New York Stories With Joe Pascal [The Documentary] [World Service]

Episodes

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01New York Stories with Joe Pascal20200322He’s the DMC in the legendary Run-DMC, a titan of the music industry. The group became known as the movie stars of rap. Busta Rhymes said of them “They didn’t just change music, they changed everything.”

Presenter Joe Pascal meets the Devastating Mic Controller himself - Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels. He grew up in Hollis Queens and was at the forefront of revolutionary change in the New York music scene with the explosion of hip hop.
He was there, watching, from the early days, with the DJs and MCs at the neighbourhood block parties. And then, alongside Run and Jam Master Jay, they became a music phenomenon – with their new kind of rap bringing hip hop to the masses. They had their own look, their own style.
DMC talks us through those early years and his later battles with alcoholism and depression. What gave him solace in that time was a song, a pop ballad that he listened to for an entire year. He would take it everywhere he went and play it, every day, morning to night.
DMC’s other passion is comic books, they fuelled his imagination and education and ultimately gave him the superpower he needed to get up on stage.

(Photo: Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels courtesy of Darryl McDaniels)

Joe Pascal meets Darryl McDaniels of the legendary rap group Run-DMC

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

01New York Stories with Joe Pascal2020032220200325 (WS)He’s the DMC in the legendary Run-DMC, a titan of the music industry. The group became known as the movie stars of rap. Busta Rhymes said of them “They didn’t just change music, they changed everything.”

Presenter Joe Pascal meets the Devastating Mic Controller himself - Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels. He grew up in Hollis Queens and was at the forefront of revolutionary change in the New York music scene with the explosion of hip hop.
He was there, watching, from the early days, with the DJs and MCs at the neighbourhood block parties. And then, alongside Run and Jam Master Jay, they became a music phenomenon – with their new kind of rap bringing hip hop to the masses. They had their own look, their own style.
DMC talks us through those early years and his later battles with alcoholism and depression. What gave him solace in that time was a song, a pop ballad that he listened to for an entire year. He would take it everywhere he went and play it, every day, morning to night.
DMC’s other passion is comic books, they fuelled his imagination and education and ultimately gave him the superpower he needed to get up on stage.

(Photo: Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels courtesy of Darryl McDaniels)

Joe Pascal meets Darryl McDaniels of the legendary rap group Run-DMC

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

01New York Stories With Joe Pascal2020032220200325 (WS)
20200326 (WS)
He’s the DMC in the legendary Run-DMC, a titan of the music industry. The group became known as the movie stars of rap. Busta Rhymes said of them “They didn’t just change music, they changed everything.”

Presenter Joe Pascal meets the Devastating Mic Controller himself - Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels. He grew up in Hollis Queens and was at the forefront of revolutionary change in the New York music scene with the explosion of hip hop.
He was there, watching, from the early days, with the DJs and MCs at the neighbourhood block parties. And then, alongside Run and Jam Master Jay, they became a music phenomenon – with their new kind of rap bringing hip hop to the masses. They had their own look, their own style.
DMC talks us through those early years and his later battles with alcoholism and depression. What gave him solace in that time was a song, a pop ballad that he listened to for an entire year. He would take it everywhere he went and play it, every day, morning to night.
DMC’s other passion is comic books, they fuelled his imagination and education and ultimately gave him the superpower he needed to get up on stage.

(Photo: Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels courtesy of Darryl McDaniels)

Joe Pascal meets Darryl McDaniels of the legendary rap group Run-DMC

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

He’s the DMC in the legendary Run-DMC, a titan of the music industry. The group became known as the movie stars of rap. Busta Rhymes said of them “They didn’t just change music, they changed everything. ?

01New York Stories with Joe Pascal2020032220200326 (WS)He’s the DMC in the legendary Run-DMC, a titan of the music industry. The group became known as the movie stars of rap. Busta Rhymes said of them “They didn’t just change music, they changed everything.”

Presenter Joe Pascal meets the Devastating Mic Controller himself - Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels. He grew up in Hollis Queens and was at the forefront of revolutionary change in the New York music scene with the explosion of hip hop.
He was there, watching, from the early days, with the DJs and MCs at the neighbourhood block parties. And then, alongside Run and Jam Master Jay, they became a music phenomenon – with their new kind of rap bringing hip hop to the masses. They had their own look, their own style.
DMC talks us through those early years and his later battles with alcoholism and depression. What gave him solace in that time was a song, a pop ballad that he listened to for an entire year. He would take it everywhere he went and play it, every day, morning to night.
DMC’s other passion is comic books, they fuelled his imagination and education and ultimately gave him the superpower he needed to get up on stage.

(Photo: Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels courtesy of Darryl McDaniels)

Joe Pascal meets Darryl McDaniels of the legendary rap group Run-DMC

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

02New York stories with Joe Pascal20200523A hundred years ago the Harlem Renaissance was in full swing. It was a booming time for African-American culture and the neighbourhood was buzzing. Today, we pay tribute to Harlem, through music, poetry and food.

The story of how chef Marcus Samuelsson made Harlem his home is nothing short of remarkable. He was born in a tiny village in Ethiopia, too small to even appear on maps. Aged two, he contracted TB. His mum carried him for 75 miles to the capital for treatment. She died, but he survived and was adopted by a Swedish family who taught him a love of cooking. Marcus is now a leading light of New York cuisine running an international restaurant chain but with his heart firmly grounded in the stories of Harlem.

Jaylene Clark Owens is a spoken word artist and actor and born and bred Harlemite. She has woven the story of her changing neighbourhood into a play: Renaissance in the Belly of a Killer Whale.

Cultural historian John T Reddick gives us a personal tour of his neighbourhood.

And Martina da Silva and John Thomas share their musical tribute to Harlem.

(Photo: Chef Marcus Samuelsson. Credit: Matt Dutile)

Homage to Harlem with poetry, music and the story of chef Marcus Samuelsson

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

02New York stories with Joe Pascal2020052320200524 (WS)A hundred years ago the Harlem Renaissance was in full swing. It was a booming time for African-American culture and the neighbourhood was buzzing. Today, we pay tribute to Harlem, through music, poetry and food.

The story of how chef Marcus Samuelsson made Harlem his home is nothing short of remarkable. He was born in a tiny village in Ethiopia, too small to even appear on maps. Aged two, he contracted TB. His mum carried him for 75 miles to the capital for treatment. She died, but he survived and was adopted by a Swedish family who taught him a love of cooking. Marcus is now a leading light of New York cuisine running an international restaurant chain but with his heart firmly grounded in the stories of Harlem.

Jaylene Clark Owens is a spoken word artist and actor and born and bred Harlemite. She has woven the story of her changing neighbourhood into a play: Renaissance in the Belly of a Killer Whale.

Cultural historian John T Reddick gives us a personal tour of his neighbourhood.

And Martina da Silva and John Thomas share their musical tribute to Harlem.

(Photo: Chef Marcus Samuelsson. Credit: Matt Dutile)

Homage to Harlem with poetry, music and the story of chef Marcus Samuelsson

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

02New York stories with Joe Pascal2020052320200527 (WS)A hundred years ago the Harlem Renaissance was in full swing. It was a booming time for African-American culture and the neighbourhood was buzzing. Today, we pay tribute to Harlem, through music, poetry and food.

The story of how chef Marcus Samuelsson made Harlem his home is nothing short of remarkable. He was born in a tiny village in Ethiopia, too small to even appear on maps. Aged two, he contracted TB. His mum carried him for 75 miles to the capital for treatment. She died, but he survived and was adopted by a Swedish family who taught him a love of cooking. Marcus is now a leading light of New York cuisine running an international restaurant chain but with his heart firmly grounded in the stories of Harlem.

Jaylene Clark Owens is a spoken word artist and actor and born and bred Harlemite. She has woven the story of her changing neighbourhood into a play: Renaissance in the Belly of a Killer Whale.

Cultural historian John T Reddick gives us a personal tour of his neighbourhood.

And Martina da Silva and John Thomas share their musical tribute to Harlem.

(Photo: Chef Marcus Samuelsson. Credit: Matt Dutile)

Homage to Harlem with poetry, music and the story of chef Marcus Samuelsson

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

02New York Stories With Joe Pascal20200523A hundred years ago the Harlem Renaissance was in full swing. It was a booming time for African-American culture and the neighbourhood was buzzing. Today, we pay tribute to Harlem, through music, poetry and food.

The story of how chef Marcus Samuelsson made Harlem his home is nothing short of remarkable. He was born in a tiny village in Ethiopia, too small to even appear on maps. Aged two, he contracted TB. His mum carried him for 75 miles to the capital for treatment. She died, but he survived and was adopted by a Swedish family who taught him a love of cooking. Marcus is now a leading light of New York cuisine running an international restaurant chain but with his heart firmly grounded in the stories of Harlem.

Jaylene Clark Owens is a spoken word artist and actor and born and bred Harlemite. She has woven the story of her changing neighbourhood into a play: Renaissance in the Belly of a Killer Whale.

Cultural historian John T Reddick gives us a personal tour of his neighbourhood.

And Martina da Silva and John Thomas share their musical tribute to Harlem.

(Photo: Chef Marcus Samuelsson. Credit: Matt Dutile)

Icons of New York share life stories and secrets of the city.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

02New York Stories With Joe Pascal2020052320200524 (WS)A hundred years ago the Harlem Renaissance was in full swing. It was a booming time for African-American culture and the neighbourhood was buzzing. Today, we pay tribute to Harlem, through music, poetry and food.

The story of how chef Marcus Samuelsson made Harlem his home is nothing short of remarkable. He was born in a tiny village in Ethiopia, too small to even appear on maps. Aged two, he contracted TB. His mum carried him for 75 miles to the capital for treatment. She died, but he survived and was adopted by a Swedish family who taught him a love of cooking. Marcus is now a leading light of New York cuisine running an international restaurant chain but with his heart firmly grounded in the stories of Harlem.

Jaylene Clark Owens is a spoken word artist and actor and born and bred Harlemite. She has woven the story of her changing neighbourhood into a play: Renaissance in the Belly of a Killer Whale.

Cultural historian John T Reddick gives us a personal tour of his neighbourhood.

And Martina da Silva and John Thomas share their musical tribute to Harlem.

(Photo: Chef Marcus Samuelsson. Credit: Matt Dutile)

Icons of New York share life stories and secrets of the city.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

02New York Stories With Joe Pascal2020052320200527 (WS)A hundred years ago the Harlem Renaissance was in full swing. It was a booming time for African-American culture and the neighbourhood was buzzing. Today, we pay tribute to Harlem, through music, poetry and food.

The story of how chef Marcus Samuelsson made Harlem his home is nothing short of remarkable. He was born in a tiny village in Ethiopia, too small to even appear on maps. Aged two, he contracted TB. His mum carried him for 75 miles to the capital for treatment. She died, but he survived and was adopted by a Swedish family who taught him a love of cooking. Marcus is now a leading light of New York cuisine running an international restaurant chain but with his heart firmly grounded in the stories of Harlem.

Jaylene Clark Owens is a spoken word artist and actor and born and bred Harlemite. She has woven the story of her changing neighbourhood into a play: Renaissance in the Belly of a Killer Whale.

Cultural historian John T Reddick gives us a personal tour of his neighbourhood.

And Martina da Silva and John Thomas share their musical tribute to Harlem.

(Photo: Chef Marcus Samuelsson. Credit: Matt Dutile)

Icons of New York share life stories and secrets of the city.

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

02New York Stories With Joe Pascal2020052320200524 (WS)
20200527 (WS)
Homage to Harlem with poetry, music and the story of chef Marcus Samuelsson

Investigating global developments, issues and affairs.

Icons of New York share life stories and secrets of the city.