Long And The Short Of It, The [Radio Ulster]

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
0101The Ulster Plantation2014072020180211
20140723 (RU)
20180214 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

1/4. The Ulster Plantation. Tim McGarry, a six foot four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at historical incidents and people.

0102The 1798 Rebellion2014072720180218
20140730 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry, a 6ft 4 comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people. The unlikely duo investigates little-known Ulster Scots stories and well-known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it.

Six-foot-four comedian Tim McGarry joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian Dr David Hume to look at historical incidents and people.

Tim McGarry, a 6ft 4 comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people. The unlikely duo investigates little-known Ulster Scots stories and well-known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it.

0103The Great Famine2014080320180225
20140806 (RU)

Six-foot-four comedian Tim McGarry joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian Dr David Hume to look at historical incidents and people.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry, a 6ft 4 comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people. The unlikely duo investigates little-known Ulster Scots stories and well-known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it.

0104The Larne Gun Running2014081020180307 (RU)
20140813 (RU)
20141228 (RU)
20141231 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

Tim McGarry, a 6ft 4 comedian, joins a vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people. The unlikely duo investigates little known Ulster-Scots stories and well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Six-foot-four comedian Tim McGarry joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian Dr David Hume to look at historical incidents and people.

Tim McGarry, a 6ft 4 comedian, joins a vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people. The unlikely duo investigates little known Ulster-Scots stories and well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it.

02011690: The Battle Of The Boyne2015071920180314 (RU)
20180311 (RU)
20150722 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at historical incidents and people.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

0202Daniel O'connell V Henry Cooke: How The Ulster Scots Became Unionists2015072620150729 (RU)
20180318 (RU)
20180321 (RU)

Comedian Tim McGarry and historian Dr David Hume investigate historical incidents and people.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

0203The Hearts Of Steel: A Secret Society2015080220150805 (RU)
20180325 (RU)
20180328 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.|Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.|

Comedian Tim McGarry and historian Dr David Hume investigate historical incidents and people.

0204How Ulster Shrank: When Ulster Became Six Counties2015080920150812 (RU)
20180401 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

Comedian Tim McGarry and historian Dr David Hume investigate historical incidents and people.

0205The Birth Of The Orange Order2015081620150819 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Comedian Tim McGarry and historian Dr David Hume investigate historical incidents and people.

0205The Birth of the Orange Order2015081620180408 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

0205The Birth of the Orange Order2015081620180411 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

0205The Birth Of The Orange Order2015081620180411 (RU)
20180408 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

0206An Ulster Heroine: Mary Ann Mccracken2015082320150826 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Comedian Tim McGarry and historian Dr David Hume investigate historical incidents and people.

0206An Ulster Heroine: Mary Ann McCracken2015082320180415 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

0206An Ulster Heroine: Mary Ann McCracken2015082320180418 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

0206An Ulster Heroine: Mary Ann Mccracken2015082320180415 (RU)

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

0301Was The Invasion Of Ireland By England A Good Thing?2016110620170706
20161110 (RU)

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at historical incidents and people.

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Historical incidents and people in Irish history investigated from different perspectives

0302Was Oliver Cromwell Really All That Bad?2016111320170709
20161117 (RU)

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at historical incidents and people.

Historical incidents and people in Irish history investigated from different perspectives

0302Was Oliver Cromwell Really All That Bad?20170713

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate Irish history from different perspectives.

0303Were The Penal Laws Justified?2016112020170716
20161124 (RU)

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it. Programme 3 - Were the Penal Laws Justified?

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate Irish history from different perspectives.

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it. Programme 3 - Were the Penal Laws Justified?

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it. Programme 3 - Where the Penal Laws Justified?

0303Were The Penal Laws Justified?20170720

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate Irish history from different perspectives.

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it. Programme 3 - Were the Penal Laws Justified?

0303Where The Penal Laws Justified20161120

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it. Programme 3 - Where the Penal Laws Justified?

0304Would You Have Voted For The Act Of Union?2016112720161201 (RU)

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it. Programme 4 - Would You Have Voted for the Act of Union?

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate Irish history from different perspectives.

0304Would You Have Voted For The Act Of Union?20170723

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate Irish history from different perspectives.

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it. Programme 4 - Would You Have Voted for the Act of Union?

0304Would You Have Voted For The Act Of Union?20170727
0305Was Home Rule Rome Rule?2016120420161208 (RU)

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it. Programme 5 - Was Home Rule Rome Rule?

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

0305Was Home Rule Rome Rule?20170730

Little-known Ulster-Scots stories and well-known historical events from a new perspective.

Tim McGarry, a six-foot-four comedian, joins vertically challenged Orangeman and historian, Dr David Hume, to look at a number of fascinating historical incidents and people in Irish history. The unlikely duo investigates well known historical events from different perspectives, to give the listener the long and the short of it.

0305Was Home Rule Rome Rule?20170803
0401Was Ireland Ever United?20171203

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume ask whether Ireland was ever united.

In this first episode, Tim and David ask was Ireland ever United?

Brian Boru was considered the first King of Ireland and his leadership is often regarded as the starting point of a united Irish nation.

Tim believes it's all been downhill since then when Boru was killed by the Vikings at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014. Tim will argue that there was always an Irish nation with a separate national identity from the rest of the islands. David will seek to convince Tim that the concept of nationhood was not one which would have been prevalent at the time of Brian Boru. And how do you define Irish anyway when you take into account the Picts, Scots, Gaels, Vikings, Norse Hugeonots etc? They both travel to Dublin Castle where a bust of Boru guards the chapel, Tim goes to Dublinia Viking Museum to explore the history of the Battle of Clontarf and David visits the resting place of Boru at St Patrick's Church of Ireland Cathedral in Armagh.

0402Was The Protestant Reformation The Worst Thing Ever To Happen To Ireland?20171210

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume come from different perspectives to explore Irish history.

In this episode Tim and David ask if the Protestant Reformation was the worst thing ever to happen to Ireland? It's been 500 years since the Reformation began. It came to Ireland when Henry VIII was
declared the Head of the Church of Ireland.

Tim believes that it failed in Ireland due to the resistance of the Catholic population and that the Reformation led to the 1641 rebellion, Cromwell, 1690, Penal Laws, the Home Rule crisis, the creation of the NI state and even the Troubles - need he say more?

David's biggest issue is how nationalism impacted on the situation. Which came first, the influence of religion on the nation or nationalism embracing a religious community? David also highlights what the reformation did achieve - a freer thought process, individual responsibility and a lack of a political monopoly by one church.

They both visit the St Mary's Abbey Chapterhouse, a hidden gem in Dublin's city centre where Silken Thomas Fitzgerald renounced his allegiance to Henry VIII, David visits Movilla Abbey in Newtownards to discuss the reformation in a European context and Tim heads to St Columb's Cathedral in Londonderry which was the first cathedral in the British Isles to have been built after the Reformation.

0403Was The Great Famine Genocide?20171217

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume come from different perspectives to explore Irish history.

In this episode Tim and David ask, was the Great Famine genocide? The Great Irish Famine of 1845 claimed the lives of over a million people.

Tim will argue that the English were cruelly indifferent to the Irish and that it amounts to a deliberate policy. He believes the famine would not have led to so many deaths had it happened in England. Upwards of another million emigrated following the famine and the population is still lower now than it was 200 years ago.

David agrees that the famine was a disaster in Irish history, but the question is whether it was a disaster waiting to happen, given reliance on one crop. He believes absentee landlords got a deservedly bad press and that the greed of the middle men was also important but none of this affirms the famine was genocide.

Protestant evangelicals including some in government did see the famine as a judgement from above on an unrighteous people but while this was reprehensible it did not represent a distinct government policy.

0403Was the Great Famine Genocide?2017121720171221 (RU)

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume come from different perspectives to explore Irish history.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

In this episode Tim and David ask, was the Great Famine genocide? The Great Irish Famine of 1845 claimed the lives of over a million people.

Tim will argue that the English were cruelly indifferent to the Irish and that it amounts to a deliberate policy. He believes the famine would not have led to so many deaths had it happened in England. Upwards of another million emigrated following the famine and the population is still lower now than it was 200 years ago.

David agrees that the famine was a disaster in Irish history, but the question is whether it was a disaster waiting to happen, given reliance on one crop. He believes absentee landlords got a deservedly bad press and that the greed of the middle men was also important but none of this affirms the famine was genocide.

Protestant evangelicals including some in government did see the famine as a judgement from above on an unrighteous people but while this was reprehensible it did not represent a distinct government policy.

0404Was The Orange Order A Force For Good?2017122420171228 (RU)

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume come from different perspectives to explore Irish history.

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume investigate in Irish history from different perspectives.

In this episode Tim and David ask was the Orange Order a force for good? In 1849 the Order was
involved in a violent marching dispute at Dolly's Brae in County Down. The 1840s saw a revival in the Orange Order, a failed rebellion in 1848 by the Young Irelander's and rising sectarian tensions.
The Dolly's Brae skirmish led to the death of a number of Catholics and became a big boost for the
Order.

Tim will argue that the Orange Order have always been in the vanguard of stoking sectarian
tensions and symbolises the desire for dominance over Catholics. David believes we cannot take one incident in isolation. The Order has had a strong positive influence within Protestantism and it had calmed down fears of absorption. Without it, David argues, there would have been less control and the Order was appealing to the authorities on occasions such as 1798 because it could be used to maintain order. They both visit Conway Square in Newtownards where deputy Grand Master William Johnston paraded in 1867, Tim travels to Castlewellan to the scene of Dolly's Brae and David visits the scene of an Orange procession in 1813 at Hercules Street in Belfast which led to violence.

0405Was The Irish War Of Independence A Sectarian War?20171231

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume come from different perspectives to explore Irish history.

In this episode Tim and David ask: was the Irish War of Independence a sectarian war? The war was fought from 1919 to 1921. Tim follows the nationalist perspective that the IRA of that time were involved in a legitimate liberation struggle against Britain based on the democratic election in 1918 that Sinn Fein won by a landslide. Were Protestants specifically targeted for murder and intimidation? David thinks that the sectarian killings around Cork and elsewhere cannot be excused away as due to fear of informers and that there was a darker side to the republican movement. Many Protestants left the Irish Free State after the partition which shows there is a deeper debate to be had. David and Tim both travel to Dublin's Lord Mayor's residence, The Mansion House where the first Dail Eireann was convened, David visits the Ulster Museum's modern history gallery and Tim visits the National Folklore Collection at UCD where stories have been collected about Protestants who were affected by the war at that time.

0406Should Eire Have Stayed Neutral In World War Ii?20180107

Tim McGarry and Dr David Hume come from different perspectives to explore Irish history.

In this final episode, Tim and David ask if Eire should have stayed neutral in World War II. Tim believes that the new Irish state had no choice and was right morally and politically to stay neutral as taking part in the war would have left the country extremely vulnerable to attack at a time when it was simply unable to defend itself.

There's no doubt that lingering anti-British feeling also played a part. Tim also has a personal connection as his great-aunt was interned during the war in an Armagh jail. David argues that if the Nazis had plans to invade Eire at the time they would not have conformed to the niceties of neutrality. However, the politics were such that it was difficult for the state to enter the war with her old adversary the UK.

Eire though could have set aside the politics of partition and opted for a common good, especially as many of her citizens joined the British in the army and spied for the allies. Tim and David both visit the World War II Memorial in Belfast, Tim's in Derry to find out more about the Donegal corridor and how Eire helped with the conflict north of the border and David heads to St George's market in Belfast which played an important part in history following the Belfast Blitz.