Marc-antoine Charpentier (1643-1704)

Episodes

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01Italy V France20170703

Donald Macleod explores Charpentier's formative years. With Le Reniement de Saint Pierre.

Donald Macleod explores Marc-Antoine Charpentier's formative years, with the dramatic motet Le Reniement de Saint Pierre and a discourse on pleasure, "Les Plaisirs de Versailles"

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

Back home after three years in Italy, the Italianate influences audible in Charpentier's music stirred up existing tensions over the merits of French and Italian style.
Donald Macleod presents complete performances of the early Italian-influenced dramatic motet Le Reniement de Saint Pierre and the charming entertainment Les Plaisirs de Versailles, in which Conversation and Music argue as to which of them is indispensable.

Te Deum, H.146 (excerpt)
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Intermèdes: Le Mariage forcé
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Le Reniement de Saint Pierre,H 424
Natalie Clifton-Griffith (soprano), Ostiaria
Grace Davidson, soprano Ancilla
Andrew Tortise (tenor) Petrus
Benjamin Hulett (tenor), Jesus
James Mustard, Eamonn Dougan (bass), Historicus
Nicholas Mulroy, (tenor), Cognatus Malchi
David Miller, Lynda Sayce, theorbo
Richard Campbell, bass viol
Silas Standage, organ
Members of Ex Cathedra Choir and Baroque Ensemble
Jeffrey Skidmore, director

Les Plaisirs de Versailles H 480
Sophie Daneman (soprano), La Musique
Katalin Kàrolyi (mezzo soprano), La Conversation
Steve Dugardin (countertenor), Le Jeu
Jean-François Gardeil (baritone), Comus
François Piolino (tenor), Un Plaisir
Patricia Petibon, soprano
Monique Zanetti, soprano
Fernand Benadi, baritone
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director.

01Italy V France20170703

Donald Macleod explores Charpentier's formative years. With Le Reniement de Saint Pierre.

Donald Macleod explores Marc-Antoine Charpentier's formative years, with the dramatic motet Le Reniement de Saint Pierre and a discourse on pleasure, "Les Plaisirs de Versailles"

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

Back home after three years in Italy, the Italianate influences audible in Charpentier's music stirred up existing tensions over the merits of French and Italian style.
Donald Macleod presents complete performances of the early Italian-influenced dramatic motet Le Reniement de Saint Pierre and the charming entertainment Les Plaisirs de Versailles, in which Conversation and Music argue as to which of them is indispensable.

Te Deum, H.146 (excerpt)
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Intermèdes: Le Mariage forcé
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Le Reniement de Saint Pierre,H 424
Natalie Clifton-Griffith (soprano), Ostiaria
Grace Davidson, soprano Ancilla
Andrew Tortise (tenor) Petrus
Benjamin Hulett (tenor), Jesus
James Mustard, Eamonn Dougan (bass), Historicus
Nicholas Mulroy, (tenor), Cognatus Malchi
David Miller, Lynda Sayce, theorbo
Richard Campbell, bass viol
Silas Standage, organ
Members of Ex Cathedra Choir and Baroque Ensemble
Jeffrey Skidmore, director

Les Plaisirs de Versailles H 480
Sophie Daneman (soprano), La Musique
Katalin Kàrolyi (mezzo soprano), La Conversation
Steve Dugardin (countertenor), Le Jeu
Jean-François Gardeil (baritone), Comus
François Piolino (tenor), Un Plaisir
Patricia Petibon, soprano
Monique Zanetti, soprano
Fernand Benadi, baritone
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director.

02The House Of Guise20170704

Exploring Marc-Antoine Charpentier's sacred and secular music written for Mlle de Guise.

Donald Macleod explores the treasury of pieces Marc-Antoine Charpentier wrote for his illustrious patron, Mlle de Guise, from theatrical entertainments to the most moving sacred texts.

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

For 18 years, Marc-Antoine Charpentier lived and worked in the Hôtel de Guise, the palatial Parisian residence of Marie de Lorraine, the Duchesse de Guise. Generally known as Mademoiselle de Guise, she was a very well connected aristocrat - a first cousin of Louis XIV. Donald Macleod presents complete performances of the touching Hymn to the Blessed Virgin Mary, probably written for Mlle de Guise's visit to a popular pilgrimage site, Notre-Dame de Liesse, near the northern French city of Laon, contrasts with a splendid motet written for her nephew's funeral and the lively instrumental Sonata in 8 Parts, the first French chamber music to be called a Sonata.

La Couronne de Fleurs (excerpts)
Teresa Watkin (soprano), Flore
Jesse Blumberg (baritone), Pan/Un Berger
Amanda Forsythe (soprano), Roselie
Dorothee Mields (soprano), Amaranthe
Mireille Lebel (mezzo-soprano), Hyacinthe
Jason McStoots (tenor), Forestan
Zachary Wilder (tenor), Mirtil
Douglas Williams (bass-baritone), Sylvandre
Boston Early Music Festival Orchestra
Paul O'Dette and Stephen Stubbs, Music Directors

Motet pour les trépassés, H311
Ensemble Vocal de l'Abbaye aux Dames de Saints
Les Menus Plaisirs
Michel Laplénie, conductor

Sonate a huit, H548
London Baroque:
Stephen Preston, Lisa Beznosiuk, transverse flutes
Ingrid Seifert, Richard Gwilt, violins
William Hunt, bass viol
Nigel North, theorbo
John Toll, harpsichord
Charles Medlam, director

Canticum in honorem beata virginis Mariae
Le Concert des Nations
Jordi Savall, director.

03Moliere And The Theatre Of Comedy20170705

Donald Macleod explores Charpentier's evocative stage music.

Donald Macleod delights over Marc-Antoine Charpentier's brilliantly evocative stage music, written for Molière and his company of actors and his historical oratorio 'Mors Saulis et Jonathae'.

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

Charpentier got his big break in the theatre after a bust-up between the two leading artists of the day: Molière, the master of theatrical comedy, and Jean-Baptiste Lully. For some years Charpentier supplied music for theatrical productions, notably 'Le Malade imaginaire' and 'Circé', which contained an unprecedented number of thrilling special effects. This innate mastery of drama lent itself perfectly to setting the Old Testament story of the Death of Saul and Jonathan. Presented by Donald Macleod.

Le Malade imaginaire (excerpts)
Overture; Premier Intermêde
Howard Crook (tenor), Spacamond
Dominique Visse (countertenor,) La Vielle
Alain Trétout (actor), Polichinelle
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Circé, H 496 (Instrumental music)
London Baroque
Charles Medlam, director

Mors Saulis et Jonathae, H 403, (Part Two)
Peter Kooy, Samuel
Klaus Mertens, Saul
Choir 1: Barbara Schlick, soprano; Kai Wessel, countertenor;
Christoph Prégardien, tenor; Peter Kooy, bass
Choir 2: Nancy Zijlstra, soprano; Dominique Visse, countertenor: Harry van Berne, tenor; Klaus Mertens, bass
Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Ton Koopman, director

La Pierre philosophale
Teresa Wakim (soprano), La Petite Gnomide
Zachary Wilder (tenor,) Un Silphe
Lydia Brotherton (soprano), Le Feu
Olivier Laquerre (bass-baritone), L'Eau
Boston Early Music Festival Vocal and Chamber Ensembles
Paul O'Dette and Stephen Stubbs, Musical Directors.

03Moliere And The Theatre Of Comedy20170705

Donald Macleod explores Charpentier's evocative stage music.

Donald Macleod delights over Marc-Antoine Charpentier's brilliantly evocative stage music, written for Molière and his company of actors and his historical oratorio 'Mors Saulis et Jonathae'.

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

Charpentier got his big break in the theatre after a bust-up between the two leading artists of the day: Molière, the master of theatrical comedy, and Jean-Baptiste Lully. For some years Charpentier supplied music for theatrical productions, notably 'Le Malade imaginaire' and 'Circé', which contained an unprecedented number of thrilling special effects. This innate mastery of drama lent itself perfectly to setting the Old Testament story of the Death of Saul and Jonathan. Presented by Donald Macleod.

Le Malade imaginaire (excerpts)
Overture; Premier Intermêde
Howard Crook (tenor), Spacamond
Dominique Visse (countertenor,) La Vielle
Alain Trétout (actor), Polichinelle
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Circé, H 496 (Instrumental music)
London Baroque
Charles Medlam, director

Mors Saulis et Jonathae, H 403, (Part Two)
Peter Kooy, Samuel
Klaus Mertens, Saul
Choir 1: Barbara Schlick, soprano; Kai Wessel, countertenor;
Christoph Prégardien, tenor; Peter Kooy, bass
Choir 2: Nancy Zijlstra, soprano; Dominique Visse, countertenor: Harry van Berne, tenor; Klaus Mertens, bass
Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Ton Koopman, director

La Pierre philosophale
Teresa Wakim (soprano), La Petite Gnomide
Zachary Wilder (tenor,) Un Silphe
Lydia Brotherton (soprano), Le Feu
Olivier Laquerre (bass-baritone), L'Eau
Boston Early Music Festival Vocal and Chamber Ensembles
Paul O'Dette and Stephen Stubbs, Musical Directors.

04Working For The Jesuits20170706

Donald Macleod focuses on Charpentier's decade working for the Jesuits.

Donald Macleod explores Marc-Antoine Charpentier's decade working for the Jesuits, whose enormous wealth supported the creation of some ambitious large scale dramatic works, a raft of sacred works, among them quite possibly the much loved Te Deum in D major.

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

In 1688 Charpentier accepted the position of music master of the church of the Jesuit College. A generous salary and resources encouraged Charpentier to stay there for the next ten years, producing music for all occasions, pretty much on demand. Donald Macleod presents the poignant centrepiece of Charpentier's ground-breaking new style of music drama, David and Jonathan, and a complete performance of his brilliant Te Deum in the buoyant key of D.

David et Jonathas (excerpts):
Marche triomphante from Act 1; Prelude and scenes from Act 4
Gérard Lesne (countertenor,) David
Monique Zanetti (soprano), Jonathan
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Third Tenebrae Lesson for Good Friday, H 137
Kai Wessel, countertenor
Christoph Prégardien, tenor
Peter Kooy, bass
Dominique Visse, countertenor
Harry van Berne, tenor
Klaus Mertens, bass
The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Ton Koopman, conductor

Te Deum, H.146
Annick Massus, soprano
Magdalena Kožená, mezzo-soprano
Eric Huchet, high tenor
Patrick Henckens, tenor
Russell Smyth, baritone
Jean-Louis Bindi, bass
Choir of Les Musiciens du Louvre
Les Musiciens du Louvre
Marc Minkowski, director.

04Working For The Jesuits20170706

Donald Macleod focuses on Charpentier's decade working for the Jesuits.

Donald Macleod explores Marc-Antoine Charpentier's decade working for the Jesuits, whose enormous wealth supported the creation of some ambitious large scale dramatic works, a raft of sacred works, among them quite possibly the much loved Te Deum in D major.

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

In 1688 Charpentier accepted the position of music master of the church of the Jesuit College. A generous salary and resources encouraged Charpentier to stay there for the next ten years, producing music for all occasions, pretty much on demand. Donald Macleod presents the poignant centrepiece of Charpentier's ground-breaking new style of music drama, David and Jonathan, and a complete performance of his brilliant Te Deum in the buoyant key of D.

David et Jonathas (excerpts):
Marche triomphante from Act 1; Prelude and scenes from Act 4
Gérard Lesne (countertenor,) David
Monique Zanetti (soprano), Jonathan
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Third Tenebrae Lesson for Good Friday, H 137
Kai Wessel, countertenor
Christoph Prégardien, tenor
Peter Kooy, bass
Dominique Visse, countertenor
Harry van Berne, tenor
Klaus Mertens, bass
The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Ton Koopman, conductor

Te Deum, H.146
Annick Massus, soprano
Magdalena Kožená, mezzo-soprano
Eric Huchet, high tenor
Patrick Henckens, tenor
Russell Smyth, baritone
Jean-Louis Bindi, bass
Choir of Les Musiciens du Louvre
Les Musiciens du Louvre
Marc Minkowski, director.

05"passion, Jealousy And Revenge"20170707

Donald Macleod assesses the great breadth of Charpentier's musical activities.

Donald Macleod assesses the astonishing breadth of Charpentier's musical activities with a drinking song, one of his most sumptuous masses and the operatic masterpiece Médée.

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

Donald Macleod explores Charpentier's final decade and attempts to get under the skin of this enigmatic, deeply talented individual. The series concludes with what is surely one of the highlights of Charpentier's career, the operatic jewel in his crown, Médée, which he produced at the age of 50 in 1693.

Ayant bu du vin clairet, H 446
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Kyrie (Messe a 8 voix et 8 violons et flutes, H.3)
Le Concert Spirituel
Hervé Niquet, director

Transfige dulcissime Jesu, H 251
Harmony of Voices, Sweden
Fredrik Malmberg, conductor

Médée, Act 1, sc 2 to 4
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
Mark Padmore (tenor) Jason
François Arcala (bass), Arcas
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Princesse, c'est sur vous que mon espoir se fonde (Médée, Act 2)
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Médée, Act 4 (excerpt)
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
François Piolino (tenor), Jealousy
Jean-Claude Sarragosse (bass), Vengeance
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director.

05Passion, Jealousy And Revenge20170707

Donald Macleod assesses the great breadth of Charpentier's musical activities.

Donald Macleod assesses the astonishing breadth of Charpentier's musical activities with a drinking song, one of his most sumptuous masses and the operatic masterpiece Médée.

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

Donald Macleod explores Charpentier's final decade and attempts to get under the skin of this enigmatic, deeply talented individual. The series concludes with what is surely one of the highlights of Charpentier's career, the operatic jewel in his crown, Médée, which he produced at the age of 50 in 1693.

Ayant bu du vin clairet, H 446
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Kyrie (Messe a 8 voix et 8 violons et flutes, H.3)
Le Concert Spirituel
Hervé Niquet, director

Transfige dulcissime Jesu, H 251
Harmony of Voices, Sweden
Fredrik Malmberg, conductor

Médée, Act 1, sc 2 to 4
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
Mark Padmore (tenor) Jason
François Arcala (bass), Arcas
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Princesse, c'est sur vous que mon espoir se fonde (Médée, Act 2)
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Médée, Act 4 (excerpt)
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
François Piolino (tenor), Jealousy
Jean-Claude Sarragosse (bass), Vengeance
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director.

05Passion, Jealousy And Revenge20170707

Donald Macleod assesses the great breadth of Charpentier's musical activities.

Donald Macleod assesses the astonishing breadth of Charpentier's musical activities with a drinking song, one of his most sumptuous masses and the operatic masterpiece Médée.

It's just a case of bad timing for Marc-Antoine Charpentier that he happened to be born a decade or so after Jean-Baptiste Lully. The manipulative king's favourite held a monopoly at the Sun King's court and in the theatres. Even after his death in 1687, Charpentier had to contend with back-biting from Lully's vociferous supporters. Happily Charpentier also possessed a big reputation and a band of loyal and well-to-do supporters. In a career spanning 35 years, he enjoyed a succession of plum jobs, writing in every kind of genre for some of the most influential patrons and establishments in Paris. Indeed, perhaps Lully's restrictive practices were inadvertently his making, affording Charpentier the kind of artistic freedom to write exactly what he wanted.

Donald Macleod explores Charpentier's final decade and attempts to get under the skin of this enigmatic, deeply talented individual. The series concludes with what is surely one of the highlights of Charpentier's career, the operatic jewel in his crown, Médée, which he produced at the age of 50 in 1693.

Ayant bu du vin clairet, H 446
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Kyrie (Messe a 8 voix et 8 violons et flutes, H.3)
Le Concert Spirituel
Hervé Niquet, director

Transfige dulcissime Jesu, H 251
Harmony of Voices, Sweden
Fredrik Malmberg, conductor

Médée, Act 1, sc 2 to 4
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
Mark Padmore (tenor) Jason
François Arcala (bass), Arcas
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Princesse, c'est sur vous que mon espoir se fonde (Médée, Act 2)
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director

Médée, Act 4 (excerpt)
Lorraine Hunt (soprano), Medea
François Piolino (tenor), Jealousy
Jean-Claude Sarragosse (bass), Vengeance
Les Arts Florissants
William Christie, director.

05 LASTPassion, Jealousy And Revenge20170707