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0120200513Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0120200513Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Gethin Russell-Jones' father was a conscientious objector during the Second World War, and in this programme he -- and his son Adam -- discuss the complicated legacy of this principled decision.

Gethin has written about his parents in two books: My Secret Life in Hut Six and Conchie.

Producer: Martin Williams

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0120200513Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Gethin Russell-Jones' father was a conscientious objector during the Second World War, and in this programme he -- and his son Adam -- discuss the complicated legacy of this principled decision.

Gethin has written about his parents in two books: My Secret Life in Hut Six and Conchie.

Producer: Martin Williams

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

022020052020200523 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0220200520Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations. This is a powerful story of opportunity and sacrifice during the Second World War leaving a legacy of dedication and love.

Betty Pachl's father, Barclay Patoir came to the UK in 1943 from British Guyana in South America, now known as Guyana. After so many lives had been lost at Dunkirk there was a shortage of engineers and Barclay answered an advert posted by the British Government in The West Indies Times saying "Your Mother Country Needs You'.

When Barclay arrived in Liverpool he was sent to install engines into Halifax bombers at the Avro factory in Speke. It was there that he met Trudy. Their love survived; painful sacrifices, war and prejudice.

Max and Betty discuss the legacy of their union and Barclay's determination to use the opportunity the Second World War gave him to make the best life he could for Trudy and their family. The family motto that if you start something you see it through to the end, endures to this day. Max is now a Consultant Paediatric Surgeon and
very proud of Barclay. He also acknowledges the sacrifices Barclay made; never again reuniting with his mother or sisters.

It is with great sadness that shortly after recording with Betty and Max both Barclay and Trudy passed away within hours of each other. Their family wanted this episode to broadcast in memory of their love, life and legacy.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

022020052020200523 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations. This is a powerful story of opportunity and sacrifice during the Second World War leaving a legacy of dedication and love.

Betty Pachl's father, Barclay Patoir came to the UK in 1943 from British Guyana in South America, now known as Guyana. After so many lives had been lost at Dunkirk there was a shortage of engineers and Barclay answered an advert posted by the British Government in The West Indies Times saying "Your Mother Country Needs You'.

When Barclay arrived in Liverpool he was sent to install engines into Halifax bombers at the Avro factory in Speke. It was there that he met Trudy. Their love survived; painful sacrifices, war and prejudice.

Max and Betty discuss the legacy of their union and Barclay's determination to use the opportunity the Second World War gave him to make the best life he could for Trudy and their family. The family motto that if you start something you see it through to the end, endures to this day. Max is now a Consultant Paediatric Surgeon and
very proud of Barclay. He also acknowledges the sacrifices Barclay made; never again reuniting with his mother or sisters.

It is with great sadness that shortly after recording with Betty and Max both Barclay and Trudy passed away within hours of each other. Their family wanted this episode to broadcast in memory of their love, life and legacy.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0220200520Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations. This is a powerful story of opportunity and sacrifice during the Second World War leaving a legacy of dedication and love.

Betty Pachl's father, Barclay Patoir came to the UK in 1943 from British Guyana in South America, now known as Guyana. After so many lives had been lost at Dunkirk there was a shortage of engineers and Barclay answered an advert posted by the British Government in The West Indies Times saying "Your Mother Country Needs You'.

When Barclay arrived in Liverpool he was sent to install engines into Halifax bombers at the Avro factory in Speke. It was there that he met Trudy. Their love survived; painful sacrifices, war and prejudice.

Max and Betty discuss the legacy of their union and Barclay's determination to use the opportunity the Second World War gave him to make the best life he could for Trudy and their family. The family motto that if you start something you see it through to the end, endures to this day. Max is now a Consultant Paediatric Surgeon and
very proud of Barclay. He also acknowledges the sacrifices Barclay made; never again reuniting with his mother or sisters.

It is with great sadness that shortly after recording with Betty and Max both Barclay and Trudy passed away within hours of each other. Their family wanted this episode to broadcast in memory of their love, life and legacy.

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

022020052020200523 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations. This is a powerful story of opportunity and sacrifice during the Second World War leaving a legacy of dedication and love.

Betty Pachl's father, Barclay Patoir came to the UK in 1943 from British Guyana in South America, now known as Guyana. After so many lives had been lost at Dunkirk there was a shortage of engineers and Barclay answered an advert posted by the British Government in The West Indies Times saying "Your Mother Country Needs You'.

When Barclay arrived in Liverpool he was sent to install engines into Halifax bombers at the Avro factory in Speke. It was there that he met Trudy. Their love survived; painful sacrifices, war and prejudice.

Max and Betty discuss the legacy of their union and Barclay's determination to use the opportunity the Second World War gave him to make the best life he could for Trudy and their family. The family motto that if you start something you see it through to the end, endures to this day. Max is now a Consultant Paediatric Surgeon and
very proud of Barclay. He also acknowledges the sacrifices Barclay made; never again reuniting with his mother or sisters.

It is with great sadness that shortly after recording with Betty and Max both Barclay and Trudy passed away within hours of each other. Their family wanted this episode to broadcast in memory of their love, life and legacy.

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

032020052720200530 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0320200527Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Kurt Marx came to the UK aboard a Kindertransport in 1939 at the age of 13. His wife Ingrid Marx lived through several years at Auschwitz. This programme centres on the legacy of those profound wartime experiences and some of the the ways in which trauma -- when it is spoken of and when it is not spoken of -- can be transferred down through the generations.

Featuring Kurt Marx, his son Michael Marx and his granddaughter Johanna Marx.

With thanks to Michael Newman of the Association of Jewish Refugees.

For more information about Kurt Marx's wartime experiences, please see Refugee Voices, a project of the AJR: https://www.ajrrefugeevoices.org.uk/

And for more information about the legacy of such experiences please visit the Second Generation Network and the Holocaust Memorial Trust:

https://secondgeneration.org.uk/
https://www.het.org.uk/

Producer: Martin Williams

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

032020052720200530 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Kurt Marx came to the UK aboard a Kindertransport in 1939 at the age of 13. His wife Ingrid Marx lived through several years at Auschwitz. This programme centres on the legacy of those profound wartime experiences and some of the the ways in which trauma -- when it is spoken of and when it is not spoken of -- can be transferred down through the generations.

Featuring Kurt Marx, his son Michael Marx and his granddaughter Johanna Marx.

With thanks to Michael Newman of the Association of Jewish Refugees.

For more information about Kurt Marx's wartime experiences, please see Refugee Voices, a project of the AJR: https://www.ajrrefugeevoices.org.uk/

And for more information about the legacy of such experiences please visit the Second Generation Network and the Holocaust Memorial Trust:

https://secondgeneration.org.uk/
https://www.het.org.uk/

Producer: Martin Williams

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0320200527Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Kurt Marx came to the UK aboard a Kindertransport in 1939 at the age of 13. His wife Ingrid Marx lived through several years at Auschwitz. This programme centres on the legacy of those profound wartime experiences and some of the the ways in which trauma -- when it is spoken of and when it is not spoken of -- can be transferred down through the generations.

Featuring Kurt Marx, his son Michael Marx and his granddaughter Johanna Marx.

With thanks to Michael Newman of the Association of Jewish Refugees.

For more information about Kurt Marx's wartime experiences, please see Refugee Voices, a project of the AJR: https://www.ajrrefugeevoices.org.uk/

And for more information about the legacy of such experiences please visit the Second Generation Network and the Holocaust Memorial Trust:

https://secondgeneration.org.uk/
https://www.het.org.uk/

Producer: Martin Williams

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

032020052720200530 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Kurt Marx came to the UK aboard a Kindertransport in 1939 at the age of 13. His wife Ingrid Marx lived through several years at Auschwitz. This programme centres on the legacy of those profound wartime experiences and some of the the ways in which trauma -- when it is spoken of and when it is not spoken of -- can be transferred down through the generations.

Featuring Kurt Marx, his son Michael Marx and his granddaughter Johanna Marx.

With thanks to Michael Newman of the Association of Jewish Refugees.

For more information about Kurt Marx's wartime experiences, please see Refugee Voices, a project of the AJR: https://www.ajrrefugeevoices.org.uk/

And for more information about the legacy of such experiences please visit the Second Generation Network and the Holocaust Memorial Trust:

https://secondgeneration.org.uk/
https://www.het.org.uk/

Producer: Martin Williams

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0420200603
0420200603How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.
042020060320200606 (R4)How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.
0420200603Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

At the end of the Second World War many soldiers returning home married and a spike in births followed. But not all of these marriages were happy ones or survived the harsh realities of post war Britain. Sean Bean discovers that while physical wounds of war heal, emotional wounds can remain open.

Just before D-Day, Beryl and George married. Two months later, their daughter, Anne Godden was born. Anne always felt her father resented her, but it was not until her adult life that she found out why.

Across the Atlantic in Canada, Barbara Sherman's parents also married at the end of the Second World War. However, two years later, after Barbara and her sister were born, her father Sonny Sherman left the family to live with another woman.

Although separated by thousands of miles Beryl and Anne discover they share a very similar legacy of war.

Produced by Kate Bissell

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

042020060320200606 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

At the end of the Second World War many soldiers returning home married and a spike in births followed. But not all of these marriages were happy ones or survived the harsh realities of post war Britain. Sean Bean discovers that while physical wounds of war heal, emotional wounds can remain open.

Just before D-Day, Beryl and George married. Two months later, their daughter, Anne Godden was born. Anne always felt her father resented her, but it was not until her adult life that she found out why.

Across the Atlantic in Canada, Barbara Sherman's parents also married at the end of the Second World War. However, two years later, after Barbara and her sister were born, her father Sonny Sherman left the family to live with another woman.

Although separated by thousands of miles Beryl and Anne discover they share a very similar legacy of war.

Produced by Kate Bissell

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0520200610
052020061020200613 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0520200610Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

John Beckett left school at 14. His service in WW1 began a political awakening which led him to become a young, maverick Labour MP in the 1920s. After losing his seat in 1931, he emerged from a period of personal and political crisis having changed political direction. He became a leading member of Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists and then, after splitting with Mosley, he founded the National Socialist League with William Joyce, the future Lord Haw Haw. He was sympathetic to Hitler and lobbied against war with Germany.

When war came, John Beckett was considered a security risk due to the possibility of his sympathy for the enemy and he was one of many imprisoned under Defence Regulation 18B.

His ideas and wartime experiences left a complicated and conflicted legacy for his children and this programme focuses on the ways they learned about and responded to that legacy.

Featuring Clare Beckett-Wrighton and Francis Beckett.

Francis Beckett’s book about his father is called Fascist in the Family (Routledge).

Producer: Martin Williams

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

052020061020200613 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

John Beckett left school at 14. His service in WW1 began a political awakening which led him to become a young, maverick Labour MP in the 1920s. After losing his seat in 1931, he emerged from a period of personal and political crisis having changed political direction. He became a leading member of Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists and then, after splitting with Mosley, he founded the National Socialist League with William Joyce, the future Lord Haw Haw. He was sympathetic to Hitler and lobbied against war with Germany.

When war came, John Beckett was considered a security risk due to the possibility of his sympathy for the enemy and he was one of many imprisoned under Defence Regulation 18B.

His ideas and wartime experiences left a complicated and conflicted legacy for his children and this programme focuses on the ways they learned about and responded to that legacy.

Featuring Clare Beckett-Wrighton and Francis Beckett.

Francis Beckett’s book about his father is called Fascist in the Family (Routledge).

Producer: Martin Williams

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0520200610Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

John Beckett left school at 14. His service in WW1 began a political awakening which led him to become a young, maverick Labour MP in the 1920s. After losing his seat in 1931, he emerged from a period of personal and political crisis having changed political direction. He became a leading member of Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists and then, after splitting with Mosley, he founded the National Socialist League with William Joyce, the future Lord Haw Haw. He was sympathetic to Hitler and lobbied against war with Germany.

When war came, John Beckett was considered a security risk due to the possibility of his sympathy for the enemy and he was one of many imprisoned under Defence Regulation 18B.

His ideas and wartime experiences left a complicated and conflicted legacy for his children and this programme focuses on the ways they learned about and responded to that legacy.

Featuring Clare Beckett-Wrighton and Francis Beckett.

Francis Beckett’s book about his father is called Fascist in the Family (Routledge).

Producer: Martin Williams

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

052020061020200613 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

John Beckett left school at 14. His service in WW1 began a political awakening which led him to become a young, maverick Labour MP in the 1920s. After losing his seat in 1931, he emerged from a period of personal and political crisis having changed political direction. He became a leading member of Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists and then, after splitting with Mosley, he founded the National Socialist League with William Joyce, the future Lord Haw Haw. He was sympathetic to Hitler and lobbied against war with Germany.

When war came, John Beckett was considered a security risk due to the possibility of his sympathy for the enemy and he was one of many imprisoned under Defence Regulation 18B.

His ideas and wartime experiences left a complicated and conflicted legacy for his children and this programme focuses on the ways they learned about and responded to that legacy.

Featuring Clare Beckett-Wrighton and Francis Beckett.

Francis Beckett’s book about his father is called Fascist in the Family (Routledge).

Producer: Martin Williams

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

062020071320201011 (R4)Stella Collis was born in London in 1947 but it wasn’t until 2009 that Stella learnt the full details about her father, Gottfried Rabe. Gottfried was a German prisoner of war who at the end of the war was interned at Wormwood Scrubs. In 1947, despite having fathered a child, he was repatriated back to Germany. Tragically Stella Collis passed away in 2018, however between 2009 and 2017 Stella recorded several interviews as she gained access to German military files and her father’s story began to unfold. These revelations completely transformed Gottfried’s legacy and Stella’s life. Stella’s daughter Juliet Weller helps to tell this remarkable story.

This programme is dedicated in the memory of Stella.

Produced by Kate Bissell

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0620200713Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

072020072020201018 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Millions of people in the Indian state of Bengal were killed by famine during World War Two. Many more were gravely affected. One of these was Syed Muzaffar Towheed, the father of Shafquat Towheed.

In this edition of Legacy of War, Shafquat reflects on the ways that his father's experience of the famine stayed with him throughout his life -- and the ways in which the Bengal Famine is remembered. And forgotten.

With thanks to Diya Gupta.

Producer: Martin Williams

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0720200720Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Millions of people in the Indian state of Bengal were killed by famine during World War Two. Many more were gravely affected. One of these was Syed Muzaffar Towheed, the father of Shafquat Towheed.

In this edition of Legacy of War, Shafquat reflects on the ways that his father's experience of the famine stayed with him throughout his life -- and the ways in which the Bengal Famine is remembered. And forgotten.

With thanks to Diya Gupta.

Producer: Martin Williams

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0820200727
082020072720201025 (R4)

Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

A proudly Irish family endorsed Dr Aidan MacCarthy's decision to serve as an RAF medic in World War Two, but his daughters Niki and Adrienne knew nothing of what he had experienced.

Finally, in the 1970s, Dr MacCarthy began to talk about what he had faced. From Dunkirk to the Far East, he had offered medical support to the sick and dying, in battle and as a prisoner of war. His extraordinary legacy was to take Niki on a journey to Nagasaki, Japan, to the site where the second atomic bomb was dropped in 1945.

She was to discover the truth behind a gleaming Japanese ceremonial sword, brought back by Dr MacCarthy and kept in the family home ever since the end of the war.

Producer Mark Rickards

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0820200727Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

A proudly Irish family endorsed Dr Aidan MacCarthy's decision to serve as an RAF medic in World War Two, but his daughters Niki and Adrienne knew nothing of what he had experienced.

Finally, in the 1970s, Dr MacCarthy began to talk about what he had faced. From Dunkirk to the Far East, he had offered medical support to the sick and dying, in battle and as a prisoner of war. His extraordinary legacy was to take Niki on a journey to Nagasaki, Japan, to the site where the second atomic bomb was dropped in 1945.

She was to discover the truth behind a gleaming Japanese ceremonial sword, brought back by Dr MacCarthy and kept in the family home ever since the end of the war.

Producer Mark Rickards

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

0920200803Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

092020080320201101 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Tom Boden experienced the bombing of Liverpool as a child and was evacuated from the city. Twice.

His stories about those tumultuous years have remained a part of his everyday life, even as he gets older and his memory recedes.

And now they have found their way into fiction.

Featuring: Tom Boden, Dawn Hann, Evie Thame and Michael Thame.

Thanks to Brian Hann.

Producer: Martin Williams

Sean Bean presents a series exploring how war experiences filter down the generations

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

102020081020201108 (R4)Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Ingrid Von Oelhafen thought she knew who she was. But she was to discover the legacy of the Second World War meant that she had been living a lie, the victim of a Nazi programme called ‘Lebensborn’ in which children were stolen from their parents. Nazi officials searched for blonde blue-eyed children in the countries they occupied, and children were removed from their families as part of a plan to build an Aryan master race. Ingrid was one of these.

She grew up in Germany and only found out at a much later age that she had actually been born to Slovenian parents. As a baby she had been taken away and sent to a Lebensborn children's home.

In this programme Ingrid reflects on how her whole life was changed by the events of the war, and how she feels about discovering her true identity.

Producers Kate Bissell and Mark Rickards

Photo: Ingrid Von Oelhafen aged about two. Courtesy of Ingrid Von Oelhafen.

Sean Bean explores how wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.

1020200810Sean Bean presents a series exploring the ways in which wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

Ingrid Von Oelhafen thought she knew who she was. But she was to discover the legacy of the Second World War meant that she had been living a lie, the victim of a Nazi programme called ‘Lebensborn’ in which children were stolen from their parents. Nazi officials searched for blonde blue-eyed children in the countries they occupied, and children were removed from their families as part of a plan to build an Aryan master race. Ingrid was one of these.

She grew up in Germany and only found out at a much later age that she had actually been born to Slovenian parents. As a baby she had been taken away and sent to a Lebensborn children's home.

In this programme Ingrid reflects on how her whole life was changed by the events of the war, and how she feels about discovering her true identity.

Producer Mark Rickards

Sean Bean explores how wartime experiences have filtered down through the generations.

How wartime experiences have informed the dynamics of families in subsequent generations.