Memphis & Martin Luther King - They Wouldn't Treat Me Like A Man

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01Memphis Desegregates Its Schools & Colleges20180328

An oral history of events leading up to the assassination of Martin Luther King in 1968.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

Clive Myrie introduces a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

Dr King was in Memphis to support a strike by the local sanitation workers, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fall out from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

An oral history of events leading up to the assassination of Martin Luther King in 1968.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

Clive Myrie introduces a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

Dr King was in Memphis to support a strike by the local sanitation workers, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fall out from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor and councilman who was targeted and almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

01Memphis desegregates its schools & colleges20180328

An oral history of events leading up to the assassination of Martin Luther King in 1968.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

Clive Myrie introduces a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

Dr King was in Memphis to support a strike by the local sanitation workers, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fall out from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

02The Sanitation Workers' Strike That Brought Dr King To Memphis20180404

An oral history of events surrounding the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

Clive Myrie introduces a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

This episode looks at the era-defining strike by local sanitation workers campaiging under the slogan "I Am A Man"

Dr King came to Memphis to support that strike, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fallout from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man"

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

This episode looks at the era-defining strike by local sanitation workers.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

A four-part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

This episode looks at the era-defining strike by local sanitation workers who campaigned under the slogan "I Am A Man".

Dr King came to Memphis to support that strike, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fallout from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man"

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor and councilman who was targeted and almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

02The sanitation workers' strike that brought Dr King to Memphis20180404

An oral history of events surrounding the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

Clive Myrie introduces a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

This episode looks at the era-defining strike by local sanitation workers campaiging under the slogan "I Am A Man"

Dr King came to Memphis to support that strike, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fallout from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man"

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

02The sanitation workers' strike that brought Dr King to Memphis20180404

This episode looks at the era-defining strike by local sanitation workers.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

A four-part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

This episode looks at the era-defining strike by local sanitation workers who campaigned under the slogan "I Am A Man".

Dr King came to Memphis to support that strike, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fallout from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man"

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

03The assassination of Dr King20180411

An oral history of events surrounding the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

Clive Myrie introduces a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

This third episode looks at the assassination itself.

Dr King came to Memphis to support a strike by local sanitation workers, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fall out from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants.

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

03The Assassination Of Dr King20180411

This episode looks at the assassination of Dr King itself.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

A four-part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

This episode looks at the assassination itself.

Dr King came to Memphis to support a strike by local sanitation workers, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fall out from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants.

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor and councilman who was targeted and almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

03The assassination of Dr King20180411

This episode looks at the assassination of Dr King itself.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

A four-part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968.

This episode looks at the assassination itself.

Dr King came to Memphis to support a strike by local sanitation workers, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fall out from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants.

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group who were infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records, including Mavis Staples, Steve Cropper, Booker T Jones and CEO Al Bell who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.

04The aftermath of Dr King's assassination, and how it affects Memphis today20180418

A look at the aftermath of Dr King's assassination, and how it affects Memphis today.

The events leading up to, surrounding and following Martin Luther King's assassination.

Clive Myrie introduces a 4 part series presenting a unique look at the events leading up to, surrounding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968. This final episode looks at the aftermath of the killing, and what its reverberations mean for Memphis today.

Dr King came to Memphis to support a strike by local sanitation workers, and for the first time those workers and their families tell their own stories, laying bare in often shocking detail the realities of the Civil Rights struggle in the Southern states of the US.

We'll hear first hand of the daily humiliations of the Jim Crow South, of the hope that Dr King brought and of the fall out from his death, the mistakes and the triumphs and what that era means for Memphis today, with testimony from people like:

The sanitation worker beaten daily by police and too scared to go to hospital to have his wounds healed - why did he strike? "Because they wouldn't treat me like a man".

The teacher arrested on a daily basis for attempting to break the colour bar in Memphis restaurants.

The man who at 6 was the first black child in Memphis to attend a white school, the trauma of which has followed him into adult life, and the grandmother who did the same at Memphis State University and whose family were harassed on a daily basis as a result.

The pastor & councilman who was targeted & almost beaten to death by police on a march to support the sanitation workers.

Members of the Memphis Invaders, the radical Black Power group infiltrated by the FBI for their work with Dr King.

The musicians and staff of Stax records who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to support Civil Rights and who supplied the soundtrack for the struggle.