Episodes

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My Name Is20190513

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My Name Is2019051320190515 (R4)

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My Name Is20190520
My Name Is2019052020190522 (R4)

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My Name Is Elizabeth20190429

Chef Elizabeth Haigh asks whether the UK restaurant industry needs its own #MeToo moment.

After a number of high profile chefs in the US were accused of patterns of sexual harassment, bullying and assault, there has been an intense conversation globally about what it would take to eliminate such practices in the industry. Kitchens are known for long hours, highly pressurised working conditions and rigid hierarchies with all powerful chefs at the top. All these things have made it easier for bullying and harassment to go unnoticed - many female chefs have experienced abuse, but felt unable to speak up or have been punished when they do.

Elizabeth Haigh is a Michelin starred chef - and former Masterchef contestant - whose passion for cooking has seen her rise through the industry to become her own boss. But in that time she's seen a great deal of behaviour she considers inexcusable and ,on occasions, she has had to quit kitchens as a result of being bullied by colleagues.

She takes us on a journey through her world - talking frankly with chefs, people trying to inspire change and even her old employer.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

Chef Elizabeth Haigh asks whether the UK restaurant industry needs its own #MeToo moment.

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My Name Is Elizabeth2019042920190501 (R4)

Chef Elizabeth Haigh asks whether the UK restaurant industry needs its own #MeToo moment.

After a number of high profile chefs in the US were accused of patterns of sexual harassment, bullying and assault, there has been an intense conversation globally about what it would take to eliminate such practices in the industry. Kitchens are known for long hours, highly pressurised working conditions and rigid hierarchies with all powerful chefs at the top. All these things have made it easier for bullying and harassment to go unnoticed - many female chefs have experienced abuse, but felt unable to speak up or have been punished when they do.

Elizabeth Haigh is a Michelin starred chef - and former Masterchef contestant - whose passion for cooking has seen her rise through the industry to become her own boss. But in that time she's seen a great deal of behaviour she considers inexcusable and ,on occasions, she has had to quit kitchens as a result of being bullied by colleagues.

She takes us on a journey through her world - talking frankly with chefs, people trying to inspire change and even her old employer.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

Chef Elizabeth Haigh asks whether the UK restaurant industry needs its own #MeToo moment.

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My Name Is Jay20190415

Jay wants to leave behind a life in gangs, but he thinks those in a position to help don't care about young men like him, and he doesn't know how to do it on his own.

Jay takes us with him on a tour of his neighbourhood - revealing an alternative geography of East London, one marked by territorial lines which are dangerous to cross; shops and street corners where friends have been shot, stabbed and died; and places of safety where he introduces us to friends he grew up and who have shared his life. At the end of a long day, he explains his motivation for wanting to get out.

After that, he sets out to meet some people who might be able to help. In a frank and open conversation he speaks to Callum, a young man in Glasgow whose story contains echoes of Jay's own, and finds out for the first time that the problems he thought were confined to his neighbourhood are far from unique. And then he goes in search of those with the power to help: a trauma surgeon, the local police commander, and the Mayor of Newham. He wants to challenge the simplistic narrative about why young men get involved in gangs in the first place, and find out why there isn't more support - of the type that was available for Callum in Glasgow - for those who want to get out.

Produced by Gaetan Portal.

Jay wants to leave behind a life in gangs, but who is there to help?

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My Name Is Josh Walker20190506

Josh Walker was a volunteer with the YPG or People's Protection Units in northern Syria. He wants to know why the media fail to explain the complexities of war.
With Lindsey Hilsum of Channel 4 news, MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle, and artist George Butler who specialises in war reportage.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Josh Walker was a volunteer with the YPG or People's Protection Units in northern Syria

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My name is Katie20190422

Forty year old Katie gambled over £50,000 in one night. in this programme she investigates how online gambling companies routinely break the regulations supposed to protect people like her.

Katie was a successful accountant working in the City of London, but she started using cocaine to stay awake to cope with the workload. After being signed off work from stress, her drug use increased. While unemployed she started gambling online after seeing advertisements on television.

The regulations say gambling companies should check the incomes of customers, and step in when they display online signs of problem gambling. This includes using a range of credit cards and playing all night – all things Katie did as she gambled away £125,000 with two gambling firms; all on credit cards. With one she lost £50,000 in a single night.

After rehabilitation Katie got hold of her account data from the gambling firms. She believes it proves how the gambling companies broke the rules and it also shows transcripts of the manner in which they spoke about her. Katie told the regulator, the Gambling Commission, about her case, but so far has heard nothing about what they are doing.

With the help of BBC Producer, Lydia Thomas, Katie wants to talk to the Gambling Commission, and she wants to meet the gambling companies who so far have refused to comment on her case. She also meets with politicians who are making promises to tighten gambling laws – Katie wants to know….when will they finally do it?

My name is Katie, and I gambled over \u00a350,000 online in one night.

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My name is Katie2019042220190424 (R4)

Forty year old Katie gambled over £50,000 in one night. in this programme she investigates how online gambling companies routinely break the regulations supposed to protect people like her.

Katie was a successful accountant working in the City of London, but she started using cocaine to stay awake to cope with the workload. After being signed off work from stress, her drug use increased. While unemployed she started gambling online after seeing advertisements on television.

The regulations say gambling companies should check the incomes of customers, and step in when they display online signs of problem gambling. This includes using a range of credit cards and playing all night – all things Katie did as she gambled away £125,000 with two gambling firms; all on credit cards. With one she lost £50,000 in a single night.

After rehabilitation Katie got hold of her account data from the gambling firms. She believes it proves how the gambling companies broke the rules and it also shows transcripts of the manner in which they spoke about her. Katie told the regulator, the Gambling Commission, about her case, but so far has heard nothing about what they are doing.

With the help of BBC Producer, Lydia Thomas, Katie wants to talk to the Gambling Commission, and she wants to meet the gambling companies who so far have refused to comment on her case. She also meets with politicians who are making promises to tighten gambling laws – Katie wants to know….when will they finally do it?

My name is Katie, and I gambled over \u00a350,000 online in one night.

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion

My Name Is Rachel20190408

Rachel Waddingham hears voices. The first time she heard them she was lying in a bed. “You’re so stupid”, “they are watching you”, “it would be much better if you just ended it all”. She was also convinced she was being watched, that she was at the centre of a conspiracy. She ended up dropping out of university and eventually was admitted to a psychiatric unit. “I began to hear the alien speak to me, and that alien told me that I was a murderer, that it could control me, that it was going to make me kill people. It was a hideous terrifying voice.” She was put on medication and it looked like everything was working. “I was less troubled, less troubled by the voices”, she says. After a few weeks Rachel was discharged, but was soon back in again, with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. “I lost all hope. It wasn't so much the voices that kind of risked my life, it was this hopelessness, this sense that I'd never be part of the normal world”. She tried to escape from the ward and was subsequently sectioned.

Rachel became what’s called a ‘revolving door patient’, in and out of hospital, sectioned multiple times. Each time she became more and more alarmed by what she saw as the lack of humanity in the system. This is Rachel’s story of being sectioned in 21st Century Britain. It’s an intimate and revealing insight into what it’s like to be a ‘revolving door patient’. Talking to a consultant psychiatrist, a psychiatric nurse and the lead author of a recent government review of the Mental Health Act, she challenges the status quo and considers how things might change. Rachel asks why she doesn’t have more rights to decide her own care and treatment, and explores how to break the cycle of the ‘revolving door’ patient.

Details of organisations offering information and support with mental health are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 155 998.

Rachel Waddingham tells her story of being sectioned multiple times.

Current affairs programme presented by someone who lives within the issue under discussion