Musical Migrants [world Service]

Episodes

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20080903

1/2. Stories of people who have relocated to other lands, influenced by music. In Chicago, Yoko Noge from Japan sings the blues.

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2/2. Stories of people who have relocated to other lands, influenced by music. In Chicago, Yoko Noge from Japan sings the blues.

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2/2.

Stories of people who have relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

In Chicago, Yoko Noge from Japan sings the blues.

Nashville - The Documentary20111024

Jesse Lee Jones explains how his love of country music took him from Brazil to Nashville.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The man now known as Jesse Lee Jones went by a different name when he was living in Brazil.

His decision to change his name was an expression of his desire to reinvent himself following his move to the USA.

Throughout a difficult upbringing, Jesse Lee always found solace in American music and dreamed of being there, but as a young man, he "was going nowhere fast".

Then, out of the blue, the members of his church - in an effort to help him - clubbed together and bought him a plane ticket.

Shortly afterwards, Jesse Lee arrived in Miami, Florida with a 12 string guitar but no English and no plan.

On his first day, while travelling on a Greyhound Bus, he was robbed of the few possessions he had - including his money and that guitar.

He got off the bus in Peoria, Illinois.

Out of pity, some people from a local church took him in.

They became his "American family" and Peoria was his home for the next decade.

Jesse Lee took a series of jobs (including training as a law enforcement officer) but he kept up with the music on the side - playing all kinds of American music in local bars.

Then a friend gave him a CD by the country and western legend Marty Robbins.

After that, Jesse Lee realised that his true passion was traditional country music.

He headed to Nashville and got a job scrubbing the decks of the General Jackson Showboat for $3.25 an hour.

However, within a few years, a series of serendipitous encounters led to his becoming first leader of the house band, then owner, of the "best honkytonk in Nashville" right in the heart of Lower Broadway.

(Photo: A cowboy with a lasso in silhouette. Credit: AP)

Nashville - The Documentary20111025

Jesse Lee Jones explains how his love of country music took him from Brazil to Nashville.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

The man now known as Jesse Lee Jones went by a different name when he was living in Brazil.

His decision to change his name was an expression of his desire to reinvent himself following his move to the USA.

Throughout a difficult upbringing, Jesse Lee always found solace in American music and dreamed of being there, but as a young man, he "was going nowhere fast".

Then, out of the blue, the members of his church - in an effort to help him - clubbed together and bought him a plane ticket.

Shortly afterwards, Jesse Lee arrived in Miami, Florida with a 12 string guitar but no English and no plan.

On his first day, while travelling on a Greyhound Bus, he was robbed of the few possessions he had - including his money and that guitar.

He got off the bus in Peoria, Illinois.

Out of pity, some people from a local church took him in.

They became his "American family" and Peoria was his home for the next decade.

Jesse Lee took a series of jobs (including training as a law enforcement officer) but he kept up with the music on the side - playing all kinds of American music in local bars.

Then a friend gave him a CD by the country and western legend Marty Robbins.

After that, Jesse Lee realised that his true passion was traditional country music.

He headed to Nashville and got a job scrubbing the decks of the General Jackson Showboat for $3.25 an hour.

However, within a few years, a series of serendipitous encounters led to his becoming first leader of the house band, then owner, of the "best honkytonk in Nashville" right in the heart of Lower Broadway.

(Photo: A cowboy with a lasso in silhouette. Credit: AP)

01Milan - The Documentary20111022

Meet Venezuelan Padro Carrillo, who moved to the birthplaceof opera to pursue his career.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Pedro Carrillo is from Venezuela.

He fell in love with Italian opera when he was five years old and heard a recording of Verdi's Rigoletto playing in his father's study.

When he grew up, Pedro fulfilled his childhood ambition and began singing regularly in the main theatre of Caracas.

However, not long into his career, the political regime in Venezuela encroached on the nation's cultural life and Pedro - who had not hidden his anti-government views - found himself blacklisted.

For three years he was unable to work as a singer.

He grew depressed, his voice suffered and he thought about giving up.

Eventually, despite many misgivings and his love for his homeland, he decided to emigrate.

He moved, with his wife Victoria, to Milan - the city of La Scala and of Verdi.

There, in the birthplace of opera, he had to start again and rebuild his career from zero.

(Photo: La Scala opera house in Milan. Credit: Getty Images)

01Milan - The Documentary20111023

Meet Venezuelan Padro Carrillo, who moved to the birthplaceof opera to pursue his career.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Pedro Carrillo is from Venezuela.

He fell in love with Italian opera when he was five years old and heard a recording of Verdi's Rigoletto playing in his father's study.

When he grew up, Pedro fulfilled his childhood ambition and began singing regularly in the main theatre of Caracas.

However, not long into his career, the political regime in Venezuela encroached on the nation's cultural life and Pedro - who had not hidden his anti-government views - found himself blacklisted.

For three years he was unable to work as a singer.

He grew depressed, his voice suffered and he thought about giving up.

Eventually, despite many misgivings and his love for his homeland, he decided to emigrate.

He moved, with his wife Victoria, to Milan - the city of La Scala and of Verdi.

There, in the birthplace of opera, he had to start again and rebuild his career from zero.

(Photo: La Scala opera house in Milan. Credit: Getty Images)

01Milan - The Documentary20111024

Meet Venezuelan Padro Carrillo, who moved to the birthplaceof opera to pursue his career.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Pedro Carrillo is from Venezuela.

He fell in love with Italian opera when he was five years old and heard a recording of Verdi's Rigoletto playing in his father's study.

When he grew up, Pedro fulfilled his childhood ambition and began singing regularly in the main theatre of Caracas.

However, not long into his career, the political regime in Venezuela encroached on the nation's cultural life and Pedro - who had not hidden his anti-government views - found himself blacklisted.

For three years he was unable to work as a singer.

He grew depressed, his voice suffered and he thought about giving up.

Eventually, despite many misgivings and his love for his homeland, he decided to emigrate.

He moved, with his wife Victoria, to Milan - the city of La Scala and of Verdi.

There, in the birthplace of opera, he had to start again and rebuild his career from zero.

(Photo: La Scala opera house in Milan. Credit: Getty Images)

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2/2.

Stories of people who have relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

In Chicago, Yoko Noge from Japan sings the blues.

0220080913
0220080913

2/2.

Stories of people who have relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

In Chicago, Yoko Noge from Japan sings the blues.

02Zanzibar - The Documentary20111029

Meet Yusuf Mahmoud, who swapped Cheltenham for Zanzibar in his love of African music.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Watching the Live Aid concert on television in the mid 80s changed the life of Englishman, Yusuf Mahmoud.

At the time, Yusuf was working as a milkman in Cheltenham and doing the odd bit of DJ-ing, but when he realised that music could be used as a tool for change he got involved in music promotion and festival organising for the anti-apartheid movement and similar operations.

After several years of doing that, an opportunity arose for him to work at the first Zanzibar International Film Festival.

Driven by his interest in the music of the region, he headed off to Tanzania intending to stay for only six months.

Thirteen years on, he's still there and has set up the Sauti Za Busara Festival - a thriving festival that promotes the music of East Africa.

Tanzania is one of the poorest countries in the world; Yusuf is used to going for months without power and his daily shower consists of a beaker and a bucket of water.

Yet such things don't phase him because - he says - he's nourished by the cultural richness of his adopted land.

02Zanzibar - The Documentary20111030

Meet Yusuf Mahmoud, who swapped Cheltenham for Zanzibar in his love of African music.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Watching the Live Aid concert on television in the mid 80s changed the life of Englishman, Yusuf Mahmoud.

At the time, Yusuf was working as a milkman in Cheltenham and doing the odd bit of DJ-ing, but when he realised that music could be used as a tool for change he got involved in music promotion and festival organising for the anti-apartheid movement and similar operations.

After several years of doing that, an opportunity arose for him to work at the first Zanzibar International Film Festival.

Driven by his interest in the music of the region, he headed off to Tanzania intending to stay for only six months.

Thirteen years on, he's still there and has set up the Sauti Za Busara Festival - a thriving festival that promotes the music of East Africa.

Tanzania is one of the poorest countries in the world; Yusuf is used to going for months without power and his daily shower consists of a beaker and a bucket of water.

Yet such things don't phase him because - he says - he's nourished by the cultural richness of his adopted land.

02Zanzibar - The Documentary20111031

Meet Yusuf Mahmoud, who swapped Cheltenham for Zanzibar in his love of African music.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Watching the Live Aid concert on television in the mid 80s changed the life of Englishman, Yusuf Mahmoud.

At the time, Yusuf was working as a milkman in Cheltenham and doing the odd bit of DJ-ing, but when he realised that music could be used as a tool for change he got involved in music promotion and festival organising for the anti-apartheid movement and similar operations.

After several years of doing that, an opportunity arose for him to work at the first Zanzibar International Film Festival.

Driven by his interest in the music of the region, he headed off to Tanzania intending to stay for only six months.

Thirteen years on, he's still there and has set up the Sauti Za Busara Festival - a thriving festival that promotes the music of East Africa.

Tanzania is one of the poorest countries in the world; Yusuf is used to going for months without power and his daily shower consists of a beaker and a bucket of water.

Yet such things don't phase him because - he says - he's nourished by the cultural richness of his adopted land.

02 LAST20080910

2/2.

Stories of people who have relocated to other lands, influenced by music.

In Chicago, Yoko Noge from Japan sings the blues.