Episodes

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20141017 (BBC7)Emrys Evans recalls the 1939 evacuation of the National Gallery's entire art collection. Faced with the threat of German bombs, the pictures were moved to Wales. From March 2003.
20141017 (BBC7)Emrys Evans recalls the 1939 evacuation of the National Gallery's entire art collection.
20141017 (BBC7)
20141018 (BBC7)
Emrys Evans recalls the 1939 evacuation of the National Gallery's entire art collection.
20170523 (BBC7)Emrys Evans recalls the 1939 evacuation of the National Gallery's entire art collection.
19990709What kind of headache do you get when you send one hundred priceless paintings off on a world tour? Max Cotton reveals the story of Dulwich Picture Gallery, Britain's oldest public art gallery, which closed down last Christmas for a nine million pound facelift. Rather than allow its collection to gather dust, the pictures were sent abroad to earn their living.
20030331In 1939, to keep the nation's pictures safe from German bombs, The National Gallery evacuated the entire collection from it's home in Travalgar Square to a number of large houses in Wales, and then to the Manod Slate Quarry near Blaenau Ffestiniog. Emrys Evans recalls seeing the strange shaped lorries lumbering up the valley to their secret destination, and current gallery staff ponder on how they would react to the threat of war today.

In 1939, to keep the nation's pictures safe from German bombs, The National Gallery evacuated the entire collection from it's home in Travalgar Square to a number of large houses in Wales, and then to the MaMusic Matters

A Sunday On La Grande Jatte By Georges Seurat2019030520190309 (R4)Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link (below) to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts and Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

The new series starts with a closer look at a pointillist masterpiece - George Seurat's A Sunday on La Grande Jatte (The Art Institute of Chicago). Painted in the 1880s, it depicts a group of day-tripping Parisians enjoying the sunshine by the river Seine. Each is a character in search of a story - the boater smoking his pipe, the shop-girl with her novels, the elderly invalid, shivering despite the sun, and the soldiers, standing to attention.

Cathy takes a wander in the park and hears how Seurat created his shimmering, glimmering, light-filled work.

Interviewees: Gloria Groom, Leah Kharibian, Colin Jones, Colin Wiggins.

Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Georges-Pierre Seurat. A Sunday on La Grande Jatte (1884–86). The Art Institute of Chicago.

Take a walk in Georges Seurat's shimmering, glimmering Parisian park.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link (below) to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Georges-Pierre Seurat. A Sunday on La Grande Jatte (1884–86). The Art Institute of Chicago.

Bacchus And Ariadne By Titian20201116Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

This episode takes us to a Greek island at sunrise, where Ariadne has been abandoned on the shore. But then the god, Bacchus, appears and everything changes.
Titian captures their exchange of glances in his extraordinary painting, now viewed as one of the greatest depictions of love at first sight in art-history. Take a closer look at this intensely sensual and intimate masterpiece, with its invitation to us, as viewers, to join the bacchanal.

To see the high-resolution image, visit www.bbc.co.uk/movingpictures and follow the link to explore Bacchus and Ariadne.

Interviewees: Matthias Wivel, Carol Plazzotta, Leah Kharibian, Anne-Marie Eze.

Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

Art history consultant: Leah Kharibian
Exec producer: Sarah Cuddon
Engineer: Mike Woolley

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

NG35: Titian, Bacchus and Ariadne, 1520-3, (c) The National Gallery, London.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

Kimono2019031920190323 (R4)Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes - or in this case, the pull and pucker of every stitch.

In the last programme of the series, we pay a visit to Japan's floating world. The collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum contains a very unusual uchikake, or outer kimono, which features embroidered scenes from a kabuki play. The design includes stunning golden shishi (mythical lions), vibrant peonies and characterful figures with glass eyes and actual hair, taken from an animal.

But the robe is something of a mystery. Was it made for an actor? Or a courtesan, perhaps? Either way, it belongs to the floating world - a fantasy land of ritualised pleasure and entertainment which had a much darker, seedier side.

Interviewees: Anna Jackson, Andrew Gerstle, Paul Griffith and Lesley Downer.

Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Kimono (c) The Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

Did a Japanese courtesan wear this robe? Cathy FitzGerald visits the floating world.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link (below) to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes - or in this case, the pull and pucker of every stitch.

Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes - or in this case, the pull and pucker of every stitch.

Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Kimono (c) The Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

The Adoration Of The Kings By Jan Gossaert2019031220190316 (R4)Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link (below) to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts and Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

Episode two takes us to the ruins of a building on a cold, clear winter's day. That's the setting for Jan Gossaert's Flemish masterpiece The Adoration of the Kings from the collection of The National Gallery, London. The picture shows the three kings giving their gifts - Caspar kneels on the ground, Melchior stands behind him with his retinue and Balthazar is on the left. Above, the sky is full of angels, with fluttering, sunset-coloured wings and, in the far, far background, there are joyful shepherds and their sheep.

Get up close to this jewel-bright masterpiece and see how Gossaert recreates the king's sumptuous costumes and crowns in oil paint. Discover the mysterious character, so cleverly concealed by the artist, he was over-looked for years - the hidden angel.

Interviewees: Susan Foister, Paula Nuttall, Lorne Campbell and Lesley Primo.

Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Jan Gossaert, The Adoration of the Kings (c) The National Gallery, London. Bought with a special grant and contributions from the Art Fund, Lord Glenconner, Lord Iveagh and Alfred de Rothschild, 1911

Can you find the hidden angel in Gossaert's masterpiece? With Cathy FitzGerald.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link (below) to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

Interviewees: Susan Foister, Paula Nuttall, Lorne Campbell and Leslie Primo.

Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Jan Gossaert, The Adoration of the Kings (c) The National Gallery, London. Bought with a special grant and contributions from the Art Fund, Lord Glenconner, Lord Iveagh and Alfred de Rothschild, 1911

The Detroit Industry Murals By Diego Rivera20201123Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image made by Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

This episode takes a closer look at the 'Detroit Industry Murals' by the Mexican artist, Diego Rivera. The masterpiece covers four walls in the Detroit Institute of Arts and gives viewers a glimpse into Ford's massive industrial complex in Detroit, known as The Rouge. How did Rivera - communist activist - come to create an artwork for the Fords - one of the wealthiest families in the world?

To see the high-resolution image, visit www.bbc.co.uk/movingpictures and follow the link to explore Detroit Industry.

Interviewees: Benjamin Colman, Tyler Taylor, Mark Castro, Barbara Haskell

Producer and presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

Art consultant: Leah Kharibian
Exec producer: Sarah Cuddon
Mix engineer: Mike Woolley
With thanks to Renato González

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Diego M. Rivera, Detroit Industry Murals North Wall (detail), 1932-1933, frescoes. Detroit Institute of Arts, Gift of Edsel B. Ford, 33.10.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

The Sherborne Missal20201130Each thirty-minute episode of Moving Pictures is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to a high-resolution image on Google Arts & Culture. Zoom in and you can see the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

This episode takes a closer look at one of the treasures of the British Library collection, the Sherborne Missal.

Made in the early 1400s, it's a titan of a manuscript, weighing as much as the average five-year-old child and containing more paintings than many art galleries, including numerous tiny portraits of the patrons who commissioned it and the monks who laboured over its decoration.

The episode focuses on the Easter Sunday page, resplendent with intensely coloured images drawn from both the bible and the natural world - and sheltering hairy, combative wodewose in its margins.

To see the high-resolution image, visit www.bbc.co.uk/movingpictures and follow the link to explore the Sherborne Missal.

Interviewees: Kathleen Doyle, Eleanor Jackson, Alixe Bovey, Paul Binski, Patricia Lovett

Producer and presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

Art consultant: Leah Kharibian
Executive producer: Sarah Cuddon
Mix engineer: Mike Woolley

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

Picture credit: a decorated initial ‘R’ containing a scene of the Resurrection of Christ, with a pheasant and the appearance of Christ to Mary Magdalene in the border. Detail from the page for Easter Sunday in the Sherborne Missal, British Library, Add. MS 74236, p. 216 © The British Library Board.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

01A Flower Painting By Rachel Ruysch2016100320170115 (R4)What is hiding in the undergrowth of Rachel Ruysch's brilliant, beautiful flower painting?

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

A three-part series for BBC Radio 4 offering the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in incredible detail.

What's hiding in the undergrowth of Rachel Ruysch's bold and beautiful flower painting? Follow the link to explore the picture and you'll be able to zoom in and see the tiniest details as you listen. This is a world where buds hiss like snakes, poppies twirl and tiny insects devour - a vibrant, fecund jungle, full of uncanny life.

Cathy FitzGerald hears how this great Dutch artist was influenced by her unusual childhood as the daughter of Frederik Ruysch, maker of one of the world's great curiosity cabinets. Frederik Ruysch's weird tableaux - created from human skeletons and embalmed bodies, insects and plants - were hugely popular in 17th century Amsterdam and his young daughter Rachel was almost certainly involved in their creation. Is this what brings a touch of strangeness to her brilliantly observed vases and bouquets?

Cathy talks to art-experts, garden historians and artists and asks why this brilliant painter - one of the most sought-after of her age - is so little known today.

Image: Roses, Convolvulus, Poppies, and Other Flowers in an urn on a Stone Ledge by Rachel Ruysch, c.1680s, from the collection of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Photograph by Google Arts and Culture.

Presenter and Producer: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

A three-part series for BBC Radio 4 offering the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in incredible detail.

What's hiding in the undergrowth of Rachel Ruysch's bold and beautiful flower painting? Follow the link to explore the picture and you'll be able to zoom in and see the tiniest details as you listen. This is a world where buds hiss like snakes, poppies twirl and tiny insects devour - a vibrant, fecund jungle, full of uncanny life.

Cathy FitzGerald hears how this great Dutch artist was influenced by her unusual childhood as the daughter of Frederik Ruysch, maker of one of the world's great curiosity cabinets. Frederik Ruysch's weird tableaux - created from human skeletons and embalmed bodies, insects and plants - were hugely popular in 17th century Amsterdam and his young daughter Rachel was almost certainly involved in their creation. Is this what brings a touch of strangeness to her brilliantly observed vases and bouquets?

Image: Roses, Convolvulus, Poppies, and Other Flowers in an urn on a Stone Ledge by Rachel Ruysch, c.1680s, from the collection of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Photograph by Google Arts and Culture.

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

01Scenes In And Around Kyoto2016101020170122 (R4)Cathy FitzGerald takes a walk around 17th-century Kyoto.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

A three-part series for BBC Radio 4 offering listeners the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed at high-resolution.

What would it be like to walk the streets of 17th century Kyoto? In this week's episode, Cathy FitzGerald explores a sumptuous pair of Japanese screens that depict the historic city in incredible detail. Follow the link to zoom in and examine the artwork as you listen.

Temples, shrines, castles, shops and homes - the image is crammed with tiny scenes. A man in a barber's shop examines his new hair cut in a mirror. People peer down into the street to watch a parade pass. Weary pilgrims sit on a verandah, sharing fruit. Men and women of every age and every social class appear, more than 1,800 in all.

Cathy FitzGerald hears how these glittering screens - a genre known as 'rakuchû rakugai-zu' or 'scenes in and around Kyoto' - were made and what they tell us about everyday life in the 17th century Japanese city.

Presenter and Producer: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Image: Sights in and around Kyoto, Artist Unknown, Mid Genna era (1615-24). From the collection of the Shimane Museum, courtesy of the Bureau of Public Enterprise, Shimane Prefectural Government. Photograph by Google Arts and Culture.

What would it be like to walk the streets of 17th century Kyoto? In this week's episode, Cathy FitzGerald explores a sumptuous pair of Japanese screens that depict the historic city in incredible detail. Follow the link to zoom in and examine the artwork as you listen.

Cathy FitzGerald hears how these glittering screens - a genre known as 'rakuchû rakugai-zu' or 'scenes in and around Kyoto' - were made and what they tell us about everyday life in the 17th century Japanese city.

Image: Sights in and around Kyoto, Artist Unknown, Mid Genna era (1615-24). From the collection of the Shimane Museum, courtesy of the Bureau of Public Enterprise, Shimane Prefectural Government. Photograph by Google Arts and Culture.

01The Harvesters By Pieter Bruegel The Elder2016092620170108 (R4)Scything, scrumping and swimming - experience harvest time with Bruegel.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

A three-part series offering the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in incredible detail.

In this first episode, immerse yourself in Pieter Bruegel the Elder's masterpiece The Harvesters, in the company of Cathy FitzGerald and experts from the artist's Flemish homeland. Follow the link to explore a high-resolution image of the painting and you'll be able to zoom in to see the tiniest details as you listen - even examine Bruegel's brushstrokes.

It's a hot, dry day in 16th century Flanders. Labourers grab a break from bringing in the harvest, they eat lunch and snooze under a tree. Behind them, the peaceful countryside is full of life. Scrumpers steal from an orchard, villagers enjoy harvest games on the green, monks escape the heat with a wild-swim.

Cathy FitzGerald takes a walk through the landscape and then hears how the masterpiece may have brightened up a wealthy Antwerp merchant's dinner parties.

Image: The Harvesters by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1565, from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photographed by Google Arts and Culture.

Presenter and producer: Cathy FitzGerald

Original music: Joe Acheson and Tomas Dvorak

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

A three-part series offering the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in incredible detail.

In this first episode, immerse yourself in Pieter Bruegel the Elder's masterpiece The Harvesters, in the company of Cathy FitzGerald and experts from the artist's Flemish homeland. Follow the link to explore a high-resolution image of the painting and you'll be able to zoom in to see the tiniest details as you listen - even examine Bruegel's brushstrokes.

It's a hot, dry day in 16th century Flanders. Labourers grab a break from bringing in the harvest, they eat lunch and snooze under a tree. Behind them, the peaceful countryside is full of life. Scrumpers steal from an orchard, villagers enjoy harvest games on the green, monks escape the heat with a wild-swim.

Cathy FitzGerald takes a walk through the landscape and then hears how the masterpiece may have brightened up a wealthy Antwerp merchant's dinner parties.

Image: The Harvesters by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1565, from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photographed by Google Arts and Culture.

Original music: Joe Acheson and Tomas Dvorak

It's a hot, dry day in 16th century Flanders. Labourers grab a break from bringing in the harvest, they eat lunch and snooze under a tree. Behind them, Music Matters

02Hanging By Ann West2018011620180120 (R4)Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

The average length of time spent looking at a painting in a gallery is 28 seconds. On Moving Pictures, we like to take a little longer. Each thirty-minute episode is devoted to a single artwork - and you're invited to look as well as listen, by following a link to an extraordinary high-resolution image made by Google Arts and Culture. Zoom in and you can see more than the artist - the pores of the canvas, the sweep of individual brushstrokes, the shimmer of pointillist dots.

In the first programme of this series, stroll along the high-street of a market town in Regency England - as imagined in a one-of-a-kind patchwork hanging, held in the collection of the V&A Museum. This needlework masterpiece features tiny applique scenes of everyday life - children flying kites, chimney sweeps heading home from work, a fishwife off to market. Cathy asks if one of the little characters might be the maker herself.

Interviewees: Jenny Lister, Kerry Taylor, Deb McGuire, Linda Seward, Tracy Chevalier
Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Ann West, Coverlet (c) Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Acquired with the support of the Friends of the V&A.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

Ann West, Coverlet (c) Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Acquired with the support of the Friends of the V&A.

02Men Of The Docks By George Bellows2018012320180127 (R4)Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

Episode two takes us to the Brooklyn docks in New York on an icy day in 1912. That's the setting for George Bellows' Men of the Docks, an extraordinary masterpiece from the collection of The National Gallery, London. The picture shows longshoremen waiting for work in the steely shadow of a cargo ship. Get up close and see how Bellows creates his cold and misty world - working quickly and fearlessly and using brushes, knives, and even his fingers, to manipulate the paint.

Cathy FitzGerald hears why the artist wanted his masterpiece on display to greet the arrival in New York of the greatest ship in the world - The Titanic.

Interviewees: Chris Riopelle, Melissa Wolfe, Rob Snyder, James Heard
Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

George Bellows, Men of the Docks (c) The National Gallery, London. Bought with a grant from the American Friends of the National Gallery, made possible by Sir Paul Getty's fund, and by a donation from Mark Getty KBE, 2014.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

George Bellows, Men of the Docks (c) The National Gallery, London. Bought with a grant from the American Friends of the National Gallery, made possible by Sir Paul Getty's fund, and by a donation from Mark Getty KBE, 2014.

02The Temptation Of Saint Anthony By Joos Van Craesbeeck20180130Cathy FitzGerald invites you to discover new details in old masterpieces, using your phone, tablet or computer.

This third programme of the series explores the dark, demonic landscape of a 17th century Flemish masterpiece - The Temptation of Saint Anthony by Joos van Craesbeeck (Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe).

A giant screaming head dominates the painting. From its mouth pour tiny devils and the forehead has been peeled back to reveal a miniature artist working inside the brain.

Cathy FitzGerald takes a closer look at Craesbeeck's strange critters in the context of the early modern fascination with curiosity cabinets, monsters - and the devil.

Interviewees: Joseph Koerner, Lelia Packer, Stuart Clark, Wes Williams, Holger Jacob-Friesen
Producer and Presenter: Cathy FitzGerald

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Joos van Craesbeeck, The Temptation of Saint Anthony (c) Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe.

A long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in extraordinary detail.

Joos van Craesbeeck, The Temptation of Saint Anthony (c) Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe.