Episodes

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Inside the World of the Financial Dominatrix2018071120190123 (WS)

What is the first idea that pops in your head about financial domination? Submissive wife looking after the children, cleaning and looking after the household?

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves” into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

With access to both fin dommes and fin subs, this documentary gives voice to the men who love to be ridiculed or to feel used, and the women (for there are female fin subs too) who dominate in real life but really get off on being vulnerable once in a while. Some of these clients are happy as subs. Some have lost everything.

Older, more experienced dominatrices – often specialising in a range of fetish work – reveal what makes a great fin domme, and the younger women just starting out on social media answer accusations that they are simply conning vulnerable people out of money.

Who engages in such a fetish? How does a dominatrix build her online persona in order to be successful? Is it about power, obedience, sacrifice or all of those? And what does the rise of findom tell us about the role of money in gender relations?

Presenter:Ana Fernandez Saiz and Tse Yin Lee.

(Photo: A financial dominatrix and her client Photo: Rafael Estefania)

Exploring the idea that money is power by looking at the fetish of financial domination.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Inside the World of the Financial Dominatrix2018071120190124 (WS)

What is the first idea that pops in your head about financial domination? Submissive wife looking after the children, cleaning and looking after the household?

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves” into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

With access to both fin dommes and fin subs, this documentary gives voice to the men who love to be ridiculed or to feel used, and the women (for there are female fin subs too) who dominate in real life but really get off on being vulnerable once in a while. Some of these clients are happy as subs. Some have lost everything.

Older, more experienced dominatrices – often specialising in a range of fetish work – reveal what makes a great fin domme, and the younger women just starting out on social media answer accusations that they are simply conning vulnerable people out of money.

Who engages in such a fetish? How does a dominatrix build her online persona in order to be successful? Is it about power, obedience, sacrifice or all of those? And what does the rise of findom tell us about the role of money in gender relations?

Presenter:Ana Fernandez Saiz and Tse Yin Lee.

(Photo: A financial dominatrix and her client Photo: Rafael Estefania)

Exploring the idea that money is power by looking at the fetish of financial domination.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Uganda: The Price of Marriage2018062020181226 (WS)

In a quest to show off new-found wealth or social status, and in a race to out-do their neighbours, people are going to extremes to put on the most lavish wedding. Ugandan nuptials are now big business with big dresses, big venues and big bills.

Having reached marrying age British-Ugandan journalist Mugabi Turya travels to Uganda to find what it really costs to get married.

Join him as he meets two young couples who have followed two very different paths to marriage - the traditional marriage and modern white wedding and the financial and cultural challenges that come with each.

Discover how the desire for the perfect day has led to a boom in Uganda’s wedding industry - creating jobs for caterers, photographers, wedding planners and even wedding TV channels.

With many Ugandans falling into financial ruin, all for the sake of bragging rights over the best party, we hear from the Ugandan MP proposing to tackle the issue through new laws.

As part of the BBC World Service's Money & Power season, join Mugabi Turya as he discovers the true cost of love and the real price of marriage in Uganda.

(Photo: Joseph Owori and Cissy Nabwire Kwanjula Photo Credit: BBC)

How weddings in Uganda are costing couples more than they bargained for.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Uganda: The Price of Marriage2018062020181227 (WS)

In a quest to show off new-found wealth or social status, and in a race to out-do their neighbours, people are going to extremes to put on the most lavish wedding. Ugandan nuptials are now big business with big dresses, big venues and big bills.

Having reached marrying age British-Ugandan journalist Mugabi Turya travels to Uganda to find what it really costs to get married.

Join him as he meets two young couples who have followed two very different paths to marriage - the traditional marriage and modern white wedding and the financial and cultural challenges that come with each.

Discover how the desire for the perfect day has led to a boom in Uganda’s wedding industry - creating jobs for caterers, photographers, wedding planners and even wedding TV channels.

With many Ugandans falling into financial ruin, all for the sake of bragging rights over the best party, we hear from the Ugandan MP proposing to tackle the issue through new laws.

As part of the BBC World Service's Money & Power season, join Mugabi Turya as he discovers the true cost of love and the real price of marriage in Uganda.

(Photo: Joseph Owori and Cissy Nabwire Kwanjula Photo Credit: BBC)

How weddings in Uganda are costing couples more than they bargained for.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

What Would You Do With $100?2018061920181219 (WS)

What do our plans for spending $100 reveal about us and the buying power of money?

Lesley Curwen travels to Washington DC where the $100 note is printed. In the city, she meets Maurice Abbey Bey, a former drug user now charity worker who would spend his imaginary $100 on both a necessity and a small luxury, while Margarita Womack, a former scientist turned entrepreneur would use her imaginary $100 to relax, away from her hectic daily life.

We also meet Pelagia Chabata who has recently left her homeland of Zimbabwe to seek work in Washington DC. For her staying connected online is paramount.

The $100 bill is most popular outside of the US and about 90% of all bills are shipped out of the country. A small handful of countries actually use the US dollar as legal tender. One of them is the cash-strapped economy of Zimbabwe.

Travelling to the Harare we meet Edgar, a married hospital doctor who would use any extra monies to help family and patients, while Alice, a maid and working mum of four would use $100 to finish her dream.

Photo: $100 bill Credit: Shutterstock

What do our plans for spending $100 reveal about us and the buying power of money?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

What Would You Do With $100?2018061920181220 (WS)

What do our plans for spending $100 reveal about us and the buying power of money?

Lesley Curwen travels to Washington DC where the $100 note is printed. In the city, she meets Maurice Abbey Bey, a former drug user now charity worker who would spend his imaginary $100 on both a necessity and a small luxury, while Margarita Womack, a former scientist turned entrepreneur would use her imaginary $100 to relax, away from her hectic daily life.

We also meet Pelagia Chabata who has recently left her homeland of Zimbabwe to seek work in Washington DC. For her staying connected online is paramount.

The $100 bill is most popular outside of the US and about 90% of all bills are shipped out of the country. A small handful of countries actually use the US dollar as legal tender. One of them is the cash-strapped economy of Zimbabwe.

Travelling to the Harare we meet Edgar, a married hospital doctor who would use any extra monies to help family and patients, while Alice, a maid and working mum of four would use $100 to finish her dream.

Photo: $100 bill Credit: Shutterstock

What do our plans for spending $100 reveal about us and the buying power of money?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Winning it Big2018070420190102 (WS)

Most people have dreamed of winning the lottery. It’s a dream that has become ever more common around the world as jackpots get bigger and lotteries more numerous. But does money really make us happy, and how much does this depend on where we live and how we spend it? To find out the BBC’s, Mike Thomson meets lottery winners from around the globe.

Mike dines with Arab-Israeli restaurateur, Jawdat Ibrahim, who spends much of his $23 million windfall on trying to bring Palestinians and Israelis closer together, through good food and dialogue. Mike meets American businessman Brad Duke, who is determined to put his mountain of money to work. Brad will not be happy, he insists, until he has trebled his $220 million winnings.

Mike goes nightclubbing with the self-declared ‘Mark Zuckerberg’ of Ghana, a man with a very different plan. The young pop video maker likes to flash his cash and seems determined to spend his way to happiness. And Mike meets Canada’s Rebecca Lapierre, who spurned a big lump sum in favour of $1000 a week for life. The former Miss Quebec has dedicated her winnings to helping the poor. True joy, she tells Mike, lies in giving rather than getting.

So, what can we learn from these lottery winners, and are they any happier than the rest of us? This revealing documentary inspires, appeals and warms the soul.

(Photo: Brad Duke holds up his winners cheque for £220 million)

Lottery jackpot winners around the globe on whether their windfall has made them happier

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Winning it Big2018070420190103 (WS)

Most people have dreamed of winning the lottery. It’s a dream that has become ever more common around the world as jackpots get bigger and lotteries more numerous. But does money really make us happy, and how much does this depend on where we live and how we spend it? To find out the BBC’s, Mike Thomson meets lottery winners from around the globe.

Mike dines with Arab-Israeli restaurateur, Jawdat Ibrahim, who spends much of his $23 million windfall on trying to bring Palestinians and Israelis closer together, through good food and dialogue. Mike meets American businessman Brad Duke, who is determined to put his mountain of money to work. Brad will not be happy, he insists, until he has trebled his $220 million winnings.

Mike goes nightclubbing with the self-declared ‘Mark Zuckerberg’ of Ghana, a man with a very different plan. The young pop video maker likes to flash his cash and seems determined to spend his way to happiness. And Mike meets Canada’s Rebecca Lapierre, who spurned a big lump sum in favour of $1000 a week for life. The former Miss Quebec has dedicated her winnings to helping the poor. True joy, she tells Mike, lies in giving rather than getting.

So, what can we learn from these lottery winners, and are they any happier than the rest of us? This revealing documentary inspires, appeals and warms the soul.

(Photo: Brad Duke holds up his winners cheque for £220 million)

Lottery jackpot winners around the globe on whether their windfall has made them happier

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money