Louis Spohr (1784-1859)

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
0120060410

History is often harsh in its judgements, and Spohr perhaps might have more grounds to feel aggrieved than most. He was one of the most noble composers ever, a gracious and dignified figure whose legacy was immense. Donald Macleod reassesses Spohr's reputation, arguing that we should give him more credit than he often receives.

Overture, Op 12

Leipzig Chamber Orchestra

Sebastian Weigle (conductor)

Clarinet Concerto No 1 in Cm, Op 26

Michael Collins

Swedish Chamber Orchestra

Robin O'Neill (conductor)

Sonata for Violin and Harp in Cm

Hugh Webb (harp)

Sophie Langdon (violin)

Variations in B flat, WoO 15 (from Alruna)

Michael Collins

Swedish Chamber Orchestra

Robin O'Neill (conductor).

0120060410

History is often harsh in its judgements, and Spohr perhaps might have more grounds to feel aggrieved than most. He was one of the most noble composers ever, a gracious and dignified figure whose legacy was immense. Donald Macleod reassesses Spohr's reputation, arguing that we should give him more credit than he often receives.

Overture, Op 12

Leipzig Chamber Orchestra

Sebastian Weigle (conductor)

Clarinet Concerto No 1 in Cm, Op 26

Michael Collins

Swedish Chamber Orchestra

Robin O'Neill (conductor)

Sonata for Violin and Harp in Cm

Hugh Webb (harp)

Sophie Langdon (violin)

Variations in B flat, WoO 15 (from Alruna)

Michael Collins

Swedish Chamber Orchestra

Robin O'Neill (conductor).

0220091215

Donald Macleod explores Spohr's work in Vienna, where he befriended Beethoven.

Donald Macleod explores the life and work of Louis Spohr.

Before he had reached the age of 30, Spohr's considerable talent was the talk of Europe. He had left his hometown in provincial Germany and secured a plum job in Vienna, then the centre of the musical universe. Once there, he composed a wide range of fine works, struck out on a concert tour of Europe and founded a great friendship with a chap by the name of Beethoven.

Vanitas! Vanitatum Vanitas, Op 41 No 6 (1815)

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (baritone)

Hartmut Holl (piano)

Orfeo C103 841A Tr 10

Overture (Faust) (1813)

Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

Christian Frolich (conductor)

CPO 999 093-2 Tr 4

Octet in E, Op 32 (1814)

Gaudier Ensemble

Hyperion CDA66699 Tr 5-8

String Quartet No 12 in C, Op 45 (3rd and last mvts) (1818)

New Budapest Quartet

Marco Polo 8.223257 Trs 6-7.

03

0320091216

With Donald Macleod. Jessonda - Overture and excerpts; Violin Concerto No 8.

Donald Macleod explores the life and work of Louis Spohr, focusing on his emphatic commitment to opera.

By 1822, Spohr had returned to Germany after several years of international travel and immediately set about trying to secure a reputation as an operatic composer. He saw a real need not just for great German opera, but for a manifesto that German composers should follow in their quest for a truly distinctive national style.

Overture (Jessonda) - 1822

Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

Christian Frolich (conductor)

CPO 999 0932 Tr 5

Jessonda's recitative and aria: Als in mitternacht'ger Stunde (Jessonda, Act 1)

Jessonda....Julia Varady (soprano)

Hamburg State Philharmonic Orchestra

Gerd Albrecht (conductor)

Orfeo C240 912H CD1 Tr 6

Tristan's aria: Der Kriegeslust ergeben (Jessonda, Act 2)

Tristan D'Acunha....Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (baritone)

Orfeo C240 912H CD2 Tr 3

Violin Concerto No 8 in A minor (in modo di scena cantate - 1816)

Elizabeth Wallfisch (violin)

Brandenberg Orchestra

Roy Goodman (conductor)

Hyperion Helios CDH 55157 Trs 8-10

Jessonda's recit and aria: Ich hatt' entsagt der Erde Freuden (Jessonda, Act 3)

Orfeo C240 912H CD2 Tr 13

Jessonda (Act 3, finale)

Hamburg State Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus

Orfeo C240 912H CD2 Tr 15.

0320091216

With Donald Macleod. Jessonda - Overture and excerpts; Violin Concerto No 8.

Donald Macleod explores the life and work of Louis Spohr, focusing on his emphatic commitment to opera.

By 1822, Spohr had returned to Germany after several years of international travel and immediately set about trying to secure a reputation as an operatic composer. He saw a real need not just for great German opera, but for a manifesto that German composers should follow in their quest for a truly distinctive national style.

Overture (Jessonda) - 1822

Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

Christian Frolich (conductor)

CPO 999 0932 Tr 5

Jessonda's recitative and aria: Als in mitternacht'ger Stunde (Jessonda, Act 1)

Jessonda....Julia Varady (soprano)

Hamburg State Philharmonic Orchestra

Gerd Albrecht (conductor)

Orfeo C240 912H CD1 Tr 6

Tristan's aria: Der Kriegeslust ergeben (Jessonda, Act 2)

Tristan D'Acunha....Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (baritone)

Orfeo C240 912H CD2 Tr 3

Violin Concerto No 8 in A minor (in modo di scena cantate - 1816)

Elizabeth Wallfisch (violin)

Brandenberg Orchestra

Roy Goodman (conductor)

Hyperion Helios CDH 55157 Trs 8-10

Jessonda's recit and aria: Ich hatt' entsagt der Erde Freuden (Jessonda, Act 3)

Orfeo C240 912H CD2 Tr 13

Jessonda (Act 3, finale)

Hamburg State Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus

Orfeo C240 912H CD2 Tr 15.

04

0420091217

Donald Macleod considers how Spohr laid the musical foundations for other composers.

Donald Macleod explores the life and work of Louis Spohr, considering how he laid the musical foundations for other more famous composers.

If history has not been as generous to Spohr as perhaps it might, one reason could be the high wall of Romanticism that seems to stand between us and the composer. The gracious elegance of Spohr's classicism seems altogether less grand than the gestures that were to follow from the pens of Berlioz, Bruckner, Mahler, Strauss and others, who he influenced.

Fourth Symphony, Op 86 (Die Weihe der Tone - 1832) - 1st mvt

Budapest Symphony Orchestra

Alfred Walter (conductor)

Marco Polo 8.223122 Tr 1

Piano Trio No 1 in E minor, Op 119 (1841)

New Munich Piano Trio

Orfeo C352 952H CD1 Tr 9; CD2 Trs 1-3

Symphony No 7 in C, Op 121 (1841) (The Earthly and Divine in Human Life) - 3rd mvt

Czecho-Slovak State Philharmonic Orchestra

Marco Polo 8.223432 Trs 1-3.

04*20060413

If history has not been as generous to Louis Spohr as perhaps it might, one reason could be the high wall of Romanticism that seems to stand between us and the composer. The gracious elegance of Spohr's classicism seems altogether less grand than the gestures that were to follow from the pens of Berlioz, Bruckner, Mahler, Strauss and the rest.

Yet Spohr was a figure whose music laid many of the foundations that these composers would build on, and Donald Macleod considers this aspect of the composer's music.

Fourth Symphony, Op 86, Die Weihe der Töne

1st movement - Largo Allegro

Budapest SO

Alfred Walter (conductor)

Piano Trio No 1 in Em, Op 119

New Munich Piano Trio

Seventh Symphony in C, Op 121

The Earthly and Divine in Human Life

Last (3rd) movement - Final Triumph of the Heavenly

Czecho-Slovak State Philharmonic Orchestra

04*2006041320091217

If history has not been as generous to Louis Spohr as perhaps it might, one reason could be the high wall of Romanticism that seems to stand between us and the composer. The gracious elegance of Spohr's classicism seems altogether less grand than the gestures that were to follow from the pens of Berlioz, Bruckner, Mahler, Strauss and the rest.

Yet Spohr was a figure whose music laid many of the foundations that these composers would build on, and Donald Macleod considers this aspect of the composer's music.

Fourth Symphony, Op 86, Die Weihe der Töne

1st movement - Largo Allegro

Budapest SO

Alfred Walter (conductor)

Piano Trio No 1 in Em, Op 119

New Munich Piano Trio

Seventh Symphony in C, Op 121

The Earthly and Divine in Human Life

Last (3rd) movement - Final Triumph of the Heavenly

Czecho-Slovak State Philharmonic Orchestra

Donald Macleod considers how Spohr laid the musical foundations for other composers.

Donald Macleod explores the life and work of Louis Spohr, considering how he laid the musical foundations for other more famous composers.

If history has not been as generous to Spohr as perhaps it might, one reason could be the high wall of Romanticism that seems to stand between us and the composer. The gracious elegance of Spohr's classicism seems altogether less grand than the gestures that were to follow from the pens of Berlioz, Bruckner, Mahler, Strauss and others, who he influenced.

Fourth Symphony, Op 86 (Die Weihe der Tone - 1832) - 1st mvt

Budapest Symphony Orchestra

Marco Polo 8.223122 Tr 1

Piano Trio No 1 in E minor, Op 119 (1841)

Orfeo C352 952H CD1 Tr 9; CD2 Trs 1-3

Symphony No 7 in C, Op 121 (1841) (The Earthly and Divine in Human Life) - 3rd mvt

Marco Polo 8.223432 Trs 1-3.

04*20060420
04*20060420

If history has not been as generous to Louis Spohr as perhaps it might, one reason could be the high wall of Romanticism that seems to stand between us and the composer. The gracious elegance of Spohr's classicism seems altogether less grand than the gestures that were to follow from the pens of Berlioz, Bruckner, Mahler, Strauss and the rest.

Yet Spohr was a figure whose music laid many of the foundations that these composers would build on, and Donald Macleod considers this aspect of the composer's music.

Fourth Symphony, Op 86, Die Weihe der Töne

1st movement - Largo Allegro

Budapest SO

Alfred Walter (conductor)

Piano Trio No 1 in Em, Op 119

New Munich Piano Trio

Seventh Symphony in C, Op 121

The Earthly and Divine in Human Life

Last (3rd) movement - Final Triumph of the Heavenly

Czecho-Slovak State Philharmonic Orchestra

05

05

05 LAST20091218

Donald Macleod considers some of the radiant music from Spohr's last years.

Donald Macleod concludes his exploration of the life and work of Louis Spohr, considering some of the radiant works that emerged - against the odds - during the composer's last years. It was a time that was far from the restful, contented autumn that it might have been, as the politics of the town of Kassel, where Spohr lived and worked left a sour taste in his mouth.

Quartet Concerto in A minor, op 131 (1845) - 1st mvt

Leipzig String Quartet and Leipzig Chamber Orchestra

Sebastian Weigle (conductor)

MDG 307 0849-2 Tr 2

Septet, Op 147 (1853)

Ensemble Villa Musica

MDG 304 1263-2 CD2 Trs 1-4

Sextet in C, Op 140 (1848) - 2nd mvt

New Haydn Quartet

Sandor Papp (2nd viola)

Tamas Varga (2nd cello)

Naxos 8.555968 - Tr 6

Abendstille, Op 154 No 6 (1854)

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (baritone)

Dmitry Sitkovetsky (violin)

Hartmut Holl (piano)

Orfeo C 103 841A Tr 6.

05 LAST* *2006041420060421

Spohr's last years were far from the restful, contented autumn that they might have been, as the politics of the town of Kassel, where he lived and worked, left a sour taste in his mouth. Donald Macleod concludes his series by looking at some of the radiant works that emerged against the odds during Spohr's last years.

Quartet Concerto in Am, Op 131

First movement - Allegro moderato

Leipzig String Quartet and Leipzig Chamber Orchestra

Sebastian Weigle (conductor)

Septet, Op 147

Ensemble Villa Musica

Sextet in C, Op 140

Second movement - Larghetto

New Haydn Quartet

Sándor Papp (2nd viola)

Tamas Varga (2nd cello)

Abendstille, Op 154, No 6

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (baritone)

Dmitry Sitkovetsky (violin)

Hartmut Höll (piano)