Niels Gade (1817-1890)

Episodes

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01The Wedding Composer20170220

Donald Macleod's charts Niels Gade's early life, leading up to his breakthrough work, "Echoes of Ossian".

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Across the week, Colin shares his own research into Gade's music and information garnered from the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

Today, Donald Macleod explores the years up to Gade's breakthrough as a composer. Born in 1817, Gade's childhood was marked by the economic hardship endured in Copenhagen after the country declared bankruptcy in 1813. Despite the disadvantages of a lack of money and a limited access to education, aged 23, Gade won a prestigious competition with an astonishingly accomplished orchestral overture, "Echoes of Ossian".

Wedding Waltz (Et Folkesagn)

The Danish Radio Sinfonietta

Harry Damgaard, conductor

Elverskud, Op.30 (Prologue and Part 1)

Kirsten Dolberg, contralto, the mother

Tivoli Concert Choir

Tivoli Symphony Orchestra

Michael Schønwandt, conductor

Acquarellen, Op.19, Vol 1

Christina Bjørkøe, piano

Hymnus

Danish National Radio Choir

Jesper Grove Jørgensen, conductor

Overture: "Echoes of Ossian", Op.1

The Danish National Radio Symphony Orchestra

Dmitri Kitajenko, conductor.

Donald Macleod on Gade's early life, leading up to his breakthrough work, Echoes of Ossian

01The Wedding Composer20170220

Donald Macleod's charts Niels Gade's early life, leading up to his breakthrough work, "Echoes of Ossian".

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Across the week, Colin shares his own research into Gade's music and information garnered from the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

Today, Donald Macleod explores the years up to Gade's breakthrough as a composer. Born in 1817, Gade's childhood was marked by the economic hardship endured in Copenhagen after the country declared bankruptcy in 1813. Despite the disadvantages of a lack of money and a limited access to education, aged 23, Gade won a prestigious competition with an astonishingly accomplished orchestral overture, "Echoes of Ossian".

Wedding Waltz (Et Folkesagn)

The Danish Radio Sinfonietta

Harry Damgaard, conductor

Elverskud, Op.30 (Prologue and Part 1)

Kirsten Dolberg, contralto, the mother

Tivoli Concert Choir

Tivoli Symphony Orchestra

Michael Schønwandt, conductor

Acquarellen, Op.19, Vol 1

Christina Bjørkøe, piano

Hymnus

Danish National Radio Choir

Jesper Grove Jørgensen, conductor

Overture: "Echoes of Ossian", Op.1

The Danish National Radio Symphony Orchestra

Dmitri Kitajenko, conductor.

Donald Macleod on Gade's early life, leading up to his breakthrough work, Echoes of Ossian

02Ghosts And Trolls20170221

How Gade responded musically to prevailing artistic currents in Copenhagen.

Donald Macleod explores folk-tales in Niels Gade's charming ballet, Et folkesagn, written as a co-production with his father-in-law, the Danish composer J.P.E Hartmann and the literary source of his only Sonata for Piano.

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Across the week, Colin shares his own research into Gade's music and information garnered from the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

Today Donald Macleod and Colin Roth discuss how Gade responded musically to the prevailing artistic currents in Copenhagen.

Pa Sjolunds fagre sletter (excerpt)

Danish National Radio Choir

Stefan Parkman, conductor

Symphony No 1 in C minor, Op. 5 (1st movement)

Collegium Musicum, Copenhagen

Michael Schønwandt, conductor

Piano Sonata in E minor, Op 28

Alexander Vaulin, piano

Et folkesagn (Act 3, Scene 1)

The Danish Radio Sinfonietta

Harry Damgaard, conductor.

02Ghosts And Trolls20170221

How Gade responded musically to prevailing artistic currents in Copenhagen.

Donald Macleod explores folk-tales in Niels Gade's charming ballet, Et folkesagn, written as a co-production with his father-in-law, the Danish composer J.P.E Hartmann and the literary source of his only Sonata for Piano.

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Across the week, Colin shares his own research into Gade's music and information garnered from the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

Today Donald Macleod and Colin Roth discuss how Gade responded musically to the prevailing artistic currents in Copenhagen.

Pa Sjolunds fagre sletter (excerpt)

Danish National Radio Choir

Stefan Parkman, conductor

Symphony No 1 in C minor, Op. 5 (1st movement)

Collegium Musicum, Copenhagen

Michael Schønwandt, conductor

Piano Sonata in E minor, Op 28

Alexander Vaulin, piano

Et folkesagn (Act 3, Scene 1)

The Danish Radio Sinfonietta

Harry Damgaard, conductor.

03Fame And Glory20170222

Donald Macleod considers Mendelssohn's influence on his protege, Niels Gade.

Donald Macleod considers Mendelssohn's influence on his protégé, Niels Gade, with a complete performance of Gade's Octet, written some twenty years after Mendelssohn had written his.

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent, leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Across the week, Colin shares his knowledge of both Gade's music and the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

Between 1843 and 1848 Niels Gade was a highly respected musician, living and working in Leipzig. It was a period of diverse musical opportunity, which led to a series of major compositions.

Fantasiestücke, Op. 43 (1st movement)

Rolf Weber, clarinet

Kazue Tsuzuki, piano

The Crusaders (excerpt from Part 2)

Marianne Rørholm, mezzo-soprano (Armida)

Kurt Westi, tenor (Rinaldo)

Canzone-koret

Da Camera

Kor 72

Musikstuderendes Kammerkor

Aarhus Symphony Orchestra

Frans Rasmusssen, Conductor

Octet in F major, Op. 17

Berlin Philharmonic String Octet.

03Fame And Glory20170222

Donald Macleod considers Mendelssohn's influence on his protege, Niels Gade.

Donald Macleod considers Mendelssohn's influence on his protégé, Niels Gade, with a complete performance of Gade's Octet, written some twenty years after Mendelssohn had written his.

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent, leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Across the week, Colin shares his knowledge of both Gade's music and the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

Between 1843 and 1848 Niels Gade was a highly respected musician, living and working in Leipzig. It was a period of diverse musical opportunity, which led to a series of major compositions.

Fantasiestücke, Op. 43 (1st movement)

Rolf Weber, clarinet

Kazue Tsuzuki, piano

The Crusaders (excerpt from Part 2)

Marianne Rørholm, mezzo-soprano (Armida)

Kurt Westi, tenor (Rinaldo)

Canzone-koret

Da Camera

Kor 72

Musikstuderendes Kammerkor

Aarhus Symphony Orchestra

Frans Rasmusssen, Conductor

Octet in F major, Op. 17

Berlin Philharmonic String Octet.

04The Rising Sun20170223

Donald Macleod introduces a complete performance of Gade's joyous Fourth Symphony.

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Across the week, Colin shares his knowledge of both Gade's music and the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

As war was breaking out across Europe, in 1848 Niels Gade decided to return to Denmark. Today, Donald Macleod explores the reasons why Gade made this momentous decision, which, according to Dr. Colin Roth's studies, are quite frequently misrepresented.

O du, der du die Liebe bist

Musica Ficta

Bo Holten, director

String Quartet in D major, Op. 63

The Copenhagen String Quartet

Symphony No 4 in B flat major, Op. 20

Collegium Musicum, Copenhagen

Michael Schønwandt, conductor.

Donald Macleod explores why Gade made a momentous decision to return to Denmark in 1848.

05Tired Of Patriotism20170224

Donald Macleod introduces Danish composer Niels Gade's Violin Concerto, arguably a hidden jewel of the Romantic repertoire.

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Colin shares his knowledge of both Gade's music and the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

Today Donald Macleod and Colin Roth assess Niels Gade's contribution to the musical history of Denmark.

Holbergiana, Op. 61 (excerpt)

Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz

Ole Schmidt, conductor

Violin Concerto

Christina Åstrand, violin

Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra

John Storgårds, conductor

Elverskud (Part 3)

Kirsten Dolberg, contralto, the Mother

Guido Paëvatalu, baritone, Oluf

Tivoli Concert Chorus

Tivoli Symphony Orchestra

Michael Schønwandt, conductor.

Donald Macleod assesses Gade's contribution to Denmark's musical history.

05 LASTTired Of Patriotism20170224

Donald Macleod introduces Danish composer Niels Gade's Violin Concerto, arguably a hidden jewel of the Romantic repertoire.

Taken under his wing by Felix Mendelssohn, in his lifetime the Danish composer Niels Gade was a celebrated figure, who performed to great acclaim in Great Britain and across Europe. In his birthland Denmark, his association with Copenhagen's Music Society and his founding directorship of the Conservatory gave him a voice of influence within musical circles. He remains part of the Danish national consciousness, through the Wedding March from his ballet "Et folkesagn". It's one of the most popular picks for weddings. However, since his death, at the age of 73 in 1890, performances of his music have become all too infrequent leaving most of his considerable legacy largely unheard.

The 200th anniversary of Gade's birth provides a good reason to rediscover his music. Weddings aside, Niels Gade is the composer of no less than eight symphonies; a concerto for his own instrument, the violin; a rich variety of choral settings and solo songs; a host of chamber music, including a piano trio, and no less than five string quartets; piano music and a whole series of large-scale works which we might want to categorise as choral cantatas but which he called "concert pieces".

There is little published information about Niels Gade available in English. Donald Macleod is joined by Dr. Colin Roth, a co-director of the Nordic Research Centre at the University of Sheffield. Colin shares his knowledge of both Gade's music and the most detailed biography of the composer, which was published in Denmark in 2002 by Danish musicologist Inger Sørensen.

Today Donald Macleod and Colin Roth assess Niels Gade's contribution to the musical history of Denmark.

Holbergiana, Op. 61 (excerpt)

Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz

Ole Schmidt, conductor

Violin Concerto

Christina Åstrand, violin

Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra

John Storgårds, conductor

Elverskud (Part 3)

Kirsten Dolberg, contralto, the Mother

Guido Paëvatalu, baritone, Oluf

Tivoli Concert Chorus

Tivoli Symphony Orchestra

Michael Schønwandt, conductor.

Donald Macleod assesses Gade's contribution to Denmark's musical history.