Muzio Clementi (1752-1832) [Composer Of The Week]

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
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20070120070827

With Donald Macleod. When Clementi was 15, Sir Peter Beckford took an interest in the young composer's musical talent and struck a deal with his father in Rome to take the boy to London, which became his base for the rest of his long and busy life.

Sonatina, Op 36 No 1

Daniel Blumenthal (piano)

Symphony No 3 (Great National)

Philharmonia Orchestra

Claudio Scimone (conductor)

Sonata in D, Op 40 No 3

Pietro De Maria (piano).

20070220070828

Donald Macleod looks at the relationship between Clementi and three great composers of his time: Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven.

Sonata in B flat, Op 24 No 2

Nikolai Demidenko (piano)

Symphony in B flat, Op 18

London Mozart Players

Matthias Bamert (conductor)

Sonata in G minor, Op 34 No 2

Christopher Czaja Sager (piano).

20070320070829

Donald Macleod finds out what effect the many women in Clementi's life had on his music.

Trio in C, Op 22 No 3 (La Chasse)

Faure Trio

Sonata in F minor, Op 13 No 6

Andreas Staier (piano)

Symphony No 2 in D

Philharmonia Orchestra

Claudio Scimone (conductor).

20070420070830

As well as a virtuoso pianist, Clementi was world famous as a piano maker and teacher. Donald Macleod looks at his relationship with two of his more famous pupils, Cramer and Field, and we hear one of his sonatas being played on a Clementi piano.

Adagio sostenuto in F (Gradus ad Parnassum)

Vladimir Horowitz (piano)

Sonata in A, Op 2 No 4

Carlo Grante (piano)

Piano Concerto in C

Felicja Blumental (piano)

Mozarteum Orchestra of Salzburg

Leopold Hager (conductor)

Sonata in D, Op 25 No 6

Peter Katin (piano).

200705 LAST20070831

With Donald Macleod. Clementi became a founding member of what is the second oldest concert society in the world, The Royal Philharmonic, formerly The London Philharmonic.

Prelude in the Style of Haydn

Andreas Staier (piano)

Symphony No 4 in D

Philharmonia Orchestra

Francesco D'Avalos (conductor)

Sonata in G minor, Op 50 No 3

Mario Patuzzi (piano).

201201Father Of The Pianoforte20120917

This week Donald Macleod celebrates the life and music of Muzio Clementi, popularly known as "the father of the pianoforte". He takes a trip to Finchcocks Musical Museum in Goudhurst, Kent, to look at a unique selection of Clementi pianos and marks the contribution Clementi has made to piano literature, with works ranging from his Opus 40 and 50 piano sonatas, through brilliant virtuoso pieces to graded works written specially for learners, and perhaps more surprisingly for a composer who's so closely associated with the piano, the series also includes some rarely heard symphonic jewels of their day and selected chamber music.

It's a measure of the high regard in which he was held in his adopted country, that Muzio Clementi's buried in Westminster Abbey. The commemorative plain black marble slab, which accords him the title "the father of the pianoforte", acts as a reminder of the part he has played in the popularisation of the piano. In his lifetime he was famous as a virtuoso keyboard performer and a teacher, not only to the aristocracy but also to succeeding generations of keyboard players, including John Field, Ludwig Berger, later Mendelssohn's teacher and Frederic Kalkbrenner, a virtuoso soloist who taught Chopin. Clementi attained further prominence as a piano manufacturer and published some of the best known manuals for the instrument, among them "Introduction to the Art of playing on the Piano Forte" and "Gradus ad Parnassum". At one time it was said that Clementi was more famous than Mozart and Haydn as well as being much admired by Beethoven, whose music he published. However, since his death in 1832, despite being championed by the likes of Vladimir Horowitz, Clementi's reputation seems to have dwindled in comparison to that illustrious trio.

The story begins in Clementi's native Italy, with an Englishman who was enjoying the Grand Tour. Whilst he was in Rome, Peter Beckford heard Clementi play and was quick to identify the teenager's talent. Beckford effectively "bought" the services of Clementi from his silversmith father and promptly transported him to his country estate in Dorset. There Clementi remained in seclusion, and spent his time perfecting his art for seven years. When he reached the age of majority at twenty-one, he was free to leave and set about establishing a name for himself in London, where music was already a lucrative and popular entertainment.

Donald Macleod focuses on Clementi's early years.

It's a measure of the high regard in which he was held in his adopted country, that Muzio Clementi's buried in Westminster Abbey. The commemorative plain black marble slab, which accords him the title ""the father of the pianoforte"", acts as a reminder of the part he has played in the popularisation of the piano. In his lifetime he was famous as a virtuoso keyboard performer and a teacher, not only to the aristocracy but also to succeeding generations of keyboard players, including John Field, Ludwig Berger, later Mendelssohn's teacher and Frederic Kalkbrenner, a virtuoso soloist who taught Chopin. Clementi attained further prominence as a piano manufacturer and published some of the best known manuals for the instrument, among them ""Introduction to the Art of playing on the Piano Forte"" and ""Gradus ad Parnassum"". At one time it was said that Clementi was more famous than Mozart and Haydn as well as being much admired by Beethoven, whose music he published. However, since his death in 1832, despite being championed by the likes of VLADIMIR HOROWITZ

201202Mozart's Rival20120918

Now a famous figure in London, in the summer of 1780 Muzio Clementi decides to spread his wings. After an enthusiastic reception from Marie Antoinette in Paris, at the invitation of the Emperor Joseph II, he travels to Vienna, where an enthralling piano contest with Mozart takes place.

Focusing on the summer of 1780, when Clementi found himself in a piano contest with Mozart

201203The Keyboard Entrepreneur20120919

Donald Macleod finds out about Clementi's entrepreneurial skills.

As well as being a successful composer and virtuoso keyboard player Muzio Clementi was also a very successful piano manufacturer and music publisher. Today, Donald Macleod is at Finchcocks Musical Museum in Goudhurst, Kent, once again, to look at how Clementi was able to exploit these business interests while still maintaining a profile as a musician.

201204The Piano Teacher20120920

Today Donald Macleod is at Finchcocks Musical Museum in Goudhurst, Kent to take a look around its collection of Clementi pianos, which range in shape, size and finish from a top of the range Grand Piano made in 1822, to more modest models made for domestic use.

Donald Macleod looks at the collection of Clementi pianos at Finchcocks Musical Museum.

201205 LASTClementi's Legacy20120921

Donald Macleod sums up Clementi's varied achievements.

By the time of his death in 1832, Muzio Clementi was an influential figure on the London musical scene and a founding member of what's now known as the Royal Philharmonic Society. In conclusion, Donald Macleod sums up the composer's diverse achievements and discovers from Clementi's great great great grandson how the Clementi name continues to be associated with music through Finchcocks Musical Museum.

Prelude I (alla Clementi)

Howard Shelley (piano)

Hyperion CDA 67850

CD2 Track 30

Capriccio in C major, Op. 47 no. 2

CD1 Tracks 7 to 9

Symphony no. 4 in D major

Philharmonia Orchestra

Claudio Scimone (conductor)

Erato 4509-92191-2

CD2 Tracks 5 to 8.

201901Prodigy For Sale20191014

Muzio Clementi was one of the 18th and 19th century’s most revered musicians – a star performer, a composer admired by Czerny, Beethoven and Chopin and an astute musical businessman. However, he also had his detractors in his own time and history hasn’t been as kind to him as to the greater names of his time – Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Today his name is unfamiliar to most but it is certainly better known than the music he wrote. He was fortunate to have interactions with perhaps the world's three greatest composers, but this fortune may have also worked against him - putting him in direct competition with them. Over this week of programmes, Donald Macleod explores Clementi’s contact with the greatest composers of his day, reassessing the life and music of the man known as the “father of the piano” in the light of these encounters.

In Monday’s programme, Donald examines the musicians who impacted on Clementi in his formative years and explores the remarkable circumstances which brought the child prodigy Clementi to live in his adopted land of England.

Symphony No 3 (finale)
Mozarteum Orchester Salzburg
Ivor Bolton, conductor

Musical Characteristics, Op 19
Pietro Spada, piano

Piano Sonata in A flat Major, WoO 13
Dominic Cheli, piano

Sonata for piano, Op 2 No 4
Howard Shelley, piano

Duetto in C Major, Op 3 No 3 (Presto)
Pietro Spada, piano
Giorgio Cozzolino, piano

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Exploring the circumstances which brought Muzio Clementi to England.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201902Clementi And Mozart20191015

Muzio Clementi was one of the 18th and 19th Century’s most revered musicians – a star performer, a composer admired by Czerny, Beethoven and Chopin and an astute musical businessman. However, he also had his detractors in his own time and history hasn’t been as kind to him as to the greater names of his time – Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Today his name is unfamiliar to most but it is certainly better known than the music he wrote. He was fortunate to have interactions with perhaps the world's three greatest composers, but this fortune may have also worked against him - putting him in direct competition with them. Over this week of programmes, Donald Macleod explores Clementi’s contact with the greatest composers of his day, reassessing the life and music of the man known as the “father of the piano” in the light of these encounters.

In Tuesday’s programme, Donald explores the relationship between Clementi and Mozart, the famed contest put on by Emperor Joseph II between the two musicians and the later use of each other’s music. Donald also explores a failed romance which in the aftermath of the contest threatened to derail Clementi's musical career.

Mozart (arr. Clementi): Symphony no. 40 in G minor, K 550 (Finale)
Gisella Curtolo, violin
Lucio Labella Danzi, cello
Davide Cabassi, piano
Luigi Lupo, flute

Sonata in G minor, Op 7 No 3
Peter Katin (fortepiano)

Toccata in B flat Major, Op 11 No 2
Howard Shelley, piano

Sonata in B flat major, Op 24 No 2
Piotr Kepinski, piano

Variations on Mozart’s Batti, batti, o bel Masetto from Don Giovanni, WoO 10
Maria Tipo, piano

Sonata in E flat major, Op. 8 No 2 (II. Larghetto con espressione)
Howard Shelley, piano

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the relationship between Muzio Clementi and Mozart.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201903Clementi And Haydn20191016

Muzio Clementi was one of the 18th and 19th century’s most revered musicians – a star performer, a composer admired by Czerny, Beethoven and Chopin and an astute musical businessman. However, he also had his detractors in his own time and history hasn’t been as kind to him as to the greater names of his time – Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Today his name is unfamiliar to most but it is certainly better known than the music he wrote. He was fortunate to have interactions with perhaps the world's three greatest composers, but this fortune may have also worked against him - putting him in direct competition with them. Over this week of programmes, Donald Macleod explores Clementi’s contact with the composers of his day, reassessing the life and music of the man known as the “father of the piano” in the light of these encounters.

Clementi likely first met Haydn on the same trip as his famed contest with Mozart. In Wednesday’s programme, Donald explores the periods when Clementi shared the London stage with the German composer, the mutual respect between the two, and Clementi's subsequent turn towards orchestral music.

Symphony in B flat major, Op 18 No 1 (I. Allegro Assai)
London Mozart Players
Matthias Bamert, conductor

Sonata in G minor, Op 9 No 2
Pietro Spada, piano

Overture in D Major
Symphony Orchestra of Rome
Francesco La Vecchia, conductor

Symphony No 4
Philharmonia Orchestra
Francesco d’Avalos, conductor

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores Muzio Clementi's life and music during Haydn's visits to London.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201904Clementi And Beethoven20191017

Muzio Clementi was one of the 18th and 19th century’s most revered musicians – a star performer, a composer admired by Czerny, Beethoven and Chopin and an astute musical businessman. However, he also had his detractors in his own time and history hasn’t been as kind to him as to the greater names of his time – Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Today his name is unfamiliar to most but it is certainly better known than the music he wrote. He was fortunate to have interactions with perhaps the world's three greatest composers, but this fortune may have also worked against him - putting him in direct competition with them. Over this week of programmes, Donald Macleod explores Clementi’s contact with the greatest composers of his day, reassessing the life and music of the man known as the “father of the piano” in the light of these encounters.

In Thursday’s programme, Donald explores the interactions between Clementi and Beethoven in the light of Clementi's move into the world of music publishing and piano manufacture.

Capriccio in F major, Op 34 No 2
Constantino Mastroprimiano (on Clementi piano)

Monferinas selection
John Khouri (on Clementi Piano)

Sonata, Op 34 No 2
Aldo Ciccolini, piano

Concerto for piano and orchestra (II. Adagio e cantibile)
Bruno Canino, piano
Symphony Orchestra of Rome
Francesco La Vecchia, conductor

Piano Sonata in F minor, Op 13 No 6 (III. Presto)
Ilia Kim, piano

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the interactions between Muzio Clementi and Beethoven.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

Muzio Clementi was one of the 18th and 19th century’s most revered musicians – a star performer, a composer admired by Czerny, Beethoven and Chopin and an astute musical businessman. However, he also had his detractors in his own time and history hasn’t been as kind to him as to the greater names of his time – Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Today his name is unfamiliar to most but it is certainly better known than the music he wrote. He was fortunate to have interactions with perhaps the world's three greatest composers, but this fortune may have also worked against him - putting him in direct competition with them. Over this week of programmes, Donald Macleod explores Clementi’s contact with the greatest composers of his day, reassessing the life and music of the man known as the “father of the piano” in the light of these encounters.

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Donald Macleod explores the interactions between Muzio Clementi and Beethoven.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.

201905 LASTClementi And John Field20191018

Muzio Clementi was one of the 18th and 19th century’s most revered musicians – a star performer, a composer admired by Czerny, Beethoven and Chopin and an astute musical businessman. However, he also had his detractors in his own time and history hasn’t been as kind to him as to the greater names of his time – Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Today his name is unfamiliar to most but it is certainly better known than the music he wrote. He was fortunate to have interactions with perhaps the world's three greatest composers, but this fortune may have also worked against him - putting him in direct competition with them. Over this week of programmes, Donald Macleod explores Clementi’s contact with the greatest composers of his day, reassessing the life and music of the man known as the “father of the piano” in the light of these encounters.

In Friday’s programme, Donald explores Clementi's role as teacher and master to the pianist and composer John Field, the pair's travels together, and how a lost hat contributed to the deterioration of their friendship.

Adagio sostenuto in F major (Gradus ad Parnassum, Book I, No 14)
Vladimir Horowitz, piano

Sonata in B minor, Op 40 No 2 (II. Largo)
Dejan Lazic, piano

Symphony No 2 in D major ( Finale)
Philharmonia Orchestra
Francesco D’Avalos, conductor

Symohony No 1 in C major (III. Minuet and Trio)
Mozarteum Orchester Salzburg
Ivor Bolton, conductor

Piano Sonata in G minor, Op 50 No 3 “Didone abbandonata”
Byron Schenkman, piano

Produced by Sam Phillips for BBC Wales

Exploring Muzio Clementi's role as teacher to pianist and composer John Field.

Donald Macleod offers a weekly guide to composers and their music.