Making History

Roger Wilkes (series 1) / Sue Cook (series 2 onwards) helps listeners to uncover personal historical mysteries, whether a dark rumour about a great aunt, a strange hole in the garden or a curio on the mantlepiece.

Plus advice on how to go about your own investigations.

Episodes

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19990101
20040420

Sue Cook returns to look into another batch of listeners' history queries, uncovering mysteries, and re-interpreting the misunderstood.

If there is a local legend, a quirk of history, a family curiosity or architectural oddity that has you puzzled, or if you can help with another listeners' query, then contact Sue and the Making History team.

Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

20040504

5/13. Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities. Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

20040511

6/13. Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities. Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

20040622

4/13. Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities. Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

20040629

11/13. Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities. Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

20041019

Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities. Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

20041026
20041109

Sue Cook looks into another batch of listeners' history queries, uncovering mysteries, and re-interpreting the past.

If there is a local legend, a quirk of history, a family curiosity or architectural oddity that has you puzzled, or if you can help with another listeners' query, then contact Sue and the Making History team. Write to:

Making History

PO Box 3096

Brighton BN1 1PL

20041116
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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

20041207
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Sue Cook returns with another batch of listeners' history queries.

Today, a listener's family link with one of the founding fathers of the ANC, and the human story behind the partition of India.

If there is a local legend, a quirk of history, a family curiosity or architectural oddity that has you puzzled, or if you can help with another listener's query, then contact Sue and the Making History team. Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

20050426

Sue Cook and the team tackle another batch of listeners' history queries. Today, Dilly Barlow visits the Big Pit in Blaenavon.

20050503

Sue Cook and the team tackle another batch of history queries. Today, listeners review the Coventry Transport Museum, one of the finalists in this year's Gulbenkian Museum Awards.

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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities. Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

"

20050621

Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

Write to:

Making History

PO Box 3096

Brighton

BN1 1PL.

20050628
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Nick Baker gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities. Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

20061024

2/10. Nick Baker presents the programme which explores ordinary people's links with the past.

Listeners can write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1TU; Email making.history@bbc.co.uk; Telephone 08700 100 400

20061031

Nick Baker presents the programme which explores ordinary people's links with the past.

Listeners can write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1TU; Email making.history@bbc.co.uk; Telephone 08700 100 400.

20061107
20061114
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Nick Baker presents the programme which explores ordinary people's links with the past.

Listeners can write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1TU; Email making.history@bbc.co.uk; Telephone 08700 100 400 [National Rate]

20061128
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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

Writer Alison Weir gives some guidance to a Midland re-enactment troupe on the character of John Tiptoft, Renaissance man or 15th century murderer?

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Vanessa Collingridge investigates the story of a 19th-century attempt at a new European order in Sheffield and finds out whether the city's steel industry provided the answer to an age-old navigational problem for Britain's sailors.

Vanessa Collingridge investigates a 19th-century attempt at a new order in Sheffield.

20081202
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Vanessa Collingridge visits Southall, Middlesex, to take listeners' questions.

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20100119

Vanessa Collingridge brings together objects from around the UK that are making A History of The World, including a 9th-century bell in Northern Ireland and rosary beads found on the Mary Rose.

20100126

Vanessa Collingridge pulls together more objects from A History of the World, including the nurse's uniform worn by one of only eight women to land with the troops on D-Day.

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Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website:

bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

20100831

Vanessa Collingridge and the team follow up more questions and research sent in by listeners that help us to understand some of the bigger stories from our past.

Today, the little known secret army of 'coders' who were trained to listen to Russian military radio communications. Such was the secrecy surrounding these operations that those taking part had little idea just how big an operation they were involved in and that it was all organised by the fledgling GCHQ.

We travel back to 16th century Warwickshire and the weeks after the birth of world-famous playwright William Shakespeare to ask why his mother didn't attend his christening and what this tells us about the place of women and their role in the family at this time.

We continue our journey to Cresswell Crags near Worksop in Nottinghamshire to find out how to identify flint tools and there's news of a new on-line archive which wants people to submit material they might have on Anglo-Saxon Britain.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The little known story of a Cold War secret army.

20100907

Vanessa Collingridge and the team follow up more questions and research sent in by listeners that help us to understand some of the bigger stories from our past.

Today, Vanessa travels to Musselburgh to find out more about the first modern battle on British soil and the first modern map that depicted it. On 10th September 1547 the English and Scottish armies faced each other just a few miles to the east of Edinburgh in one of the key moments of what's become known as the War of the 'Rough Wooing'.

The English were using new, European-influenced, fighting techniques that included artillery; the Scots, however, relied on the medieval duality of man and horse. They were dealt a heavy defeat. However, despite this being: the last battle between Scots and English and the first 'modern' battle, there is little locally that commemorates it and few know much about it.

Vanessa talks with historian Dr Fiona Watson and then travels to the British Library in London to look at a map of the Battle of Pinkie that librarian Peter Barber believes is our first 'modern' map.

Also in the programme, listeners in a small town on the Essex/Suffolk border have got together for a community performance of song and speech which recalls bitter rural unrest in East Anglia in 1816 when the cry went up: 'bread or blood'. We hear how an economic downturn, new technology and the return of thousands of farm-workers from the Napoleonic wars pushed this sleepy part of the world into open revolt.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

20100914

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today, military historian Professor Richard Holmes reveals the fate of English soldiers left in France after Waterloo and Vanessa discovers how Jacobites ran riot in Manchester.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Professor Richard Holmes on the fate of English soldiers left in France after Waterloo.

20100921

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today, 'hard graft'- how labour camps were used to deal with unemployment in the 1930s; how walking became a Victorian entertainment; and celebrating our oldest cinema.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge examines the labour camps used to deal with unemployment in the 1930s

20100928

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

20101005

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Contact:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Presenter: Vanessa Collingridge

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

20101012

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

20101019

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Presenter: Vanessa Collingridge

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

20101026

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

20110301

A new series and a team of new presenters. Tom Holland, Helen Castor and Fiona Watson share the workload as we sift through listeners' questions and research and turn to some of our leading historians for some answers.

Why would you boast about having a chicken in France, why is a motorcycle gunner wearing spurs and why should we thrilled about graffiti on a medieval church wall in rural East Anglia?

Each week, the Making History team: tackles these and many other questions; here's about the latest research and puts the Radio 4 audience at the heart of historical debate.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with the first in a new series of Radio 4's popular history magazine.

20110308

Historian Helen Castor presents the programme that connects people with the past.

Today, a poem found amongst the personal papers of a listener's father reveals world-wide admiration for an Italian fascist whose death raises questions about his relationship with Mussolini.

Fiona Watson heads for a deserted Scottish island to uncover the 7th century equivalent of photo-journalism.

Tom Holland marks the 250th anniversary of the bloodiest riot outside of London in the 18th century.

And a listener's photograph of her father in the First World War brings to life the moment when motorised horsepower took over from the real thing.

Presenter: Helen Castor

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor presents the popular history magazine.

20110315

Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110322

Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with listeners' stories that change the way we see the past.

20110329

Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110405

Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110412
20110419

Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110426

Fiona Watson presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Fiona Watson with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110503

Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110510

Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110517
20110524

Fiona Watson presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Fiona Watson with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110531
20110607

Helen Castor talks to Professor Mark Stoyle of the University of Southampton about the moment that the reality of the civil war hit home for the English in 1642 and people had to chose between King or Parliament. Forced out of London, King Charles 1st uses Commissions of Array to recruit supporters but as Mark Stoyle explains there were many places where these simply did not work.

Reporter Lizz Pearson meets listener Eileen Fardon who has come across letters from the Bloomfield family in Coney Weston in Suffolk to a son serving in France in 1918. Within the letters is the revelation that the boys' mother travels to Abbeyville in France by herself after receiving a telegram that says he's been wounded.

When was the last trial of a witch in England?

Professor Owen Davies tells Helen Castor about the trial of Jane Wenham in 1712 and how a belief in witchcraft continued for more than 200 years despite laws that outlawed and further prosecutions.

In our 'Double Top Domesday' series, Professor Ian Rotherham at the University of Sheffield Hallam throws a dart and ends up near Barnsley where his reading of the local vegetation reveals a surprisingly wet landscape history.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20110614

Helen Castor and the team explore recent historical research and follow up listeners' questions and comments.

A listener's visit to a town in Kent leads us to the remarkable story of the Barbary Corsairs - but not the one we'd envisaged! The town in question is Faversham and it's there that a plaque to a local sailor rescued from pirates was spotted. But, the link between the Barbary Corsairs and Faversham is much more than a rescued sailor. One of the most feared pirates in the seventeenth century came from Faversham. Helen Castor spoke with the author Adrian Tinniswood who explained the background to this story: how peace with Spain in the early 1600's threw thousands of mercenaries out of work and how many moved to North Africa to join with the pirates we know as the Barbary Corsairs. There was no one more infamous than Issouf Reis who converted to Islam and made so much money that he lived in Tunis in a house made out of Marble and Alabaster.

Foreign correspondent Tom Gibb follows up last week's story about the Civil War 'Commissions of Array' which were used by the king to recruit followers in the fight with parliament. He likens events in the seventeenth century in England to what he saw in Central America in the 1980's where most people simply didn't want anything to do with the conflict.

In Ipswich, Making History reporter Joanna Pinnock discovers a little-known side to the life of Henry VIII's Lord Chancellor Cardinal Wolsey. Retired headteacher, John Blatchly has led a campaign to commemorate Wolsey in his home town with a statue. Whilst raising funds, local people have been researching the life of Wolsey and have found that he was an important influence on England's fledgling education system - even proposing his own national curriculum.

In this week's edition of 'Double-Top Domesday' Professor Alun Howkins, a social historian from the University of Sussex, is at the oche. His dart lands close to the Norfolk village of Old Buckenham and Alun soon finds evidence for a hidden radical past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor presents the programme that reflects listeners' passions for the past.

20110621
20110823

A new series of 'Making History'. Tom Holland, Helen Castor and Fiona Watson share the workload as we sift through listener's questions and research and turn to some of our leading historians for some answers.

Each week, the Making History team: tackles listeners questions; hears about the latest research and puts the Radio 4 audience at the heart of historical debate.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Listeners share their ideas and questions with some of the world's leading historians.

20110830

Radio 4's popular history magazine series. Listeners share their ideas and questions with some of the world's leading historians.

Radio 4's popular history magazine series.

20110906

A new series of 'Making History'. Tom Holland, Helen Castor and Fiona Watson share the workload as we sift through listener's questions and research and turn to some of our leading historians for some answers.

Each week, the Making History team: tackles listeners questions; hears about the latest research and puts the Radio 4 audience at the heart of historical debate.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Radio 4's popular history magazine series.

20110913
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Is History In Crisis?:

TV seems full to bursting with history programmes, the bookshops are stuffed full of historic fact and fiction - and there are few decent radio programmes on the subject too! So, is history in crisis? That was one of the themes up for discussion at a conference organised by History Today and Tom went along to gauge the feeling of students and researchers. Many were worried by perceived cutbacks in the humanities in universities but it was the breadth of teaching that concerned people most. In short: too many Nazis and not enough Magna Carta, English Civil War or understanding of Welsh, Scottish and Irish history.

Unexplained Circles in Ashdown Forest:

A listener in Turkey has spotted 2 unexplained circles in Ashdown Forest whilst looking at satellite mapping (Grid References: TQ 45410 30887, E 545410.5 N 130887). Helen Castor visited the team at the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty where they have been using a new laser technique called LIDAR as part of a community archaeology partnership which might explain more.

Krojanty 1939:

Dr Richard Butterwick from University College London explains how the myth that Polish cavalry charged Nazi tanks in September 1939 took hold and spread.

Bath Pump Room Band:

Lizz Pearson meets up with Robert and Nicola Hyman who have written a history of music at the Pump Room in Bath.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland presents the programme that reflects listeners' passion for the past.

20111122
20120403

Historian Helen Castor presents a new series of Radio 4's popular magazine in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

From Stirling to Southampton, Oxford to Orleans, the Making History team have been out and about in the last few weeks chasing down answers to questions posed in the emails and letters sent in by the Radio 4 audience: family research, forgotten diaries, architectural oddities, unexplained features in the landscape... all these, and more, add to a 'must-listen mix' of topics that range from the Aztecs to the obsession of a French railway enthusiast in Amersham.

In this week's programme: Helen meets two listeners who are about to embark on a journey of a lifetime to see for themselves the exact spot in the icy waters of the North Atlantic where a relative died on a British ship sunk by a British minefield in a little-known accident during the Second World War; fellow presenter Tom Holland heads down Route 66 to discover that mediaeval Native Americans loved the city-life just as much as their twenty-first century cousins; and a professional map-maker puzzles over some unexplained symbols that are making horticultural history in the Surrey countryside.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Two listeners head to the spot in the North Atlantic where a relative died in World War II

20120410

Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today, the programme marks the centenary of the sinking of the Titanic by looking into our understanding of icebergs 100 years ago and asking whether the ship's designers can really be blamed for not knowing what we know now. Helen Castor is in Exeter at the home of the Met Office to uncover the tragic and little-known story of the men who manned the Atlantic weather ships in wartime. And a listener in Dorset needs your help with a project which marks the impact of Black American GI's during the Second World War.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Presented by Tom Holland. Marking the centenary of the sinking of the Titanic.

20120417

Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today: the brutality of war and revolution in Russia - but what was a man from the East Midlands doing there? Is the name "Wessex" as old as we think it is? Did Aztecs and North American Indians ever meet? And the serious politics that was behind fun and games in fifteenth century Scotland.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor with more of your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

20120424

Historian Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history magazine.

20120501

Historian Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history magazine.

20120508

Historian Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland presents the popular history magazine programme.

20120522

Historian Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20120529

Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Oak Apple Day: Professor Mark Stoyle from the University of Southampton explains the origins of Oak Apple Day, the day that marks the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660. In Fowey in Cornwall listener David Ruffer wants to find out more about the regicide Hugh Peter. Meanwhile in Sweden, listener Peter Henriksson wants to know what happened to foreign treaties during the Long Parliament and the Restoration that followed. Helen speaks to Dr Toby Osborne at the University of Durham.

Much Wenlock: In the week that the Olympic flame is carried through the Shropshire town of Much Wenlock, the BBC School Report team help local youngsters research the local man who was a huge influence on the modern games.

The Fall of Constantinople: Tom Holland marks the anniversary of the Fall of Constantinople in May 1453 by talking to Professor Jonathan Harris at Royal Holloway University of London to discover whether it was indeed a clash of two religious empires.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20120605

Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Irish Deserters in the British Army: Making History listener Paddy Reid from County Dublin in the Irish Republic wrote to the programme with the story of his father who, aged 17, deserted from the Irish Army to fight for the British during the Second World War. Having served in India and Burma Paddy's father returned home to Ireland in 1946 and was then effectively barred from employment for the best part of 16 years because many regarded him as a traitor. As the debate about amnesty for these men goes on in Dublin, Tom Holland talks to Paddy and to Professor Brian Girvin who is the Co-Director of the Volunteers Project at University College Cork.

Chalk: Patricia Nash in Basingstoke is working on a project to ensure that every public right of way in Hampshire is marked on a definitive map. Her research has meant that she has looked at hundreds of old maps and she is amazed at the number of chalk workings that are shown. 'What were they for', she asks? Making History's Simon Evans joined archaeologist Dr Matt Pope on the South Downs to find out more.

Richard Cromwell: Den Cartlidge heard our recent programme about the English Civil War and the Long Parliament. He asks why Richard Cromwell's short tenure as Lord Protector is so often ignored? Tom Holland talks to Professor Ronald Hutton from the University of Bristol.

Abebe Bikali: Helen Castor talks to the author Simon Martin about the Ethiopian runner whose barefoot victory in the Olympic marathon in Rome in 1960 paved the way for the African domination of distance running that we are familiar with today.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

20120612

Historian Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20120619
20120626

Helen Castor with more listeners questions which help shed new light on the past.

The Klondike Gold Rush: Listener Mike Rouse wants to know more about the Britons who journeyed out west to make their fortune. Helen Castor talks to Professor Marjory Harper from the University of Aberdeen.

Gibbets: A project at the University of Leicester needs Making History listeners to help with a nationwide survey of gibbet sites. Lizz Pearson talks to Professor Sarah Tarlow to find out more.

1409 the year of three Popes: Helen talks to Professor David D'Avray about a moment in the early years of the fifteenth century when there was not one but three Popes.

Aerofilms: Tom Holland at the offices of English Heritage in Swindon discovers more about a unique archive of aerial photographs which stretch back to 1919 and are now available on-line.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20121023

Tom Holland is in the chair for the first in a new series of programmes in which listener's historical and archaeological inquiries are showcased alongside the latest work being carried out in universities, archives and museums across the UK.

Joining Tom in the studio are Dr Lucy Worsley from the Historic Royal Palaces and Professor Owen Davies from the University of Hertfordshire. Helen Castor is in Lancashire to find out how local ghost stories help us understand the way people thought in centuries gone by.

Martin Ellis takes on the invading Normans to find out whether re-enactment is just dressing up or serious historical research and Professor Ronald Hutton takes us to the inspirational medieval castle in Wales that set him on a lifetime's path of making history.

Join in the discussion on Facebook, Twitter or by emailing making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20121030
20121106
20121113
20121120
20121127
20130115

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in the next six weeks of this new series, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards, investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite effect, and finding out why you can't necessarily see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130122

Helen Castor is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130129

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in the next six weeks, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards; investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite affect; and finding out why you can't, necessarily, see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130205

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in this series, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards, investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite affect, and finding out why you can't necessarily see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130212

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in this six week series, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards, investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite affect, and finding out why you can't necessarily see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130219

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in this series, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor, will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards, investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite affect, and finding out why you can't, necessarily, see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130226
20130416

Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Elaine Chalus, who is Director of the Centre for History and Culture at Bath Spa University and currently involved in researching The Admirals Wife: An Intimate History of Family, Navy and Empire. It draws upon the largely unknown diaries of Elizabeth Wynne Fremantle (1778-1857).

Alongside her is one of Britain's leading historians of the eighteenth century, Professor Jeremy Black from the University of Exeter.

Tom heads to the British Library in London to take a privileged look at a remarkable volume of naval dispatches. Unearthed by naval historian Sam Willis, this beautifully bound book contains first - hand accounts of some of the key sea battles between 1794 and 1805. So why don't we know more about it?

In Warwickshire, archivist Rob Eyre brings us evidence for a unique way of paying for Nelson's navy: a hair-powder tax.

And Helen Castor takes a trip to Watford to meet a Making History listener who can shed new light on the role of toads in pregnancy testing before the DIY kits of today.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130423

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by Michelle Brown, Professor of Medieval Manuscript Studies at the University of London.

Martin Ellis is on the border of England and Wales to celebrate an iconic landscape feature which doesn't attract the attention that its history warrants. He asks who Offa was, and what made him build a dyke which has become the physical border between two nations.

Joining Tom from Ireland is Dr Gillian Kenny from Trinity College in Dublin where she works on research into women in medieval Gaelic society. Remarkably, she has discovered that married women enjoyed a freedom in the Ireland of the middle ages that their English counterparts never had.

And Helen Castor is out on the cut finding out about the women who joined a scheme to keep the canals going during the Second World War. But has this middle-class history eclipsed a longer working-class one?

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130430
20130507
20130514
20130820

Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by archaeologist Professor Francis Pryor and Arthur MacGregor the author of the much praised history of our relationship with animals, "Animal Encounters".

Tom talks to Professor Lisa Brady from BioseStateUniversity in the USA to find out what we mean by environmental history and why it seems to be more popular across the Atlantic than it is in Europe. Professor Ian Rotherham takes us on a journey into England's lost fens and Helen Castor is in the wetlands of Somerset with Professor Ronald Hutton to hear Making History listener Steve Pole's theories on why religion and landscape made Bridgwater such a rebellious town.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/pages/Making-History-Radio-4/149443762242

Making History is produced by Nick Patrick and is a Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

20130827
20130827

Helen Castor chairs 'Historians' Question Time' from the Chalke Valley History Festival.

20130903

Tom Holland is joined by leading historians to discuss the latest historic research and showcase listener's passions that, together, are helping to deliver new insight into our past.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130903

Tom Holland is joined by leading historians to discuss the latest historic research and showcase listener's passions that, together, are helping to deliver new insight into our past.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130910

Helen Castor is joined in the Making History studio by Rana Mitter, Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China at the University of Oxford and, from Salford, by Dr Andrew Fearnley a historian of Modern America at the University of Manchester.

The programme begins with the little acknowledged role that China played in World War 2 and its war with Japan which began in 1937. We hear how a poor and divided country desperately fought off the Japanese and, in so doing, tied up troops which would otherwise have been turned on the Allies in the Pacific theatre of war. Helen asks why this history is so little known.

Fifty years after Martin Luther King made his iconic "I have a dream speech" speech in front of the Lincoln memorial in Washington, we find out about the black power movement that turned its back on King and the organisation that grew out of this. We may think of the Black Panthers as an American organisation, but a new photography and oral history project in Brixton reveals the story of the British Black Panthers.

Finally, Tom Holland heads off to the beautiful north Somerset coast at the village of Kilve to discover the past use of a decaying brick building. To his surprise, he hears that this might well have become home to the British oil shale industry if prospectors had been successful back in the 1920s.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130910

Helen Castor is joined in the Making History studio by Rana Mitter, Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China at the University of Oxford and, from Salford, by Dr Andrew Fearnley a historian of Modern America at the University of Manchester.

The programme begins with the little acknowledged role that China played in World War 2 and its war with Japan which began in 1937. We hear how a poor and divided country desperately fought off the Japanese and, in so doing, tied up troops which would otherwise have been turned on the Allies in the Pacific theatre of war. Helen asks why this history is so little known.

Fifty years after Martin Luther King made his iconic "I have a dream speech" speech in front of the Lincoln memorial in Washington, we find out about the black power movement that turned its back on King and the organisation that grew out of this. We may think of the Black Panthers as an American organisation, but a new photography and oral history project in Brixton reveals the story of the British Black Panthers.

Finally, Tom Holland heads off to the beautiful north Somerset coast at the village of Kilve to discover the past use of a decaying brick building. To his surprise, he hears that this might well have become home to the British oil shale industry if prospectors had been successful back in the 1920s.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20130917

Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Matt Pope from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London and from Luton by Mark Thomas who is Professor of Evolutionary Genetics at University College London.

Today's programme has just a touch of Disney. But we're not at the movies - rather under the English Channel, exploring the role played by Dumbo, Bambi and Pluto in the Allied invasion of France in 1944 and finding out that these pipelines might not have been as successful in delivering fuel after the invasion of France than the history books tell us.

We explore the history of milk. It's something that we take for granted but, in fact, the ability to drink milk into adulthood is something that only some 35% of humans possess. Its origins lie in a genetic mutation that first began spreading through Europe some 7,500 years ago. The consequences were far-reaching - Europe's very first revolution. The hunter-gatherer lifestyle that had dominated the continent since the first arrival of Cro-Magnon man was swept away, and an imprint stamped on diet and population that is still evident to this day. Mark Thomas has recently explored this fusion of genetics and archaeology in Nature Magazine.

We head to Wiltshire to study records from nearly two centuries ago which show that, back then even more than today, the debate about welfare was as much about morality as economics.

And we hear about a new project devoted to the First World War, which could give a whole new meaning to bible studies.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Matt Pope from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London and from Luton by Mark Thomas who is Professor of Evolutionary Genetics at University College London.

Today's programme has just a touch of Disney. But we're not at the movies - rather under the English Channel, exploring the role played by Dumbo, Bambi and Pluto in the Allied invasion of France in 1944 and finding out that these pipelines might not have been as successful in delivering fuel after the invasion of France than the history books tell us.

We explore the history of milk. It's something that we take for granted but, in fact, the ability to drink milk into adulthood is something that only some 35% of humans possess. Its origins lie in a genetic mutation that first began spreading through Europe some 7,500 years ago. The consequences were far-reaching - Europe's very first revolution. The hunter-gatherer lifestyle that had dominated the continent since the first arrival of Cro-Magnon man was swept away, and an imprint stamped on diet and population that is still evident to this day. Mark Thomas has recently explored this fusion of genetics and archaeology in Nature Magazine.

We head to Wiltshire to study records from nearly two centuries ago which show that, back then even more than today, the debate about welfare was as much about morality as economics.

And we hear about a new project devoted to the First World War, which could give a whole new meaning to bible studies.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20131231

Helen Castor is back with a new series of the programme in which listeners join with some of the world's leading researchers to discuss the latest work that is Making History.

Over the next five weeks, historians and archaeologists will be helping us to understand more about the origins of the Welsh language, learn how French royalty escaped revolutionary persecution in Aylesbury, discover why the gloves are off in the nation's archives, and find out how some of our leading early socialists thought that the unemployed could do with a spell in a labour camp.

Today it's science versus history. Tom Holland is on the Wirral to hear a debate that's been rekindled by historian Michael Wood - where is Brunaburh, the site of the Great War of 937? Is it Bromborough near Birkenhead as place-name and DNA evidence might suggest - or should we, as Wood argues, trust the historical sources and look across to the Humber and South Yorkshire?

Also, maritime historian Sam Willis is in Devon to find out how an eighteenth century inventor from Ipswich turned to gambling to finance one of the world's first submarine journeys - to the bottom of Plymouth Sound.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20131231

Helen Castor is back with a new series of the programme in which listeners join with some of the world's leading researchers to discuss the latest work that is Making History.

Over the next five weeks, historians and archaeologists will be helping us to understand more about the origins of the Welsh language, learn how French royalty escaped revolutionary persecution in Aylesbury, discover why the gloves are off in the nation's archives, and find out how some of our leading early socialists thought that the unemployed could do with a spell in a labour camp.

Today it's science versus history. Tom Holland is on the Wirral to hear a debate that's been rekindled by historian Michael Wood - where is Brunaburh, the site of the Great War of 937? Is it Bromborough near Birkenhead as place-name and DNA evidence might suggest - or should we, as Wood argues, trust the historical sources and look across to the Humber and South Yorkshire?

Also, maritime historian Sam Willis is in Devon to find out how an eighteenth century inventor from Ipswich turned to gambling to finance one of the world's first submarine journeys - to the bottom of Plymouth Sound.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140107

Tom Holland presents the programme in which listeners join with some of the world's top researchers to discuss the latest work that is Making History.

This week, Tom is joined by one of the most experienced archaeologists of Viking Britain, Professor Martin Carver from the University of York. Well known for his work at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, Martin joins us to talk about his other labour of love - the first monastery of the Picts which he discovered in a remote part of North East Scotland.

Also, Helen Castor finds out why the gloves have finally come off in the UK's archives as experts begin to understand that it's good to touch history.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140107

Tom Holland presents the programme in which listeners join with some of the world's top researchers to discuss the latest work that is Making History.

This week, Tom is joined by one of the most experienced archaeologists of Viking Britain, Professor Martin Carver from the University of York. Well known for his work at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, Martin joins us to talk about his other labour of love - the first monastery of the Picts which he discovered in a remote part of North East Scotland.

Also, Helen Castor finds out why the gloves have finally come off in the UK's archives as experts begin to understand that it's good to touch history.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140114

Helen Castor and a cast of leading historians, together with listeners, discuss the latest historical research from across the UK. This week - the British work camps that time forgot and the return of the Diggers to a London suburb.

Helen is joined by Professor Justin Champion from Royal Holloway, University of London and Professor Malcolm Chase from the University of Leeds to shine a light on the ways people of different political persuasions have used land and community to tackle social and economic ills.

Tom Holland visits an occupation at Runnymede, where the name of the seventeenth century Diggers has been taken by protestors closely aligned to the occupy movement. Meanwhile at Carstairs, between Glasgow and Edinburgh, Dr Fiona Watson meets up with Dr John Field from the University of Stirling to look at the site of a 1920's work camp that history has forgotten. Remarkably, it was one of hundreds that were established in Britain from the 1870's through to the Second World War.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140114

Helen Castor and a cast of leading historians, together with listeners, discuss the latest historical research from across the UK. This week - the British work camps that time forgot and the return of the Diggers to a London suburb.

Helen is joined by Professor Justin Champion from Royal Holloway, University of London and Professor Malcolm Chase from the University of Leeds to shine a light on the ways people of different political persuasions have used land and community to tackle social and economic ills.

Tom Holland visits an occupation at Runnymede, where the name of the seventeenth century Diggers has been taken by protestors closely aligned to the occupy movement. Meanwhile at Carstairs, between Glasgow and Edinburgh, Dr Fiona Watson meets up with Dr John Field from the University of Stirling to look at the site of a 1920's work camp that history has forgotten. Remarkably, it was one of hundreds that were established in Britain from the 1870's through to the Second World War.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140121

Tom Holland is joined by the author of Britain Against Napoleon The Organisation of Victory, 1793-1815, Professor Roger Knight and the leader of a new oral history project which is capturing the social and cultural impact of National Service, Dr Matthew Grant from the University of Essex.

Nearly 200 years ago, in April 1814, King Louis XVIII of France left Hartwell House near Aylesbury to reclaim the throne of France after more than twenty years in exile. Seven of these were in England, two at Gosfield Hall in Essex and five at Hartwell. The biographer of Napoleon's Josephine, Dr Kate Williams, went to Hartwell to find out more about Louis in England.

As Louis traipsed around Europe, the Continent was in turmoil. Britain had been humbled just a few years earlier in the War of American Independence so how did she reorganise to fight the French?

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Series that looks at the latest historic research and showcases listeners' passions.

20140121

Tom Holland is joined by the author of Britain Against Napoleon The Organisation of Victory, 1793-1815, Professor Roger Knight and the leader of a new oral history project which is capturing the social and cultural impact of National Service, Dr Matthew Grant from the University of Essex.

Nearly 200 years ago, in April 1814, King Louis XVIII of France left Hartwell House near Aylesbury to reclaim the throne of France after more than twenty years in exile. Seven of these were in England, two at Gosfield Hall in Essex and five at Hartwell. The biographer of Napoleon's Josephine, Dr Kate Williams, went to Hartwell to find out more about Louis in England.

As Louis traipsed around Europe, the Continent was in turmoil. Britain had been humbled just a few years earlier in the War of American Independence so how did she reorganise to fight the French?

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Series that looks at the latest historic research and showcases listeners' passions.

20140128

Series that looks at the latest historic research and showcases listeners' passions.

20140128

Series that looks at the latest historic research and showcases listeners' passions.

20140624

Helen Castor and Tom Holland return with the latest research that's Making History.

Today's programme includes what the French really thought about the Allied bombing raids on their cities, why the Spanish still can't face remembering their civil war, and London to Great Yarmouth in around 10 minutes - 200 years ago.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Helen Castor

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140624

Helen Castor and Tom Holland return with the latest research that's Making History.

Today's programme includes what the French really thought about the Allied bombing raids on their cities, why the Spanish still can't face remembering their civil war, and London to Great Yarmouth in around 10 minutes - 200 years ago.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Helen Castor

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140701

History magazine programme in which listeners and researchers share their passion for the past.

20140701

History magazine programme in which listeners and researchers share their passion for the past.

20140708

History magazine programme in which listeners and researchers share their passion for the past.

20140708

History magazine programme in which listeners and researchers share their passion for the past.

20140715

History magazine programme in which listeners and researchers share their passion for the past.

20140715

History magazine programme in which listeners and researchers share their passion for the past.

20140722

Helen Castor is joined by Professor Mark Stoyle from the University of Southampton and Dr Hugh Doherty from the University of East Anglia.

Tom Holland is in Spain at the World Championships of the International Medieval Combat Federation in Belmonte where fifteenth century combat is acted out under the blistering sun - but how accurate is this display and what does it tell us about knights of old?

We explore another iconic historic figure, the cavalier - and, in particular, Sir Thomas Lunsford, the so-called 'cannibal cavalier'. Did he 'snack' on body parts as the propaganda of the day might have us believe or had the Roundheads fallen for a Royalist joke?

We cross to Dublin to hear from Professor James Kelly about new work that shows just how many 'unwanted' children might have been kidnapped or trafficked. Professor Kelly believes that this little explored topic might well reveal thousands of individuals who were either transported to America or 'used' by street beggars or petty criminals.

Contact the programme by emailing making.history@bbc.co.uk - or write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140722

Helen Castor is joined by Professor Mark Stoyle from the University of Southampton and Dr Hugh Doherty from the University of East Anglia.

Tom Holland is in Spain at the World Championships of the International Medieval Combat Federation in Belmonte where fifteenth century combat is acted out under the blistering sun - but how accurate is this display and what does it tell us about knights of old?

We explore another iconic historic figure, the cavalier - and, in particular, Sir Thomas Lunsford, the so-called 'cannibal cavalier'. Did he 'snack' on body parts as the propaganda of the day might have us believe or had the Roundheads fallen for a Royalist joke?

We cross to Dublin to hear from Professor James Kelly about new work that shows just how many 'unwanted' children might have been kidnapped or trafficked. Professor Kelly believes that this little explored topic might well reveal thousands of individuals who were either transported to America or 'used' by street beggars or petty criminals.

Contact the programme by emailing making.history@bbc.co.uk - or write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140729

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Hannah Skoda from the University of Oxford and the historian and biographer Dr Kate Williams.

Helen Castor joins Des Newell from Oxford Brookes University at the Peacock Gym in Canning Town, East London, to find out more about his work on eighteenth century street-fighting. In the age of the duel, what many might see as random, working-class violence was actually played out under a code of honour and was hugely important in the policing of communities before the formation of the Metropolitan Police Force.

We preview one of the big cultural events of the autumn, the British Library's celebration of the rise of Gothic literature. The exhibition is called Terror and Wonder and ties in with the 250th anniversary of Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto. But what was it about the 1760's that gave rise to such a powerful and enduring literary genre?

Fiona Watson reports from the Scottish Highlands on why one particular district, Lochaber, was so plagued by bandits between the 15th and 18th centuries. She's joined by Professor Allan McInnes from the University of Strathclyde who explains that the social, cultural and economic make-up of this area - as well as its geography made - for prime cattle-rustling territory.

Contact the programme by emailing making.history@bbc.co.uk, or write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140729

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Hannah Skoda from the University of Oxford and the historian and biographer Dr Kate Williams.

Helen Castor joins Des Newell from Oxford Brookes University at the Peacock Gym in Canning Town, East London, to find out more about his work on eighteenth century street-fighting. In the age of the duel, what many might see as random, working-class violence was actually played out under a code of honour and was hugely important in the policing of communities before the formation of the Metropolitan Police Force.

We preview one of the big cultural events of the autumn, the British Library's celebration of the rise of Gothic literature. The exhibition is called Terror and Wonder and ties in with the 250th anniversary of Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto. But what was it about the 1760's that gave rise to such a powerful and enduring literary genre?

Fiona Watson reports from the Scottish Highlands on why one particular district, Lochaber, was so plagued by bandits between the 15th and 18th centuries. She's joined by Professor Allan McInnes from the University of Strathclyde who explains that the social, cultural and economic make-up of this area - as well as its geography made - for prime cattle-rustling territory.

Contact the programme by emailing making.history@bbc.co.uk, or write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140805

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Lucy Robinson from the University of Sussex and Professor Justin Champion from Royal Holloway University of London who has recently been elected President of the Historical Association.

Helen Castor visits the National Gallery to look at the beautiful 14th century Wilton Diptych, one of two pairings featuring King Richard II. Helen is joined by Curator Susan Foister and Dr Jenny Stratford to explore whether a monarch under pressure and in need of a strong, kingly image, gave rise to our earliest examples of royal portrait.

On the day that Scottish Higher results are published (and a little more than a week before A Levels) we hear from academics at Edgehill University and the University of Roehampton who are working on using social media and on-line activities to help bridge the gap between studying history at school and university.

Down on the Solent, Dr Sam Willis meets up with members of Subterranea Brtiannica who are celebrating 40 years of exploring underground history with a visit to a Palmerston Fort near Portsmouth.

Contact the programme by emailing making.history@bbc.co.uk, or writing to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140805

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Lucy Robinson from the University of Sussex and Professor Justin Champion from Royal Holloway University of London who has recently been elected President of the Historical Association.

Helen Castor visits the National Gallery to look at the beautiful 14th century Wilton Diptych, one of two pairings featuring King Richard II. Helen is joined by Curator Susan Foister and Dr Jenny Stratford to explore whether a monarch under pressure and in need of a strong, kingly image, gave rise to our earliest examples of royal portrait.

On the day that Scottish Higher results are published (and a little more than a week before A Levels) we hear from academics at Edgehill University and the University of Roehampton who are working on using social media and on-line activities to help bridge the gap between studying history at school and university.

Down on the Solent, Dr Sam Willis meets up with members of Subterranea Brtiannica who are celebrating 40 years of exploring underground history with a visit to a Palmerston Fort near Portsmouth.

Contact the programme by emailing making.history@bbc.co.uk, or writing to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20140812

Making History Programme Description Tuesday12th August

Helen Castor chairs Historian's Question Time at the Chalke Valley History Festival, the now annual event in which Making History listeners can quiz a panel of leading historians, writers and journalists. This year the questions range from the importance of anniversaries to the validity of studying the history of sport, theatre and even gardening.

Joining Helen is the sixteenth century specialist Dr Suzannah Lipscombe; the Professor of International History David Reynolds; the historian of gardening and science Dr Andrea Wulf; and one of our leading foreign correspondents the presenter of Channel 4 News' Jon Snow.

Contact the programme -

Email making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Find us on Facebook.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland presents the programme in which listeners join with some of the world's leading researchers to discuss the latest work that is Making History.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

20140812

Tom Holland presents the programme in which listeners join with some of the world's leading researchers to discuss the latest work that is Making History.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Making History Programme Description Tuesday12th August

Helen Castor chairs Historian's Question Time at the Chalke Valley History Festival, the now annual event in which Making History listeners can quiz a panel of leading historians, writers and journalists. This year the questions range from the importance of anniversaries to the validity of studying the history of sport, theatre and even gardening.

Joining Helen is the sixteenth century specialist Dr Suzannah Lipscombe; the Professor of International History David Reynolds; the historian of gardening and science Dr Andrea Wulf; and one of our leading foreign correspondents the presenter of Channel 4 News' Jon Snow.

Contact the programme -

Email making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Find us on Facebook.

20150203
20150203

Tom and Helen Castor are back with the programme which shares listener's passion for the past.

This week, Tom is joined by two of our leading historians/biographers - Jenny Uglow and Andrew Roberts. Dr Kate Williams takes a trip to out of season Torquay to re-live the mad summer days when the Emperor Napoleon came to town and Helen Castor discusses a new series of books which deliver a concise and opinionated history of English kings and queens.

Over the next eight weeks, the team will be criss-crossing the United Kingdom and going further afield to discover more about the stories that are really making history - including looking out for missing pre-Raphaelite paintings in Birmingham, asking whether local government cut-backs are leaving our historic landscape unprotected, learning how heritage is helping build new futures in Stoke-On-Trent and visiting the scene of an early aviators' tragic crash-landing some 300 years ago.

You can contribute news and views by emailing making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150210

Seventy years on from dramatic and deadly Allied air attacks, Tom Holland visits Dresden in the east of Germany. He finds out how the city has dealt with this history, why it continues to concern us and how different regimes have used it.

In the studio, Helen Castor and her guests - Professor Richard Overy (University of Exeter) and Dr Anna Hajkova (University of Warwick) - discuss the horror of those nights in February 1945 and how they compared with bombing raids on other European cities such as London, Coventry and Hamburg.

Back in England, Martin Ellis visits Stoke-On-Trent to find out whether history and heritage can replace garden festivals to become a major factor in the social and economic rejuvenation of the Potteries.

Contact the programme by email: making.history@bbc.co.uk - or write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio4.

20150217

Tom Holland and Helen Castor present the programme that shares listeners' passion for the past.

This week, Dr Matt Pope visits Oswestry to hear how local people are fighting the possibility of 117 houses being built close to one of our most important iron-age hillforts.

Contact the programme by email: making.history@bbc.co.uk - or write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio4.

20150217

Tom Holland and Helen Castor present the programme that shares listeners' passion for the past.

This week, Dr Matt Pope visits Oswestry to hear how local people are fighting the possibility of 117 houses being built close to one of our most important iron-age hillforts.

Contact the programme by email: making.history@bbc.co.uk - or write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio4.

20150224

Helen Castor hosts the programme in which history and historians meet.

This week, Tom Holland is hot on the trail of missing frescoes which shed light on Birmingham's artistic heritage and its place at the centre of civic politics before the First World War, and Dr Sam Willis heads for Shrewsbury to explore the history of our 18th century flying men.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150224

Helen Castor hosts the programme in which history and historians meet.

This week, Tom Holland is hot on the trail of missing frescoes which shed light on Birmingham's artistic heritage and its place at the centre of civic politics before the First World War, and Dr Sam Willis heads for Shrewsbury to explore the history of our 18th century flying men.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150303
20150303

History magazine programme.

20150310
20150317
20150317

History magazine programme.

20150324
20150324

History magazine programme.

20150707

How can history inform the debate about Britain's relationship with Europe? Tom Holland and guests look to Caruasius, Aethelwold, Henry II and Historians for Britain for valuable pointers.

Tom is joined in the studio by Professor David Abulafia from the University of Cambridge and Professor Justin Champion from Royal Holloway University of London.

David Abulafia leads a new pressure group of historians, called Historians for Britain, who believe that the UK is better out of the EU. Justin Champion, on the other hand, is part of a loose coalition of historians called Historians for History who argue that Britain's history is a European one. But, how can history help inform the forthcoming referendum?

In the 3rd Century a leading military man, Carausius, led a break with Europe - the Roman Empire in this case - when he made himself Emperor of Britain. Was this a UKIP-styled revolt or just a simpler way of gaining power while still following Roman ideals? Tom talks to Roman historian Guy de la Bedoyere.

And, in Suffolk, Helen Castor visits the magnificent castle at Orford to hear from the most recent biographer of Henry II, Richard Barber, about how Europe was at the heart of his domestic problems.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150707

How can history inform the debate about Britain's relationship with Europe? Tom Holland and guests look to Caruasius, Aethelwold, Henry II and Historians for Britain for valuable pointers.

Tom is joined in the studio by Professor David Abulafia from the University of Cambridge and Professor Justin Champion from Royal Holloway University of London.

David Abulafia leads a new pressure group of historians, called Historians for Britain, who believe that the UK is better out of the EU. Justin Champion, on the other hand, is part of a loose coalition of historians called Historians for History who argue that Britain's history is a European one. But, how can history help inform the forthcoming referendum?

In the 3rd Century a leading military man, Carausius, led a break with Europe - the Roman Empire in this case - when he made himself Emperor of Britain. Was this a UKIP-styled revolt or just a simpler way of gaining power while still following Roman ideals? Tom talks to Roman historian Guy de la Bedoyere.

And, in Suffolk, Helen Castor visits the magnificent castle at Orford to hear from the most recent biographer of Henry II, Richard Barber, about how Europe was at the heart of his domestic problems.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150714

Popular history series. Helen Castor and guests discuss the latest research.

20150714

Popular history series. Helen Castor and guests discuss the latest research.

20150721

Tom Holland is joined by Andrea Wulf and Dr Paul Warde for an environmental Making History.

Helen Castor meets up with Professor Tom Williamson in south Norfolk to hear how our understanding of what makes a wood 'ancient' is changing - and why it matters.

Conservationist Graham White is in Dunbar, the home of John Muir - the father of American conservation.

Paul Warde discusses his work on the history of sustainability and Andrea Wulf previews her up-comming biography of Alexander von Humboldt.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150721

Tom Holland is joined by Andrea Wulf and Dr Paul Warde for an environmental Making History.

Helen Castor meets up with Professor Tom Williamson in south Norfolk to hear how our understanding of what makes a wood 'ancient' is changing - and why it matters.

Conservationist Graham White is in Dunbar, the home of John Muir - the father of American conservation.

Paul Warde discusses his work on the history of sustainability and Andrea Wulf previews her up-comming biography of Alexander von Humboldt.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150728

Popular history series.

20150728

Popular history series.

20150804

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Francis Young and Dr Charles Insley to discuss Aethelwold's rebellion, the cult of Saint Edmund and how Catholic martyrs turned execution into theatre.

20150804

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Francis Young and Dr Charles Insley to discuss Aethelwold's rebellion, the cult of Saint Edmund and how Catholic martyrs turned execution into theatre.

20150811
20150811

Popular history series.

20150818

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by the historical consultant for Horrible Histories, Greg Jenner.

Helen Castor is on the South Downs with geographer Dr Geoffrey Mead who has been researching responses to the housing crisis of the 1920s. Close to Brighton, he has discovered an informal settlement - one that was maybe once described as a 'shanty-town', but was built by the aspirational middle-classes who could find £10 to buy a plot of land. Dr Adrian Green from the University of Durham explains that these communities, built on what geographers describe as marginal or non-productive land, were commonplace right the way back to the middle ages when people would move to be closer to work.

Professor Sharon Ruston from Lancaster University is in Warrington, where she highlights the role of the town's dissenting academy - and the work of Joseph Priestley in particular - in promoting the teaching of science to a community of scholars that were barred from Oxford and Cambridge because of their radical religious beliefs and who, she argues, were the intellectual driving force of the industrial revolution.

Tom Holland visits Sheffield to talk to research student Dr Hannah Probert about the significance of facial hair in Roman times.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150818

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by the historical consultant for Horrible Histories, Greg Jenner.

Helen Castor is on the South Downs with geographer Dr Geoffrey Mead who has been researching responses to the housing crisis of the 1920s. Close to Brighton, he has discovered an informal settlement - one that was maybe once described as a 'shanty-town', but was built by the aspirational middle-classes who could find £10 to buy a plot of land. Dr Adrian Green from the University of Durham explains that these communities, built on what geographers describe as marginal or non-productive land, were commonplace right the way back to the middle ages when people would move to be closer to work.

Professor Sharon Ruston from Lancaster University is in Warrington, where she highlights the role of the town's dissenting academy - and the work of Joseph Priestley in particular - in promoting the teaching of science to a community of scholars that were barred from Oxford and Cambridge because of their radical religious beliefs and who, she argues, were the intellectual driving force of the industrial revolution.

Tom Holland visits Sheffield to talk to research student Dr Hannah Probert about the significance of facial hair in Roman times.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150825

Claire Tomalin, Jessie Childs, Dan Jones and Justin Champion join Helen Castor for a Historians' Question Time from the Chalke Valley History Festival.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20150825

Claire Tomalin, Jessie Childs, Dan Jones and Justin Champion join Helen Castor for a Historians' Question Time from the Chalke Valley History Festival.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160216

Helen Castor takes the chair for the programme which showcases new historical research and the people doing it.

Today, Tom Holland is on the Dorset/Wiltshire border where a farmer has dug up a Bronze Age body. Remarkably, as Dr Tom Booth from the University of Sheffield explains, this is far from unique. Indeed, just when the Pharaohs were building the pyramids to house them forever, Bronze Age Britons were busy mummifying their dead too.

With Bridge of Spies and now Deutschland '83, Helen Castor finds out why the Cold War has become such a hot topic with historians as well as TV viewers.

And Dan Snow takes us back to the year when the British Museum opened its doors for the first time, Wedgwood started production, Kew Gardens was founded and Britain swept almost everyone away on battlefields and seas across the globe. Is 1759 the most important date in history?

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160216

Helen Castor takes the chair for the programme which showcases new historical research and the people doing it.

Today, Tom Holland is on the Dorset/Wiltshire border where a farmer has dug up a Bronze Age body. Remarkably, as Dr Tom Booth from the University of Sheffield explains, this is far from unique. Indeed, just when the Pharaohs were building the pyramids to house them forever, Bronze Age Britons were busy mummifying their dead too.

With Bridge of Spies and now Deutschland '83, Helen Castor finds out why the Cold War has become such a hot topic with historians as well as TV viewers.

And Dan Snow takes us back to the year when the British Museum opened its doors for the first time, Wedgwood started production, Kew Gardens was founded and Britain swept almost everyone away on battlefields and seas across the globe. Is 1759 the most important date in history?

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160301
20160301

The latest historical and archaeological research.

20160308
20160308

The latest historical and archaeological research.

20160322

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Nick Beech from Queen Mary University of London and Professor Emma Griffin from the University of East Anglia.

We're in Toxteth, Liverpool, to find out more about the history of the terraced house.

Christian Wolmar joins us from King's Cross railway station where he asks whether the Flying Scotsman deserves to be so famous.

And we explore the history of Easter with the Bishop of Norwich who explains why it moves around the calendar.

Helen Castor catches up with Dr Oleg Benesch at the University of York who argues that the Samurai of the nineteenth century borrowed heavily from the Victorian notion of chivalry.

Finally, the author Jenny Uglow shares with us her favourite year - 1798.

Producer Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160322

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Nick Beech from Queen Mary University of London and Professor Emma Griffin from the University of East Anglia.

We're in Toxteth, Liverpool, to find out more about the history of the terraced house.

Christian Wolmar joins us from King's Cross railway station where he asks whether the Flying Scotsman deserves to be so famous.

And we explore the history of Easter with the Bishop of Norwich who explains why it moves around the calendar.

Helen Castor catches up with Dr Oleg Benesch at the University of York who argues that the Samurai of the nineteenth century borrowed heavily from the Victorian notion of chivalry.

Finally, the author Jenny Uglow shares with us her favourite year - 1798.

Producer Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160329

Helen is joined in the studio by BBC New Generation Thinker Danielle Thom from the V&A in London and Dr Gillian Kenny from Trinity College in Dublin.

Dr Tom Charlton uncovers some surprising evidence that the original Darby and Joan were 17th Century radical pamphleteers. He heads to the first Darby and Joan club, which was opened in 1942 in Streatham, South London, and talks to Professor Ted Vallance at the University of Roehampton.

Maurice Casey joins us from Cambridge to discuss new evidence that Bolsheviks visited the scene of the Easter Rising in Dublin in 1916 to find out more about the Republicans' tactics.

Tom Holland is in Oxford to ask why there are memorials to Nazis in some of the colleges.

And Dominic Sandbrook takes us back to the oil crisis of 1973, which he feels is a pivotal year in history.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160802

In the first in a new series of the topical history programme Helen Castor is joined by the historian of women in medieval Ireland, Dr Gillian Kenny and Dr Jennifer Redmond who lectures in Twentieth Century Irish History and is President of the Women's History Association of Ireland.

Tom Holland is in Northern Ireland, close to to the border with the Republic near Enniskillen. There are no customs officials or soldiers these days but will Brexit change that? Tom meets the historian Seamas McCannay and geographer Bryonie Reid to ask whether the 95 year-old history of a border between North and South can help us understand what the future for Britain's only physical connection with Europe might be.

Dr Bob Nicholson of Edge Hill University heads to Liverpool on the lookout for Bosom Caressers, Corpse Revivers and a real Eye Opener. These are all cocktails, described in a Victorian song which Bob has discovered in his research and which has led him to question our perception of the Victorian middle class as abstemious and upright citizens. He spends an afternoon drinking to further his historical research.

There won't be a dry eye in the house as we consider a relatively new sphere of historical endeavour - the history of emotions. Dr Thomas Dixon at Queen Mary University of London kicks off a short series by considering the history of crying and, in particular, the history of men crying.

And which character from the past do you feel that history has forgotten? We ask historians, writers and those in the public eye to suggest the overlooked individuals who really should be on the People's Plinth. Sue MacGregor suggests Ellen Kuzwayo, women's rights activist and president of the African National Congress Youth League.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor and guests with a new series of the topical history programme.

20160802

In the first in a new series of the topical history programme Helen Castor is joined by the historian of women in medieval Ireland, Dr Gillian Kenny and Dr Jennifer Redmond who lectures in Twentieth Century Irish History and is President of the Women's History Association of Ireland.

Tom Holland is in Northern Ireland, close to to the border with the Republic near Enniskillen. There are no customs officials or soldiers these days but will Brexit change that? Tom meets the historian Seamas McCannay and geographer Bryonie Reid to ask whether the 95 year-old history of a border between North and South can help us understand what the future for Britain's only physical connection with Europe might be.

Dr Bob Nicholson of Edge Hill University heads to Liverpool on the lookout for Bosom Caressers, Corpse Revivers and a real Eye Opener. These are all cocktails, described in a Victorian song which Bob has discovered in his research and which has led him to question our perception of the Victorian middle class as abstemious and upright citizens. He spends an afternoon drinking to further his historical research.

There won't be a dry eye in the house as we consider a relatively new sphere of historical endeavour - the history of emotions. Dr Thomas Dixon at Queen Mary University of London kicks off a short series by considering the history of crying and, in particular, the history of men crying.

And which character from the past do you feel that history has forgotten? We ask historians, writers and those in the public eye to suggest the overlooked individuals who really should be on the People's Plinth. Sue MacGregor suggests Ellen Kuzwayo, women's rights activist and president of the African National Congress Youth League.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor and guests with a new series of the topical history programme.

20160809

Tom Holland considers historical revelations with a resonance today. He's joined by two archaeologists - Professor Carenza Lewis from the University of Lincoln and David Miles, the former Director of Archaeology and Chief Archaeologist at English Heritage.

As combine harvesters tear into Britain's corn crops, David Miles takes us back to the birth of farming and the transformational period that was the Neolithic.

Iszi Lawrence changes into her running gear to recreate the Battle of Marathon - in Salford. Can historians and sports' scientists work together to solve a mystery surrounding this famous victory of the Greeks over the Persians which continues to puzzle historians?

Think British steel and its places such as Middlesborough, Sheffield and Port Talbot that come to mind. So why is Helen Castor in Clerkenwell? Professors Chris Evans and David Green give her a guided tour of one of Britain's earliest and most important centres of steel production.

And Professor Simon Schaffer at the University of Cambridge tells us why the Danish scientist Hans Christian Oersted should really be on the People's Plinth.

Producer Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160809

Tom Holland considers historical revelations with a resonance today. He's joined by two archaeologists - Professor Carenza Lewis from the University of Lincoln and David Miles, the former Director of Archaeology and Chief Archaeologist at English Heritage.

As combine harvesters tear into Britain's corn crops, David Miles takes us back to the birth of farming and the transformational period that was the Neolithic.

Iszi Lawrence changes into her running gear to recreate the Battle of Marathon - in Salford. Can historians and sports' scientists work together to solve a mystery surrounding this famous victory of the Greeks over the Persians which continues to puzzle historians?

Think British steel and its places such as Middlesborough, Sheffield and Port Talbot that come to mind. So why is Helen Castor in Clerkenwell? Professors Chris Evans and David Green give her a guided tour of one of Britain's earliest and most important centres of steel production.

And Professor Simon Schaffer at the University of Cambridge tells us why the Danish scientist Hans Christian Oersted should really be on the People's Plinth.

Producer Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160816

Helen Castor is joined by the architectural writer and cultural commentator Travis Elborough and garden historian Deborah Trentham.

Tom Holland takes a ride on Brighton's new attraction, the British Airways i360, and is joined at 450 feet by Professor Fred Gray to gain new insight into the history of seaside attractions. Surprisingly, the new doughnut on a stick (as locals are describing it), offers similar experiences and challenges to those of the West Pier which opened 150 years ago.

In Norfolk, Radio 4's organic gardening legend Bob Flowerdew gets to grips with a character who, on the face of it, is his horticultural opposite. Lancelot 'Capability' Brown was born 300 years ago and Bob visits one of his masterpieces - Kimberley Hall - to ask landscape historian Professor Tom Williamson where the neatness and order of the English country house came from and what it was supposed to do for those who lived with it.

We continue our series of forgotten history heroes as food writer William Sitwell nominates the man who became famous for his pie but who also kept Britain fed during World War 2 - Lord Fred Woolton

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160816

Helen Castor is joined by the architectural writer and cultural commentator Travis Elborough and garden historian Deborah Trentham.

Tom Holland takes a ride on Brighton's new attraction, the British Airways i360, and is joined at 450 feet by Professor Fred Gray to gain new insight into the history of seaside attractions. Surprisingly, the new doughnut on a stick (as locals are describing it), offers similar experiences and challenges to those of the West Pier which opened 150 years ago.

In Norfolk, Radio 4's organic gardening legend Bob Flowerdew gets to grips with a character who, on the face of it, is his horticultural opposite. Lancelot 'Capability' Brown was born 300 years ago and Bob visits one of his masterpieces - Kimberley Hall - to ask landscape historian Professor Tom Williamson where the neatness and order of the English country house came from and what it was supposed to do for those who lived with it.

We continue our series of forgotten history heroes as food writer William Sitwell nominates the man who became famous for his pie but who also kept Britain fed during World War 2 - Lord Fred Woolton

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160823
20160823

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Lucy Robinson from the University of Sussex to consider jazz in the trenches, woad and the women behind the Notting Hill Carnival.

Helen Castor meets Dr Michael Hammond, Associate Professor at the University of Southampton, to hear about Blues in the Trenches. Dr Hammond argues that 'the blues' as a musical tradition was brought to the trenches of the Great War by African-American soldiers from all parts of the US and they shared different performance styles and traditions - creating cross-pollinations that foreshadow the country blues recordings of the 1920s and 30s by Charley Patton, Furry Lewis, Bukka White, Geechie Wiley, Ma Rainey, Elvey Thomas, Blind Willie Johnson and notable others.

Closer to home, on the banks of the River Thames, Iszi Lawrence traces the origins of today's craze for tattoos and body art back to the Celts, when she learns to make woad.

On the eve of the Notting Hill Carnival, comic Ava Vidal nominates the activist, feminist, socialist and founder of the Carnival Claudia Jones for the Making History plinth.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160830

Helen Castor is joined by Professor Ted Vallance from the University of Roehampton and Dr Alex Woolf from the University of St Andrews.

On the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London, Dr Tom Charlton heads to St Paul's to learn how preparatory work by Sir Christopher Wren and the storage of printers manuscripts fuelled the inferno. Afterwards, the building lay in ruins and accusations flew freely - many suspecting the destruction of the historic church was the work of Catholics. After an outbreak of the plague and war with the Dutch, these were difficult times for Charles II and the restored monarchy.

Tom Holland visits Glasgow where archaeologists are working on the newly discovered ruins of what they believe to be a twelfth century bishop's palace. The find is shedding more light on the history of the kingdom of Strathclyde, which stretched from the Clyde into modern Cumbria and played a part in fighting Athelstan's attempts to bring all of Britain under his rule in the tenth century. The English king of Wessex and Mercia won the battle against the Scottish kingdoms but was only successful in creating what we now know as England. Alex Woolf explains how long it took for Scotland to become a political entity.

Also, Al Murray nominates Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery for the Making History plinth and Tiffany Watt Smith unpacks the history of anger.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160830

Helen Castor is joined by Professor Ted Vallance from the University of Roehampton and Dr Alex Woolf from the University of St Andrews.

On the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London, Dr Tom Charlton heads to St Paul's to learn how preparatory work by Sir Christopher Wren and the storage of printers manuscripts fuelled the inferno. Afterwards, the building lay in ruins and accusations flew freely - many suspecting the destruction of the historic church was the work of Catholics. After an outbreak of the plague and war with the Dutch, these were difficult times for Charles II and the restored monarchy.

Tom Holland visits Glasgow where archaeologists are working on the newly discovered ruins of what they believe to be a twelfth century bishop's palace. The find is shedding more light on the history of the kingdom of Strathclyde, which stretched from the Clyde into modern Cumbria and played a part in fighting Athelstan's attempts to bring all of Britain under his rule in the tenth century. The English king of Wessex and Mercia won the battle against the Scottish kingdoms but was only successful in creating what we now know as England. Alex Woolf explains how long it took for Scotland to become a political entity.

Also, Al Murray nominates Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery for the Making History plinth and Tiffany Watt Smith unpacks the history of anger.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160906
20160906

Tom Holland and guests discuss the stories that are Making History.

Helen Castor is joined by Stephen Chalke and former Sussex cricket captain John Barclay to discuss the origins and rather odd structure of English (and Welsh) county cricket.

Iszi Lawrence heads to North Yorkshire to hear a story of divorce and betrayal from the 1st century and the forgotten queen who was central to both.

And the former head of Friends of the Earth, Tony Juniper, takes us to South America to remind us of the achievements of the nineteenth century scientist and explorer Johann Baptist von Spix.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160913
20160913

Tom Holland is joined by Rebecca Rideal and Dr Tom Lorman to discuss armed revolt, fire and a secret war.

Helen Castor meets up with a witness to the Hungarian Revolution of sixty-years ago and we discuss the changing attitudes to refugees.

In London, Dr Tom Charlton is joined by Professor Vanessa Harding and Professor Justin Champion in what became the 17th century equivalent of the Calais 'jungle' - a refugee camp created by the Great Fire of 1666 which was occupied for years.

And Lord Paddy Ashdown makes the case for a forgotten hero to be remembered on the Making History plinth - the wartime SOE's Roger Landes.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160920

Helen Castor is joined by Professor Mark Bailey from the University of East Anglia and Dr Eloise Moss from the University of Manchester to discuss the Black Death and Victorian tabloids.

Tom Holland is in Lincolnshire where Professor Carenza Lewis explains why pottery is telling us so much more about the Black Death. Her new research, working with volunteers across East Anglia, shows the pan-European epidemic of the mid-fourteenth century had an 'eye-watering impact' with communities losing up to 70% of their population.

Dr Bob Nicholson and former newspaper editor Roy Greenslade leaf through the pages of one of the most scurrilous tabloid publications ever, the tamely titled Illustrated Police News.

And we invite listeners to suggest characters from the past for the Making History plinth.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20160920

Helen Castor is joined by Professor Mark Bailey from the University of East Anglia and Dr Eloise Moss from the University of Manchester to discuss the Black Death and Victorian tabloids.

Tom Holland is in Lincolnshire where Professor Carenza Lewis explains why pottery is telling us so much more about the Black Death. Her new research, working with volunteers across East Anglia, shows the pan-European epidemic of the mid-fourteenth century had an 'eye-watering impact' with communities losing up to 70% of their population.

Dr Bob Nicholson and former newspaper editor Roy Greenslade leaf through the pages of one of the most scurrilous tabloid publications ever, the tamely titled Illustrated Police News.

And we invite listeners to suggest characters from the past for the Making History plinth.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

20180717

Series exploring the latest historical and archaeological research.

Popular history series where the past connects with the present.

14/10/200820100622
196820180102

The Prague Spring, a French take on our island story, and historical hangovers.

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Alice Taylor from King's College in London and the historian of pop culture, Travis Elborough.

Helen Castor charts the course of the Prague Spring, that period of liberalisation in Czechoslovakia brought in when Alexander Dubcek became leader in January 1968. She hears from those who were there and those who study that period now and asks whether people had any inkling what an extraordinary year it would be.

Alice Taylor introduces a new project which will celebrate the 700th anniversary of the Declaration of Arbroath in 2020. She explains how fact and fiction were brought together to create the notion of a Scottish nation and a document that would heavily influence the Constitution of the United States.

French Journalist Agnes Poirier leafs through the pages of Our Island Story, the 1905 children's book that some argue not only re-imagined English history but then shaped the world-view of some of our political leaders.

Fresh from the publication of his book of twentieth century diary extracts, Travis Elborough discusses if the diary is dead in the digital post-truth age.

And Iszi Lawrence enlists the help of the world wide web in her search for the origins of the expression "hair of the dog".

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Acid Attacks20180109

Actor murdering mania, suffragettes and the martial arts, and Top Town History.

Helen Castor is in the chair for this edition of the long-running history magazine programme. Today, she's joined by the historian of Victorian sex, suffrage and entertainment, Dr Fern Riddell - along with an expert on Victorian and Edwardian humour, Dr Bob Nicholson of Edge Hill University in Lancashire.

Making History reporter Hester Cant braves the streets of north London with Fern Riddell to dig into the nasty past of acid attacks on the capital's streets, and a nineteenth century scare that became actor murdering mania.

Iszi Lawrence takes to the jiu jitsu mat with historian Naomi Paxton to discover how and why the suffragettes embraced this martial art.

Tom Holland has a tale that's hot off the historical presses.

And the Cornwall village of Linkinhorne comes under the spotlight when it enters the jeux sans frontières of history competitions, Top Town History.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Being Gay Before Gay Lib20170725

Helen Castor on homosexuality in Victoria's Britain and the history of the 'gig' economy.

Helen Castor takes the hot seat for the programme which shows why history matters.

Today, testimony about coming out before the decriminalisation of homosexuality in 1967 and what we know about the lives of gay people in Victoria's Britain.

Iszi Lawrence discovers that the 'gig' economy was widespread in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. And Tom Holland is on Tyneside to celebrate the history of a building which played host to an almost forgotten intellectual revolution.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Church Pews and the Medieval Weather Forecast20180710

Tom Holland takes a back-side view of church architecture.

Popular history series where the past connects with the present.

Tom Holland presents the history programme which connects the past with today.

Enthusiasts for Victorian church architecture are furious that the pews designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in Bath Abbey have been dismantled and removed and are to be sold. Supporters of the plan say that it will create a huge space which the Abbey can then use for community events. Of course, back in medieval times most churches had no furniture, so why was it introduced and what can it tell us about the people that installed and sat on it? Iszi Lawrence visits Somerset to find out more.

It's the season of village fetes, country fairs, music festivals, cricket and world-class tennis and everyone is more than usually interested in the weather forecast. We think of this as a very modern service and are amazed even at the accuracy of meterologists during the planning of D-Day in 1944. But weather forecasts have been made for centuries and those making them knew more about the science behind them than we may think. Helen Castor visits Merton College Library in Oxford, which in the fourteenth century was the Met Office of its day.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Coastal change: Overfishing and the death of the seaside20180612

Tom Holland discovers when East Coast fishermen were very much a part of Europe.

Popular history series where the past connects with the present.

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Matthew Green for a programme that's all at sea.

Helen Castor is in Great Yarmouth where local people voted overwhelmingly for Brexit. One of their major gripes with Brussels was the detrimental impact they thought EU quotas had on the town's fishing industry. Dr James Barrett is an archaeologist who researches the medieval fishing communities of Britain and he reveals that, 800 years ago, the fishermen of Gt Yarmouth worked closely with their counterparts across the North Sea to bring in unimaginable quantities of herring - along with Britain's main supply of wine.

Earlier this year and just a few miles north of Great Yarmouth, villagers living in chalets on the cliffs at Hemsby were evacuated as the so-called "Beast from the East" tore into the unstable, sandy cliffs. Several of these properties have since been demolished, whie others have been the focus of a frantic attempt to protect them from the unforgiving sea. Such destruction is commonplace in the history of the East Coast. Geographer Sally Brown from the University of Southampton heads to East Yorkshire to meet Marcus Jecock from Historic England and find out how the North Sea has shaped the lives of people living nearby for centuries.

The British seaside resort has been an unloved place ever since package holidays took its clientele to sunnier climes overseas. Now funding bodies such as the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Arts Council have been investing in projects that seek to restore some of these places to their former glory. But how effective is this and does one seaside history fit every coastal resort? Guardian writer Tim Burrows goes home to Southend to ponder the death of the seaside.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Coastal Change: Overfishing And The Death Of The Seaside20180612

Tom Holland discovers when East Coast fishermen were very much a part of Europe.

Series exploring the latest historical and archaeological research

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Matthew Green for a programme that's all at sea.

Helen Castor is in Great Yarmouth where local people voted overwhelmingly for Brexit. One of their major gripes with Brussels was the detrimental impact they thought EU quotas had on the town's fishing industry. Dr James Barrett is an archaeologist who researches the medieval fishing communities of Britain and he reveals that, 800 years ago, the fishermen of Gt Yarmouth worked closely with their counterparts across the North Sea to bring in unimaginable quantities of herring - along with Britain's main supply of wine.

Earlier this year and just a few miles north of Great Yarmouth, villagers living in chalets on the cliffs at Hemsby were evacuated as the so-called "Beast from the East" tore into the unstable, sandy cliffs. Several of these properties have since been demolished, whie others have been the focus of a frantic attempt to protect them from the unforgiving sea. Such destruction is commonplace in the history of the East Coast. Geographer Sally Brown from the University of Southampton heads to East Yorkshire to meet Marcus Jecock from Historic England and find out how the North Sea has shaped the lives of people living nearby for centuries.

The British seaside resort has been an unloved place ever since package holidays took its clientele to sunnier climes overseas. Now funding bodies such as the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Arts Council have been investing in projects that seek to restore some of these places to their former glory. But how effective is this and does one seaside history fit every coastal resort? Guardian writer Tim Burrows goes home to Southend to ponder the death of the seaside.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Dark tourism, World Cup 1938, The mobile library20180605

Helen Castor presents the first in a new series of the popular history magazine.

Popular history series where the past connects with the present.

Helen Castor presents the first in a new series of the popular history magazine. She's joined today by Dr Jane Hamlett from Royal Holloway University of London.

It's 140 years since the UK prison system was nationalised, and Iszi Lawrence visits Shrewsbury with Professor Alyson Brown from Edge Hill University to discover why a change in organisation was needed then. Today, paying customers are experiencing life here at Her Majesty's pleasure - and all over the world people seem to want to visit places which have a grim and troubling past. So what's the appeal and the purpose of so-called "dark tourism"? Tom Holland talks to Dr Philip Stone from the University of Central Lancashire.

It's another World Cup year. The tournament in Russia comes at a time when President Putin's stock is high at home, but on the floor abroad. Not for the first time, football might offer a political leader a global platform. We go back to France '38 which was held against a backdrop of a growing global diplomatic crisis. Sports writer Julie Welch is joined by Professor Simon Martin and football journalist Jonathan Wilson to explain how, with: civil war in Spain, the merging of the Austrian and German teams after the Nazi Anschluss and Mussolini promoting his brand of fascism through football, this really was a tournament with all to play for.

Council budget cuts, E-readers and on-line delivery are all presenting challenges to Britain's library service, and mobile libraries in particular have been badly affected. But when did the library van first start doing its rounds? Author of Mobile Library, David Whitehouse, heads back home to Nuneaton and the mobile library his mother used to clean.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Dark Tourism, World Cup 1938, The Mobile Library20180605

Helen Castor presents the first in a new series of the popular history magazine.

Series exploring the latest historical and archaeological research

Helen Castor presents the first in a new series of the popular history magazine. She's joined today by Dr Jane Hammett from Royal Holloway University of London.

It's 140 years since the UK prison system was nationalised, and Iszi Lawrence visits Shrewsbury with Professor Alyson Brown from Edge Hill University to discover why a change in organisation was needed then. Today, paying customers are experiencing life here at Her Majesty's pleasure - and all over the world people seem to want to visit places which have a grim and troubling past. So what's the appeal and the purpose of so-called "dark tourism"? Tom Holland talks to Dr Philip Stone from the University of Central Lancashire.

It's another World Cup year. The tournament in Russia comes at a time when President Putin's stock is high at home, but on the floor abroad. Not for the first time, football might offer a political leader a global platform. We go back to France '38 which was held against a backdrop of a growing global diplomatic crisis. Sports writer Julie Welch is joined by Professor Simon Martin and football journalist Jonathan Wilson to explain how, with: civil war in Spain, the merging of the Austrian and German teams after the Nazi Anschluss and Mussolini promoting his brand of fascism through football, this really was a tournament with all to play for.

Council budget cuts, E-readers and on-line delivery are all presenting challenges to Britain's library service, and mobile libraries in particular have been badly affected. But when did the library van first start doing its rounds? Author of Mobile Library, David Whitehouse, heads back home to Nuneaton and the mobile library his mother used to clean.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Gambling, Homelessness, Human trafficking20180206

Helen Castor looks back at the gambling crisis of the 18th century.

Helen Castor is joined in the studio by Professor Lucy Robinson from the University of Sussex.

As concerns grow about fixed-odds betting machines on our high streets, Matthew Greent takes us back to a gambling crisis over 200 years ago in London.

Dr Rachael Attwood explores the dangerous, de-humanising world of nineteenth century human trafficking and, as the numbers of rough sleepers grows on Britain's streets, we find out about homelessness in the past.

And the last in our challenge to find the place that is top for history in the UK - Top Town History.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961130]

Over the next six weeks, Professor

Christopher Andrew reveals some of the blood, sweat and tears in academic life by following a variety of historians as they go about their work. Today three first-timers, a Texan, a Baptist and a woman footballer, start on their projects. Producer Ian Bell

Repeated Sunday at 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961130]

Unknown: Christopher Andrew

Producer: Ian Bell

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961201]

Repeated from yesterday 4.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961207]

Professor Christopher Andrew continues his look behind the scenes as a variety of historians go about their work. Today, the best-selling author preparing for his next historical blockbuster, the Irishman inspired by a sepia family photograph, and disaster for the woman footballer researching the early days of the FA. Producer Ian Bell

Repeated Sunday at 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961207]

Unknown: Professor Christopher Andrew

Producer: Ian Bell

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961208]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19961214]

Professor Christopher Andrew continues his look behind the scenes as a variety of historians go about their work. Today, he reveals how a best-selling historian gets to grips with his subject, why a student's work may be too top-secret for his examiners to read, and what an Ulster historian makes of a war memorial that proved an embarrassment to the Irish

Republic for almost half a century.

Producer Ian Bell. Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961214]

Unknown: Professor Christopher Andrew

Producer: Ian Bell.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961215]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19961221]

Christopher Andrew continues his look behind the scenes as a variety of historians go about their work. He comes across a near-suicidal PhD student and a Cambridge don rejuvenated by Wagner. He finds out what top secrets can now be found on the internet and learns how in Zaire wearing your trousers inside out could just save your life.

Producer Ian Bell. Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961221]

Unknown: Christopher Andrew

Producer: Ian Bell.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961222]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19961228]

Professor Christopher Andrew continues his look behind the scenes as a variety of historians go about their work. Today, he discovers whether anyone turns up to hear Tim Blanning 's sales pitch about Wagner and how the examiners react to Hugh Matthew 's work on Baptist missionaries.

Producer Ian Bell. Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961228]

Unknown: Professor Christopher Andrew

Unknown: Tim Blanning

Unknown: Hugh Matthew

Producer: Ian Bell.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961229]

Professor Christopher Andrew continues his look behind the scenes as a variety of historians go about their work. Repeated from yesterday 4.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19961229]

Unknown: Professor Christopher Andrew

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970104]

The last programme in the series finds Professor Christopher Andrew desperate to learn how Wylie Reeves is faring in his quest for his PhD. Producer Ian Bell

Repeated tomorrow 8.30pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970104]

Unknown: Professor Christopher Andrew

Unknown: Wylie Reeves

Producer: Ian Bell

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970105]

Professor Christopher Andrew observes historians as they go about their work. Repeated from yesterday 4.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970105]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19981204]

Roger Wilkes is on a personal historical trail with a listener. Producer John Tuckey

PHONE: [number removed]

E-MAIL: making.history@bbc.co.uk

WEB SITE: www.bbc.co.uk/education

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981204]

Unknown: Roger Wilkes

Producer: John Tuckey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981211]

Roger Wilkes is on a personal historical trail with a listener. Plus advice on how to go about your own investigations.

Producer John Tuckey

PHONE: [number removed]

E-MAIL: making.history@bbc.co.uk

WEB SITE: www.bbc.co.uk/education

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981211]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19981218]

Roger Wilkes is on a personal historical trail with a listener. Plus advice on how to go about your own investigations.

Producer John Tuckey. PHONE: [number removed] E-MAIL: making.history@bbc.co.uk

WEB SITE: www.bbc.co.uk/education

Genome: [r4 Bd=19981218]

Unknown: Roger Wilkes

Producer: John Tuckey.

Hadrian's Wall20170718

, Iron Age origins of Heathrow Airport and a Saxon Burial mound in Slough.

Tom Holland travels north to mark the 1900th anniversary of Hadrian becoming Emperor, by examining the impact of his biggest legacy in Britain - Hadrian's Wall.

We also take-off for Heathrow to learn about its Iron Age origins and ask if a mound near a car park in Slough could really be a Saxon burial site.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

, Iron Age origins of Heathrow Airport and a Saxon Burial mound in Slough.

Tom Holland travels north to mark the 1900th anniversary of Hadrian becoming Emperor, by examining the impact of his biggest legacy in Britain - Hadrian's Wall.

We also take-off for Heathrow to learn about its Iron Age origins and ask if a mound near a car park in Slough could really be a Saxon burial site.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor And Guests Discuss The Stories That Are Making History20160315

Helen Castor is joined by Dr Jane Hamlett from Royal Holloway University of London and the critic and writer Kate Maltby.

Tom Holland travels to Thetford, the ancient capital of East Anglia, to hear evidence that the Iceni were speaking a form of English in the years before the Romans arrived. Dr Daphne Nash Briggs and Dr Sam Newton have examined coins of the period to reveal that the people of Norfolk had as strong a relationship with the Continent as they did with the rest of Britain - and, as well as speaking the Celtic Brittonic language, would also have conversed with their trading partners in the Germanic languages that would eventually become English. If true, this thesis completely changes our ideas that our language came with the Anglo-Saxons after the Romans left these shores.

We travel to Liverpool to try out some Victorian jokes. Its all part of research being carried out by Dr Bob Nicholson at Edge Hill University. Stand-up comic Iszi Lawrence finds out more.

This week's favourite year is 1453, put forward by Dr Rory Cox from St Andrews University.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Jack Monroe And Rationing In The First World War20170711

Rationing in 1917, Silk Roads, Franklin's last voyage and the history of the duffle coat.

Helen Castor is joined by Dr Sam Willis to discuss food shortages in the First World War, Silk Roads, the history of the duffle coat and Franklin's infamous last voyage.

Food blogger Jack Monroe heads for the National Archives to learn how the submarine war in 1917 presented a serious threat to food supplies. She discovers that the rationing put in place then was successfully used again in World War Two.

Tom Holland meets the author of the best-seller Silk Roads, Peter Frankopan, to ask whether China is trying to emulate a centuries old history of trade and influence through its Belt and Road policy.

Fashion historian Amber Butchart marks the passing of author Michael Bond to explain the history of Paddington Bear's iconic duffle coat.

And Sam Willis previews Death in the Ice, a new exhibition on Franklin's ill-fated journey to find the North West passage.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Pilgrimage, Overseas Cricketers, How The Ancients Helped Build Milton Keynes20180626

Tom Holland presents the programme where the past meets the present.

Popular history series where the past connects with the present.

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by Dr Marion Bowman from the Open University.

As more and more people become interested in making a pilgrimage, Tonderai Munyevu - the star of the play Black Men Walking - joins with members of the British Pilgrimage Trust for a day on the South Downs where they encounter pagans, priests and members of the public. Is a journey into the past a spritual wander or just an excuse for a nice walk?

The cricket season is in full swing and following on from a heavy defeat to the Scots, England now face the Aussies and India in a hectic summer when it seems every cricket playing nation is represented. It's only fifty years since the first overseas players came into the county game and Helen Castor has been meeting with two people who were at the vanguard of this sporting influx - the Barbardian Vanburn Holder and the legendary Indian wicketkeeper Farokh Engineer.

As the longest day passes and the night begin to lengthen again, Tom celebrates the solstice in the most unlikely place and finds out about the role of ancient people in the planning of Milton Keynes.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Rage Against The Machine20180123

Helen Castor on history's forerunners of today's concerns about housing and technology.

Helen Castor and her guests take us back to moments in the past when social and economic change conspired to produce the historical forerunners of two of today's most pressing issues - technological change and housing.

Tom Holland visits a fruit-packing factory in Kent where, today, much of the work is done by robots. Their introduction hasn't threatened any jobs yet but, half an hour away, are the villages where, in 1830, rural farmworkers raged against new threshing machines they feared would take away much-needed work in the winter months. Professor Carl Griffin from the University of Sussex explains how the mythical Captain Swing shook the government of the day and terrified landowners in a series of machine-wrecking riots that swept South East England, Wiltshire and East Anglia.

Britain's housing issues have kick-started a boom in a type of home that came to the rescue in the dark days after World War Two, when prefabs offered accommodation for those who were bombed or living in slums. Thanks to a certain Swedish company, we all know about flat-packed furniture but, back in the late 1940s, it was Swedish flat-packed houses that were causing a stir. Architectural writer Jonathan Glancey gives us the low-down on a house that changed lives and is, in some places, still standing.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Segregation In Wartime Britain20170704

Helen Castor on race in wartime, China's Belt and Road and what makes a good museum.

Helen Castor and her guests discuss the history stories that are alive today.

Seventy five years on from the first American bomber raid taking off from British soil to attack targets in Nazi-occupied Europe, poet Sugar Brown hears how the thousands of Yanks who arrived in the UK in 1942 were segregated by race - both when they were in uniform and when they were out on civvy street.

On the eve of the announcement of the Art Fund Museum of the Year, we hear from two retired ladies who, having completed a journey on every London bus route, are now visiting every museum in the capital. Iszi Lawrence asks them what makes a good museum.

Tom Holland meets with the author Peter Frankopan to hear how China's new Belt and Road initiative has its historical roots in the Silk Road which, for a millennium, connected the Korean peninsular and Japan to the Mediterranean Sea.

And as a new TGV line opens to Bordeaux we ask what's 'must-see' in that fabulous city for the historian.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Tasting the Past20180116

Tom Holland on how Romans fed their legions, and the history of street food.

Tom Holland and his guests showcase the stories that are making history.

Helen Castor heads for Wales and new scientific research telling us much more about what the Romans ate and how far away they had to source their food to feed their armies. Helen's in Newport, not far from Caerleon which was one of only three permanent fortresses in Roman Britain. Here, archaeologists and scientists from Cardiff University are using dental palaeopathology to discover where the animals that were slaughtered for their meat came from. The results suggest that so-called supply chains were as long and involved as they are today.

Also, we cross the Bristol Channel for more food history as reporter Hester Cant tastes the city's vibrant street food culture and discovers just how long its been established in the UK.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The Charter Of The Forest20170801

Tom Holland on the world's oldest environmental charter and Iron Age Heathrow.

Tom Holland with the last in the series, exploring new historical research and resonances.

We travel to Durham to examine the world's oldest piece of environmental legislation, the Charter of the Forest which was made law 800 years ago in 1217.

Tom reveals how travellers from Heathrow may well be taking off from one of the most important Iron Age sites in the UK.

We also hear memories of family holidays from a unique collection in Leicester and reveal how key figures in Russia's October revolution of 1917 met in the East End of London 10 years earlier.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The Dunkirk Spirit20170627

Dunkirk, Churchill, hermits and the archaeology of play.

Tom Holland is joined by Dr Dan Todman from Queen Mary University, London and Professor Lucy Robinson at the University of Sussex.

Britain's retreat from Dunkirk in 1940 was a precursor to the fall of France and a summer in which it looked like Britain too would be be overwhelmed by the Nazi war machine. The evacuation of thousands of troops from the beaches of Northern France in an armada of boats of all shapes and sizes has been spun into a defining moment when the plucky Brits snatched victory from the jaws of defeat. But Dunkirk was a disaster. So why don't we remember it as one? As a new film explores this moment of history, we explore the "Dunkirk spirit" and whether it really existed.

Helen Castor is in Norwich which, it was once said, had a pub for every day of the year and a church for every Sunday. In the Middle Ages, it also seemed to be teeming with anchoresses, anchorites and hermits - people who, with the blessing of the church, withdrew from everyday life but were still on hand to dish out advice to those who wanted it. How important were these people in medieval society and why are we less comfortable with loners and recluses today? Helen is joined at St Julian's in Norwich by Professor Carole Rawcliffe and Dr Tom Licence from the University of East Anglia.

There are archaeological artefacts from all eras. In Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, it is the sweet-wrappers, marbles and toy figures discarded by children in the 1950s and 60s that are adding to our knowledge of the past. In a housing estate that was designed by planners influenced by American ideas from the 1920's, a team from the University of Lincoln is working with the local community to see whether ideas about encouraging play in British housing estates really worked.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The English Pearl Harbour20170606

Tom Holland on the 350th anniversary of the Medway Raid and Domesday uncovered.

Tom Holland returns with the history magazine that showcases the latest research and demonstrates the relevance of the past in the present day.

The Dutch Are Coming!
350 years on from a daring Dutch mission up the Thames estuary, in which the flagship of the English fleet was taken and Sheerness captured, we ask whether this was the pinnacle of power for the Netherlands navy and how the international ambitions of both countries in the 17th century may also have helped shaped their response to globalisation today.

Domesday Uncovered.
Helen Castor is deep in the archives at Exeter Cathedral to find out how new research is unravelling some of the mysteries of one of the most famous documents in English and Welsh history, the Domesday Survey of 1086. Remarkably, this priceless historic gem was discovered by historian Stephen Baxter in a dreadful condition a few years ago. Now, splendidly restored, its able to shed some light on how William's great survey was actually achieved and why he did it.

The History of Political Constituencies.
As voters across the United Kingdom prepare to go to the polls, Iszi Lawrence asks Dr Paul Seaward and the team at the History of Parliament to explain the history of our political constituencies, how and why they have changed, and some of the shenanigans that went on in them throughout our electoral past.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The fight to eradicate polio20180130

Tom Holland on the Coventry polio epidemic, and when Parliament left Westminster.

Tom Holland and guests highlight histories that help us understand more about the background to some of today's important issues.

Helen Castor visits Coventry where, in 1957, one of the last polio epidemics hit the city. Local people were furious that widespread vaccination wasn't brought in, but the fledgling NHS simply didn't have enough stocks and medical experts were concerned about an American trial that had gone wrong. We learn that the government of the day were worried that Britain was entering a high-tech world without the skills that other countries had and was reluctant to bring in costly medicines from overseas, preferring that we develop our own.

The last time Parliament sat outside Westminster was in 1681, when it went to Oxford for a week. Today, with the government yet to finalise plans for the restoration and repair of the Palace of Westminster, we ask whether history might be made and a decision taken to move the engine of our democracy out to the shires once again, on a temporary basis. What can we learn from that short relocation over 300 years ago.

Top Town History features the home of Magna Carta, Egham, and the former-industrial powerhouse of Bury in Lancashire.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The Radio Ballads, Dorothea Lange And The Archaeology Of The A1420180703

Series exploring the latest historical and archaeological research.

Popular history series where the past connects with the present.

The Radio Ballads, Dorothea Lange, Archaeology of the A1420180703

Helen Castor on the photography of Dorothea Lange and the radio ballads of Charles Parker.

Popular history series where the past connects with the present.

Helen Castor is joined by Professor Lucy Robinson from the University of Sussex.

A new exhibition at the Barbican in London features the photography of Dorothea Lange who is best known for her coverage of the dust-bowl depression of mid-west America in the 1930s. Many of her now iconic images were actually staged - but does that alter their historical importance? Helen takes in the exhibition with the historian of race in modern America, Dr Melissa Milewski.

The 70th anniversary of the NHS at 70 is being marked across the BBC. In one of the more unusual ideas, Radio 3 are creating a symphony from the sounds that are commonplace in the health service. The inspiration for the piece comes from the "radio ballads" back in the late fifties and early sixties, produced by Charles Parker and featuring the music of Ewan McColl. Olivette Otele is a French-African historian who had never come across these radio programmes - so what can she glean about life in Britain sixty years ago by listening to them again?

And Tom Holland has a song of the road too. He's in Cambridgeshire, in the middle of Britain's biggest archaeological dig, where the A14 meets the A1 and a new historic landscape is being revealed.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The Stonehenge Tunnel20170620

Digging under Stonehenge, the archaeology of a 1960s estate and China's Belt and Road.

Tom Holland goes behind the headlines to look at the stories making history.

Helen Castor travels to Salisbury Plain to hear more about a growing row between archaeologists and our leading heritage organisations about plans to build a tunnel under Stonehenge. She discovers how, increasingly, it isn't iconic Stonehenge that is at the centre of researchers' thinking but the wider and even more historic landscape.

In Lincolnshire, Carenza Lewis and a team from the University of Lincoln are using archaeology for what some might describe as more pressing questions - how we can tackle the housing crisis and provide green space and places to play. A community project in Gainsborough has been evaluating the success of the 20th Century Garden City Movement by analysing artefacts from a post-war housing estate, to see if people actually exploited the space provided by urban planners.

Chinese President Xi Jinping's Belt and Road initiative is a multi-billion dollar infrastructure project that looks set to transform large swaths of Asia and the world beyond. But, as Tom Holland discovers from Silk Road historian Peter Frankopan, British explorers were eying up the economic possibilities of the isolated frontier near Pakistan, Afghanistan and Tajikistan more than 150 years ago.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland And Guests Discuss The Stories That Are Making History20160223

With Syria in turmoil and its largest city battered, Tom Holland is joined by Philip Mansel and Professor Jerry Brotton to discover an age when this place was a cosmopolitan cornerstone of the Middle East.

Helen Castor treks west to find out how men and women tamed the wilderness of North America both on the ground and in popular culture.

And social historian Juliet Gardiner shares her favourite year from history - 1936.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom is joined by Professor Marjory Harper from the University of Aberdeen and Dr Elizabeth Shlala from Harvard.

Helen Castor treks west to find out how men and women tamed the wilderness of North America both on the ground and in popular culture. She talks to Dr Karen Jones from the University of Kent.

Social historian Juliet Gardiner shares her favourite year from history - 1936.

And Dr Catherine Fletcher from the University of Swansea discusses the new breed of "hashtag historians".

Tom Holland Shares The Stories That Light Up Our Past20160209

In the first of a new series, Tom Holland shares the stories and new research that light up our past.

With the BBC's iconic wartime comedy Dad's Army entertaining cinema goers, Helen Castor sets out to find if this view of a rather amateurish war effort, in which the British won through against the odds, is really true. She's joined by historian James Holland who argues that Britain's military victory came about through science and industrial expertise that was actually well ahead of the Nazi's. She's also joined by Dr Chris Smith from the University of Kent who claims this this is true also in the rigorous approach used by the codebreakers at Bletchley Park.

In Cambridge, Professor Mary Beard settles by the fire to tell us about the year she thinks is the most important in history - 212AD, a year in which everyone who wasn't a slave received citizenship across the Roman Empire.

In Birmingham, musician David Hinds from the band Steel Pulse is taken back to the streets he grew up on, by the remarkable photographic archive of Janet Mendelssohn. Through her lens, we can see just what it was like to live in one of the new, immigrant communities in places such as Balsall Heath and Handsworth. David is joined by Dr Kieran Connell from Queen's University Belfast who helped put together a new exhibition at the Ikon gallery in Birmingham.

And, quiet please, is the role of the library about to be shelved in this digital age? Young historian and BBC Radio 3 New Generation Thinker Tom Charlton thinks not. He argues that, for the historian, the library will remain the 'go to' place for new research - however tempting doing it online might become.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

In the first of a new series, Tom Holland shares the stories and new research that light up our past.

With the BBC's iconic wartime comedy Dad's Army entertaining cinema goers, Helen Castor sets out to find if this view of a rather amateurish war effort, in which the British won through against the odds, is really true. She's joined by historian James Holland who argues that Britain's military victory came about through science and industrial expertise that was actually well ahead of the Nazi's. She's also joined by Dr Chris Smith from the University of Kent who claims this this is true also in the rigorous approach used by the codebreakers at Bletchley Park.

In Cambridge, Professor Mary Beard settles by the fire to tell us about the year she thinks is the most important in history - 212AD, a year in which everyone who wasn't a slave received citizenship across the Roman Empire.

In Birmingham, musician David Hinds from the band Steel Pulse is taken back to the streets he grew up on, by the remarkable photographic archive of Janet Mendelssohn. Through her lens, we can see just what it was like to live in one of the new, immigrant communities in places such as Balsall Heath and Handsworth. David is joined by Dr Kieran Connell from Queen's University Belfast who helped put together a new exhibition at the Ikon gallery in Birmingham.

And, quiet please, is the role of the library about to be shelved in this digital age? Young historian and BBC Radio 3 New Generation Thinker Tom Charlton thinks not. He argues that, for the historian, the library will remain the 'go to' place for new research - however tempting doing it online might become.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Who Was Saint Stephen?20171226

Saint Stephen, martyrdom and an Edwardian feast of festive football.

Series exploring the latest historical and archaeological research

Helen Castor is in the chair for a festive edition of the popular history magazine programme. She's joined by Professor Miri Rubin from Queen Mary, University of London and Tony Collins the Professor of Sport at De Montfort University in Leicester.

On this feast of Stephen, Tom visits Norwich to find out more about the character who met a violent death and became the first christian martyr. He talks to the choristers who will be singing Good King Wenceslas in the city's grand Norman cathedral over Christmas and the Bishop of Norwich the Rt Reverend Graham James.

Dr Hugh Doherty from the University of East Anglia takes the story of martyrdom on to the 12th century. In Norwich, a city which had no saint, a twelve year old boy called William was found dead just before the feast of Passover. Some pointed the finger of blame for this death at the city's growing Jewish community, accusing them of a ritual murder. Was William a martyr as some in Norwich tried to make him, or was this nothing more than a nasty anti-semitic medieval marketing campaign.

Boxing Day is a time for games and a feast of sport. A football match will be on many people's festive agenda. Journalist Paul Brown has traced festive football back to its Victorian and Edwardian roots and discovered that Everton FC once played no fewer than three games on Christmas Day and Boxing Day!

Finally, a new game - Top Town History. Two Making History listeners go head to head to prove that where they live is best for history. Today, Fort William meets Reading in a battle for the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Saint Stephen, martyrdom and an Edwardian feast of festive football.

Helen Castor is in the chair for a festive edition of the popular history magazine programme. She's joined by Professor Miri Rubin from Queen Mary, University of London and Tony Collins the Professor of Sport at De Montfort University in Leicester.

On this feast of Stephen, Tom visits Norwich to find out more about the character who met a violent death and became the first christian martyr. He talks to the choristers who will be singing Good King Wenceslas in the city's grand Norman cathedral over Christmas and the Bishop of Norwich the Rt Reverend Graham James.

Dr Hugh Doherty from the University of East Anglia takes the story of martyrdom on to the 12th century. In Norwich, a city which had no saint, a twelve year old boy called William was found dead just before the feast of Passover. Some pointed the finger of blame for this death at the city's growing Jewish community, accusing them of a ritual murder. Was William a martyr as some in Norwich tried to make him, or was this nothing more than a nasty anti-semitic medieval marketing campaign.

Boxing Day is a time for games and a feast of sport. A football match will be on many people's festive agenda. Journalist Paul Brown has traced festive football back to its Victorian and Edwardian roots and discovered that Everton FC once played no fewer than three games on Christmas Day and Boxing Day!

Finally, a new game - Top Town History. Two Making History listeners go head to head to prove that where they live is best for history. Today, Fort William meets Reading in a battle for the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Witches, Poison And Why The Hedgehog Was Unloved In History20180619

A #metoo moment for 17th-century witches?

Popular history series where the past connects with the present.

Helen Castor is joined in the studio by the historian of witchcraft, Professor Owen Davies.

Historian Tom Charlton travels to Manningtree in North Essex - the scene, in the 17th century, of a series of witch-trials instigated by the so-called Witchfinder General Matthew Hopkins. Hopkins has gained notoriety for these and other brutal acts against women but he is the one who is always remembered - not the victims. Now a local woman, Grace Carter, wants a #MeToo moment so that the women are not forgotten. Professor Alison Rowlands, who studies witchcraft across Europe, joins Tom to help Grace sort out fact from fiction as she plans a monument to this painful past.

The poison attack on the former Russian spy Sergei Skripal in Salisbury caused consternation around the world. Skripal and his daughter were in hospital for weeks and were lucky not to have been killed by the nerve agent used against them. Poisoning seems a very underhand act today but, back in the Middle Ages when knowledge of the natural world was more instinctive, it was commonplace. Indeed, as Iszi Lawrence found out, natural poisons were at the root of medieval medicine.

Our modern world, with its fast roads and industrial farmland, is no place for hedgehogs and their numbers are in serious decline. Perhaps it's the threat to their numbers or the affectionate portrayal of Mrs Tiggy Winkle by Beatrix Potter, but we seem to be very fond of this prickly mammal. Four hundred years ago, things were very different. Hedgehog numbers were healthy but people thought they were witches and hunted them. To find out why, Tom Holland has been spending the night spotting hedgehogs in an Oxfordshire garden with natural history writer Hugh Warwick.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Series exploring the latest historical and archaeological research

Zombies In Yorkshire?20170613

Medieval mutilation, whisky smuggling and the deserted city of Paquime.

Helen Castor presents the programme that goes behind the history headlines. Scottish medievalist Fiona Watson and landscape historian Francis Pryor join Helen to discuss medieval mutilations in North Yorkshire, illegal whisky distilling in nineteenth century Scotland and the news that human beings may have evolved in Africa 100,000 years earlier than we thought.

Tom Holland travels to North Yorkshire and the deserted medieval village at Wharram Percy which archaeologists now believe was the site of a gruesome practice of mutilation in the middle ages. Dr Simon Mays is a human skeletal biologist for Historic England and he noticed some odd marks on human bones recovered at Wharram Percy in the sixties. These bones were found in the middle of the deserted village - not in the churchyard. Simon thinks the marks on them were caused by severe blows made shortly after death - maybe to stop disruptive souls from tormenting villagers again.

Whisky writer Rachel McCormack takes us to another remote and deserted location, the Cabrach between Aberdeen and Inverness. This was the centre of a well-developed, but illegal, whisky distilling industry in the eighteenth century. Although the remote location kept these stills hidden from the revenue men it also made them commercially unviable when whisky production was licensed in the 1820s. The ruined farmsteads in this otherwise untouched environment are the only clues to this tumultuous past.

Dr Vanessa King and Dr Matthew Green show Helen a seedy and brutal history of a night out on London's South Bank, and Dr John McNabb responds to news that Homo Sapiens may be 100,000 older than we once thought.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Medieval mutilation, whisky smuggling and the deserted city of Paquime.

Helen Castor presents the programme that goes behind the history headlines. Scottish medievalist Fiona Watson and landscape historian Francis Pryor join Helen to discuss medieval mutilations in North Yorkshire, illegal whisky distilling in nineteenth century Scotland and the news that human beings may have evolved in Africa 100,000 years earlier than we thought.

Tom Holland travels to North Yorkshire and the deserted medieval village at Wharram Percy which archaeologists now believe was the site of a gruesome practice of mutilation in the middle ages. Dr Simon Mays is a human skeletal biologist for Historic England and he noticed some odd marks on human bones recovered at Wharram Percy in the sixties. These bones were found in the middle of the deserted village - not in the churchyard. Simon thinks the marks on them were caused by severe blows made shortly after death - maybe to stop disruptive souls from tormenting villagers again.

Whisky writer Rachel McCormack takes us to another remote and deserted location, the Cabrach between Aberdeen and Inverness. This was the centre of a well-developed, but illegal, whisky distilling industry in the eighteenth century. Although the remote location kept these stills hidden from the revenue men it also made them commercially unviable when whisky production was licensed in the 1820s. The ruined farmsteads in this otherwise untouched environment are the only clues to this tumultuous past.

Dr Vanessa King and Dr Matthew Green show Helen a seedy and brutal history of a night out on London's South Bank, and Dr John McNabb responds to news that Homo Sapiens may be 100,000 older than we once thought.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

03

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Roger Wilkes (series 1) / Sue Cook (series 2 onwards) helps listeners to uncover personal historical mysteries, whether a dark rumour about a great aunt, a strange hole in the garden or a curio on the mantlepiece.

Plus advice on how to go about your own investigations.

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Roger Wilkes is on a personal historical trail with a listener.

Plus advice on how to go about your own investigations.

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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of your historical mysteries, meets the people who are making history themselves and gets the best advice on how to conduct your own research.

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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, meets the people who are making history themselves and gets the best advice on how to conduct your own research.

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Sue Cook returns with the series that gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

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Sue Cook presents the series that gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

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Sue Cook presents the last in the current series that gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

Today the team visits the National Railway Museum in York to explore the history of our railways.

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Sue Cook presents the programme that examines listeners' historical queries, exploring avenues of research and uncovering mysteries.

This week, the search for an odd family link with T E Lawrence leads to the spot where he died.

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Sue Cook presents the programme that examines listeners' historical queries, exploring avenues of research and uncovering mysteries.

This week a listener from the New Forest leads the team back 900 years to the death of William Rufus and asks whether this was a tragic accident or cold-blooded murder.

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Sue Cook presents the programme that examines listeners' historical queries, exploring avenues of research and uncovering mysteries.

This week, a listener's search for Scottish ancestors leads to an analysis of the Highland Clearances.

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Sue Cook presents the programme that examines listeners' historical queries, exploring avenues of research and uncovering mysteries.

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Sue Cook presents the programme that investigates listeners' historical queries, exploring avenues of research and uncovering mysteries.

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Sue Cook presents the last in the current series that investigates listeners' historical queries, exploring avenues of research and uncovering mysteries.

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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

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11/13.

Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

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Sue Cook looks into another batch of listeners' history queries, uncovering mysteries, and re-interpreting the past.

If there is a local legend, a quirk of history, a family curiosity or architectural oddity that has you puzzled, or if you can help with another listeners' query, then contact Sue and the Making History team.

Write to:

Making History

PO Box 3096

Brighton BN1 1PL.

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Today, a listener's family link with one of the founding fathers of the ANC, and the human story behind the partition of India.

If there is a local legend, a quirk of history, a family curiosity or architectural oddity that has you puzzled, or if you can help with another listener's query, then contact Sue and the Making History team.

Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

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Today, Dilly Barlow visits the Big Pit in Blaenavon.

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Today, listeners review the Coventry Transport Museum, one of the finalists in this year's Gulbenkian Museum Awards.

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Sue Cook gets to the bottom of historical mysteries, local legends, family curiosities and architectural oddities.

Write to Making History, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1PL.

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Nick Baker presents the programme which explores ordinary people's links with the past.

Listeners can write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1TU; Email making.history@bbc.co.uk; Telephone 08700 100 400.

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Nick Baker presents the programme which explores ordinary people's links with the past.

Listeners can write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096, Brighton BN1 1TU; Email making.history@bbc.co.uk; Telephone 08700 100 400 [National Rate]

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Vanessa Collingridge

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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

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Writer Alison Weir gives some guidance to a Midland re-enactment troupe on the character of John Tiptoft, Renaissance man or 15th century murderer?

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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

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Vanessa Collingridge investigates a 19th-century attempt at a new order in Sheffield.

Vanessa Collingridge investigates the story of a 19th-century attempt at a new European order in Sheffield and finds out whether the city's steel industry provided the answer to an age-old navigational problem for Britain's sailors.

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Vanessa visits Southall, Middlesex, where listeners ask about the story of immigration from East Africa, the pre-urban landscape and the origins of the doll's house.

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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

Could a listener's hotel in North Wales once have been the court of the 13th-century Welsh leader Llewellyn the Great? Plus listeners caught up in the expulsions from Idi Amin's Uganda in 1972 revisit their personal experiences, and medicine historian Dr Elizabeth Hurren lifts the lid on the grim history of the undertaker.

Could a listener's hotel in North Wales once have been the court of Llewellyn the Great?

2202*20090414

Listener Bridget Long sets out to confirm a family story - that her late father played oboe in the premiere of a piece of work by Benjamin Britten while being held in a German POW camp.

Archaeologists at the University of Liverpool reveal how they know what Britons ate before the introduction of farming.

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Military historian Professor Richard Holmes explains how the militia worked in the 18th century, and Andy Cassell reports from Scotland on Britain's only private army.

Historian Professor Richard Holmes explains how the militia worked in the 18th century.

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Vanessa Collingridge explores ordinary people's links with the past.

Professor Mark Stoyle goes in search of the Civil War dead from the bitter siege of Lyme Regis.

Professor Mark Stoyle goes in search of the Civil War dead from the siege of Lyme Regis.

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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

Could a leaf collection in Southport provide valuable historical research for climate researchers in the future?

Could a leaf collection in Southport provide valuable historical research?

2206*20090512

How the experiences of a painter and decorator from Sale in 19th-century China reveals more about the spread of religion in that period.

Plus the remarkable story of the listener who witnessed the German surrender at Monte Cassino.

220720090519

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

The story of John Bellingham, the only person to murder a British Prime Minister.

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One of the few surviving members of the British whaling fleet recalls life on South Georgia, and Professor Tom Williamson from the University of East Anglia reveals the rich history of a now almost lost hamlet.

One of the surviving members of the British whaling fleet recalls life on South Georgia.

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Featuring a listener's search for justice for an ancestor who was a hero during a dramatic mine rescue in 19th-century Wales.

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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

230120091006
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Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

Is the skin that binds a book in Bristol the gruesome remains of a listener's ancestor?

2303*20091020

Vanessa Collingridge joins the residents of Mildenhall in Suffolk as they remember the early aviators who took part in an air race to Melbourne in 1934.

On the coast she meets the team from the University of East Anglia that is mapping Second World War defences, and near Norwich she sees the human remains that may well shine a new light on the world of Boudicca.

Residents of Mildenhall remember the aviators who took part in an air race in 1934.

2304*20091027

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

Are some green lanes and place names in southern England a reminder of an earlier Welsh invasion?

Are some green lanes and place names in southern England a reminder of a Welsh invasion?

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Vanessa Collingridge brings together objects from around the UK that are making A History of The World, including a 9th-century bell in Northern Ireland and rosary beads found on the Mary Rose.

Vanessa Collingridge brings together objects from around the UK.

Vanessa Collingridge brings together objects from around the UK that are making A History of The World, including a 9th-century bell in Northern Ireland and rosary beads found on the Mary Rose.

Vanessa Collingridge brings together objects from around the UK.

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Vanessa Collingridge pulls together more objects from A History of the World, including the nurse's uniform worn by one of only eight women to land with the troops on D-Day.

Vanessa Collingridge pulls together more objects from A History of the World.

Vanessa Collingridge pulls together more objects from A History of the World, including the nurse's uniform worn by one of only eight women to land with the troops on D-Day.

Vanessa Collingridge pulls together more objects from A History of the World.

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Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects that help tell A History Of The World.

Today, a writing tablet from Roman Cumbria and the original blueprint for garden suburbs.

Vanessa Collingridge hears about a writing tablet from Roman Cumbria.

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Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects that help tell A History of The World.

Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects to help tell A History Of The World

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Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects that help tell A History Of The World.

Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects to help tell A History Of The World

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Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects that help tell A History of The World.

Vanessa Collingridge asks listeners to suggest objects to help tell A History of The World

250120100518

Vanessa Collingridge returns with a new series of Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

This episode features the nineteenth-century Somerset boot-maker who helped improve the lives of millions of amputees and changed the course of medical history; and in the North West a literary scheme that is using historical fiction to help readers unlock the past.

But is there a temptation for a good story to get in the way of historical facts?

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

With Vanessa Collingridge.

Including the Somerset bootmaker who changed medical history.

250220100525

A listener's search for the answer to a television quiz programme reveals how a new philosophy changed the physical face of Edinburgh back in the eighteenth century.

Dylan Winter travels to North Wales and Somerset to discover the history of lager in the UK 100 years before the lager lout, and we learn about a new English Heritage project that hopes to capture memories of the evacuation of Dunkirk.

Vanessa Collingridge presents the popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The history of lager and how a new philosophy changed Edinburgh.

With Vanessa Collingridge

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One of the country's leading experts on First World War archaeology enlists the help of Making History to help him solve a family mystery.

Andrew Robertshaw wants to find out exactly what went on in Roundhay Park in Leeds between 1914 and 1918.

Was it used as a training ground for soldiers detailed to serve at Ypres?

Meanwhile in Cornwall we unpack the story of a medicine chest that was used in the exploration of Africa.

Vanessa Collingridge presents the popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Strange marks on the moors near Sheffield reveal a hidden military history.

250420100608

Vanessa Collingridge presents the popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Vanessa is in Lincolnshire finding out more about one of our most unusual spa towns and hearing from locals who think the preservation of buildings in England is too focussed on architecture, and not the wider heritage of the place that the building is in.

Richard Daniel visits Essex and Edinburgh to hear how Viking settlement was encouraged by global warming.

We also revisit some of the epic moments in the history of the British cavalry on the Continent and ask: how did the horses get there?

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

When it comes to the preservation of buildings, is history losing out to architecture?

250520100615

Vanessa Collingridge presents the popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Help us by taking part in a new project to record old advertising signs painted on the sides of buildings.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

250620100622
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Vanessa Collingridge presents the popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website:

www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

2508 LAST20100706

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website:

bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

260120100831

Vanessa Collingridge and the team follow up more questions and research sent in by listeners that help us to understand some of the bigger stories from our past.

Today, the little known secret army of 'coders' who were trained to listen to Russian military radio communications.

Such was the secrecy surrounding these operations that those taking part had little idea just how big an operation they were involved in and that it was all organised by the fledgling GCHQ.

We travel back to 16th century Warwickshire and the weeks after the birth of world-famous playwright William Shakespeare to ask why his mother didn't attend his christening and what this tells us about the place of women and their role in the family at this time.

We continue our journey to Cresswell Crags near Worksop in Nottinghamshire to find out how to identify flint tools and there's news of a new on-line archive which wants people to submit material they might have on Anglo-Saxon Britain.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

The little known story of a Cold War secret army.

260220100907

Vanessa Collingridge and the team follow up more questions and research sent in by listeners that help us to understand some of the bigger stories from our past.

Today, Vanessa travels to Musselburgh to find out more about the first modern battle on British soil and the first modern map that depicted it.

On 10th September 1547 the English and Scottish armies faced each other just a few miles to the east of Edinburgh in one of the key moments of what's become known as the War of the 'Rough Wooing'.

The English were using new, European-influenced, fighting techniques that included artillery; the Scots, however, relied on the medieval duality of man and horse.

They were dealt a heavy defeat.

However, despite this being: the last battle between Scots and English and the first 'modern' battle, there is little locally that commemorates it and few know much about it.

Vanessa talks with historian Dr Fiona Watson and then travels to the British Library in London to look at a map of the Battle of Pinkie that librarian Peter Barber believes is our first 'modern' map.

Also in the programme, listeners in a small town on the Essex/Suffolk border have got together for a community performance of song and speech which recalls bitter rural unrest in East Anglia in 1816 when the cry went up: 'bread or blood'.

We hear how an economic downturn, new technology and the return of thousands of farm-workers from the Napoleonic wars pushed this sleepy part of the world into open revolt.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

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Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today, military historian Professor Richard Holmes reveals the fate of English soldiers left in France after Waterloo and VanesSa Discovers how Jacobites ran riot in Manchester.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Professor Richard Holmes on the fate of English soldiers left in France after Waterloo.

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Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today, 'hard graft'- how labour camps were used to deal with unemployment in the 1930s; how walking became a Victorian entertainment; and celebrating our oldest cinema.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge examines the labour camps used to deal with unemployment in the 1930s

260520100928

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

260620101005

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Contact:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Presenter: Vanessa Collingridge

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

260720101012

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

260820101019

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Presenter: Vanessa Collingridge

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

2609 LAST20101026

Vanessa Collingridge presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

You can send us questions or an outline of your own research.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History.

BBC Radio 4.

PO Box 3096.

Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website: www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Vanessa Collingridge presents more of your stories that change the way we see the past.

2701Chickens, Motorcycle Gunners And Graffiti20110301

Chickens, motorcycle gunners and graffiti

A new series and a team of new presenters.

Tom Holland, Helen Castor and Fiona Watson share the workload as we sift through listeners' questions and research and turn to some of our leading historians for some answers.

Why would you boast about having a chicken in France, why is a motorcycle gunner wearing spurs and why should we thrilled about graffiti on a medieval church wall in rural East Anglia?

Each week, the Making History team: tackles these and many other questions; here's about the latest research and puts the Radio 4 audience at the heart of historical debate.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with the first in a new series of Radio 4's popular history magazine.

A new series and a team of new presenters. Tom Holland, Helen Castor and Fiona Watson share the workload as we sift through listeners' questions and research and turn to some of our leading historians for some answers.

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Historian Helen Castor presents the programme that connects people with the past.

Today, a poem found amongst the personal papers of a listener's father reveals world-wide admiration for an Italian fascist whose death raises questions about his relationship with Mussolini.

Fiona Watson heads for a deserted Scottish island to uncover the 7th century equivalent of photo-journalism.

Tom Holland marks the 250th anniversary of the bloodiest riot outside of London in the 18th century.

And a listener's photograph of her father in the First World War brings to life the moment when motorised horsepower took over from the real thing.

Presenter: Helen Castor

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor presents the popular history magazine.

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Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

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Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with listeners' stories that change the way we see the past.

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Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners' questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

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Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

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Helen Castor talks to Professor Mark Stoyle of the University of Southampton about the moment that the reality of the civil war hit home for the English in 1642 and people had to chose between King or Parliament.

Forced out of London, King Charles 1st uses Commissions of Array to recruit supporters but as Mark Stoyle explains there were many places where these simply did not work.

Reporter Lizz Pearson meets listener Eileen Fardon who has come across letters from the Bloomfield family in Coney Weston in Suffolk to a son serving in France in 1918.

Within the letters is the revelation that the boys' mother travels to Abbeyville in France by herself after receiving a telegram that says he's been wounded.

When was the last trial of a witch in England?

Professor Owen Davies tells Helen Castor about the trial of Jane Wenham in 1712 and how a belief in witchcraft continued for more than 200 years despite laws that outlawed and further prosecutions.

In our 'Double Top Domesday' series, Professor Ian Rotherham at the University of Sheffield Hallam throws a dart and ends up near Barnsley where his reading of the local vegetation reveals a surprisingly wet landscape history.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor with your stories that are changing the way we see the past.

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Helen Castor and the team explore recent historical research and follow up listeners' questions and comments.

A listener's visit to a town in Kent leads us to the remarkable story of the Barbary Corsairs - but not the one we'd envisaged! The town in question is Faversham and it's there that a plaque to a local sailor rescued from pirates was spotted.

But, the link between the Barbary Corsairs and Faversham is much more than a rescued sailor.

One of the most feared pirates in the seventeenth century came from Faversham.

Helen Castor spoke with the author Adrian Tinniswood who explained the background to this story: how peace with Spain in the early 1600's threw thousands of mercenaries out of work and how many moved to North Africa to join with the pirates we know as the Barbary Corsairs.

There was no one more infamous than Issouf Reis who converted to Islam and made so much money that he lived in Tunis in a house made out of Marble and Alabaster.

Foreign correspondent Tom Gibb follows up last week's story about the Civil War 'Commissions of Array' which were used by the king to recruit followers in the fight with parliament.

He likens events in the seventeenth century in England to what he saw in Central America in the 1980's where most people simply didn't want anything to do with the conflict.

In Ipswich, Making History reporter Joanna Pinnock discovers a little-known side to the life of Henry VIII's Lord Chancellor Cardinal Wolsey.

Retired headteacher, John Blatchly has led a campaign to commemorate Wolsey in his home town with a statue.

Whilst raising funds, local people have been researching the life of Wolsey and have found that he was an important influence on England's fledgling education system - even proposing his own national curriculum.

In this week's edition of 'Double-Top Domesday' Professor Alun Howkins, a social historian from the University of Sussex, is at the oche.

His dart lands close to the Norfolk village of Old Buckenham and Alun soon finds evidence for a hidden radical past.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Helen Castor presents the programme that reflects listeners' passions for the past.

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A new series of 'Making History'.

Tom Holland, Helen Castor and Fiona Watson share the workload as we sift through listener's questions and research and turn to some of our leading historians for some answers.

Each week, the Making History team: tackles listeners questions; hears about the latest research and puts the Radio 4 audience at the heart of historical debate.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Listeners share their ideas and questions with some of the world's leading historians.

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Radio 4's popular history magazine series.

Listeners share their ideas and questions with some of the world's leading historians.

280320110906

A new series of 'Making History'.

Tom Holland, Helen Castor and Fiona Watson share the workload as we sift through listener's questions and research and turn to some of our leading historians for some answers.

Each week, the Making History team: tackles listeners questions; hears about the latest research and puts the Radio 4 audience at the heart of historical debate.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Radio 4's popular history magazine series.

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Is History In Crisis?:

TV seems full to bursting with history programmes, the bookshops are stuffed full of historic fact and fiction - and there are few decent radio programmes on the subject too! So, is history in crisis? That was one of the themes up for discussion at a conference organised by History Today and Tom went along to gauge the feeling of students and researchers.

Many were worried by perceived cutbacks in the humanities in universities but it was the breadth of teaching that concerned people most.

In short: too many Nazis and not enough Magna Carta, English Civil War or understanding of Welsh, Scottish and Irish history.

Unexplained Circles in Ashdown Forest:

A listener in Turkey has spotted 2 unexplained circles in Ashdown Forest whilst looking at satellite mapping (Grid References: TQ 45410 30887, E 545410.5 N 130887).

Helen Castor visited the team at the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty where they have been using a new laser technique called LIDAR as part of a community archaeology partnership which might explain more.

Krojanty 1939:

Dr Richard Butterwick from University College London explains how the myth that Polish cavalry charged Nazi tanks in September 1939 took hold and spread.

Bath Pump Room Band:

Lizz Pearson meets up with Robert and Nicola Hyman who have written a history of music at the Pump Room in Bath.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland presents the programme that reflects listeners' passion for the past.

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Historian Helen Castor presents a new series of Radio 4's popular magazine in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

From Stirling to Southampton, Oxford to Orleans, the Making History team have been out and about in the last few weeks chasing down answers to questions posed in the emails and letters sent in by the Radio 4 audience: family research, forgotten diaries, architectural oddities, unexplained features in the landscape... all these, and more, add to a 'must-listen mix' of topics that range from the Aztecs to the obsession of a French railway enthusiast in Amersham.

In this week's programme: Helen meets two listeners who are about to embark on a journey of a lifetime to see for themselves the exact spot in the icy waters of the North Atlantic where a relative died on a British ship sunk by a British minefield in a little-known accident during the Second World War; fellow presenter Tom Holland heads down Route 66 to discover that mediaeval Native Americans loved the city-life just as much as their twenty-first century cousins; and a professional map-maker puzzles over some unexplained symbols that are making horticultural history in the Surrey countryside.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Two listeners head to the spot in the North Atlantic where a relative died in World War II

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Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Today, the programme marks the centenary of the sinking of the Titanic by looking into our understanding of icebergs 100 years ago and asking whether the ship's designers can really be blamed for not knowing what we know now. Helen Castor is in Exeter at the home of the Met Office to uncover the tragic and little-known story of the men who manned the Atlantic weather ships in wartime. And a listener in Dorset needs your help with a project which marks the impact of Black American GI's during the Second World War.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Presented by Tom Holland. Marking the centenary of the sinking of the Titanic.

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Historian Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history magazine.

290520120501
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Historian Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Tom Holland presents the popular history magazine programme.

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Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Oak Apple Day: Professor Mark Stoyle from the University of Southampton explains the origins of Oak Apple Day, the day that marks the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660. In Fowey in Cornwall listener David Ruffer wants to find out more about the regicide Hugh Peter. Meanwhile in Sweden, listener Peter Henriksson wants to know what happened to foreign treaties during the Long Parliament and the Restoration that followed. Helen speaks to Dr Toby Osborne at the University of Durham.

Much Wenlock: In the week that the Olympic flame is carried through the Shropshire town of Much Wenlock, the BBC School Report team help local youngsters research the local man who was a huge influence on the modern games.

The Fall of Constantinople: Tom Holland marks the anniversary of the Fall of Constantinople in May 1453 by talking to Professor Jonathan Harris at Royal Holloway University of London to discover whether it was indeed a clash of two religious empires.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

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Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listener's questions and research help offer new insights into the past.

Irish Deserters in the British Army: Making History listener Paddy Reid from County Dublin in the Irish Republic wrote to the programme with the story of his father who, aged 17, deserted from the Irish Army to fight for the British during the Second World War. Having served in India and Burma Paddy's father returned home to Ireland in 1946 and was then effectively barred from employment for the best part of 16 years because many regarded him as a traitor. As the debate about amnesty for these men goes on in Dublin, Tom Holland talks to Paddy and to Professor Brian Girvin who is the Co-Director of the Volunteers Project at University College Cork.

Chalk: Patricia Nash in Basingstoke is working on a project to ensure that every public right of way in Hampshire is marked on a definitive map. Her research has meant that she has looked at hundreds of old maps and she is amazed at the number of chalk workings that are shown. 'What were they for', she asks? Making History's Simon Evans joined archaeologist Dr Matt Pope on the South Downs to find out more.

Richard Cromwell: Den Cartlidge heard our recent programme about the English Civil War and the Long Parliament. He asks why Richard Cromwell's short tenure as Lord Protector is so often ignored? Tom Holland talks to Professor Ronald Hutton from the University of Bristol.

Abebe Bikali: Helen Castor talks to the author Simon Martin about the Ethiopian runner whose barefoot victory in the Olympic marathon in Rome in 1960 paved the way for the African domination of distance running that we are familiar with today.

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

Historian Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

291120120612

Historian Helen Castor presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

291220120619

Historian Tom Holland presents Radio 4's popular history programme in which listeners and leading researchers share their passion for the past.

Join in by contacting the programme:

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Write to Making History. BBC Radio 4. PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL

Join the conversation on our Facebook page or find out more from the Radio 4 website - www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/makinghistory

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.

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Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in the next six weeks of this new series, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards, investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite effect, and finding out why you can't necessarily see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

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Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in this series, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards, investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite affect, and finding out why you can't necessarily see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

310520130212

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in this six week series, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards, investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite affect, and finding out why you can't necessarily see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

310620130219

Tom Holland is joined in the studio by leading historians and writers to discuss issues from our past that have been raised by new research carried out by listeners, heritage organisations and the academic community.

Among the highlights in this series, Tom and his co-presenter Helen Castor, will be asking whether the Renaissance began on the 26th April 1336, probably about tea time... and possibly over a game of cards, investigating how a London conference set up to limit naval fire power in 1930 had the opposite affect, and finding out why you can't, necessarily, see the wood through the trees in a Royal Forest.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

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Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Elaine Chalus, who is Director of the Centre for History and Culture at Bath Spa University and currently involved in researching The Admirals Wife: An Intimate History of Family, Navy and Empire. It draws upon the largely unknown diaries of Elizabeth Wynne Fremantle (1778-1857).

Alongside her is one of Britain's leading historians of the eighteenth century, Professor Jeremy Black from the University of Exeter.

Tom heads to the British Library in London to take a privileged look at a remarkable volume of naval dispatches. Unearthed by naval historian Sam Willis, this beautifully bound book contains first - hand accounts of some of the key sea battles between 1794 and 1805. So why don't we know more about it?

In Warwickshire, archivist Rob Eyre brings us evidence for a unique way of paying for Nelson's navy: a hair-powder tax.

And Helen Castor takes a trip to Watford to meet a Making History listener who can shed new light on the role of toads in pregnancy testing before the DIY kits of today.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

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Tom Holland is joined in the studio by Michelle Brown, Professor of Medieval Manuscript Studies at the University of London.

Martin Ellis is on the border of England and Wales to celebrate an iconic landscape feature which doesn't attract the attention that its history warrants. He asks who Offa was, and what made him build a dyke which has become the physical border between two nations.

Joining Tom from Ireland is Dr Gillian Kenny from Trinity College in Dublin where she works on research into women in medieval Gaelic society. Remarkably, she has discovered that married women enjoyed a freedom in the Ireland of the middle ages that their English counterparts never had.

And Helen Castor is out on the cut finding out about the women who joined a scheme to keep the canals going during the Second World War. But has this middle-class history eclipsed a longer working-class one?

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

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History magazine programme.

Helen Castor is joined by Dr Lucy Robinson from the University of Sussex and Dr Catherine Rider from the University of Exeter.

We hear about the conclusion to a four year project which helps us understand just how ordinary people worshipped in the sixteenth century. How did the church maintain its hold over a population that could not read or write and certainly didn't understand Latin?

Burnley may seem an unlikely place in the Lesbian and Gay history of Britain, compared perhaps with more metropolitan areas. However, a new project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund is uncovering some remarkable evidence which shows that East Lancashire was at the forefront of the gay liberation movement in the 1960's and 70's.

And Tom Holland is in the Oxfordshire countryside with a leading classicist and a beekeeper to find out how the Ancient Greeks and Romans would have tackled the decline of the bee population.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

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