased by 70% in the last two years.

Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders and David Tucker from the College of Policing about their response to this rising concern.

He also speaks to those directly affected by the failures - members of the public charged and taken to court because police failed to disclose evidence that would clear them.

Such cases are nothing new to the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), which investigates potential miscarriages of justice. Law in Action speaks to the CCRC's chair Richard Foster about the current wave of cases and his concerns that people are being wrongly imprisoned because evidence is not shared with defence teams.

CONTRIBUTORS

Clive Steer, businessman

Julia Smart, barrister at Furnival Chambers

Dr Hannah Quirk, Senior Lecturer in Criminal Law & Justice, University of Manchester

Richard Foster, Chair of the Criminal Cases Review Commission

Alison Saunders, Director of Public Prosecution

David Tucker, crime and criminal justice lead for the College of Policing.

Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders speaks on recent disclosure failings.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

David Tucker, crime and criminal justice lead for the College of Policing.

Dr Hannah Quirk, Senior Lecturer in Criminal Law and Justice, University of Manchester

Failings In Evidence Disclosure20180301Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders speaks on recent disclosure failings.

The number of prosecutions in England and Wales that collapsed because of a failure by police or prosecutors to disclose evidence increased by 70% in the last two years.

Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders and David Tucker from the College of Policing about their response to this rising concern.

He also speaks to those directly affected by the failures - members of the public charged and taken to court because police failed to disclose evidence that would clear them.

Such cases are nothing new to the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), which investigates potential miscarriages of justice. Law in Action speaks to the CCRC's chair Richard Foster about the current wave of cases and his concerns that people are being wrongly imprisoned because evidence is not shared with defence teams.

CONTRIBUTORS

Clive Steer, businessman

Julia Smart, barrister at Furnival Chambers

Dr Hannah Quirk, Senior Lecturer in Criminal Law & Justice, University of Manchester

Richard Foster, Chair of the Criminal Cases Review Commission

Alison Saunders, Director of Public Prosecution

David Tucker, crime and criminal justice lead for the College of Policing.

Fake News And The Law2017032120170323 (R4)Is current legislation adequate to deal with the phenomenon of fake news?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Fire Courts20201103The lessons of history: what the Great Fire of London can teach us about dealing with a modern plague. And, as the lord chief justice tells his judges to keep calm and carry on — despite the lockdown to be introduced in England on Thursday — we ask whether the Nightingale courts of England and Wales could learn a thing or two from the Odeon courts of Scotland. Joshua Rozenberg reports.

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

What can the Great Fire of London teach us about dealing with our current pandemic?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Fire Courts20201103The lessons of history: what the Great Fire of London can teach us about dealing with a modern plague. And, as the lord chief justice tells his judges to keep calm and carry on — despite the lockdown to be introduced in England on Thursday — we ask whether the Nightingale courts of England and Wales could learn a thing or two from the Odeon courts of Scotland. Joshua Rozenberg reports.

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

What can the Great Fire of London teach us about dealing with our current pandemic?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Gambling With The Law2020060920200611 (R4)How a case about a \u00a37.7 million win at baccarat changed the legal test of dishonesty.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

A poker player who used a Victorian conjuring trick to win £7.7 million from a London casino left court empty-handed in 2017 after a court found he “took positive steps to fix the deck”. But now judges have decided that the ruling in Phil Ivey’s case should be the test for dishonesty. Joshua Rozenberg explains how it works, while a gambler tells us that the courts have got it wrong.

Also this week, how do you ensure social distancing in a crowded detention centre?

And how is lockdown affecting the work of the civil justice system?

Contributors:
Dr Natalie Byrom, director of research at the Legal Education Foundation
Toufique Hossain, director of public law at Duncan Lewis Solicitors
Richard Munchkin, host, “Gambling with an Edge” podcast
Professor David Ormerod, University College London

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

Gay Cake2016032920160331 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg travels to Belfast to untangle the legal layers of the 'gay cake' story.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

This programme will focus on the legal issues surrounding the 'gay cake' controversy in Northern Ireland.

When a Christian bakery in Belfast was found guilty last year of discriminating against a gay man, by refusing his request for a cake with a pro-gay marriage slogan on it, it became headline news around the world.

It also divided people in Northern Ireland. Many there see it as a battle between freedom of conscience and the right to religious expression, and Northern Ireland's equality laws. Joshua Rozenberg travels to Belfast to untangle the legal layers of the so-called 'gay cake' story.

Producer: Ben Crighton.

Joshua Rozenberg travels to Belfast to untangle the legal layers of the 'gay cake' story.

When a Christian bakery in Belfast was found guilty last year of discriminating against a gay man, by refusing his request for a cake with a pro-gay marriage slogan on it, it became headline news around the world.

It also divided people in Northern Ireland. Many there see it as a battle between freedom of conscience and the right to religious expression, and Northern Ireland's equality laws. Joshua Rozenberg travels to Belfast to untangle the legal layers of the so-called 'gay cake' story.

Joshua Rozenberg travels to Belfast to untangle the legal layers of the 'gay cake' story.

Gchq20171031Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.
Genocide V Crimes Against Humanity2016053120160602 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg examines the history and tension between two seemingly related laws

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19880129]The Lord Chancellor answers questions from John Eidinow in this topical weekly magazine about issues thrown up by the courts and by Parliament. Producer ANTHONY MONCRIEFF
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900504]with Marcel Berlins

Producer Gwyneth Williams

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900511]with Marcel Berlins Producer Margaret Hill
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900518]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910118]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins returns with a weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Gareth Butler

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Gareth Butler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910125]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Gareth Butler

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Gareth Butler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910201]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Gareth Butler

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Gareth Butler

The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Gareth Butler

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Gareth Butler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910208]with Marcel Berlins

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910215]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910222]Presented by Marcel Berlins

Producer Andrew Denwood

Contributors

Presented By: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Andrew Denwood

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910301]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Andrew Denwood

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Andrew Denwood

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910308]The last of the present series in which

Marcel Berlins looks at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Andrew Denwood

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Andrew Denwood

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910426]The cases, the courts and the lawyers. The first of four programmes in which

Marcel Berlins looks at developments in the law and how they affect you. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910503]The cases, the courts and the lawyers. The second programme in the series in which Marcel Berlins looks at developments in the law and how they affect you.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910510]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect you. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910517]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect you. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect you. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910621]NEW Marcel Berlins returns with his weekly look at developments in the law. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910628]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910705]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910712]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910719]with Marcel Berlins.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins.

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910726]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911018]Inthe first of a way new series.

Marcel Berlins reports live from Brussels and the Law

Society National Conference on the issues which have been exercising the lawyers this week. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911025]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affec people's lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911101]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect people's lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911108]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect people's lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect people's lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911115]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect people's fives. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911122]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911129]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect people's fives. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect people's fives. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911206]The final programme in the series.

The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins looks at the developments in the law and how they affect people's lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Marcel Berlins

Producer: Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920117]Marcel Berlins returns with a weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920124]The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins takes a weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920131]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920207]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920214]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920221]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect people's lives. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920228]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920306]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect people's lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920313]with Marcel Berlins. Last in the series looking at the cases, the courts, the lawyers and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920501]Marcel Berlins returns with the weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920508]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law. Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920515]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920522]The last in the series of Marcel Berlins ' weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920626]The return of Marcel Berlins with a weekly look at developments in the law. Tonight he talks to the new Lord Chief Justice, Lord Taylor.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920703]Marcel Berlins ' weekly look at the law.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920710]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the law.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920717]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920724]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920731]In the last programme of the series Marcel Berlins looks at the developments in the law.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921016]Marcel Berlins 's

I weekly look at the developments in the law. Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921023]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921030]The cases, the courts and the lawyers -

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at how developments in the law affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921106]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921113]with Marcel Berlins.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921120]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921127]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921204]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930129]The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins is back with his weekly look at developments in the law.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930205]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930219]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930226]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930305]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930312]with Marcel Berlins. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930319]The last programme in the series of Marcel Berlins 's weekly looks at the developments in the law. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930430]NEW Marcel Berlins I returns with his weekly look at the developments in the law. Producer Andrew Smith
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930507]'I'he cases, the courts and the lawyers

Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Andrew Smith

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930514]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at developments in the law.

Producer Andrew Smith

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930521]Marcel Berlins with the last in the present series. Producer Andrew Smith
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930625]Marcel Berlins returns with another series of weekly looks at developments in the law. Producer Andrew Smith
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930702]Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law. Producer Andrew Smith
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930709]The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins 's weekly look at the developments in the law. Producer Andrew Smith
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930716]with Marcel Berlins. Producer Andrew Smith
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930723]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930730]Marcel Berlins presents the last in the present series.

Producer Andrew Smith

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931015]Marcel Berlins takes a weekly look at the developments in the law and how they affect our lives. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931022]Marcel Berlins looks at developments in the law and how they affect people's lives. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931029]Marcel Berlins takes his weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931105]The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlinstakes his weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931112]Marcel Berlins takes his weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931119]Marcel Berlins looks at developments in the law and how they affect our lives. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931126]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931203]Last of the series in which Marcel Berlins looks at developments in the law and how they affect our lives. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940121]Marcel Berlins returns with the programme that takes a weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940128]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940204]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940211]Marcel Berlins takes a weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Sallie Davies

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940218]Marcel Berlins takes a weekly look at developments in the law. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940225]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940304]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940311]Marcel Berlins takes a last look at developments in the law. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940429]The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins returns with his weekly look at developments in the law. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940506]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940513]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940520]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940624]The cases, the courts and the lawyers- Marcel Berlins returns with his weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives. Producer Edward Odim
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940701]Marcel Berlins takes a weekly look at developments in the law. Producer Edward Odim
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940708]Presented by Marcel Berlins. Producer Charles Sigler
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940715]Presented by Marcel Berlins. Producer Sallie Davies
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940722]Presented by Marcel Berlins. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940729]Marcel Berlins presents the last in the series about developments in the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941021]Marcel Berlins presents the first in a new series of programmes which examine the issues shaping and determining the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941028]with Marcel Berlin. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941104]Marcel Berlins presents the weekly examination of the issues that matter to those who need and provide legal services.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941111]with Marcel Berlins. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941118]Marcel Berlins examines the issues which matter to those who need and provide legal services. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941125]Marcel Berlins ' weekly examination of the issues shaping the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19941202]with Marcel Berlins.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941209]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950127]Marcel Berlins presents the first in a new series of the programme which examines the issues shaping the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950203]Marcel Berlins takes a weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950210]Marcel Bertins reports from South Africa as the country's new constitutional court prepares to start work. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950217]Marcel Berlins examines the issues shaping the law.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950224]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950303]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950310]Marcel Berlins presents the last in the series examining legal issues. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950428]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950505]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950512]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950519]Marcel Berlins with the last of the series examining issues shaping the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950623]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950630]As the new European Court of Human Rights building opens in Strasbourg, Marcel Berlins examines the ever-growing role of the Court and asks how well it protects our fundamental rights and freedoms. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950707]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950714]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950721]With Marcel Berlins.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950728]Last in series in which Marcel Berlins examines the issues shaping the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19951020]Marcel Berlins returns with his weekly programme which examines the judgements, the cases and the issues in the law.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19951027]Marcel Berlins presents a topical programme which examines the judgements, the cases and the issues in the law.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19951103]Marcel Berlins presents a topical programme on the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19951110]Marcel Berlins presents a topical programme on the judgements, the cases and the issues in the law.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19951117]Marcel Berlins reports on the issues shaping the law, including a report on courtroom evidence from children. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19951124]Marcel Berlins presents a topical programme on the judgements, the cases and the issues in the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19951201]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19951208]Marcel Berlins with the last in the series of topical programmes on the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960119]The topical series on legal issues returns with a special edition about the little known world of our senior judges. Marcel Berlins questions top judges about their world and its impact on the British public. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960126]With Marcel Berlins. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960202]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960209]Marcel Berlins presents the topical series on legal issues. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960216]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960223]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960301]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960308]Marcel Berlins presents the last in the topical series on legal issues. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960517]Marcel Berlins launches the series with an investigation of Britain's small claims courts. The system is meant to offer quick and easy public access to civil justice. But is it failing to deliver? Producer Zareer Masani
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960524]Legal issues with Marcel Berlins. Producer Zareer Masani
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960531]Legal issues with Marcel Berlins. Producer Zareer Masan i
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960607]Marcel Berlins analyses legal issues. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960614]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960621]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960628]Marcel Berlins analyses topical legal issues.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19960705]Marcel Berlins analyses topical legal issues.

Producer Zareer Masani

Genome: [r4 Bd=19960712]Marcel Berlins analyses topical legal issues.

Producer Andy Denwood

Genome: [r4 Bd=19960719]Marcel Berlins analyses legal issues. Producer Andy Denwood
Genome: [r4 Bd=19960726]In the last of the series, Marcel Berlins looks at how the courtroom is portrayed in film, and in the theatre. Also, a report on Lord Woolf's review of civil justice. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19961018]In a special programme, Marcel Berlins looks at the most powerfuljudges in England and Wales - the Law Lords and the judges of the Court of Appeal. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19961025]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19961101]With Marcel Berlins. Including a special report from America where the Supreme Court is contemplating the legal complexities of assisted suicide. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19961108]With Marcel Berlins.

Including a special report on the future of law centres.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961115]Marcel Berlins with the latest from the legal world.

Producer Simon Coates

* Face behind the Voice: page 14

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961122]Marcel Berlins presents a topical programme on thejudgements, the cases and the issues in the law.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961129]In a special programme for the eve of St Andrew 's Day, Marcel Berlins reports from Scotland on the key legal issues north of the border - and their impact further south. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19961206]Presented by Marcel Berlins.

Lucy Ash reports from Russia on reactions to the tentative experiment there in trial by jury. Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961213]Marcel Berlins presents the last in the current series of the programme which looks at the issues, the cases and the people behind the law. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970124]A Fit of Legal Morality

Law making on issues like euthanasia has become highly controversial and emotionally charged. Marcel Berlins asks, is our law now being driven by moral crusades or is it just becoming better attuned to deep public feelings? Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970131]Presented by Marcel Berlins. As enthusiasm grows among politicians for curfews and tagging for young criminals, Sally Hardcastle asks: if juvenile offenders are the problem, is the law the answer? Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970207]Presented by Marcel Berlins. Louise Shorter reports on the growing pressure for legal controls on the internet, and the problems confronting governments and individuals in protecting their interests in cyberspace. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970214]Presented by Marcel Berlins.

Including a special report on recent changes to the law on public order. Do they fetter the public's right to protest and demonstrate on controversial issues such as animal rights, road building and rights of access?

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970221]Presented by Marcel Berlins. Zareer Masani asks how far the law should let you go in using force to defend yourself, your family and your property. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970228]Presented by Marcel Berlins. With the recent explosion in claims for medical negligence, Sallie Davies asks whether there is a fairer and cheaper way of compensating the victims of doctors' and health workers' mistakes.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970307]Presented by Marcel Berlins. Are the judges in Luxemburg really out of control? Sally Hardcastle asks if the Government's plans to reform the European Court of Justice will work. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970314]Marcel Berlins looks forward to the wide range of legal reforms which the next parliament is likely to bring. Reporter Sally Hardcastle. Last in the series. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970523]A special documentary to start a series of 11 programmes.

A Smoking Gun ? Smokers are suddenly turning to law. After big-money settlements in the US, claims are pending here. Marcel Berlins reports from America on the legal besieging of the tobacco industry. Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970530]Legal series with Marcel Berlins.

2: Sally Hardcastle reports on what the law says about the ownership of art treasures as governments, museums and collectors around the world argue over who should have what.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970606]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970613]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine programme. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970620]With Marcel Berlins. Sally Hardcastle reports on the future of civil legal aid. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970627]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine programme. Louise Shorter asks: does the new act which criminalises stalking go too far, and does it confer on the government new powers restricting citizens' rights? Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970704]Marcel Berlins asks if the legal system can deliver cheaper, quicker, simpler and fairer justice. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970711]Presented by Marcel Berlins. The

Government thinks we are entitled to know more about how it does its work and how its decisions affect the public. Sally Hardcastle asks if such legal rights can make a difference to the individual citizen and, if so, how? Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970718]With Marcel Berlins. Margaret Renn asks if our courts are sufficiently rigorous in their treatment of forensic evidence. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970725]Presented by Marcel Berlins. Instances of genocide and other heinous crimes, often extending beyond national boundaries, have prompted calls for an international criminal court. Anthony Dworkin asks how it might work. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970801]In the final programme of the series, Marcel Berlin asks if the special treatment by our courts for the crime of rape can be justified. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971024]The Marchioness tragedy,

Stephen Lawrence , deaths in custody - inquests are becoming more complex and controversial. Marcel Berlins asks if coroners' courts need reforming, and if the Government's legal-aid review will end state help in personal injury cases. Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971031]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine series. James Erlichman asks how solicitors rate on the issues that matter to their clients.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971107]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine series. The laws on assault go back nearly 150 years and have been described as antiquated, absurd and unjust. Louise Shorter reports on how they might be reformed to reflect today's realities, including the deliberate infliction of sexual disease. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971114]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine series. Magistrates' courts are being closed at an accelerating rate across the country. Does this herald the destruction of centuries-old local justice? Dinah Lammiman asks if we are moving towards remote justice.

Producer Simon Coates

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971121]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine series. As stores start to sue shoplifters for the costs of their crime, James Erlichman asks if this new approach, coupled with criminal proceedings, is fair and workable. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971128]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine series. The Government is to tackle the growing problem of youth criminality. But. Patricia Wyn Davies asks, can the plans work, or should we rethink our approach to juvenile offenders? Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971205]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine series. How should the law provide for those who have lost the ability to make decisions about their own lives? Dinah Lammiman asks who should decide and what legal role "living wills" should play. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971212]Marcel Berlins presents the legal magazine series. The victim's charter aims to inform those who suffer directly from crime about the progress of their cases. But does it amount to any more than warm words, and can it make a lasting difference to our criminal justice system? Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971219]The media is alarmed that a privacy law may be foisted on it. Is this inevitable or is it just scaremongering? Presented by Marcel Berlins. Producer Simon Coates
Genome: [r4 Bd=19981203]With Marcel Berlins.

Producers Sallie Davies and Charies Sigler Repeated Sunday 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981206]With Marcel Berlins. Repeated from Thursday
Genome: [r4 Bd=19981210]With Marcel Berlins.

Producers Sallie Davies and Charles Sigler Repeated Sunday 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981213]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19981217]With Marcel Berlins.

Producers Sallie Davies and Chartes Sigler Repeated Sunday 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981220]With Marcel Berlins.

Producers Sallie Davies and Charles Sigler Repeated from Thursday

Good advice20201110How has the North Kensington Law Centre managed to keep going for 50 years when other social legal advice providers have run out of money? One reason must be the vision of Peter Kandler, 85, who set up the UK’s first law centre in a former butcher’s shop and is still closely involved in running it today. He tells Joshua Rozenberg that, half a century on, the centre is now coping with housing and immigration problems that he thought were a thing of the past.

Picture: Peter Kandler, founder of North Kensington Law Centre courtesy of Law Centres Network.
The programme includes an Extract from 'North Kensington Law Centre', © Crown copyright/BFI - British Film Institute or BFI Player.

How the UK\u2019s first law centre still provides free legal advice, 50 years after its birth.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Good advice2020111020201112 (R4)How has the North Kensington Law Centre managed to keep going for 50 years when other social legal advice providers have run out of money? One reason must be the vision of Peter Kandler, 85, who set up the UK’s first law centre in a former butcher’s shop and is still closely involved in running it today. He tells Joshua Rozenberg that, half a century on, the centre is now coping with housing and immigration problems that he thought were a thing of the past.

Picture: Peter Kandler, founder of North Kensington Law Centre courtesy of Law Centres Network.
The programme includes an Extract from 'North Kensington Law Centre', © Crown copyright/BFI - British Film Institute or BFI Player.

How the UK\u2019s first law centre still provides free legal advice, 50 years after its birth.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Good Advice2020111020201112 (R4)How has the North Kensington Law Centre managed to keep going for 50 years when other social legal advice providers have run out of money? One reason must be the vision of Peter Kandler, 85, who set up the UK’s first law centre in a former butcher’s shop and is still closely involved in running it today. He tells Joshua Rozenberg that, half a century on, the centre is now coping with housing and immigration problems that he thought were a thing of the past.

Picture: Peter Kandler, founder of North Kensington Law Centre courtesy of Law Centres Network.
The programme includes an Extract from 'North Kensington Law Centre', © Crown copyright/BFI - British Film Institute or BFI Player.

How the UK's first law centre still provides free legal advice, 50 years after its birth.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme featuring reports and discussion

Grenfell Tower: Inquest Or Public Inquiry?2017062020170622 (R4)Should an inquest or a public inquiry occur after multiple deaths? And is bridge a sport?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Joshua Rozenberg considers the legal issues of the moment and how they affect our lives.

Joshua Rozenberg asks a former High Court judge who has both chaired a public inquiry and conducted an inquest involving a high-profile loss of life whether a public inquiry or a coroner's inquest is the more appropriate vehicle for the investigation of the significant loss of life in the Grenfell Tower fire.

He also explores the state of forensic science with one of Britain's most experienced forensic scientists; and asks a leading human rights lawyer why women from Northern Ireland must pay for abortions carried out in England. And he discovers if duplicate contract bridge is a sport.

Help For Vulnerable Witnesses2019110520191107 (R4)A look at a scheme to help vulnerable witnesses by letting them give pre-recorded evidence

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion.

How Did The Us Supreme Court Become So Powerful?2018111320181115 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg hears the story of the extraordinary case that rewrote the way America is governed - giving the Supreme Court the power to overrule Congress. He discovers what American prosecutors get up to behind the closed doors of the grand jury room. And he asks whether we should be screening jurors in England and Wales for bias before they are allowed to serve on rape trials.
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

The extraordinary case that rewrote the way America is governed

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme featuring reports and discussion

Inside The Supreme Court2013030520130307Britain's most senior judge Lord Neuberger answers questions from the Supreme Court.

In a broadcasting first the programme comes from inside the United Kingdom Supreme Court where the country's most senior judge, the Court's president Lord Neuberger, answers questions put by Joshua Rozenberg and an audience of Law in Action listeners.

In a broadcasting first the programme comes from inside the United Kingdom Supreme Court where the country's most senior judge, the Court's president Lord Neuberger, answers questions put by Joshua Rozenberg and an audience of Law in Action listeners.

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg

Internet Privacy And Copyright20120228Joshua Rozenberg asks how the law on privacy and copyright, with different features in different countries, should be adapted for the global internet age? Interview with legal counsel for Google, William Patry. And with growing concerns about the extent of information on users held by Google+ and Facebook, in particular, how robust are the protections in place to protect us and how will they be kept up to date? Joshu Rozenberg reports.

Producer: Simon Coates.

How should laws on privacy and copyright be adapted for the global internet age?

Joshua Rozenberg asks how the law on privacy and copyright, with different features in different countries, should be adapted for the global internet age? Interview with legal counsel for Google, William Patry. And with growing concerns about the extent of information on users held by Google+ and Facebook, in particular, how robust are the protections in place to protect us and how will they be kept up to date? Joshu Rozenberg reports.

Interview With Alison Saunders, Director Of Public Prosecutions2016102520161027 (R4)The director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders speaks to Joshua Rozenberg.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Thirty years ago the Crown Prosecution Service was established - the body which acts as a gatekeeper to the criminal justice system of England and Wales. Those three decades have not been an easy ride for the CPS, which faced staffing shortages from the start. What's beyond doubt is that a well-run prosecution service is essential if the criminal courts are going to deliver justice.

In this first programme of the new series, Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the current head of the CPS - the Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders.

They discuss how the CPS has changed the legal landscape, as well as some of the key areas of work for the CPS in recent years such as increasing the success rate of rape prosecutions; bringing historical child sexual abuse cases to trial; the recovery of proceeds of crime; and the new challenges social media is presenting for the justice system.

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.

In this first programme of the new series, Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the current head of the CPS - the Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders.

Interview With Lord Chancellor David Gauke2018032020180322 (R4)Lord chancellor and secretary of state for justice David Gauke speaks to Joshua Rozenberg.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

David Gauke MP, Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice speaks to Joshua Rozenberg about prisons, modernising the courts system, legal aid and the coroners service.

Also: Could plans to change the way solicitors are regulated result in easier and cheaper access to legal services or put consumers at risk? Paul Philip, chief executive of the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) and deputy vice president of the Law Society, Simon Davis, discuss the pros and cons of the proposed changes.

Plus the Secret Barrister, who blogs and tweets about life as a criminal barrister tells Law In Action why the criminal justice system is close to breaking point.

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Interview With Rt Hon Kenneth Clarke Mp2010102620101028Rt Hon Kenneth Clarke MP, the new Justice Secretary, is interviewed in front of an audience at Gray's Inn by presenter Joshua Rozenberg.

Joshua Rozenberg questions Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke about the government's plans.

Interview With Rt Hon Kenneth Clarke Mp20101028Joshua Rozenberg questions Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke about the government's plans.
Interview With The Attorney General2013101520131017Attorney General Dominic Grieve on sentencing, the laws of war and human rights.

In this week's programme, the Attorney General for England and Wales Dominic Grieve speaks to Joshua Rozenberg in an extended interview.

To begin, they discuss the issue of sentencing and the attorney general's role as gatekeeper to the appeals court. How does he go about deciding whether a sentence is lenient or unduly lenient - and therefore worthy of an appeal? What are the factors he takes into consideration? And how can members of the public make an appeal to his office, to ask for a case to be reviewed?

The programme also speaks to Lord Justice Sir Colman Treacy, a senior member of the Sentencing Council, about the council's advisory role, asking whether he thinks sentencing is becoming more lenient.

The conversation moves on to international law, and the recent raids by US special forces in Libya and Somalia, in which a suspected leader of Al Qaeda was detained. Did the United States break international law by taking such action? And what about the British government's decision to push for military action in Syria - would it have been legal?

Finally, many voices within the Conservative Party want to restrict the influence of the European Court of Human Rights. But does Dominic Grieve agree with his cabinet colleagues? He warns of the potential cost to the UK's reputation and to the promotion of human rights around the world.

Contributors include:

Dominic Grieve QC MP, Attorney General for England and Wales

Lord Justice Sir Colman Treacy, senior member of The Sentencing Council

Ann Oakes-Odger MBE, founder of KnifeCrime.org

Dapo Akande, Co-Director of the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict

Producer: Mike Wendling

Series Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith

Editor: Richard Knight.

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg

Interview With The Lord Chancellor David Lidington2017062720170629 (R4)The agenda for the new justice secretary, the law and holograms, and ageing sex offenders.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Joshua Rozenberg examines the implications for the criminal justice system - especially the courts and prisons - of the growing number of prosecutions and convictions of older people for sexual offences.

The programme also discovers the legal implications of the explosion in the theatrical use of holograms of both the living and the dead. And we find out what's on the agenda for the new Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, David Lidington.

The programme also discovers the legal implications of the explosion in the theatrical use of holograms of both the living and the dead. And we find out what's on the agenda for the new Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, David Lidington."

Interview With The Lord Chancellor Lord Falconer20080219Former Lord Chancellor Lord Falconer on archived internet stories and contempt of court.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

As ministers pledge to review the laws on coroners and their courts, he asks how inquests today should work.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news. As ministers pledge to review the laws on coroners and their courts, he asks how inquests today should work.

Interview With The Lord Chief Justice Of England And Wales2017112120171123 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg talks to Sir Ian Burnett for his first interview since taking office.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Joshua Rozenberg talks to the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales.

In his first interview since taking office, the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, talks to Joshua Rozenberg. He explains what can be done to gain back public confidence.

Also, if you are a foster carer, are you an employee or a worker? How a Scottish couple fought to have their status changed.

Katie Gollop QC in conversation with Nemone Lethbridge who was called to the Bar nearly sixty years ago. She remembers why she was not allowed to use one particular facility in Chambers.

Finally, as Paddington comes to the big screen again, immigration barrister Colin Yeo explains what the Peruvian bear's status is in England.

Paddington 2 is directed by Paul King and produced by StudioCanal.

Producers: Diane Richardson & Smita Patel
Editor: Richard Vadon.

Producers: Diane Richardson and Smita Patel
Editor: Richard Vadon.

Interview With Us Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia20080212The US Supreme Court's Justice Antonin Scalia talks to Clive Coleman.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

In an age of proliferating blogs and podcasts, he looks at what the law permits the media to report and asks if the law on contempt should now be scrapped.

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news. In an age of proliferating blogs and podcasts, he looks at what the law permits the media to report and asks if the law on contempt should now be scrapped.

Investigating The Dead2017111420171116 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg asks what's the point of investigating the dead over allegations of abuse

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Joshua Rozenberg asks what's the point of investigating the dead over allegations of abuse. He speaks to the former judge Sir Richard Henriques, who is critical of recent police investigations into dead people accused of abuse.

The programme also explores whether we need new laws to protect cyclists on our roads.

Producer: Smita Patel
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Investigatory Powers Tribunal2013110520131107Interview with the president of the court which considers complaints brought against MI5.

Law in Action speaks exclusively to Mr Justice Burton, president of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal - a judicial body, independent of the government, which considers complaints brought against the intelligence services, the police, military and local authorities. It specifically investigates whether surveillance has been conducted in a lawful manner.

During the interview, which marks the first time any member of the tribunal has spoken to the media, Mr Justice Burton reveals how the court works, and how its members go about investigating the potentially sensitive work of the British intelligence services.

Also: There has been much public debate regarding the wearing of veils in court rooms, with critics claiming how vital it is for judges and jurors to see the face of those giving evidence, to help determine whether they are telling the truth or not.

Law in Action asks can we really tell if someone is lying by their facial expression? And would it be fairer if the face of every witness and defendant was obscured, so jurors only pay attention to what is being said in court?

Plus, a new ruling has come into force which enables musicians to reap royalties from their performances for an additional 20 years - but is it time to tear up copyright law and re-invent it?

Contributors:

Mr Justice Burton, President of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal

Prof Glenn Wilson, Gresham College

Mukul Chawla QC, 9-12 Bell Yard

Les Reed, musical arranger and composer

John Smith, General Secretary of the Musicians' Union

Sir Robin Jacob, The Laddie Chair in Intellectual Property Law, University College London

Producers: Hannah Barnes and Charlotte Pritchard

Series Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith

Editor: Richard Knight.

Jack Merritt's Legacy2020111720201119 (R4)Remembering Jack Merritt, who was murdered in the attack at London Bridge in November 2019. He and Saskia Jones, who was also killed, were associated with an offender rehabilitation programme at Cambridge University called Learning Together. The murderer was a former prisoner attending a conference at Fishmongers Hall to mark its fifth anniversary. Earlier in 2019, Law in Action had interviewed Jack Merritt and some of the prisoners he was supporting at Warren Hill Prison in Suffolk. A year on, we hear about his legacy.
Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg
Producer: Paul Connolly
Researcher: Diane Richardson

Remembering Jack Merritt, murdered in the London Bridge attack a year ago.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Jailhouse Law2019031220190314 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg reports from a prison where inmates study legal issues alongside law students from Cambridge University. The academics who launched this ground-breaking project have found that both groups of students benefit by learning together.

Plus, why four doctors have launched a Judicial Review of the Royal College of Physician’s assisted dying poll.

Producers: Neil Koenig and Diane Richardson.

Inside the prison where inmates study alongside law students.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme featuring reports and discussion.

Producers: Neil Koenig and Diane Richardson.

Joint Enterprise And Homicide Law2016111520161117 (R4)Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Why did the Court of Appeal reject challenges to Joint Enterprise murder convictions?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Joshua Goes To Prison2017032820170330 (R4)Are Scottish prisons doing better than those in England in Wales?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

The prison service in England and Wales is in crisis with over-crowding, violence and drugs. Joshua Rozenberg reports from Edinburgh prison and asks whether there are lessons for prisons south of the border.

Producer: Jim Frank.

Julian Assange: What Next?2019061820190620 (R4)Prosecutors in the United States want Julian Assange extradited to face charges of conspiring to obtain and disclose classified defence documents. What chance does he have of defeating the US extradition request at a hearing planned for next February?

Also on Law in Action: if you’ve been turned down for social security payments, how easy is it to take the government to a tribunal? And the Australian defence lawyer who shopped her gangster clients to the police.

Producers: Bob Howard and Neil Koenig

US prosecutors want Julian Assange extradited - what are their chances of success?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion.

Producers: Bob Howard and Neil Koenig

Jurors In The Dock2014031120140313Tough new laws for juries, lawyer-free litigants, and can you arrest Tony Blair?

People on juries have gone to prison for looking up defendants on the internet. But should we have more faith in jurors' ability to ignore information from outside court? Or are tough penalties what's needed to stop the integrity of our justice system being compromised? The Attorney General, Dominic Grieve, will be in the Law In Action studio to explain the government's new laws on contempt of court.

Also on the programme, presenter Joshua Rozenberg hears claims of a murder attempt and lives in turmoil as he speaks to people who turn up at the High Court without legal representation.

And could Tony Blair be subject to a citizen's arrest?

Tough new laws for juries, lawyer-free litigants, and can you arrest Tony Blair?

Also on the programme, presenter Joshua Rozenberg hears claims of a murder attempt and lives in turmoil as he speaks to people who turn up at the High Court without legal representation.

And could Tony Blair be subject to a citizen's arrest?

Justice In Lockdown2020060220200604 (R4)Can virtual courts deliver justice? We speak to participants of a mock jury trial held by law reform group Justice, with legal teams and jurors replacing the courtroom with the sitting room.

Scotland's second most senior judge, Lord Justice Clerk Lady Dorrian, outlines how socially distanced jury trials can resume safely in July.

And Joshua Rozenberg asks Director of Service Prosecutions Andrew Cayley QC if the Service Prosecuting Authority is prosecuting cases of rape and sexual assault effectively and whether charges are likely to be brought against British military personnel accused of offences against Iraqi civilians.

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

How has the law adapted to the coronavirus crisis? Joshua Rozenberg reports.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Can virtual courts deliver justice? Joshua Rozenberg reports.

How has the law adapted to the coronavirus crisis? Joshua Rozenberg reports.

Law In Action At 302014101420141016 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg discusses the most significant legal developments of the last 30 years.

BBC Radio 4's Law in Action first broadcast on 14 October 1984, presented by a young Joshua Rozenberg.

Much has changed since then: the constitution was reformed; the Crown Prosecution Service founded; the Human Rights Act passed; and Joshua's beard removed.

To mark 30 years of a programme which has consistently and expertly explained the legal world to a general audience, Law in Action is broadcasting a special debate.

We will be asking a distinguished panel - including the former Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge, Deputy President of the Supreme Court Lady Hale, and the former DPP Sir Keir Starmer - to discuss the most significant legal developments of the last 30 years.

Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg

Editor: Richard Knight.

Editor: Richard Knight.

Legal Aid Changes: Long Overdue Reform Or Denial Of Justice?2012022120120223"The single biggest attack on access to justice since the legal aid system was introduced". That's the view of the Law Society on the government's controversial proposals to reform the civil justice system. But the government argue that the legal aid system has become unaffordable and along with no win no fee has helped create a litigious society. They say the current system is a boon for lawyers, while draining resources from organisations like the NHS and leaving many small businesses in fear of legal action. The Government are planning to scrap legal aid in some areas and make fundamental changes to no-win no fee. The aim is to bring down costs and encourage alternatives to going to court. But the bill to introduce these changes has been having a rocky ride in Parliament and there is widespread opposition to the reforms. Advice centres, lawyers and even some from the government's own benches say the changes will deny justice for vulnerable people, and will ultimately end up costing the government more money. In the first programme of a new series of Law in Action, Joshua Rozenberg examines the arguments and the likely impact of the contentious changes.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.

Joshua Rozenbeerg looks at the government's controversial legal aid proposals.

"The single biggest attack on access to justice since the legal aid system was introduced". That's the view of the Law Society on the government's controversial proposals to reform the civil justice system. But the government argue that the legal aid system has become unaffordable and along with no win no fee has helped create a litigious society. They say the current system is a boon for lawyers, while draining resources from organisations like the NHS and leaving many small businesses in fear of legal action. The Government are planning to scrap legal aid in some areas and make fundamental changes to no-win no fee. The aim is to bring down costs and encourage alternatives to going to court. But the bill to introduce these changes has been having a rocky ride in Parliament and there is widespread opposition to the reforms. Advice centres, lawyers and even some from the government's own benches say the changes will deny justice for vulnerable people, and will ultimately end up costing the government more money. In the first programme of a new series of Law in Action, Joshua Rozenberg examines the arguments and the likely impact of the contentious changes.

Legal Aid Changes: Long Overdue Reform Or Denial Of Justice?20120223"The single biggest attack on access to justice since the legal aid system was introduced". That's the view of the Law Society on the government's controversial proposals to reform the civil justice system. But the government argue that the legal aid system has become unaffordable and along with no win no fee has helped create a litigious society. They say the current system is a boon for lawyers, while draining resources from organisations like the NHS and leaving many small businesses in fear of legal action. The Government are planning to scrap legal aid in some areas and make fundamental changes to no-win no fee. The aim is to bring down costs and encourage alternatives to going to court. But the bill to introduce these changes has been having a rocky ride in Parliament and there is widespread opposition to the reforms. Advice centres, lawyers and even some from the government's own benches say the changes will deny justice for vulnerable people, and will ultimately end up costing the government more money. In the first programme of a new series of Law in Action, Joshua Rozenberg examines the arguments and the likely impact of the contentious changes. The programme includes an interview with Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the government's controversial legal aid proposals.

Legal Aid Cuts: The Solicitors' Verdict2015110320151105 (R4)Solicitors affected by cuts in criminal legal aid give their verdicts on the changes.

Solicitors are in uproar about government changes to the criminal legal aid system. Not only has the budget been slashed by 17.5 per cent, but, in a recent tender process the number of firms eligible to provide duty solicitors to represent clients at police stations was reduced from 1600 to little more than 500. The firms who lost out are bitterly disappointed and there are fears that firms which were successful will be over-stretched, meaning clients will receive a reduced standard of service.

In the week the new contracts are due to be signed, Joshua Rozenberg goes to Nottingham to meet two solicitors - one, whose bid for three new contracts was successful, the other who got nothing. What is the future of their firms and how well will clients be represented in the future? Both men express similar reservations about the new pared-down system.

Also, Supreme Court judge Lord Carnwath discusses whether the courts should play a role in arguments about climate change.

And with the EU referendum on the horizon, Dr Sylvia de Mars of Newcastle University explains whether Britain would simply be able to scrap EU laws should the public decides it wants to leave.

Producers: Keith Moore and Tim Mansel.

Legal Lessons From Brexit2019102920191031 (R4)In holding the government to account over Brexit, our judges have added new pages to the UK's uncodified constitution. Joshua Rozenberg finds the law more active today than at any time since he launched this programme 35 years ago, and in the first episode of the new series he asks what legal lessons we can learn from the tumult caused by Brexit.

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

Joshua Rozenberg asks what we can learn about the law and the constitution from Brexit.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Magna Carta 800 Years On2015020320150205 (R4)This year, 2015, marks the 800th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta, a legal document often seen as the cornerstone of British freedoms.

The anniversary is being celebrated by the British Library with an exhibition that brings together the four surviving copies of the ""Great Charter"" for the first time in 800 years. Two of these extraordinary mediaeval documents are permanently housed at the Library; the other two are normally kept in the cathedrals of Lincoln and Salisbury.

Law in Action is playing its own part in the celebrations with a special programme recorded at the British Library in which a distinguished panel will consider how much of our current law actually comes from Magna Carta; how much of its legacy is little more than myth; and to what extent the protections attributed to Magna Carta are under threat.

Joining presenter Joshua Rosenberg to discuss these matters are: Lord Judge, formerly the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales; Richard Godden, for 25 years a partner at the law firm Linklaters; and Claire Breay, Head of Mediaeval Manuscripts at the British Library.

How much of today's law really comes from Magna Carta?

The anniversary is being celebrated by the British Library with an exhibition that brings together the four surviving copies of the "Great Charter" for the first time in 800 years. Two of these extraordinary mediaeval documents are permanently housed at the Library; the other two are normally kept in the cathedrals of Lincoln and Salisbury.

How much of today's law really comes from Magna Carta?

Mental-health Offenders2016032220160324 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg reports on offenders with mental-health problems.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Precise numbers are difficult to pin point but prisons in England and Wales are full of people with mental health problems and are increasing. This week, Joshua Rozenberg looks at mental health and the criminal justice system and asks how joined up is mental health system and the criminal justice system? Are they in tune with each other?

Joshua spends the morning with the Norfolk Police and one of their new custody centres to see what happens when someone is first brought into the criminal justice system. What do the Police do if they arrest offenders with mental health problems and what happens to them? And Joshua talks to a local solicitor who specialises in crime and one of the country's top forensic psychiatrists who express concerns about the numbers of people with mental health issues who are sent to prison.

Producer: Jim Frank.

Mums Behind Bars2015112420151126 (R4)Should fewer mothers be sent to prison? Joshua Rozenberg asks if there are alternatives.

Every year thousands of children see their mothers jailed, typically for non-violent offences. Often the mother is the child's primary carer. And in the vast majority of cases the children of imprisoned mothers are placed in the care of other relatives or foster parents. This week Law in Action asks whether fewer mothers should be sent to prison, and whether there are better alternatives. A mother and daughter tell Joshua Rozenberg what it's like when childhood is disrupted by a mother's imprisonment. And we hear from Juliet Lyon of the Prison Reform Trust and Andrea Albutt, the new president of the Prison Governors Association. Also in the programme: Jeremy Wright, the Attorney General, on contempt of court.

Producers: Keith Moore and Tim Mansel.

No-fault Divorce2018060520180607 (R4)Should it be easier to end a marriage? The Supreme Court is currently considering a rare defended divorce. Campaigners hope the case will prompt a change in the law in England and Wales - but others fear this will lead to divorce on demand. Joshua Rozenberg investigates.

Also in this week's programme: Christina Blacklaws, incoming president of the Law Society of England and Wales, on the implications of an important milestone. A century after the reform that allowed them to become lawyers, most practising solicitors are now women.

And, the Attorney General Jeremy Wright on what to do with the National Fund: nearly 500 million pounds which was meant to pay off the national debt.

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Should it be easier to end a marriage? Joshua Rozenberg investigates.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Should it be easier to end a marriage? The Supreme Court is currently considering a rare defended divorce. Campaigners hope the case will prompt a change in the law in England and Wales - but others fear this will lead to divorce on demand. Joshua Rozenberg investigates.
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Should it be easier to end a marriage? The Supreme Court is currently considering a rare defended divorce. Campaigners hope the case will prompt a change in the law in England and Wales - but others fear this will lead to divorce on demand. Joshua Rozenberg investigates.
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

On Parole2020022520200227 (R4)The Parole Board will soon have to decide whether it’s safe to release prisoners convicted of low-level terrorist offences. But how effective is it at predicting whether a criminal will reoffend? Joshua Rozenberg visits the Parole Board for England and Wales to find out.
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

How effective is the Parole Board at predicting whether a criminal will reoffend?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Also new legal powers to prevent the spread of coronavirus, Joshua speaks to David Lawson, Barrister at Serjeants' Inn Chambers and Catharine Arnold, author of Pandemic 1918.

Online Abuse And The Law2019031920190321 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg asks whether new laws are needed to protect online and social media users from abuse?

Plus, in our latest look behind the scenes of courts large and small, we visit an immigration tribunal in central London. Joshua Rozenberg meets applicants who want to stay in Britain and judges who need an encyclopaedic knowledge of world affairs to decide whether they can remain.

Is our legal system failing victims of online abuse?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Open Prisons2014061720140619Following a spate of high profile escapes, does the open prison system need reforming?

Following a spate of high profile escapes, Law in Action asks does the open prison system need reforming?

This week, Joshua Rozenberg visits Kirkham Prison - an open prison in Lancashire - to speak with inmates and the prison's governor to find out what open prisons are really like, and what purpose they serve in the rehabilitation of criminals. In the studio, Joshua speaks to Conservative MP Philip Davies - who has been highly critical of the recent high-profile escapes - and journalist Noel Smith, who was given a 26 year sentence for bank robbery.

Also: It's 50 years since Nelson Mandela and 7 other defendants were sentenced to life imprisonment in the Rivonia trial. Joshua Rozenberg meets George Bizos - an advocate working on the defence team at the time - to reflect on Mr Mandela's life as a lawyer and devotee to the rule of law.

And American lawyer Steven Wise, of the Non-Human Rights Project, explains his legal battle to secure legal rights for non-human species through habeas corpus lawsuits. Habeas corpus enables another person to seek the release of an unlawfully detained prisoner, which in this case includes chimpanzees, elephants and orcas.

CONTRIBUTORS

Philip Davies, Conservative MP for Shipley

Noel Smith, journalist

George Bizos, defence lawyer for Nelson Mandela

Steven Wise, president of the Non-Human Rights Project

Producer: Keith Moore

Series Producer: Richard Fenton Smith.

Peacemaking, New York Style.2018112020181122 (R4)Judge Alex Calabrese can wield the big stick if he needs to. But peacemakers at the Red Hook Community Justice Centre in Brooklyn often find it more effective to pass round what they call a talking stick. Joshua Rozenberg finds out whether a Native American form of dispute resolution can be transplanted to a deprived corner of New York.

Also, what the new director of public prosecutions for England and Wales thinks about screening jurors before they try rape cases. And one of the BBC team covering the Grenfell Tower Inquiry brings us up to date with the lines of evidence that have emerged so far.

(Picture: Alex Calabrese, Acting Supreme Court Justice for the State of New York and Presiding Judge at Red Hook Community Justice Centre)

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

Can justice based on ancient tradition work better than a criminal court?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Policing Social Media2014062420140626Are online arguments and abuse on social media taking up too much police time?

Cases of cyber-bullying on social media are becoming more and more common - and the police are often the first to hear about them. On this week's Law in Action, Joshua Rozenberg asks just how much time are the police spending on dealing with social media disputes?

Speaking to the programme is Chief Constable Alex Marshall, head of the College of Policing, who estimates that as much as half of a front-line officer's daily workload is spent dealing with calls related to online disputes. Some are very serious indeed, others less so - but where should the police and the public draw the line on what constitutes a crime?

Also: Last week a group of five Native Americans persuaded the US Patent and Trademark Office to cancel six long-standing trademarks previously registered by the Washington Redskins American football team, on the basis that the team's name is derogatory. Law in Action speaks to NYU Law professor Christopher Jon Sprigman about how this was possible, and what it means for one of football's most-famous franchises.

In another landmark case, Joshua Rozenberg speaks to solicitor Michael O'Kane about a recent private prosecution - thought to be the biggest of its kind, costing the businessman who brought the case around £1 million of his own money. But why was the case not brought through the usual channels of the CPS or Serious Fraud Office?

Finally: Should humans be the only species with legal rights? Law in Action speaks to lawyer Steven Wise, president of The Nonhuman Rights Project - an American organization working toward legal rights for members of species other than our own.

CONTRIBUTORS

Chief Constable Alex Marshall, CEO The College of Policing

Prof Christopher Jon Sprigman, New York University Law School

Michael O'Kane, Peters & Peters

Steven Wise, The Nonhuman Rights Project

Producer: Keith Moore

Series Producer: Richard Fenton Smith.

Michael O'Kane, Peters and Peters

Also: Last week a group of five Native Americans persuaded the US Patent and Trademark Office to cancel six long-standing trademarks previously registered by the Washington Redskins American football team, on the basis that the team's name is derogatory. Law in Action speaks to NYU Law professor Christopher Jon Sprigman about how this was possible, and what it means for one of football's most-famous franchises.

Finally: Should humans be the only species with legal rights? Law in Action speaks to lawyer Steven Wise, president of The Nonhuman Rights Project - an American organization working toward legal rights for members of species other than our own.

Privacy And Copyright20120301Joshua Rozenberg considers the law on privacy in the light of two recent, highly significant - and little-noticed - decisions of the European Court of Human Rights. He talks to the senior appeal court judge, Lady Justice Arden, about what the rulings mean and how they relate to the courts and the press in the United Kingdom. He also considers a decision of the High Court in London last week on the claim for privacy brought by the young international rugby player, Jonathan Spelman - who is also the son of the Cabinet minister, Caroline Spelman. He talks to a leading media lawyer about how the position of young people who are well-known in their own field may be legally affected.

The programme also looks at how, in the internet age, personal privacy is safeguarded and copyright could change. The BBC's technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones discusses how data on computer users is collected and how privacy concerns can be addressed. Simon Davies of Privacy International and Nick Stringer of the Internet Advertising Bureau then debate the issues of personal privacy and targeted advertising. The former Information Commissioner, Richard Thomas, considers how far proposed new EU legal rules on data protection and e-privacy will protect users while enabling search engines and other companies to carry on their legitimate data-gathering activities.

William Patry, senior copyright counsel at Google, Inc., has recently published a book called How to Fix Copyright. Joshua Rozenberg asks him to explain some of his proposed reforms, especially as they relate to copyright procedures in the United States, and how far these might serve the interests of the company for which he works as well as copyright holders in film, music and books.

Joshua Rozenberg asks how laws on privacy and copyright should work in the internet age.

Joshua Rozenberg considers the law on privacy in the light of two recent, highly significant - and little-noticed - decisions of the European Court of Human Rights. He talks to the senior appeal court judge, Lady Justice Arden, about what the rulings mean and how they relate to the courts and the press in the United Kingdom. He also considers a decision of the High Court in London last week on the claim for privacy brought by the young international rugby player, Jonathan Spelman - who is also the son of the Cabinet minister, Caroline Spelman. He talks to a leading media lawyer about how the position of young people who are well-known in their own field may be legally affected.

The programme also looks at how, in the internet age, personal privacy is safeguarded and copyright could change. The BBC's technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones discusses how data on computer users is collected and how privacy concerns can be addressed. Simon Davies of Privacy International and Nick Stringer of the Internet Advertising Bureau then debate the issues of personal privacy and targeted advertising. The former Information Commissioner, Richard Thomas, considers how far proposed new EU legal rules on data protection and e-privacy will protect users while enabling search engines and other companies to carry on their legitimate data-gathering activities.

William Patry, senior copyright counsel at Google, Inc., has recently published a book called How to Fix Copyright. Joshua Rozenberg asks him to explain some of his proposed reforms, especially as they relate to copyright procedures in the United States, and how far these might serve the interests of the company for which he works as well as copyright holders in film, music and books.

Joshua Rozenberg asks how laws on privacy and copyright should work in the internet age.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 February 199019900202Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 09 February 1990

Previous in series: 26 January 1990

Broadcast history

02 Feb 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0805

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 February 199619960202Producer: S.

COATES

Next in series: 16 February 1996

Previous in series: 19 January 1996

Broadcast history

02 Feb 1996 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 March 199019900302Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 09 March 1990

Previous in series: 23 February 1990

Broadcast history

02 Mar 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0809

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 November 199019901102Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 09 November 1990

Previous in series: 26 October 1990

Broadcast history

02 Nov 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0844

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 06 July 199019900706Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 13 July 1990

Previous in series: 29 June 1990

Broadcast history

06 Jul 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0827

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 09 February 199019900209Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 16 February 1990

Previous in series: 02 February 1990

Broadcast history

09 Feb 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0806

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 09 March 199019900309Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 27 April 1990

Previous in series: 02 March 1990

Broadcast history

09 Mar 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0810

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 09 November 199019901109Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 16 November 1990

Previous in series: 02 November 1990

Broadcast history

09 Nov 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0845

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 July 199019900713Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 20 July 1990

Previous in series: 06 July 1990

Broadcast history

13 Jul 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0828

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 February 199019900216Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 23 February 1990

Previous in series: 09 February 1990

Broadcast history

16 Feb 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0807

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 February 199619960216Producer: S.

COATES

Next in series: 23 February 1996

Previous in series: 02 February 1996

Broadcast history

16 Feb 1996 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 November 199019901116Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 23 November 1990

Previous in series: 09 November 1990

Broadcast history

16 Nov 1990 19:20-20:05 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0846

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 January 199019900119Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 26 January 1990

Previous in series: 08 December 1989

Broadcast history

19 Jan 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0803

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 January 199619960119Producer: S.

COATES

Next in series: 02 February 1996

Previous in series: 08 December 1995

Broadcast history

19 Jan 1996 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Producer: S. COATES

Programme Catalogue - Details: 199005041990050404 May 1990

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 11 May 1990

Previous in series: 27 April 1990

Broadcast history

04 May 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Producer: G. BUTLER

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0818

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 199005111990051111 May 1990

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE IN LUXEMBOURG

Previous in series: 04 May 1990

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11 May 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Producer: G. BUTLER

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0819

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 20 July 199019900720Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 27 July 1990

Previous in series: 13 July 1990

Broadcast history

20 Jul 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0829

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 22 June 199019900622Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 29 June 1990

Previous in series: THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE IN LUXEMBOURG

Broadcast history

22 Jun 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0825

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 February 199019900223Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 02 March 1990

Previous in series: 16 February 1990

Broadcast history

23 Feb 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0808

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 February 199619960223Producer: S.

COATES

Next in series: 01 March 1996

Previous in series: 16 February 1996

Broadcast history

23 Feb 1996 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 November 199019901123Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 30 November 1990

Previous in series: 16 November 1990

Broadcast history

23 Nov 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0847

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 January 199019900126Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 02 February 1990

Previous in series: 19 January 1990

Broadcast history

26 Jan 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0804

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 October 199019901026Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 02 November 1990

Previous in series: 27 July 1990

Broadcast history

26 Oct 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0843

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 27 April 199019900427Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 04 May 1990

Previous in series: 09 March 1990

Broadcast history

27 Apr 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0817

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 27 July 199019900727Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 26 October 1990

Previous in series: 20 July 1990

Broadcast history

27 Jul 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0830

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 29 June 199019900629Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 06 July 1990

Previous in series: 22 June 1990

Broadcast history

29 Jun 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0826

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: 30 November 199019901130Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 25 January 1991

Previous in series: 23 November 1990

Broadcast history

30 Nov 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0848

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - Details: The European Court Of Justice In Luxembourg19900518Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 22 June 1990

Previous in series: 11 May 1990

Broadcast history

18 May 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

BBC Programme Number: 90VE0820

Producer: G. BUTLER

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Programme Catalogue - StationRadio 4.
Protecting The Innocent2015021020150212 (R4)

Dwaine George was sent to prison in 2001 for murder. Aged 18 and a member of a Manchester gang, he was convicted for shooting dead another 18-year-old and sentenced to life imprisonment. But Dwaine George said he didn't do it and continued to protest his innocence throughout the 12 years he eventually served. He was finally vindicated by the Court of Appeal shortly before Christmas, when his conviction was quashed.

Dwaine George wasn't the only person celebrating that day. Crammed into court for the appeal hearing had been a group of students and lecturers from Cardiff Law School. The law school runs an Innocence Project, where students take up alleged miscarriages of justice. There are more than 30 such projects at universities all over the country. The Dwaine George case was the first case in the UK brought by an Innocence Project to be successfully appealed.

In this week's Law in Action Joshua Rozenberg goes to Cardiff to meet the people who made this happen. He hears about the years of work that went into their investigation, and the further years of waiting after the appeal was filed in 2010. And he hears about their euphoria and relief when the email finally came through that the Court of Appeal had quashed the conviction.

But is the system that is designed to guard against miscarriages of justice working properly? There are plenty of lawyers who say it isn't. Parliament's Justice Committee is currently conducting an inquiry into the effectiveness of the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), through which all appeals for wrongful conviction must go. The commission's chairman Richard Foster gave evidence to the committee on February 3rd and will be in the Law In Action studio to debate the issue with Joshua Rozenberg and others.

Producer: Tim Mansel

Editor: Richard Knight.

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Raising The Bar?2019061120190613 (R4)Should a non-traditional background be a bar to joining the Bar? Barristers want the best recruits. But many law students waste time and money training for a profession they will never succeed in joining. Leading lawyers tell Joshua Rozenberg how they plan to reduce training fees and increase diversity.

Also this week: threats and transparency in the Court of Protection. And the law behind the failed attempt to launch a private prosecution against Boris Johnson.

Producers: Neil Koenig and Nina Robinson

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion.

Producers: Neil Koenig and Nina Robinson

Rape Myths2019062520190627 (R4)Do jurors believe in rape myths? A coalition campaigning to end violence against women said a third of people questioned in an opinion poll thought that sex without consent was not rape if there was no physical violence involved.

Professor Cheryl Thomas at University College London has interviewed more than 50 real juries about their views. Ahead of publication, she outlines her findings to Joshua Rozenberg.

Also this week, the court that can close your business down in a few seconds; and whether contestants on Love Island should have to leave their legal rights at the door of their villa.

Producers: Bob Howard and Neil Koenig

Do juries believe in rape myths? An update on new research into what jurors really think.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion.

Producers: Bob Howard and Neil Koenig

Reinventing The Law2020061620200618 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg asks if new ways of working can deliver justice at a time of crisis.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

How can the courts cope with the constraints of Coronavirus? That’s the challenge facing Lord Burnett of Maldon, head of the judiciary in England and Wales. Joshua Rozenberg asks the Lord Chief Justice whether new ways of working can deliver justice at a time of crisis.

Among those innovations is mediation, Law in Action speaks to a court-based mediator and a court user whose case was resolved without leaving home.

And we find out how lockdown is changing the civil courts. Can remote hearings work effectively?

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

Religious Legal Systems20080210A special report on the challenges and opportunities created by parallel legal systems.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Scotland20110630Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at recent developments in the Scottish legal system.
Sex Discrimination Law2018030620180308 (R4)Is sex discrimination law failing women in the workplace?

It's more than 40 years since parliament passed the first Sex Discrimination Act, making it unlawful for employers to discriminate against women in the workplace by treating them less favourably than men. Still, allegations of sexual discrimination and sexual harassment have dominated the news over the past few months.

Joeli Brearley tells the story of how she lost her job after she told her employer that she was pregnant and Joshua Rozenberg asks former High Court Justice Dame Laura Cox and employment discrimination lawyer Karen Jackson whether the law itself needs reform.

Also: Judges ought to know their sentencing law, but it's much harder to get sentencing right than it should be, according to the government's law reform advisers. The Law Commission is recommending a new sentencing code that will be much easier for judges to follow. Law in Action speaks to David Ormerod QC, the law commissioner in charge of the project.

Plus the story of how an international group of graffiti artists won nearly $7 million in damages in a New York court after their work was destroyed. We speak to the artist Meres One, curator at the 5 Pointz building which housed the work, and lawyer Eric Baum about the Visual Artists Rights Act which protected the artworks under law.

Does the law regarding sex discrimination in the workplace need to be reformed?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Plus the story of how an international group of graffiti artists won nearly $7 million in damages in a New York court after their work was destroyed. We speak to the artist Meres One, curator at the 5 Pointz building which housed the work, and lawyer Eric Baum about the Visual Artists Rights Act which protected the artworks under law.

Does the law regarding sex discrimination in the workplace need to be reformed?

Sex Discrimination Law20180308Does the law regarding sex discrimination in the workplace need to be reformed?
Sexual Risk Orders2016062120160623 (R4)Policing the daily life of potential sex offenders before they are given a conviction.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

A man living in Yorkshire has been told he must give the police 24 hours before he plans to have sex - despite having no conviction, after being cleared during a rape trial last year.

This restriction on his behaviour is a result of a Sexual Risk Order - what some have dubbed 'Sex ASBOS' - which have been designed to prohibit the activity of people deemed to be a potential threat to the public. This could be limiting access to the internet or preventing people from being alone with children - but is there a fine line between crime prevention, and unfairly punishing people who have no criminal record?

Plus: The decision to raise court fees in England and Wales has been a controversial one and this week the House of Commons Justice Committee published its report on the policy. It didn't pull any punches. Joshua Rozenberg speaks to committee chairman Bob Neill MP.

Finally: the quality of the courtroom performance of witnesses can determine the difference in winning or losing a case. Law in Action finds a court where people are actively encouraged to kick up a song and dance - the Karaoke Court.

In East London artist and law graduate Jack Tan has created a mock courtroom, with all the traditional trappings of the law re-imagined. He wants to revive the spirit of Central Arctic Eskimo song duels, in which claims were resolved through singing. A paying audience will help to decide disputes between a number of litigants, singing their case in front of a real-live circuit judge who'll act as an arbitrator.

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Neill MP, Chair of the House of Commons Justice Committee

Hugh Davies QC, Three Raymond Buildings

Detective Superintendent Nigel Costello, North Yorkshire Police

Jack Tan, Artist

PRODUCERS: Richard Fenton-Smith & Ben Crighton.

PRODUCERS: Richard Fenton-Smith and Ben Crighton.

PRODUCERS: Richard Fenton-Smith and Ben Crighton.

Should A Former Soldier Be Tried Without A Jury?2018103020181101 (R4)Dennis Hutchings, a former soldier charged with attempted murder in Northern Ireland in 1974, says the UK Supreme Court should let him face trial by jury, rather than a hearing at a special court where a judge sits alone. Joshua Rozenberg speaks to Mr Hutchings and his lawyer. And in the first of a series of reports from the US, we investigate whether female lawyers face prejudice in the courtroom - including allegations of using tears to manipulate jurors.

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

Should serious crimes be tried by a judge alone? And bias against female lawyers in the US

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Should Doping In Sport Be Criminalised?20151117Lord Moynihan, an Olympic medallist and a former Minister of Sport, has called for doping in sport to be made a criminal offence. His call came in reaction to the allegations made in an independent report commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Association that the London Olympics had been sabotaged by systemic doping by Russia. Lord Moynihan has long been known to favour tough measures against drug cheats - and similar criminal offences exist in Australia, Italy and France. But how workable would legislation be? And it would it act as a deterrent? We ask about the legal repercussions of the Paris attacks. And, the migrant crisis reaches Cyprus. But could those migrants now come to Britain?

Legal magazine programme.

Should Justice Move Online?2018061220180614 (R4)Is moving justice online a good idea? In British Columbia they have done just that, with a new online tribunal handling things like small claims and property disputes. Could something like this work in Britain? Joshua Rozenberg reports from Vancouver.

Also in this week's programme: law is an immensely popular subject for students, but are they given sufficient warnings about how difficult it will be to find work as a solicitor or barrister - especially in the field of criminal law?

And does Donald Trump have the ability to pardon himself were he to commit a crime?

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Are online courts a good idea? Joshua Rozenberg reports from Vancouver.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Are online courts a good idea? Joshua Rozenberg reports from Vancouver.

Is moving justice online a good idea? In British Columbia they have done just that, with a new online tribunal handling things like small claims and property disputes. Could something like this work in Britain? Joshua Rozenberg reports from Vancouver.

And does Donald Trump have the ability to pardon himself were he to commit a crime?

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Social Media In The Dock2018061920180621 (R4)Does social media pose a threat to criminal justice - and can fair trials be ensured?

In this week's programme, Sir Brian Leveson, head of criminal justice in the courts of England and Wales, tells Joshua Rozenberg that the law needs updating to cope with the growth in social media. And a retired senior judge from Northern Ireland considers whether more needs to be done to protect complainants - and defendants - in sexual assault trials.

Also in this edition of Law in Action: something rather unusual - a private prosecution for fraud.

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Does social media pose a threat to criminal justice and how can fair trials be ensured?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

How we can ensure fairness, anonymity and integrity in criminal trials?

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson.

Sorting Out Extradition And Prisoner Voting2012110620121108Joshua Rozenberg asks how rows over extradition and votes for prisoners can be resolved.

Joshua Rozenberg asks how rows over extradition and votes for prisoners can be resolved.

Joshua Rozenberg considers how the tension between politicians' wishes and what the law requires is likely to be resolved in two highly controversial areas of government policy: extradition and prisoners' right to vote.

The Home Secretary's recent decision to prevent the extradition to the United States of Gary McKinnon prompted dismay in Washington. But the US welcomed the much-delayed transfer at around the same time of five suspected terrorists, including Abu Hamza al-Masri. Joshua asks what planned changes to the law of extradition are likely to mean for those UK citizens sought by other countries and how such decisions can be made more quickly in future.

Meanwhile, tensions with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg have risen after the Prime Minister ruled out votes for prisoners during the life of the present government - a statement which appeared to set the government on a collision course with the court. Ministers have only a few more weeks to respond formally to the court's judgment earlier this year that the United Kingdom would be in breach of its obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights if it continued to operate a blanket ban on prisoners' voting. The Attorney General has now underlined the importance of the issue by telling MPs that the UK should be seen to abide by the judgments of the Strasbourg court. Joshua asks legal experts and politicians if these two seemingly contradictory positions can be reconciled and, if so, how.

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg considers how the tension between politicians' wishes and what the law requires is likely to be resolved in two highly controversial areas of government policy: extradition and prisoners' right to vote.

Joshua Rozenberg considers how the tension between politicians' wishes and what the law requires is likely to be resolved in two highly controversial areas of government policy: extradition and prisoners' right to vote.

The Home Secretary's recent decision to prevent the extradition to the United States of Gary McKinnon prompted dismay in Washington. But the US welcomed the much-delayed transfer at around the same time of five suspected terrorists, including Abu Hamza al-Masri. Joshua asks what planned changes to the law of extradition are likely to mean for those UK citizens sought by other countries and how such decisions can be made more quickly in future.

Spies, Fifa, Fare Dodging2015061620150618 (R4)The proposal to give judges the power to authorise the interception of communications.

This week more Britons have travelled to Syria to join Islamic State. Joshua Rozenberg talks to David Anderson QC - the Government's Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation - about whether new law could help stop others following them.

In a wide-ranging interview, David Anderson talks about his proposal to give judges, rather than ministers, the power to authorise the interception of communications. And he tells Law in Action what he made of recent reports about the consequences of the Edward Snowden leaks.

Also in the programme: how likely is it that Lord Janner could face prosecution in Scotland, when the Crown Prosecution Service has ruled out a trial in England? With football's governing body Fifa in crisis, we explore the legal implications of trying to strip Russia or Qatar of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups. And a cautionary tale about a man who boarded a train without a ticket.

Producers: Joe Kent and Hannah Barnes

Editor: Richard Knight.

Sport And The Law2012030620120308The law is increasingly impacting on sport, with landmark cases being heard in the High Court and European Court of Justice in areas like drugs and employment law. The involvement of lawyers has increased as the professionalism and importantly the money has increased. But when sport ends up in the ordinary courts the cases can be slow and in some cases financially crippling. Governing bodies are often keen to stay out of court, and sport has instituted its own courts, such as the Court for Arbitration for Sport. Many sporting governing bodies write into their constitutions that the CAS be the first port of call in dispute resolution.

The CAS will play a key role at the Olympics, but dispute resolution starts long before the games themselves. Britain's rhythm gymnastics team are already appealing against a decision not to select them for the Olympics and sprinter Dwain Chambers is awaiting a decision by CAS on whether the British Olympic Association rules that currently bar him from competing in an Olympic Games break the international rules on drug bans.

But the move away from the normal courts is not driven by cost alone. There is a debate about how far the law courts should be involved in decisions which impact on sport. The European Union has recognised the special nature of sport, and this has been welcomed by sporting governing bodies. But are we seeing the build up of a body of sports law, which might conflict with law in other areas? How far should sport be special in the eyes of the law? And where should the boundary lie between areas which are decided by traditional courts, sports courts or left up to the sport governing bodies themselves? Joshua Rosenberg talks to those involved with sport and the law.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how the law is increasingly impacting on sport.

Sport And The Law20120308The law is increasingly impacting on sport, with landmark cases being heard in the High Court and European Court of Justice in areas like drugs and employment law. The involvement of lawyers has increased as the professionalism and importantly the money has increased. But when sport ends up in the ordinary courts the cases can be slow and in some cases financially crippling. Governing bodies are often keen to stay out of court, and sport has instituted its own courts, such as the Court for Arbitration for Sport. Many sporting governing bodies write into their constitutions that the CAS be the first port of call in dispute resolution.

The CAS will play a key role at the Olympics, but dispute resolution starts long before the games themselves. Britain's rhythm gymnastics team are already appealing against a decision not to select them for the Olympics and sprinter Dwain Chambers is awaiting a decision by CAS on whether the British Olympic Association rules that currently bar him from competing in an Olympic Games break the international rules on drug bans.

But the move away from the normal courts is not driven by cost alone. There is a debate about how far the law courts should be involved in decisions which impact on sport. The European Union has recognised the special nature of sport, and this has been welcomed by sporting governing bodies. But are we seeing the build up of a body of sports law, which might conflict with law in other areas? How far should sport be special in the eyes of the law? And where should the boundary lie between areas which are decided by traditional courts, sports courts or left up to the sport governing bodies themselves? Joshua Rosenberg talks to those involved with sport and the law.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how the law is increasingly impacting on sport.

Super Injunctions20110609Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at the rise of super injunctions in privacy cases.
Supporting Evidence2020030320200305 (R4)Imagine what it must be like to be a child with autism. Your school won’t give you the support you need. But challenging that decision involves giving evidence at a tribunal where the lighting seems dazzling and the air-conditioning sounds deafening. Joshua Rozenberg reports from a tribunal in Glasgow designed by children for children. He visits a unique sensory room designed to put children with autism at their ease and help them speak for themselves.
Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

The unique sensory room designed to put child witnesses with autism at their ease.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion.

Also, could Manchester City FC overturn their UEFA ban at the Court of Arbitration for Sport? Joshua speaks to Christopher Flanagan, editor of The International Sports Law Journal.

Terrorism, Extremism And The Law2016110120161103 (R4)Interview with David Anderson QC - the Independent Reviewer of terrorism legislation.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Do the laws designed to counter terrorism and extremism strike the right balance between stopping violent attacks and protecting our civil liberties?

Weighing up this question has been one of the main tasks of David Anderson QC - the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation. Mr Anderson is due to step down after six years in the post, and he speaks to Joshua Rozbenberg about the changes he has seen in counter-terrorism law, and whether the net has now been cast too wide in the fight against extremism.

One critic of the current law is Salman Butt who is bringing a judicial review case against the Home Office, which he says unfairly labelled him as an extremist speaker.

Mr Butt, who is the editor of the website Islam 21c, says the government conflates conservative religious views with extremism and this unfairly targets members of the Muslim community. Next month at the High Court he will be challenging sections of the government's Prevent counter-extremism policy, which he says conflicts with the right to free speech.

These concerns are shared by the Home Affairs select committee which has also criticised the policy, with MPs saying that that unless concerns among the Muslim community are addressed, Prevent would continue to be viewed by many as toxic.

Law in Action has also discovered that one of the key architects of Prevent also believes it has lost its way. In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg speaks to former GCHQ director Sir David Omand about how the strategy was devised and how it differs to his original vision.

Producers: Richard Fenton-Smith & Matt Bardo

Editor: Penny Murphy.

Producers: Richard Fenton-Smith and Matt Bardo

Producers: Richard Fenton-Smith and Matt Bardo

The Changing Rights Of Unmarried Couples20070206Legal programme, looking at the changing rights of unmarried couples.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

This week, how changes to the law are making it more difficult for unmarried couples who live together to avoid some of the rights and obligations of marriage.

The programme that tackles the big legal issues and the everyday ones. This week, how changes to the law are making it more difficult for unmarried couples who live together to avoid some of the rights and obligations of marriage.

The End Of Legal Highs?2016031520160317 (R4)Will new legislation deal effectively with the problem of so-called legal highs?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Joshua Rozenberg with the legal magazine programme featuring reports and discussion.

On today's programme, will new legislation deal effectively with the problem of so-called legal highs? Or will it just drive the issue further underground?

In a rare interview, Joshua talks to the Chief Coroner for England and Wales. Does the inquest system need reform?

And we hear from departing Director of Liberty, Shami Chakrabarti.

Producers: Jim Frank and Ben Crighton.

Joshua Rozenberg with the legal magazine programme featuring reports and discussion.

And we hear from departing Director of Liberty, Shami Chakrabarti.

The Family Drug And Alcohol Court2019030520190307 (R4)How a court in Coventry tries to solve social problems via the law.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

The International Criminal Court2020102720201029 (R4)An independent investigation into the International Criminal Court has revealed examples of bullying, sexual harassment and judicial incompetence. Victims of war crimes are having to wait a lifetime for reparations. But, as Joshua Rozenberg has been hearing, those same victims are hugely grateful to a court that has given them a voice.

And with a week to go before the presidential election, courts across the United States have already been dealing with voting-related challenges. Will the next US president be chosen by the judges?

The former president of the Supreme Court, Lord Neuberger, says the government's Internal Market Bill is a threat to the nation's reputation as a stalwart of the rule of law, especially when it is asking citizens to abide by restrictions during the pandemic. "It is a massive own goal for the government to be announcing to the people of this country that it does not keep its word, that it does not obey international law," he tells Joshua.

Extract from video of ICC court proceedings courtesy of the International Criminal Court.

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

Is the International Criminal Court beset by incompetence, or a lifeline for victims?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

The Judiciary In Pakistan20080205Clive Coleman reports on the tension between government and judiciary in Pakistan.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Clive Coleman reports on the tension between government and judiciary in Pakistan.

The Law After The Election20170613In a special live edition, Joshua Rozenberg considers what the election means for the law.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Following the general election, Joshua Rozenberg introduces a special live discussion programme in which he and his guests consider what the composition of the new House of Commons means for the law. They consider the courts and those who use them, the strained prison system, impending legislative changes to the law - including those required to achieve commitments made on Brexit - and how those seeking access to justice are likely to fare.

Producer Simon Coates.

Producer Simon Coates."

The Lawyers Working For Gchq2017103120171102 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg talks to the director for legal affairs at the intelligence agency GCHQ

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

The New Business Of Law20110623The liberalisation of the legal services market in the autumn has been described as the sectors 'big bang' comparable with the deregulation of financial services in the eighties. Change might not come overnight but the legal landscape will see a huge shift in the next five to ten years with new players coming into the market and some firms going out of business. Co-op is already staking it's claim - trialling legal services in branches of Britannia building society and smaller law firms are banding together to form countrywide chains, seeing strength in numbers. It is the result of the Legal Services Act introduced by the last government and it aims to increase competition, make services better for consumers and improve access to justice. But those hostile to the changes believe that a drive for profit compromises lawyers professional ethics and will drive down standards.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at radical changes to the way law firms can be owned and run.

The Policing Debate2014032520140327A panel of experts and an audience in Liverpool ask: can we trust the police?

How have recent stories like undercover policing, the deaths of Mark Duggan and Ian Tomlinson, and ""Plebgate"" affected public confidence in the police? Do the police have the right powers to do their job and do they use them as they should? Has the introduction of Police and Crime Commissioners in England and Wales helped to make the police more accountable?

Ahead of fresh inquests into the deaths of 96 men, women and children at Hillsborough, Joshua Rozenberg chairs a panel with legal, policing and political perspectives in front of an audience in Liverpool and asks: can we trust the police?

How have recent stories like undercover policing, the deaths of Mark Duggan and Ian Tomlinson, and "Plebgate" affected public confidence in the police? Do the police have the right powers to do their job and do they use them as they should? Has the introduction of Police and Crime Commissioners in England and Wales helped to make the police more accountable?

The Right To Be Forgotten2013062520130627What information do internet companies have on us, and how can we delete it?

The Right to be Forgotten: What information do internet companies and social networks have on us and can we delete it? Joshua Rozenberg explores the legal battle going on in Europe about a new law to enable consumers more rights to delete information held on them. We hear what Facebook thinks of the proposed law.

Plus, how does the military court system work?

We have an exclusive interview with the Judge Advocate General, Judge Jeff Blackett. He is the most senior judge in the military courts. He raises concerns about how some aspects of these function, namely that the board, their equivalent of a jury, can convict people with just a majority of one.

Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

The Spywatcher2014102820141030 (R4)Are the UK's spy agencies breaking the law? We ask the man whose job it is to judge.

The Intelligence Services Commissioner, Sir Mark Waller, gives Law In Action his first broadcast interview.

Sir Mark, a retired judge, is charged with judicial oversight of, among other organisations, MI5, MI6 and GCHQ.

It's his job to check the security services comply with the law when applying for warrants against individuals. Joshua Rozenberg asks him about the delicate balance between privacy and security, and the challenges created by Edward Snowden's revelations.

Also: why the County Court might not be the best place to solve disputes. We hear from a disappointed litigant and explore the possibility of resolving disputes online in the fashion pioneered by companies eBay and PayPal.

Following the collapse of a trial concerning sham marriages at a south London church in which immigration officers were found to have lied on oath and covered up evidence, Joshua speaks to Trevor Francis of Blackford solicitors, which represented one of the defendants in the case.

And is an establishment figure the right person to lead an inquiry into allegations of an establishment cover-up of sexual abuse? The journalists Andreas Whittam Smith and Oliver Kamm discuss.

Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg

Producers: Tim Mansel and Keith Moore

Editor: Richard Knight.

Editor: Richard Knight.

The Supreme Court2019022620190228 (R4)Behind the scenes at the UK's top court: Joshua Rozenberg talks to staff, officials and the court’s most senior justices. Why do they allow some appeals and refuse even to hear others? How activist are they? And what effect did the Brexit challenge of 2016 have on the reputation of the judiciary?
Producer: Neil Koenig

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Plus, coercive and controlling behaviour in an intimate or family relationship became a criminal offence in England and Wales in 2015. This week, the legislation will be used to appeal the conviction of Sally Challen, found guilty of murdering her husband Richard in 2011. Joshua speaks to Sally Challen’s solicitor Harriet Wistrich and her son David.

And new domestic abuse laws take effect in Scotland at the beginning of April. Glasgow based criminal solicitor Grazia Robertson discusses the changes.

Producers: Neil Koenig & Diane Richardson

Long-running legal magazine programme featuring reports and discussion.

Too Many Law Students, Not Enough Jobs?2013102920131031Are too many students studying law in a time when jobs in the legal profession are scarce?

Joshua Rozenberg investigates claims that too many students are training to be lawyers in a time when jobs in the legal profession are scarce.

He speaks to law graduates who spent tens of thousands of pounds training to be lawyers, only to find the essential training contracts which would seal their career were in short supply.

Should the regulatory bodies and law schools be more open with prospective students about the odds of finding work? And could they be more selective when it comes to choosing who can undertake professional exams?

Also: So-called 'patent trolls' have burdened many American companies with outlandish infringement claims, which have them cost millions of dollars in legal settlements - could Europe's new Unified Patent Court open the doors to similar claims on this side of the Atlantic?

Contributors include:

Baroness Ruth Deech QC, chair of The Bar Standards Board

Professor Nigel Savage, chief executive of The University of Law, London

Samuel Clague, The Stephen James Partnership Legal

Christopher Thornham, partner at Taylor Wessing specialising in patents law

Alexander Ramsay, vice chairman of the preparation committee of the Unified Patent Court

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard

Series Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith

Editor: Richard Knight.

Transparency In The Courts2019060420190606 (R4)When judges make decisions on family issues, should their courts be open to all?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Trump, The Fbi And The Law2017060620170608 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg explains the role of special counsel in the US legal system

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Foreign legal stories feature in the first of a new series, presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Joshua Rozenberg returns with the first edition in a new series of Radio 4's legal magazine programme. This week, following the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel to investigate alleged links between Russians and Donald Trump's election campaign, Joshua finds out what the role of the special counsel involves, how he will go about his work and how the White House will be affected by the probe. Also in the programme, the BBC's Delhi Correspondent, Sanjoy Majumder, reports on the reaction to a recent Indian Supreme Court decision which has upset drinkers and liquor store owners - but pleased those affected by drink-driving accidents. And, as the African Union prepares to meet later this month, Joshua talks to a leading South African-based lawyer about the fierce debate taking place on whether African countries should continue to be part of the International Criminal Court.

Joshua Rozenberg returns with the first edition in a new series of Radio 4's legal magazine programme. This week, following the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel to investigate alleged links between Russians and Donald Trump's election campaign, Joshua finds out what the role of the special counsel involves, how he will go about his work and how the White House will be affected by the probe. Also in the programme, the BBC's Delhi Correspondent, Sanjoy Majumder, reports on the reaction to a recent Indian Supreme Court decision which has upset drinkers and liquor store owners - but pleased those affected by drink-driving accidents. And, as the African Union prepares to meet later this month, Joshua talks to a leading South African-based lawyer about the fierce debate taking place on whether African countries should continue to be part of the International Criminal Court."

Us And Uk Legal Systems2018103020181101 (R4)Comparing two Anglophone legal systems, and are Diplock courts just?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

If the US and the UK are two countries separated by a common language, do America and Britain have two legal systems separated by a common law? Visiting Washington, Philadelphia and New York, Joshua Rozenberg found legal institutions that were superficially similar but profoundly different. Also this week, why Dennis Hutchings, a former soldier charged with attempted murder in Northern Ireland in 1974, says the UK Supreme Court should let him face trial by jury, rather than a hearing at a so-called Diplock court.
Producer: Neil Koenig

If the US and the UK are two countries separated by a common language, do America and Britain have two legal systems separated by a common law? Visiting Washington, Philadelphia and New York, Joshua Rozenberg found legal institutions that were superficially similar but profoundly different. Also this week, why Dennis Hutchings, a former soldier charged with attempted murder in Northern Ireland in 1974, says the UK Supreme Court should let him face trial by jury, rather than a hearing at a so-called Diplock court.
Producer: Neil Koenig

Waiting For Justice20201103Victims of serious crimes in England and Wales may have to wait two years before they can give evidence in court and see offenders brought to justice. In Scotland, however, the courts have come up with a novel way of holding socially isolated trials: juries sit in out-of-town cinemas and follow cases on the big screen. How well is criminal justice coping with the coronavirus crisis? Joshua Rozenberg reports.

Researcher: Diane Richardson
Producer: Neil Koenig

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

What Is The Future For Juries?20110301The so-called right to trial by jury is one available in only a small minority of criminal cases in England and Wales. Yet many people regard it as a fundamental human right. Recently, a number of our most senior judges have asked what the future role of jury trial should be in the criminal justice system.

As forensic evidence becomes more detailed and the use of - sometimes controversial - expert witnesses grows, do we need to reform our jury system to take account of changing needs and practices? And with strict controls placed on research into how juries work and how well they understand court procedures, do we even know what problems jurors may have with the system we now have? On top of this, politicians and others are concerned about the cost of jury trials.

Joshua Rozenberg considers the pressures on our historic system of trial by jury, what changes are being proposed and speaks to two recent jurors about their experiences.

Joshua Rozenberg considers the pressures on our historic system of trial by jury and how well it seems to be coping with them.

As trials become more complicated, Joshua Rozenberg asks what is the future for juries?

The so-called right to trial by jury is one available in only a small minority of criminal cases in England and Wales. Yet many people regard it as a fundamental human right. Recently, a number of our most senior judges have asked what the future role of jury trial should be in the criminal justice system. As forensic evidence becomes more detailed and the use of - sometimes controversial - expert witnesses grows, do we need to reform our jury system to take account of changing needs and practices? And with strict controls placed on research into how juries work and how well they understand court procedures, do we even know what problems jurors may have with the system we now have? On top of this, politicians and others are concerned about the cost of jury trials.

What Next For The Family Courts?20101019The family justice system has been criticised from all angles. It's been described as a slow, bureaucratic system that is bursting at the seams leaving families torn apart by its unfriendly and adversarial nature. In the first of a new series of Law In Action Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the Head of the Family Court Division Sir Nicholas Wall about what the future holds and how the sytem can be changed to help those caught up in it.

Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the head of the Family Court Sir Nicholas Wall.

What Next For The Family Courts?20101021Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the head of the Family Court Sir Nicholas Wall.

What's It Really Like To Be In Prison?2019111920191121 (R4)The secrets of life behind bars, revealed in a new podcast series. Joshua Rozenberg meets the ex-prisoners and others behind the project from The Prison Radio Association and The Prison Reform Trust.

The bedroom tax and why the Court of Appeal got it wrong, plus online courts and the future of justice.

Photo: Joshua Rozenberg with The Secret Life of Prisons presenters and contributors:

Paula Harriott, Head of Prisoner Engagement at Prison Reform Trust.
Brenda Birungi, Poet and Founder of Unchained poetry.
David Breakspear, Prison Reform Campaigner.
Phil Maguire, Chief Executive of the Prison Radio Association.

If you are feeling emotionally distressed and would like details of organisations which offer advice and support, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information 0800 066 066.

Producers: Diane Richardson and Neil Koenig.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion.

Where Next For The Hillsborough Families?2012101620121018Joshua Rozenberg asks where next for the families of those who died at Hillsborough.

Joshua Rozenberg asks where next for the families of those who died at Hillsborough and looks at what can you say on Twitter without attracting the attention of the law.

Whistleblowing, Forgotten Children And The Legal Future Of Wales2013021920130221Joining us this week is Theo Huckle QC, the chief legal officer of Wales who - controversially - says it's "inevitable" that Wales will become a separate legal jurisdiction. Are centuries of legal union with England really coming to an end?

Also in this week's programme: as President Obama raises the problem of the millions of children in the US who have no legal status because they were born to illegal immigrants, we find out what's going on in Britain.

And, amid the national debate about so-called 'gagging clauses', we explain the extent of the existing legal protection for whistleblowers. The law as it stands is, it seems, rather more powerful than many think.

Producer: Mukul Devichand.

Joining us this week is Theo Huckle QC, the chief legal officer of Wales who - controversially - says it's ""inevitable"" that Wales will become a separate legal jurisdiction. Are centuries of legal union with England really coming to an end?

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg

Producer: Mukul Devichand.

Why Are We Short Of Judges?2017031420170316 (R4)Vacancies for senior Judges and circuit Judges are now at an all-time high - why?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

Wikileaks And The Law2011022220110224 (R4)Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal issues behind the Wikileaks story.

The attempt to extradite the Wikileaks founder Julian Assange to Sweden has attracted media interest from across the world.

In the first of the news series Joshua Rozenberg speaks to Mr Assange's lawyer Mark Stephens and asks whether his regular press conferences and comments to the press have crossed the line between representing and supporting his client.

He asks the United States legal representative in the UK, Amy Jeffress, if the extradition arrangements between the US and UK need changing and he looks at whether people should be tweeting from court.

Workplace Law2020031720200319 (R4)Recent high-profile discrimination claims have cast a media spotlight on the employment tribunals of England, Wales and Scotland. But how good are they are at resolving disputes between employers and staff? How independent are they of the government? And how well have they recovered from fee increases that meant some employment judges had to move jobs?

Why an autistic man’s experiments with explosives were lawful. Joshua speaks to Jonathan Hall QC, Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation about the case of Chez Copeland, who spent almost two years in a maximum security prison for setting off explosions in his garden.

Also US courtroom drama Judge Judy is to end after 25 years. Joshua asks Adam Benforado, associate professor of law, about the show’s legacy and popularity.

Producer: Neil Koenig
Researcher: Diane Richardson

How good are employment tribunals at resolving disputes between employers and staff?

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion.

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0120040528Law in Action returns with a new look.

Taking over the reins from Marcel Berlins is barrister and writer Clive Coleman who brings a lively approach to the week's legal issues and controversies.

Does the law work? What do House of Lords judgments mean? And how does the legal system affect you and me? The series starts by asking is the legal aid system close to collapse?

0120050204Radio 4's weekly cross examination of the law and legal system returns for a brand new series.

Each week, presenter Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the major legal stories.

01Corporate Killing20041001This week, what's happened to the Government's manifesto pledge to reform the law on corporate killing? Law in Action finds out if worries about government bodies being sued are the source of all the delays.

Clive Coleman returns with a new series of his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

01Secret Courts, Drones And International Law2012060520120607
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In the first of a new series Joshua Rozenberg talks to Sir Daniel Bethlehem the former principal legal advisor at the Foreign Office. He asks him about the changing face of international law and its effect on the making of foreign policy, including the rise in litigation against the government on foreign matters. He also asks about international law and the use of drones, and the government's Justice and Security bill and why Sir Daniel thinks the measures laid out there are necessary.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.

Joshua Rozenberg talks to former Foreign Office legal adviser, Sir Daniel Bethlehem.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legality of drone attacks and the issue of time and the law.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legality of drone attacks, the changing face of international law and the thorny issue of time and the law.

In the first of a new series Joshua Rozenberg talks to Sir Daniel Bethlehem the former principal legal advisor at the Foreign Office. He asks him about the changing face of international law and its effect on the making of foreign policy, including the rise in litigation against the government on foreign matters. He also asks about international law and the use of drones, and the government's Justice and Security bill and why Sir Daniel thinks the measures laid out there are necessary.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legality of drone attacks and the issue of time and the law.

01Super Injunctions2011060720110609Celebrities have been taking advantage of new privacy laws to protect their reputations.

Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at how and why these new laws have developed.

Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at the rise of super injunctions in privacy cases.

Celebrities have been taking advantage of new privacy laws to protect their reputations. Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at how and why these new laws have developed.

01The Data Protection Act20040130Marcel Berlins returns with the first in a new series of the weekly investigation of our law, and asks if confusion over how the Data Protection Act works can be resolved to ensure fair trials and maintain public confidence.
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02Clashes Between Us Politicians And Judges2012061220120614
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A major confrontation between the courts and the government in the United States is set to ignite with the autumn election campaign about to start.

On health care and immigration - issues of direct concern to tens of millions of voters - the judges of the US Supreme Court will rule on laws that are championed by the leaders of both political parties. These decisions loom just as tensions between elected politicians and appointed judges are mounting in the UK, too, over issues as varied as voting rights for prisoners and the deportation of alleged terrorists.

Joshua Rozenberg discovers why these disagreements are becoming more heated now and how they are being tackled in the two countries.

He considers, in particular, what lessons Britain could learn from the American experience. Should we empower our courts to strike down laws passed by the democratically-elected parliament? If not, what real check exists against the arbitrary use of power by government? Or is tension between different parts of government unavoidable - and perhaps even a good thing?

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg asks why US judges and politicians seem set for an epic confrontation.

A major confrontation between the courts and the government in the United States is set to ignite with the autumn election campaign about to start.

On health care and immigration - issues of direct concern to tens of millions of voters - the judges of the US Supreme Court will rule on laws that are championed by the leaders of both political parties. These decisions loom just as tensions between elected politicians and appointed judges are mounting in the UK, too, over issues as varied as voting rights for prisoners and the deportation of alleged terrorists.

Joshua Rozenberg discovers why these disagreements are becoming more heated now and how they are being tackled in the two countries.

Producer Simon Coates.

02Good Samaritan' Laws20040604This week, should citizens have a legal obligation to intervene to try and prevent crimes they witness? Many European countries already have so-called 'Good Samaritan' laws, would similar legislation work in England and Wales?

Clive Coleman with Radio 4's lively approach to the week's legal issues and controversies. This week, should citizens have a legal obligation to intervene to try and prevent crimes they witness? Many European countries already have so-called 'Good Samaritan' laws, would similar legislation work in England and Wales?

02The Coalition's Sentencing Reform Plans2011061420110616The plans of Kenneth Clarke, the Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, for changes to sentencing in England and Wales have already proved highly controversial.

But how are they likely to work in practice and what are their effects going to be?

Joshua Rozenberg explores what the thinking behind the reforms is and how the Justice Secretary's plans for higher discounts on sentences for "early pleas" of guilty by offenders came unstuck.

He also talks to a leading criminologist about a radical new approach towards the early identification of potentially serious criminals.

He discovers how reliable the evidence for this strategy is and what benefits it might offer the police, the courts - and politicians seeking to achieve a smaller prison population.

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg explores the thinking behind the Justice Secretary's sentencing reforms.

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0320040213The Home Secretary claims that plans for a national victims' fund will support people whose lives are ruined by crime.

Marcel Berlins asks how victims will be helped and if they will be persuaded to report crime and help secure more convictions.

The Home Secretary claims that plans for a national victims' fund will support people whose lives are ruined by crime. Marcel Berlins asks how victims will be helped and if they will be persuaded to report crime and help secure more convictions.

0320041015This week, will plans for new environmental courts lead to a change in the legal climate?

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news. This week, will plans for new environmental courts lead to a change in the legal climate?

0320050218Radio 4's weekly cross examination of the law and legal system returns for a brand new series.

Each week, presenter Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the major legal stories.

Radio 4's weekly cross examination of the law and legal system returns for a brand new series. Each week, presenter Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the major legal stories.

03The Future Of The Legal Professions2012061920120621Joshua Rozenberg asks if reducing costs is affecting the quality of advocacy in the courts

As the lines blur between the work of solicitors and barristers , Joshua Rozenberg asks whether a cheaper service provides better value for money or is it leading to poor advocacy and ultimately miscarriages of justice? Joshua Rozenberg looks at where the legal professions are going and how best to make sure that future legal advocates are up to scratch.

Joshua Rozenberg asks if reducing costs is affecting the quality of advocacy in the courts

As the lines blur between the work of solicitors and barristers , Joshua Rozenberg asks whether a cheaper service provides better value for money or is it leading to poor advocacy and ultimately miscarriages of justice? Joshua Rozenberg looks at where the legal professions are going and how best to make sure that future legal advocates are up to scratch.

03The Inns Of Court20040611Clive Coleman presents the series looking at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

This edition explains the mysteries of the Inns of Court.

Clive Coleman presents the series looking at developments in the law and how they affect our lives. This edition explains the mysteries of the Inns of Court.

03The New Business Of Law2011062120110623Radical changes to the way in which solicitors firms can operate as businesses come into force in October.

Joshua Rozenberg examines the implications for lawyers and consumers.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at radical changes to the way law firms can be owned and run.

The liberalisation of the legal services market in the autumn has been described as the sectors 'big bang' comparable with the deregulation of financial services in the eighties.

Change might not come overnight but the legal landscape will see a huge shift in the next five to ten years with new players coming into the market and some firms going out of business.

Co-op is already staking it's claim - trialling legal services in branches of Britannia building society and smaller law firms are banding together to form countrywide chains, seeing strength in numbers.

It is the result of the Legal Services Act introduced by the last government and it aims to increase competition, make services better for consumers and improve access to justice.

But those hostile to the changes believe that a drive for profit compromises lawyers professional ethics and will drive down standards.

The liberalisation of the legal services market in the autumn has been described as the sectors 'big bang' comparable with the deregulation of financial services in the eighties. Change might not come overnight but the legal landscape will see a huge shift in the next five to ten years with new players coming into the market and some firms going out of business. Co-op is already staking it's claim - trialling legal services in branches of Britannia building society and smaller law firms are banding together to form countrywide chains, seeing strength in numbers. It is the result of the Legal Services Act introduced by the last government and it aims to increase competition, make services better for consumers and improve access to justice. But those hostile to the changes believe that a drive for profit compromises lawyers professional ethics and will drive down standards.

Radical changes to the way in which solicitors firms can operate as businesses come into force in October. Joshua Rozenberg examines the implications for lawyers and consumers.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at radical changes to the way law firms can be owned and run.

0420040618Clive Coleman with Radio 4's analysis of the week's legal issues and controversies with the second in a series of reports looking at how our legal system really works.

This week's programme examines the practice of "Taking Silk," whereby barristers are promoted to Queen's Counsel.

Does the system favour the best and the brightest, or does it encourage favouritism with senior legal appointments being decided on "a nod and a wink"?

This week's programme examines the practice of ""Taking Silk,"" whereby barristers are promoted to Queen's Counsel.

Does the system favour the best and the brightest, or does it encourage favouritism with senior legal appointments being decided on ""a nod and a wink""?

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04Burial Space20040220Shortage of burial space is intensifying, yet any proposed reforms to the law need to take account of human sensitivities.

Marcel Berlins investigates.

04White-collar Crime2012062620120628Joshua Rozenberg asks if the government is planning to go easy on white-collar criminals.

The government plans to simplify how serious fraud is prosecuted and punished in the UK.

The costs of bringing complicated cases to trial are growing. But some experts in white collar crime believe that the likelihood is increasing that defendants in such cases may receive only light sentences or fines - even if they are convicted. This state of affairs is prompting a re-think about serious fraud is handled by the criminal justice system.

Ministers are now promoting a less punitive approach. This, they believe, will save money by encouraging those who have committed fraud to own up before a case comes to court. Perpetrators should then receive lower fines or prison sentences.

But Joshua Rozenberg asks if this is the right way to tackle white collar crime. Should those who have swindled companies - and the public at large - out of their money be treated more leniently than other criminals? And will innocent shareholders end up paying for the misdeeds of those who act dishonestly in their name?

Producer Simon Coates.

The government plans to simplify how serious fraud is prosecuted and punished in the UK.

But Joshua Rozenberg asks if this is the right way to tackle white collar crime. Should those who have swindled companies - and the public at large - out of their money be treated more leniently than other criminals? And will innocent shareholders end up paying for the misdeeds of those who act dishonestly in their name?

04 LASTScotland2011062820110630Joshua Rozenberg examines the relationship between the Scottish legal system and that of the rest of the UK.

Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at recent developments in the Scottish legal system.

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0520050304Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the week's major legal stories and controversies.

And also unpicks the complex world of international law.

Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the week's major legal stories and controversies. And also unpicks the complex world of international law.

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05Divorce Laws20040625With Clive Coleman.

As controversy rages over the divorce laws, are Family Courts putting the rights and interests of mothers above those of fathers and children?

With Clive Coleman. As controversy rages over the divorce laws, are Family Courts putting the rights and interests of mothers above those of fathers and children?

05Inquests20040227are being reopened into a number of high profile deaths - including that of the Princess of Wales - but the way such hearings are conducted and the decisions they can reach have barely changed in modern times.

Marcel Berlins asks if public concern about its scope means the time has come to radically overhaul the inquest system.

0620040305Animal researchers are seeking a new law to control threatening behaviour by anti-vivisectionists who insist on their right to committed protest.

Marcel Berlins asks if special legislation is the right approach or if it may lead to more problems than it solves.

0620040702Clive Coleman with the series looking at developments in the law.

This edition looks at the probation service, where staff say that morale is low and the system is in chaos.

Clive Coleman with the series looking at developments in the law. This edition looks at the probation service, where staff say that morale is low and the system is in chaos.

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0720041112
0720050318Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the week's major legal stories and controversies.
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07Language Of A Bygone Age20040709This week, why do Courts still use language of a bygone age when the government says it wants to make the system more accessible? What do those legal professionals who use it in Court think about having to talk in this way? And what do defendants, victims, press and public think?

Should use of language be included in Sir David Clementi's review of our legal system?

07Tradition20040312Marcel Berlins asks whether we really understand the powerful legacy of tradition in our legal system and how, rightly or wrongly, it influences our courts today.
0820040319If the effect of reforms to legal aid is to deprive areas of the country of proper cover, do we run the risk of miscarriages of justice? Marcel Berlins investigates.
0820040716Clive Coleman presents Radio 4's analysis of the week's legal issues and controversies.

With the prisons full to bursting, the Courts are sentencing more people to community service.

For most of us, this conjures up images of people doing public good, helping the needy perhaps or working on under funded public projects.

But what's the reality? Do those serving these sentences actually complete them? And are there real benefits to them and to the community?

0820041119Another edition of the legal series in which Clive Coleman tackles the big legal issues and the everyday ones - without long words, small print or expensive fees.
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0920040326As Marcel Berlins bids farewell to the programme he has presented for over 15 years, he considers how the law and its practice have changed and what the future holds for justice.
0920040723Clive Coleman with Radio 4's analysis of the week's legal issues and controversies.

This week, why have lawyers got such a bad image? Many people think of them as slick, overpaid and manipulative.

Is this perception unfair? If so, what are lawyers doing to try and change it?

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0920070731Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

Long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion

1020040730Clive Coleman with the series looking at developments in the law and how they affect us.

This edition looks at the forthcoming change in admission policy for secondary schools.

Clive Coleman with the series looking at developments in the law and how they affect us. This edition looks at the forthcoming change in admission policy for secondary schools.