Nicola Lefanu (1947-)

Episodes

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01Studying In Oxford And London20170424

Nicola LeFanu talks about how she was inspired by the music of Alexander Goehr.

01Studying In Oxford And London20170424

Nicola LeFanu talks about how she was inspired by the music of Alexander Goehr.

British composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about being inspired by the music of Alexander Goehr

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

Nicola LeFanu was born into a creative environment. Her father was the scholar and writer William LeFanu, and her mother the composer Elizabeth Maconchy. LeFanu didn't set out to be a composer and initially was more interested in the theatre. One seminal moment came when she heard music by Alexander Goehr, The Deluge. LeFanu subsequently started to compose more works, whilst her musical language changed. From this point onwards she received tuition from various composers, including Jeremy Dale Roberts and then Alexander Goehr. LeFanu didn't remain long studying with one person for as she puts it, she didn't want to be told the answers but instead find these out for herself. Her first critical success was a work for solo oboe called Soliloquy, which was published whilst she was still studying at Oxford. From there LeFanu went on to the Royal College of Music, and after this made her way in London as a freelance composer.

A Penny for a Song (Seas are Wild Tonight)
Tracey Chadwell, soprano
Pamela Lidiard, piano

But Stars Remaining
Alison Smart, soprano

Jeremy Dale Roberts: Winter Music
Lontano
Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Nicola LeFanu: Soliloquy
Jinny Shaw, oboe

The Same Day Dawns
Jane Manning, soprano
Kathryn Lukas, flute
Ian Mitchell, clarinet
Adrian Levine, violin
David Smith, cello
James Wood, percussion
Nicola LeFanu, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

British composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about being inspired by the music of Alexander Goehr

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

Nicola LeFanu was born into a creative environment. Her father was the scholar and writer William LeFanu, and her mother the composer Elizabeth Maconchy. LeFanu didn't set out to be a composer and initially was more interested in the theatre. One seminal moment came when she heard music by Alexander Goehr, The Deluge. LeFanu subsequently started to compose more works, whilst her musical language changed. From this point onwards she received tuition from various composers, including Jeremy Dale Roberts and then Alexander Goehr. LeFanu didn't remain long studying with one person for as she puts it, she didn't want to be told the answers but instead find these out for herself. Her first critical success was a work for solo oboe called Soliloquy, which was published whilst she was still studying at Oxford. From there LeFanu went on to the Royal College of Music, and after this made her way in London as a freelance composer.

A Penny for a Song (Seas are Wild Tonight)

Tracey Chadwell, soprano

Pamela Lidiard, piano

But Stars Remaining

Alison Smart, soprano

Jeremy Dale Roberts: Winter Music

Lontano

Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Nicola LeFanu: Soliloquy

Jinny Shaw, oboe

The Same Day Dawns

Jane Manning, soprano

Kathryn Lukas, flute

Ian Mitchell, clarinet

Adrian Levine, violin

David Smith, cello

James Wood, percussion

Nicola LeFanu, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

01Studying In Oxford And London20170424

Nicola LeFanu talks about how she was inspired by the music of Alexander Goehr.

British composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about being inspired by the music of Alexander Goehr

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

Nicola LeFanu was born into a creative environment. Her father was the scholar and writer William LeFanu, and her mother the composer Elizabeth Maconchy. LeFanu didn't set out to be a composer and initially was more interested in the theatre. One seminal moment came when she heard music by Alexander Goehr, The Deluge. LeFanu subsequently started to compose more works, whilst her musical language changed. From this point onwards she received tuition from various composers, including Jeremy Dale Roberts and then Alexander Goehr. LeFanu didn't remain long studying with one person for as she puts it, she didn't want to be told the answers but instead find these out for herself. Her first critical success was a work for solo oboe called Soliloquy, which was published whilst she was still studying at Oxford. From there LeFanu went on to the Royal College of Music, and after this made her way in London as a freelance composer.

A Penny for a Song (Seas are Wild Tonight)
Tracey Chadwell, soprano
Pamela Lidiard, piano

But Stars Remaining
Alison Smart, soprano

Jeremy Dale Roberts: Winter Music
Lontano
Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Nicola LeFanu: Soliloquy
Jinny Shaw, oboe

The Same Day Dawns
Jane Manning, soprano
Kathryn Lukas, flute
Ian Mitchell, clarinet
Adrian Levine, violin
David Smith, cello
James Wood, percussion
Nicola LeFanu, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

British composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about being inspired by the music of Alexander Goehr

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

Nicola LeFanu was born into a creative environment. Her father was the scholar and writer William LeFanu, and her mother the composer Elizabeth Maconchy. LeFanu didn't set out to be a composer and initially was more interested in the theatre. One seminal moment came when she heard music by Alexander Goehr, The Deluge. LeFanu subsequently started to compose more works, whilst her musical language changed. From this point onwards she received tuition from various composers, including Jeremy Dale Roberts and then Alexander Goehr. LeFanu didn't remain long studying with one person for as she puts it, she didn't want to be told the answers but instead find these out for herself. Her first critical success was a work for solo oboe called Soliloquy, which was published whilst she was still studying at Oxford. From there LeFanu went on to the Royal College of Music, and after this made her way in London as a freelance composer.

A Penny for a Song (Seas are Wild Tonight)

Tracey Chadwell, soprano

Pamela Lidiard, piano

But Stars Remaining

Alison Smart, soprano

Jeremy Dale Roberts: Winter Music

Lontano

Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Nicola LeFanu: Soliloquy

Jinny Shaw, oboe

The Same Day Dawns

Jane Manning, soprano

Kathryn Lukas, flute

Ian Mitchell, clarinet

Adrian Levine, violin

David Smith, cello

James Wood, percussion

Nicola LeFanu, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

02Inspired By The Outback20170425

Nicola LeFanu talks about her time in the Australian outback with composer David Lumsdaine

02Inspired By The Outback20170425

Nicola LeFanu talks about her time in the Australian outback with composer David Lumsdaine

Composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her time in the Australian outback with composer David Lumsdaine

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

During the 1970s and 1980s Nicola LeFanu made a number of visits to Australia. With fellow composer David Lumsdaine, they spent a long period of 1976 in the Outback, living and working in a location accessible only by boat. It was here that LeFanu composed her opera 'Dawnpath'. Once back in the UK, LeFanu established the composition department at King's College London, but by 1979, the same year she married David Lumsdaine, they both returned to Australia to the New South Wales Conservatory of Music as joint Composers-in-Residence. In 1984 came another visit to Australia. It was here that working for an entire month in the Outback, LeFanu was inspired to compose 'Moon Over the Western Ridge', written for the Rascher Saxophone Quartet. It was during this same period that LeFanu also composed 'The Old Woman of Beare', this time not inspired by the Australian landscape, but instead depicting the wild country of Ireland's west coast.

Preludio 2
Foundation Philharmonic Orchestra
David Snell, conductor

David Lumsdaine
Blue upon Blue
David Pereira, cello

Nicola LeFanu
Moon Over The Western Ridge
Rascher Saxophone Quartet

The Old Woman of Beare
Jane Manning, soprano
Lontano
Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

Composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her time in the Australian outback with composer David Lumsdaine

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

During the 1970s and 1980s Nicola LeFanu made a number of visits to Australia. With fellow composer David Lumsdaine, they spent a long period of 1976 in the Outback, living and working in a location accessible only by boat. It was here that LeFanu composed her opera 'Dawnpath'. Once back in the UK, LeFanu established the composition department at King's College London, but by 1979, the same year she married David Lumsdaine, they both returned to Australia to the New South Wales Conservatory of Music as joint Composers-in-Residence. In 1984 came another visit to Australia. It was here that working for an entire month in the Outback, LeFanu was inspired to compose 'Moon Over the Western Ridge', written for the Rascher Saxophone Quartet. It was during this same period that LeFanu also composed 'The Old Woman of Beare', this time not inspired by the Australian landscape, but instead depicting the wild country of Ireland's west coast.

Preludio 2

Foundation Philharmonic Orchestra

David Snell, conductor

David Lumsdaine

Blue upon Blue

David Pereira, cello

Nicola LeFanu

Moon Over The Western Ridge

Rascher Saxophone Quartet

The Old Woman of Beare

Jane Manning, soprano

Lontano

Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

02Inspired By The Outback20170425

Nicola LeFanu talks about her time in the Australian outback with composer David Lumsdaine

Composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her time in the Australian outback with composer David Lumsdaine

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

During the 1970s and 1980s Nicola LeFanu made a number of visits to Australia. With fellow composer David Lumsdaine, they spent a long period of 1976 in the Outback, living and working in a location accessible only by boat. It was here that LeFanu composed her opera 'Dawnpath'. Once back in the UK, LeFanu established the composition department at King's College London, but by 1979, the same year she married David Lumsdaine, they both returned to Australia to the New South Wales Conservatory of Music as joint Composers-in-Residence. In 1984 came another visit to Australia. It was here that working for an entire month in the Outback, LeFanu was inspired to compose 'Moon Over the Western Ridge', written for the Rascher Saxophone Quartet. It was during this same period that LeFanu also composed 'The Old Woman of Beare', this time not inspired by the Australian landscape, but instead depicting the wild country of Ireland's west coast.

Preludio 2
Foundation Philharmonic Orchestra
David Snell, conductor

David Lumsdaine
Blue upon Blue
David Pereira, cello

Nicola LeFanu
Moon Over The Western Ridge
Rascher Saxophone Quartet

The Old Woman of Beare
Jane Manning, soprano
Lontano
Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

Composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her time in the Australian outback with composer David Lumsdaine

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

During the 1970s and 1980s Nicola LeFanu made a number of visits to Australia. With fellow composer David Lumsdaine, they spent a long period of 1976 in the Outback, living and working in a location accessible only by boat. It was here that LeFanu composed her opera 'Dawnpath'. Once back in the UK, LeFanu established the composition department at King's College London, but by 1979, the same year she married David Lumsdaine, they both returned to Australia to the New South Wales Conservatory of Music as joint Composers-in-Residence. In 1984 came another visit to Australia. It was here that working for an entire month in the Outback, LeFanu was inspired to compose 'Moon Over the Western Ridge', written for the Rascher Saxophone Quartet. It was during this same period that LeFanu also composed 'The Old Woman of Beare', this time not inspired by the Australian landscape, but instead depicting the wild country of Ireland's west coast.

Preludio 2

Foundation Philharmonic Orchestra

David Snell, conductor

David Lumsdaine

Blue upon Blue

David Pereira, cello

Nicola LeFanu

Moon Over The Western Ridge

Rascher Saxophone Quartet

The Old Woman of Beare

Jane Manning, soprano

Lontano

Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

03An Impregnable Taboo20170426

Nicola LeFanu discusses her research and publications about the neglect of women composers

03An Impregnable Taboo20170426

Nicola LeFanu discusses her research and publications about the neglect of women composers

Nicola LeFanu chats with Donald Macleod about her research and publication on the neglect of women composers

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

By the mid-1980s Nicola LeFanu was busy working on another opera, this time a commission from BBC Radio 3. 'The Story of Mary O'Neill' is a work specifically for the radio and is about the fortunes of an Irishwoman who emigrates to South America. As LeFanu's career in the UK went from strength to strength, she researched and published an article called 'Master Musician: An Impregnable Taboo'. This article provided details and statistics demonstrating that the work of women composers were being neglected at that time. Her research received a lot of attention, and in 1987 LeFanu also became a founding member of Women in Music. One year later, LeFanu composed her 'Lament', to mark two significant anniversaries: firstly it was the year when Nelson Mandela turned seventy, but was still in prison; secondly, 1988 was also the year in which Australia celebrated its bicentennial marking the arrival of British settlers.

A Penny for a Song
Tracey Chadwell, soprano
Pamela Lidiard, piano

Invisible Places
Gemini

The Story of Mary O'Neill (excerpt, Scene 2)
Mary....Sarah Leonard (soprano)
BBC Singers
John Poole, conductor

Elizabeth Maconchy: Symphony for Double String Orchestra (1st mvt)
BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Nicola LeFanu: Lament
Bridget Cary, viola
Kate Romano, bass clarinet
Jinny Shaw, cor anglais
Neil Heyde, cello

Producer Luke Whitlock.

Nicola LeFanu chats with Donald Macleod about her research and publication on the neglect of women composers

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

By the mid-1980s Nicola LeFanu was busy working on another opera, this time a commission from BBC Radio 3. 'The Story of Mary O'Neill' is a work specifically for the radio and is about the fortunes of an Irishwoman who emigrates to South America. As LeFanu's career in the UK went from strength to strength, she researched and published an article called 'Master Musician: An Impregnable Taboo'. This article provided details and statistics demonstrating that the work of women composers were being neglected at that time. Her research received a lot of attention, and in 1987 LeFanu also became a founding member of Women in Music. One year later, LeFanu composed her 'Lament', to mark two significant anniversaries: firstly it was the year when Nelson Mandela turned seventy, but was still in prison; secondly, 1988 was also the year in which Australia celebrated its bicentennial marking the arrival of British settlers.

A Penny for a Song

Tracey Chadwell, soprano

Pamela Lidiard, piano

Invisible Places

Gemini

The Story of Mary O'Neill (excerpt, Scene 2)

Mary - Sarah Leonard (soprano)

BBC Singers

John Poole, conductor

Elizabeth Maconchy: Symphony for Double String Orchestra (1st mvt)

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Nicola LeFanu: Lament

Bridget Cary, viola

Kate Romano, bass clarinet

Jinny Shaw, cor anglais

Neil Heyde, cello

Producer Luke Whitlock.

03An Impregnable Taboo20170426

Nicola LeFanu discusses her research and publications about the neglect of women composers

Nicola LeFanu chats with Donald Macleod about her research and publication on the neglect of women composers

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

By the mid-1980s Nicola LeFanu was busy working on another opera, this time a commission from BBC Radio 3. 'The Story of Mary O'Neill' is a work specifically for the radio and is about the fortunes of an Irishwoman who emigrates to South America. As LeFanu's career in the UK went from strength to strength, she researched and published an article called 'Master Musician: An Impregnable Taboo'. This article provided details and statistics demonstrating that the work of women composers were being neglected at that time. Her research received a lot of attention, and in 1987 LeFanu also became a founding member of Women in Music. One year later, LeFanu composed her 'Lament', to mark two significant anniversaries: firstly it was the year when Nelson Mandela turned seventy, but was still in prison; secondly, 1988 was also the year in which Australia celebrated its bicentennial marking the arrival of British settlers.

A Penny for a Song
Tracey Chadwell, soprano
Pamela Lidiard, piano

Invisible Places
Gemini

The Story of Mary O'Neill (excerpt, Scene 2)
Mary....Sarah Leonard (soprano)
BBC Singers
John Poole, conductor

Elizabeth Maconchy: Symphony for Double String Orchestra (1st mvt)
BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Nicola LeFanu: Lament
Bridget Cary, viola
Kate Romano, bass clarinet
Jinny Shaw, cor anglais
Neil Heyde, cello

Producer Luke Whitlock.

Nicola LeFanu chats with Donald Macleod about her research and publication on the neglect of women composers

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

By the mid-1980s Nicola LeFanu was busy working on another opera, this time a commission from BBC Radio 3. 'The Story of Mary O'Neill' is a work specifically for the radio and is about the fortunes of an Irishwoman who emigrates to South America. As LeFanu's career in the UK went from strength to strength, she researched and published an article called 'Master Musician: An Impregnable Taboo'. This article provided details and statistics demonstrating that the work of women composers were being neglected at that time. Her research received a lot of attention, and in 1987 LeFanu also became a founding member of Women in Music. One year later, LeFanu composed her 'Lament', to mark two significant anniversaries: firstly it was the year when Nelson Mandela turned seventy, but was still in prison; secondly, 1988 was also the year in which Australia celebrated its bicentennial marking the arrival of British settlers.

A Penny for a Song

Tracey Chadwell, soprano

Pamela Lidiard, piano

Invisible Places

Gemini

The Story of Mary O'Neill (excerpt, Scene 2)

Mary - Sarah Leonard (soprano)

BBC Singers

John Poole, conductor

Elizabeth Maconchy: Symphony for Double String Orchestra (1st mvt)

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Odaline de la Martinez, conductor

Nicola LeFanu: Lament

Bridget Cary, viola

Kate Romano, bass clarinet

Jinny Shaw, cor anglais

Neil Heyde, cello

Producer Luke Whitlock.

04Operas And Accolades20170427

Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about writing three operas in close succession.

04Operas And Accolades20170427

Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about writing three operas in close succession.

Composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about writing three operas in close succession

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

Nicola LeFanu has worked with many celebrated artists during her career. One was the saxophonist John-Edward Kelly, for whom she composed a single-movement concerto. Kelly also recorded LeFanu's work 'Ervallagh', which was composed in 1993 and is a musical portrait looking out to sea and the Aran Islands from the west coast of Ireland. The 1990s was a hugely busy period for Nicola LeFanu, composing three operas in quick succession including, for one project, working with two hundred children. It was from her opera 'Blood Wedding' that came the inspiration for composing her work for countertenor and ensemble, 'Canción de la luna', setting words by Lorca. Then in 1994 came a major change for LeFanu, when she moved away from London to become Professor of Music at the University of York. Teaching has always been important for LeFanu, and her pupils have included Paul Mealor, Grainne Mulvey, Luis Tinoco and Sadie Harrison.

A Travelling Spirit (Riddle 7: Swan)
Lesley-Jane Rogers, soprano
John Turner, recorder

Ervallagh
John-Edward Kelly, saxophone

Canción de la luna
Nicholas Clapton, countertenor
The Goldberg Ensemble
Malcolm Layfield, conductor

Sadie Harrison:...ballare una passacaglia di ombre...
Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

Nicola LeFanu: Catena, for eleven solo strings
The Goldberg Ensemble
Malcolm Layfield, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

Composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about writing three operas in close succession

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

Nicola LeFanu has worked with many celebrated artists during her career. One was the saxophonist John-Edward Kelly, for whom she composed a single-movement concerto. Kelly also recorded LeFanu's work 'Ervallagh', which was composed in 1993 and is a musical portrait looking out to sea and the Aran Islands from the west coast of Ireland. The 1990s was a hugely busy period for Nicola LeFanu, composing three operas in quick succession including, for one project, working with two hundred children. It was from her opera 'Blood Wedding' that came the inspiration for composing her work for countertenor and ensemble, 'Canción de la luna', setting words by Lorca. Then in 1994 came a major change for LeFanu, when she moved away from London to become Professor of Music at the University of York. Teaching has always been important for LeFanu, and her pupils have included Paul Mealor, Grainne Mulvey, Luis Tinoco and Said Harrison.

A Travelling Spirit (Riddle 7: Swan)

Lesley-Jane Rogers, soprano

John Turner, recorder

Ervallagh

John-Edward Kelly, saxophone

Canción de la luna

Nicholas Clapton, countertenor

The Goldberg Ensemble

Malcolm Layfield, conductor

Sadie Harrison:...ballare una passacaglia di ombre...

Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

Nicola LeFanu: Catena, for eleven solo strings

Producer Luke Whitlock.

Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about writing three operas in close succession.

Composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about writing three operas in close succession

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

Nicola LeFanu has worked with many celebrated artists during her career. One was the saxophonist John-Edward Kelly, for whom she composed a single-movement concerto. Kelly also recorded LeFanu's work 'Ervallagh', which was composed in 1993 and is a musical portrait looking out to sea and the Aran Islands from the west coast of Ireland. The 1990s was a hugely busy period for Nicola LeFanu, composing three operas in quick succession including, for one project, working with two hundred children. It was from her opera 'Blood Wedding' that came the inspiration for composing her work for countertenor and ensemble, 'Canción de la luna', setting words by Lorca. Then in 1994 came a major change for LeFanu, when she moved away from London to become Professor of Music at the University of York. Teaching has always been important for LeFanu, and her pupils have included Paul Mealor, Grainne Mulvey, Luis Tinoco and Sadie Harrison.

A Travelling Spirit (Riddle 7: Swan)
Lesley-Jane Rogers, soprano
John Turner, recorder

Ervallagh
John-Edward Kelly, saxophone

Canción de la luna
Nicholas Clapton, countertenor
The Goldberg Ensemble
Malcolm Layfield, conductor

Sadie Harrison:...ballare una passacaglia di ombre...
Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

Nicola LeFanu: Catena, for eleven solo strings
The Goldberg Ensemble
Malcolm Layfield, conductor

Producer Luke Whitlock.

Composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about writing three operas in close succession

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

Nicola LeFanu has worked with many celebrated artists during her career. One was the saxophonist John-Edward Kelly, for whom she composed a single-movement concerto. Kelly also recorded LeFanu's work 'Ervallagh', which was composed in 1993 and is a musical portrait looking out to sea and the Aran Islands from the west coast of Ireland. The 1990s was a hugely busy period for Nicola LeFanu, composing three operas in quick succession including, for one project, working with two hundred children. It was from her opera 'Blood Wedding' that came the inspiration for composing her work for countertenor and ensemble, 'Canción de la luna', setting words by Lorca. Then in 1994 came a major change for LeFanu, when she moved away from London to become Professor of Music at the University of York. Teaching has always been important for LeFanu, and her pupils have included Paul Mealor, Grainne Mulvey, Luis Tinoco and Said Harrison.

A Travelling Spirit (Riddle 7: Swan)

Lesley-Jane Rogers, soprano

John Turner, recorder

Ervallagh

John-Edward Kelly, saxophone

Canción de la luna

Nicholas Clapton, countertenor

The Goldberg Ensemble

Malcolm Layfield, conductor

Sadie Harrison:...ballare una passacaglia di ombre...

Peter Sheppard Skærved, violin

Nicola LeFanu: Catena, for eleven solo strings

Producer Luke Whitlock.

05Future Collaborations20170428

Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her recent and future compositional projects.

05Future Collaborations20170428

Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her recent and future compositional projects.

British composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her recent and future compositional projects

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

In 1996 Nicola LaFanu composed her String Quartet No 2. It was commissioned for the following year's London International String Quartet Competition and was dedicated to the memory of her mother, the composer Elizabeth Maconchy, and of her father, the scholar and writer William LeFanu. In this programme, Nicola LeFanu discusses with Donald her recent and future composition projects. She looks back at her career, chats about how she writes music, and also the sort of music she enjoys performing at home, often with her son Peter, to whom she dedicated her work 'Amores'.

The nightingale has flown out of the pretty cage (from 'Mira Clas Tenebras')
Sally Bradshaw, mezzo-soprano
Bridget Carey, viola
Jinny Shaw, oboe d'amore
Lucy Wakeford, harp

String Quartet No 2
Goldberg Ensemble

The Bourne
Elizabeth Atherton, soprano
Lucy Wakeford, harp

Gillian Whitehead: The Berries (from 'Awa Herea')
Tracey Chadwell, soprano
Pamela Lidiard, piano

Nicola LeFanu: Amores
Richard Watkins, horn
Goldberg Ensemble
Malcolm Layfield, conductor.

British composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her recent and future compositional projects

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

In 1996 Nicola LaFanu composed her String Quartet No 2. It was commissioned for the following year's London International String Quartet Competition and was dedicated to the memory of her mother, the composer Elizabeth Maconchy, and of her father, the scholar and writer William LeFanu. In this programme, Nicola LeFanu discusses with Donald her recent and future composition projects. She looks back at her career, chats about how she writes music, and also the sort of music she enjoys performing at home, often with her son Peter, to whom she dedicated her work 'Amores'.

The nightingale has flown out of the pretty cage (from 'Mira Clas Tenebras')

Sally Bradshaw, mezzo-soprano

Bridget Carey, viola

Jinny Shaw, oboe d'amore

Lucy Wakeford, harp

String Quartet No 2

Goldberg Ensemble

The Bourne

Elizabeth Atherton, soprano

Gillian Whitehead: The Berries (from 'Awa Herea')

Tracey Chadwell, soprano

Pamela Lidiard, piano

Nicola LeFanu: Amores

Richard Watkins, horn

Malcolm Layfield, conductor.

05Future Collaborations20170428

Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her recent and future compositional projects.

British composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her recent and future compositional projects

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

In 1996 Nicola LaFanu composed her String Quartet No 2. It was commissioned for the following year's London International String Quartet Competition and was dedicated to the memory of her mother, the composer Elizabeth Maconchy, and of her father, the scholar and writer William LeFanu. In this programme, Nicola LeFanu discusses with Donald her recent and future composition projects. She looks back at her career, chats about how she writes music, and also the sort of music she enjoys performing at home, often with her son Peter, to whom she dedicated her work 'Amores'.

The nightingale has flown out of the pretty cage (from 'Mira Clas Tenebras')
Sally Bradshaw, mezzo-soprano
Bridget Carey, viola
Jinny Shaw, oboe d'amore
Lucy Wakeford, harp

String Quartet No 2
Goldberg Ensemble

The Bourne
Elizabeth Atherton, soprano
Lucy Wakeford, harp

Gillian Whitehead: The Berries (from 'Awa Herea')
Tracey Chadwell, soprano
Pamela Lidiard, piano

Nicola LeFanu: Amores
Richard Watkins, horn
Goldberg Ensemble
Malcolm Layfield, conductor.

British composer Nicola LeFanu talks to Donald Macleod about her recent and future compositional projects

Composer Nicola LeFanu has been at the heart of British contemporary music for several decades, and at the forefront of promoting the works of her fellow women composers. In 2017 LeFanu turns seventy, and in conversation with Donald Macleod she looks back at her distinguished career including commissions from many leading artists. LeFanu also chats about some of the composers who have influenced her including her mother Elizabeth Maconchy, and also her husband David Lumsdaine.

In 1996 Nicola LaFanu composed her String Quartet No 2. It was commissioned for the following year's London International String Quartet Competition and was dedicated to the memory of her mother, the composer Elizabeth Maconchy, and of her father, the scholar and writer William LeFanu. In this programme, Nicola LeFanu discusses with Donald her recent and future composition projects. She looks back at her career, chats about how she writes music, and also the sort of music she enjoys performing at home, often with her son Peter, to whom she dedicated her work 'Amores'.

The nightingale has flown out of the pretty cage (from 'Mira Clas Tenebras')

Sally Bradshaw, mezzo-soprano

Bridget Carey, viola

Jinny Shaw, oboe d'amore

Lucy Wakeford, harp

String Quartet No 2

Goldberg Ensemble

The Bourne

Elizabeth Atherton, soprano

Gillian Whitehead: The Berries (from 'Awa Herea')

Tracey Chadwell, soprano

Pamela Lidiard, piano

Nicola LeFanu: Amores

Richard Watkins, horn

Malcolm Layfield, conductor.