Episodes

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Back From The Brink2018063020180701 (WS)

Stories of entrepreneurs who have tried and failed \u2013 and are trying again

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Meet the entrepreneurs facing the toughest of tests. In three vivid stories from across the globe, we hear from individuals who have created businesses and watched them fail. Now, they are picking themselves up, dusting themselves off, and starting all over again.

Rafael Agostinho Rodrigues, created a massively successful sunglasses brand in his native Brazil, turning over $15 million and employing 45 sales representatives. He watched as cheap Chinese imitations of his high-end products flooded the market and his business went under. Now he is in Miami, Florida, with 14,000 pairs of sunglasses in a warehouse, trying to find an investor so he can start up all over again.

In South Korea, Hyerin Park attempted to kickstart the market for green energy through tidal power. But her ambitious project faced numerous challenges and it went bust. Today she has an innovative new product she is trying to sell – a portable unit which can generate power for campers by dipping it in a stream.

And in Israel, Miriam Lottner set up a web-based animated TV show aimed at getting more young women interested in science and tech. The business failed and now she has created a new educational card game for children. Will she succeed?

We hear about the hopes, the angst and the burning drive which keeps these serial entrepreneurs going even when the going gets tough.

Researcher: Louise Byrne
Producer and Presenter: Georgia Catt

(Photo: Hyerin Park, Korean entrepreneur. Credit: BBC)

As part of the BBC World Service’s Money and Power season, we meet the entrepreneurs facing the toughest of tests. In three vivid stories from across the globe, we hear from individuals who have created businesses and watched them fail. Now, they are picking themselves up, dusting themselves off, and starting all over again.

We meet Rafael Agostinho Rodrigues, who created a massively successful sunglasses brand in his native Brazil, turning over $15 million and employing 45 sales representatives. He watched as cheap Chinese imitations of his high-end products flooded the market and his business went under. Now he’s in Miami, Florida, with 14,000 pairs of sunglasses in a warehouse, trying to find an investor so he can start up all over again.

In South Korea, Hyerin Lee attempted to kickstart the market for green energy through tidal power. But her ambitious project faced numerous challenges and it went bust. Today she has an innovative new product she’s trying to sell – a portable unit which can generate power for campers by dipping it in a stream.

And in Israel, there’s Miriam Lottner, who set up a web-based animated TV show aimed at getting more young women interested in science and tech. The business failed and now she’s created a new educational card game for children. Will she succeed?

Presented by Georgia Catt.

Stories of entrepreneurs who have tried and failed \u2013 and are trying again

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Meet the entrepreneurs facing the toughest of tests. In three vivid stories from across the globe, we hear from individuals who have created businesses and watched them fail. Now, they are picking themselves up, dusting themselves off, and starting all over again.

Rafael Agostinho Rodrigues, created a massively successful sunglasses brand in his native Brazil, turning over $15 million and employing 45 sales representatives. He watched as cheap Chinese imitations of his high-end products flooded the market and his business went under. Now he is in Miami, Florida, with 14,000 pairs of sunglasses in a warehouse, trying to find an investor so he can start up all over again.

In South Korea, Hyerin Park attempted to kickstart the market for green energy through tidal power. But her ambitious project faced numerous challenges and it went bust. Today she has an innovative new product she is trying to sell – a portable unit which can generate power for campers by dipping it in a stream.

And in Israel, Miriam Lottner set up a web-based animated TV show aimed at getting more young women interested in science and tech. The business failed and now she has created a new educational card game for children. Will she succeed?

We hear about the hopes, the angst and the burning drive which keeps these serial entrepreneurs going even when the going gets tough.

Researcher: Louise Byrne
Producer and Presenter: Georgia Catt

(Photo: Hyerin Park, Korean entrepreneur. Credit: BBC)

In Every Dream Home A Heartache2018071420180718 (WS)
20180715 (WS)

Successful Pakistani immigrants living in Oslo return to the Punjab to build their dream home.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Over the last twenty years or so hundreds of mansions have appeared in the Kharian region of the Punjab. Each mansion represents a successful migration to the West – some people from this region migrated to the UK but, perhaps surprisingly, starting back in the early 60s most people from here migrated to Norway.

In Oslo these Punjabi men and their families have mostly lived in small spaces and had low paying jobs. For decades these men they have worked hard and saved hard. For them the dream, as well as the economic statement of success, is to own a mansion back in the Punjab – and now many of them do.

For three or four weeks a year the mansions are holiday homes to the returning migrants and their Norwegian born children – this is often a time when differences and rifts in extended families emerge and a time when young people must assess their futures.

Presented by Asad Ali Chardhry.

Successful Pakistani immigrants living in Oslo return to the Punjab to build their dream home.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Over the last twenty years or so hundreds of mansions have appeared in the Kharian region of the Punjab. Each mansion represents a successful migration to the West – some people from this region migrated to the UK but, perhaps surprisingly, starting back in the early 60s most people from here migrated to Norway.

In Oslo these Punjabi men and their families have mostly lived in small spaces and had low paying jobs. For decades these men they have worked hard and saved hard. For them the dream, as well as the economic statement of success, is to own a mansion back in the Punjab – and now many of them do.

For three or four weeks a year the mansions are holiday homes to the returning migrants and their Norwegian born children – this is often a time when differences and rifts in extended families emerge and a time when young people must assess their futures.

Presented by Asad Ali Chardhry.

Inside The World Of The Financial Dominatrix2018071120180712 (WS)
20180715 (WS)
20190123 (WS)
20190124 (WS)

Exploring the idea that money is power by looking at the fetish of financial domination.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

What is the first idea that pops in your head about financial domination? Submissive wife looking after the children, cleaning and looking after the household?

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves” into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

With access to both fin dommes and fin subs, this documentary gives voice to the men who love to be ridiculed or to feel used, and the women (for there are female fin subs too) who dominate in real life but really get off on being vulnerable once in a while. Some of these clients are happy as subs. Some have lost everything.

Older, more experienced dominatrices – often specialising in a range of fetish work – reveal what makes a great fin domme, and the younger women just starting out on social media answer accusations that they are simply conning vulnerable people out of money.

Who engages in such a fetish? How does a dominatrix build her online persona in order to be successful? Is it about power, obedience, sacrifice or all of those? And what does the rise of findom tell us about the role of money in gender relations?

Presenter:Ana Fernandez Saiz and Tse Yin Lee.

(Photo: A financial dominatrix and her client Photo: Rafael Estefania)

Exploring the idea that money is power by looking at the fetish of financial domination.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

What is the first idea that pops in your head about financial domination? Submissive wife looking after the children, cleaning and looking after the household?

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves ? into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

With access to both fin dommes and fin subs, this documentary gives voice to the men who love to be ridiculed or to feel used, and the women (for there are female fin subs too) who dominate in real life but really get off on being vulnerable once in a while. Some of these clients are happy as subs. Some have lost everything.

Older, more experienced dominatrices – often specialising in a range of fetish work – reveal what makes a great fin domme, and the younger women just starting out on social media answer accusations that they are simply conning vulnerable people out of money.

Who engages in such a fetish? How does a dominatrix build her online persona in order to be successful? Is it about power, obedience, sacrifice or all of those? And what does the rise of findom tell us about the role of money in gender relations?

Presenter:Ana Fernandez Saiz and Tse Yin Lee.

(Photo: A financial dominatrix and her client Photo: Rafael Estefania)

Financial domination: The first idea that pops in your head? Submissive wife, looking after the children, cleaning and looking after the household?

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves” into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

Older, more experienced dominatrixes – often specialising in a range of fetish work – reveal what makes a great fin domme, and the younger women just starting out on social media answer accusations they are simply conning vulnerable people out of money.

Presented by Ana Fernandez Saiz and Tse Yin Lee.

Exploring the idea that money is power by looking at the fetish of financial domination.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

What is the first idea that pops in your head about financial domination? Submissive wife looking after the children, cleaning and looking after the household?

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves” into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

With access to both fin dommes and fin subs, this documentary gives voice to the men who love to be ridiculed or to feel used, and the women (for there are female fin subs too) who dominate in real life but really get off on being vulnerable once in a while. Some of these clients are happy as subs. Some have lost everything.

Older, more experienced dominatrices – often specialising in a range of fetish work – reveal what makes a great fin domme, and the younger women just starting out on social media answer accusations that they are simply conning vulnerable people out of money.

Who engages in such a fetish? How does a dominatrix build her online persona in order to be successful? Is it about power, obedience, sacrifice or all of those? And what does the rise of findom tell us about the role of money in gender relations?

Presenter:Ana Fernandez Saiz and Tse Yin Lee.

(Photo: A financial dominatrix and her client Photo: Rafael Estefania)

What is the first idea that pops in your head about financial domination? Submissive wife looking after the children, cleaning and looking after the household?

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves” into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

With access to both fin dommes and fin subs, this documentary gives voice to the men who love to be ridiculed or to feel used, and the women (for there are female fin subs too) who dominate in real life but really get off on being vulnerable once in a while. Some of these clients are happy as subs. Some have lost everything.

Older, more experienced dominatrices – often specialising in a range of fetish work – reveal what makes a great fin domme, and the younger women just starting out on social media answer accusations that they are simply conning vulnerable people out of money.

Who engages in such a fetish? How does a dominatrix build her online persona in order to be successful? Is it about power, obedience, sacrifice or all of those? And what does the rise of findom tell us about the role of money in gender relations?

Presenter:Ana Fernandez Saiz and Tse Yin Lee.

(Photo: A financial dominatrix and her client Photo: Rafael Estefania)

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves ? into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

Older, more experienced dominatrices – often specialising in a range of fetish work – reveal what makes a great fin domme, and the younger women just starting out on social media answer accusations that they are simply conning vulnerable people out of money.

(Photo: A financial dominatrix and her client Photo: Rafael Estefania)

Think again. Financial domination, or findom, is an increasingly popular sexual fetish revolving around money and power. In this internet-based world, submissives (subs) are known as cash slaves and pay pigs. The financial dominatrices (dommes) humiliate, manipulate, seduce or even blackmail their willing “fiscal slaves” into sending them money or gifts – most have an Amazon wish list connected to their social media profiles. No sex is required.

Money, Tech And Power20180629

We investigate how social media has shaped what we think about and spend our money on.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

In a special live programme from outside the BBC’s headquarters in Central London, we investigate how social media has shaped what we think about and what we spend our money on.

As part of our Money and Power season, presenter Susannah Streeter will host a gathering of influential entrepeneurs who have all been using technology to generate profits and influence in the 21st Century.

Money, Women And Power20180629

How can the media do a better job at reporting stories about women and for women?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

What do young women around the world think about the stories covered in the media and which stories are missing? Lyse Doucet is joined by three of the BBC's new Women Affairs journalists - Divya Arya who is based in Delhi, India; Abigail Ony Nwaohuocha who covers Africa, and Feranak Amidi who looks after the Near East including Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Turkey. Together they discuss how the media in the broadest sense - newspapers, TV, radio and online - could do a better job at reporting stories about women and for women.

Presenter: Lyse Doucet
Producer: Siobhan O'Connell

Photo: Lyse Doucet (fourth from left) with the production team Credit: BBC

Only Not Lonely2018070320180704 (WS)
20181031 (WS)
20181101 (WS)

Is it really so odd to have an only child?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Even today the stereotype continues that only children are selfish, spoiled and lonely – it’s the so-called “only child syndrome”. But around the world one-child families are becoming more common. So why do some parents decide to have only one child? And how much does it have to do with circumstance and economics?

Harriet Noble, an only child herself, travels across Europe and speaks to three families, each with one child.

Despite a tradition of large families, these days Portugal one of the largest percentages of only children in the EU. In Lisbon, Harriet meets football loving mother and daughter Sofia and Diana, both only children, their stories reflects the intricacies of modern life and global economics.

It’s a different case 3,000km away in Sweden which has one of the the lowest percentages of only children in the EU – in part due to generous state support. In Stockholm Harriet meets Therese, her decision to have just one child was greeted with confusion and anger by friends.

Finally, Harriet goes home to the south-west England to speak to her own parents, and for the first time asks how come she is an only child.

Even today the stereotype continues that only children are selfish, spoiled and lonely – it’s the so-called “only child syndrome ? But around the world one-child families are becoming more common. So why do some parents decide to have only one child? And how much does it have to do with circumstance and economics?

Finally, Harriet goes home to the south-west England to speak to her own parents, and for the first time asks how come she is an only child.

Even today the stereotype continues that only children are selfish, spoiled and lonely – it’s the so-called “only child syndrome ? But around the world one-child families are becoming more common. So why do some parents decide to have only one child? And how much does it have to do with circumstance and economics?

Harriet Noble, an only child herself, travels across Europe and speaks to three families, each with one child.

Despite a tradition of large families, these days Portugal one of the largest percentages of only children in the EU. In Lisbon, Harriet meets football loving mother and daughter Sofia and Diana, both only children, their stories reflects the intricacies of modern life and global economics.

It’s a different case 3,000km away in Sweden which has one of the the lowest percentages of only children in the EU – in part due to generous state support. In Stockholm Harriet meets Therese, her decision to have just one child was greeted with confusion and anger by friends.

Finally, Harriet goes home to the south-west England to speak to her own parents, and for the first time asks how come she is an only child.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Finally, Harriet goes home to the south-west England to speak to her own parents, and for the first time asks how come she is an only child.

Even today the stereotype continues that only children are selfish, spoiled and lonely – it’s the so-called “only child syndrome”. But around the world one-child families are becoming more common. So why do some parents decide to have only one child? And how much does it have to do with circumstance and economics?

Finally, Harriet goes home to the south-west England to speak to her own parents, and for the first time asks how come she is an only child.

Putting Your Money Where Your Mouth Is2018062320180624 (WS)

What do our teeth say about us?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Putting Your Money Where Your Mouth Is20180719

How much does the state of our teeth depend on what's in our bank balance?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

The US is the home of the perfect Hollywood smile, but in one of the world’s richest countries tens of millions of people struggle to pay for a dentist. Natalia Guerrero goes on a dental voyage of discovery across America to investigate the relationship between cavities and cash. In the Appalachian Mountains she encounters the 82-year-old British adventurer who sets up temporary dental hospitals to provide free treatment to the dentally poor.

And in Beverly Hills she meets the celebrity dentist who created the world’s most expensive dental jewellery for pop star Katy Perry.

The Bbc She Debate20180629

How can the media do a better job at reporting stories about women and for women?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

What do young women around the world think about the stories covered in the media and which stories are missing? Lyse Doucet is joined by three of the BBC's new Women Affairs journalists - Divya Arya who is based in Delhi, India; Abigail Ony Nwaohuocha who covers Africa, and Feranak Amidi who looks after the Near East including Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Turkey. Together they discuss how the media in the broadest sense - newspapers, TV, radio and online - could do a better job at reporting stories about women and for women.

Presenter: Lyse Doucet
Producer: Siobhan O'Connell

The Private Cities Of Honduras2018071820180719 (WS)

Will the plan to privatise entire cities in Honduras work?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

As part of the BBC World Service's Money and Power season, Luis Fajardo examines a controversial plan to create privatised cities in the impoverished Central American country of Honduras.

Nearly a decade ago a US star economist, Paul Romer, proposed “charter cities” as a model for developing countries to escape poverty and violence: new cities with Western-style institutions and laws, to be built and managed by foreigners in semi-autonomous enclaves carved out of the country. These new cities would hopefully attract investment from abroad and offer stability and prosperity to locals.

Many condemned the initiative as thinly-veiled colonialism. But the current leaders of Honduras, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere and one of the most violent in the world, were receptive to Romer’s idea, feeling they had little to lose. They have begun laying down the legal groundwork for the plan. President Juan Orlando Hernandez won re-election in 2017 in a vote where the privatised cities plan was one of the central controversies.

But activists warn that the privatised enclaves will only worsen social inequality and undermine sovereignty in an already weak and deeply divided country.

How much sovereignty should poor countries like Honduras relinquish to chase foreign investment? Can cities, by definition the wellspring of civic spirit, flourish if their public institutions are privatised? Should someone own an entire city? And would you like to live in it?

Photo: Amapala Church with Isla del Tigre Volcano background Valle Honduras Credit: Getty Images

Uganda: The Price Of Marriage2018062020181226 (WS)
20181227 (WS)
20180621 (WS)

In a quest to show off new-found wealth or social status, and in a race to out-do their neighbours, people are going to extremes to put on the most lavish wedding. Ugandan nuptials are now big business with big dresses, big venues and big bills.

Having reached marrying age British-Ugandan journalist Mugabi Turya travels to Uganda to find what it really costs to get married.

Join him as he meets two young couples who have followed two very different paths to marriage - the traditional marriage and modern white wedding and the financial and cultural challenges that come with each.

Discover how the desire for the perfect day has led to a boom in Uganda’s wedding industry - creating jobs for caterers, photographers, wedding planners and even wedding TV channels.

With many Ugandans falling into financial ruin, all for the sake of bragging rights over the best party, we hear from the Ugandan MP proposing to tackle the issue through new laws.

As part of the BBC World Service's Money & Power season, join Mugabi Turya as he discovers the true cost of love and the real price of marriage in Uganda.

(Photo: Joseph Owori and Cissy Nabwire Kwanjula Photo Credit: BBC)

How weddings in Uganda are costing couples more than they bargained for.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

How weddings in Uganda are costing couples more than they bargained for.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

In a quest to show off new-found wealth or social status, and in a race to out-do their neighbours, people are going to extremes to put on the most lavish wedding. Ugandan nuptials are now big business with big dresses, big venues and big bills.

Having reached marrying age British-Ugandan journalist Mugabi Turya travels to Uganda to find what it really costs to get married.

Join him as he meets two young couples who have followed two very different paths to marriage - the traditional marriage and modern white wedding and the financial and cultural challenges that come with each.

Discover how the desire for the perfect day has led to a boom in Uganda’s wedding industry - creating jobs for caterers, photographers, wedding planners and even wedding TV channels.

With many Ugandans falling into financial ruin, all for the sake of bragging rights over the best party, we find out how Uganda’s parliament are trying to tackle the issue through new laws.

As part of the BBC World Service's Money & Power season, join Mugabi Turya as he discovers the true cost of love and the real price of marriage in Uganda.

(Photo: A Ugandan couple on the day of their wedding Photo Credit: Ssentongo Moses)

As part of the Money & Power season, we look at the expensive luxury wedding trend in Uganda \u2013 and the alternative.

In Uganda, when it comes to weddings, there are really only two options: go big, or go home... literally. If you're hoping to make your vows steeped in tradition, couples return home to their family and tribe. But, if you're following the latest craze, you'll certainly be going big: big dresses, big venues and big bills. With many Ugandans falling into financial ruin, all for the sake of bragging rights over the best party, the government may soon pass the 'The Anti-Luxury Wedding Bill' capping expenses on a couple's most special day.

As part of the BBC World Service's Money & Power season, Mugabi Turya follows two couples on two very different journeys: one in the heart of Kampala and one in the rural Mbale as we discover the true cost of love.

With many Ugandans falling into financial ruin, all for the sake of bragging rights over the best party, we hear from the Ugandan MP proposing to tackle the issue through new laws.

(Photo: Joseph Owori and Cissy Nabwire Kwanjula Photo Credit: BBC)

How weddings in Uganda are costing couples more than they bargained for.

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

In a quest to show off new-found wealth or social status, and in a race to out-do their neighbours, people are going to extremes to put on the most lavish wedding. Ugandan nuptials are now big business with big dresses, big venues and big bills.

Having reached marrying age British-Ugandan journalist Mugabi Turya travels to Uganda to find what it really costs to get married.

Join him as he meets two young couples who have followed two very different paths to marriage - the traditional marriage and modern white wedding and the financial and cultural challenges that come with each.

Discover how the desire for the perfect day has led to a boom in Uganda’s wedding industry - creating jobs for caterers, photographers, wedding planners and even wedding TV channels.

With many Ugandans falling into financial ruin, all for the sake of bragging rights over the best party, we find out how Uganda’s parliament are trying to tackle the issue through new laws.

As part of the BBC World Service's Money and Power season, join Mugabi Turya as he discovers the true cost of love and the real price of marriage in Uganda.

(Photo: A Ugandan couple on the day of their wedding Photo Credit: Ssentongo Moses)

As part of the Money and Power season, we look at the expensive luxury wedding trend in Uganda \u2013 and the alternative.

In Uganda, when it comes to weddings, there are really only two options: go big, or go home... literally. If you're hoping to make your vows steeped in tradition, couples return home to their family and tribe. But, if you're following the latest craze, you'll certainly be going big: big dresses, big venues and big bills. With many Ugandans falling into financial ruin, all for the sake of bragging rights over the best party, the government may soon pass the 'The Anti-Luxury Wedding Bill' capping expenses on a couple's most special day.

As part of the BBC World Service's Money and Power season, Mugabi Turya follows two couples on two very different journeys: one in the heart of Kampala and one in the rural Mbale as we discover the true cost of love.

What Would You Do With $100?2018061920180620 (WS)
20181219 (WS)
20181220 (WS)

What do our plans for spending $100 reveal about us and the buying power of money?

Lesley Curwen travels to Washington DC where the $100 note is printed. In the city, she meets Maurice Abbey Bey, a former drug user now charity worker who would spend his imaginary $100 on both a necessity and a small luxury, while Margarita Womack, a former scientist turned entrepreneur would use her imaginary $100 to relax, away from her hectic daily life.

We also meet Pelagia Chabata who has recently left her homeland of Zimbabwe to seek work in Washington DC. For her staying connected online is paramount.

The $100 bill is most popular outside of the US and about 90% of all bills are shipped out of the country. A small handful of countries actually use the US dollar as legal tender. One of them is the cash-strapped economy of Zimbabwe.

Travelling to the Harare we meet Edgar, a married hospital doctor who would use any extra monies to help family and patients, while Alice, a maid and working mum of four would use $100 to finish her dream.

Photo: $100 bill Credit: Shutterstock

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Travelling to the Harare we meet Edgar, a married hospital doctor who would use any extra monies to help family & patients, while Alice, a maid & working mum of four would use $100 to finish her dream.

Photo: Alice, a maid from Harare, Zimbabwe Credit: BBC

Photo: Alice, a maid from Harare, Zimbabwe Credit: BBC

Lesley Curwen travels to Washington DC where the $100 note is printed. In the city, she meets Maurice Abbey Bey, a former drug user now charity worker who would spend his imaginary $100 on both a necessity and a small luxury, while Margarita Womack, a former scientist turned entrepreneur would use her imaginary $100 to relax, away from her hectic daily life.

What would you do with a $100 bill? What does it reveal about us and the buying power of money?

What's Mine Is Yours?2018061620180617 (WS)
20180620 (WS)

What does the way you handle your finances say about your relationship?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Emily Thomas goes behind closed doors, and delves into the finances of couples around the globe to see how money influences power in personal relationships.

Across the globe the number of women participating in the labour market is rising, but how is this changing power dynamics between couples?

Can pooling resources lead to greater relationship satisfaction, and does this vary depending on the culture you live in? And can a relationship ever be truly equal if those in it have different amounts of money to spend?

This documentary gets up close to one of the main causes of conflict within relationships across the globe – disparity of income.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)

What does the way you handle your finances say about your relationship?

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Emily Thomas goes behind closed doors, and delves into the finances of couples around the globe to see how money influences power in personal relationships.

Across the globe the number of women participating in the labour market is rising, but how is this changing power dynamics between couples?

Can pooling resources lead to greater relationship satisfaction, and does this vary depending on the culture you live in? And can a relationship ever be truly equal if those in it have different amounts of money to spend?

This documentary gets up close to one of the main causes of conflict within relationships across the globe – disparity of income.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)

Can couples' relationships be equal when there is a significant difference in earnings?

Emily Thomas goes behind closed doors, and delves into the finances of couples around the globe to see what part money plays in personal relationships.

Does holding the purse strings determine who holds the power? Can pooling resources lead to greater relationship satisfaction, and if so, does this vary depending on the culture you live in? And can a relationship ever be truly equal if those in it earn significantly different amounts of money.

Photo: Henry and Yinka Adigun from Abuja, Nigeria Credit: Henry Adigun

Winning It Big2018070420180705 (WS)

Lottery jackpot winners around the globe on whether their windfall has made them happier

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Most people have dreamed of winning the lottery. It’s a dream that has become ever more common around the world as jackpots get bigger and lotteries more numerous. But does money really make us happy, and how much does this depend on where we live and how we spend it? To find out the BBC’s, Mike Thomson meets lottery winners from around the globe.

Mike dines with Arab-Israeli restaurateur, Jawdat Ibrahim, who spends much of his $23 million windfall on trying to bring Palestinians and Israelis closer together, through good food and dialogue. Mike meets American businessman Brad Duke, who is determined to put his mountain of money to work. Brad will not be happy, he insists, until he has trebled his $220 million winnings.

Mike goes nightclubbing with the self-declared ‘Mark Zuckerberg’ of Ghana, a man with a very different plan. The young pop video maker likes to flash his cash and seems determined to spend his way to happiness. And Mike meets Canada’s Rebecca Lapierre, who spurned a big lump sum in favour of $1000 a week for life. The former Miss Quebec has dedicated her winnings to helping the poor. True joy, she tells Mike, lies in giving rather than getting.

So, what can we learn from these lottery winners, and are they any happier than the rest of us? This revealing documentary inspires, appeals and warms the soul.

(Photo: Brad Duke holds up his winners cheque for £220 million)

Lottery jackpot winners around the globe on whether their windfall has made them happier

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money

Most people have dreamed of winning the lottery. It’s a dream that has become ever more common around the world as jackpots get bigger and lotteries more numerous. But does money really make us happy, and how much does this depend on where we live and how we spend it? To find out the BBC’s, Mike Thomson meets lottery winners from around the globe.

Mike dines with Arab-Israeli restaurateur, Jawdat Ibrahim, who spends much of his $23 million windfall on trying to bring Palestinians and Israelis closer together, through good food and dialogue. Mike meets American businessman Brad Duke, who is determined to put his mountain of money to work. Brad will not be happy, he insists, until he has trebled his $220 million winnings.

Mike goes nightclubbing with the self-declared ‘Mark Zuckerberg’ of Ghana, a man with a very different plan. The young pop video maker likes to flash his cash and seems determined to spend his way to happiness. And Mike meets Canada’s Rebecca Lapierre, who spurned a big lump sum in favour of $1000 a week for life. The former Miss Quebec has dedicated her winnings to helping the poor. True joy, she tells Mike, lies in giving rather than getting.

So, what can we learn from these lottery winners, and are they any happier than the rest of us? This revealing documentary inspires, appeals and warms the soul.

(Photo: Brad Duke holds up his winners cheque for £220 million)

Winning It Big2018070420190102 (WS)
20190103 (WS)

Most people have dreamed of winning the lottery. It’s a dream that has become ever more common around the world as jackpots get bigger and lotteries more numerous. But does money really make us happy, and how much does this depend on where we live and how we spend it? To find out the BBC’s, Mike Thomson meets lottery winners from around the globe.

Mike dines with Arab-Israeli restaurateur, Jawdat Ibrahim, who spends much of his $23 million windfall on trying to bring Palestinians and Israelis closer together, through good food and dialogue. Mike meets American businessman Brad Duke, who is determined to put his mountain of money to work. Brad will not be happy, he insists, until he has trebled his $220 million winnings.

Mike goes nightclubbing with the self-declared ‘Mark Zuckerberg’ of Ghana, a man with a very different plan. The young pop video maker likes to flash his cash and seems determined to spend his way to happiness. And Mike meets Canada’s Rebecca Lapierre, who spurned a big lump sum in favour of $1000 a week for life. The former Miss Quebec has dedicated her winnings to helping the poor. True joy, she tells Mike, lies in giving rather than getting.

So, what can we learn from these lottery winners, and are they any happier than the rest of us? This revealing documentary inspires, appeals and warms the soul.

(Photo: Brad Duke holds up his winners cheque for £220 million)

Lottery jackpot winners around the globe on whether their windfall has made them happier

A season of programmes that uncovers our relationship with money